Author Topic: Stainable Wood Fillers  (Read 903 times)

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Offline Pnw painter

  • Posts: 100
Stainable Wood Fillers
« on: October 08, 2017, 10:28 AM »
I've got a project coming up where I'll be staining some Beech window sills to match the cabinet doors.

What type of filler would you guys recommend for the nails holes.

Also, where in the process of staining and clear coating (SW High Build Lacquer) would you apply the filler?


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Offline Peter Halle

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  • Let's Redux / Revive / Rewind / Rollback the FOG!
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 11:03 AM »
This might be a wondrous time for some advice from @Scott Burt

Peter
Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1533
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2017, 12:29 PM »
Wood glue mixed with saw dust from piece to be filled is the best way to ensure best matching.  More dust than glue.

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 224
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2017, 12:51 PM »
The best results I've gotten have been from using Timbermate.   I usually blend a couple different shades to get a better match.


Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5150
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2017, 05:58 PM »
Baking soda, stain, isocyinate.

Tom

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1714
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #5 on: October 08, 2017, 10:32 PM »
Timbermate is the best I've found; expensive but good for staining and finishing.
Randy

Offline Bob Wolfe

  • Posts: 80
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2017, 01:00 AM »
Tom.
 Can you shed some light on proportions..... That mix is new to me but I will sure give it a try.
Thanks
BW

Offline Pnw painter

  • Posts: 100
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #7 on: October 09, 2017, 01:02 AM »
I'm also curious about Tom's recommendation, since I've never heard of it, but his advice is always spot on.


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Offline Pnw painter

  • Posts: 100
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2017, 01:17 AM »
I picked up some Timbermate and Famowood Waterbased at Woodcraft today. Hopefully, I can come up with something that works well between those two products.


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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5150
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2017, 08:47 AM »
Tom.
 Can you shed some light on proportions..... That mix is new to me but I will sure give it a try.
Thanks
BW

When it comes to fillers, always put a least one coat of finish or sanding sealer on the wood prior to using the filler (or plan on a lot of extra sanding)

Place baking soda on wax paper.

Add stain to match desired color.

Allow to dry, recheck color.

Break apart, pack into defect.

Cover with a few drops of isocyanate.

The glue bonds the filler to the substrate.

You can make up as much as you need.

Timbermate is also an excellent filler and stains better than most on the market. If you mix it with about 25% DryDex it is much easier to sand.

Tom

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1714
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2017, 11:08 AM »
While I use Timbermate when I want a quick wood filler solution, I have used an idea I found at finewoodworking.com. If you can generate sufficient sawdust from the wood you are using, and intend to finish without staining, you can mix the sawdust with a shellac cut to a 1 lb. mix. This usually generates a fill which looks almost like the wood you are filling. This works particularly well with exotic woods that standard wood fillers like Timbermate don't attempt to match. Problem is this process is a little tricky and usually requires more than one layer of filler to build the filled spot up to the surface. It took a lot of special sanding on some wood to generate enough sawdust for the job.
Randy

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3459
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2017, 12:42 PM »
What type of filler would you guys recommend for the nails holes.

Timbermate is good, sands easily and you can mix different colours to get to match the final color.

Also, where in the process of staining and clear coating (SW High Build Lacquer) would you apply the filler?
After staining. All fillers take stain differently. Seal, and finish. If the hole is still visible correct with a hard wax (Konig or Mohawk system) fill. It will completely disappear.
Tim

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1714
Re: Stainable Wood Fillers
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2017, 03:15 PM »
Also, sometimes using a colored pencil close to the same color as the grain lines in the wood and lightly marking lines on the repaired area that, more or less, look like the grain of that area of the wood, can help hide the repair. Once you put finish over the top the lines are there permanently. True, it doesn't always work, but it's worth a shot since the lines can just be wiped away if it doesn't look right.
Randy