Author Topic: Ventilation  (Read 1052 times)

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Offline wptski

  • Posts: 354
Ventilation
« on: January 23, 2017, 01:20 PM »
One may or may not have proper ventilation in their shop for spraying, what is done when spraying on site?
Bill
Most Confused!

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Offline sigmatango

  • Posts: 66
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #1 on: January 23, 2017, 03:53 PM »
I like to mask out the whole floor and ceiling to deal with overspray. I also wear a R95 or better cartridge in my mask. Googles are also a good idea. Eyeballs are actually the most communicative tissue you have, if I remember biology class correctly....

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 357
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2017, 04:04 PM »
One may or may not have proper ventilation in their shop for spraying, what is done when spraying on site?

In the 70's (as in the last century) I was on a paint crew of college kids that sprayed lacquer on some doors in an unventilated basement.  On the way home everything was absolutely hilarious, and the next morning we all had terrible headaches.  While that is actually what we did on site, I would not recommend it.  I'll be interested to hear what we should have done as people respond to this thread.

Offline usatu

  • Posts: 121
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2017, 09:23 PM »
I don't have such experience yet. But from the youtube videos I watched, looks like many used zipwall to block the kitchen area, open the window and run a fan in the window. Don't know whether that is the best practice or not. I am going to do that. Maybe also open my range hood to vent.

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 203
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2017, 04:46 AM »
Given you have a clean hose (so you don't spew dust from a dirty one) and a CT-SYS at hand you could put it into the blower configuration and use it to suck in air from the outside an push it into the room. This will also have the upside that the added air had been filtered and most likely will be cleaner (regarding dust) than one you would get from a fan or open windows.

Googles and a mask with filters matching what you do is a must nevertheless, as is removal of all ignition sources that could spark you into oblivion.

Offline wptski

  • Posts: 354
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2017, 07:54 AM »
Given you have a clean hose (so you don't spew dust from a dirty one) and a CT-SYS at hand you could put it into the blower configuration and use it to suck in air from the outside an push it into the room. This will also have the upside that the added air had been filtered and most likely will be cleaner (regarding dust) than one you would get from a fan or open windows.

Googles and a mask with filters matching what you do is a must nevertheless, as is removal of all ignition sources that could spark you into oblivion.
Why use a CT-SYS or any other vac in blower mode?  I was thinking of just using my twin-HEPA filtered vac with the hose lying in the room.  As far as a fan in a window, it would be used to pull air from space not blow it into and could be fitted with a filter.  They also have fans made for confined spaces that can be used to push or pull air.

I'm current spraying poly in a vacant bedroom, floor is covered and also the walls with the supply/return registers cover with filter material.  I could shut down the furnace and run the circulating fan all the time.  There are two windows also.
Bill
Most Confused!

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 203
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2017, 05:27 AM »
Given you have a clean hose (so you don't spew dust from a dirty one) and a CT-SYS at hand you could put it into the blower configuration and use it to suck in air from the outside an push it into the room. This will also have the upside that the added air had been filtered and most likely will be cleaner (regarding dust) than one you would get from a fan or open windows.

Googles and a mask with filters matching what you do is a must nevertheless, as is removal of all ignition sources that could spark you into oblivion.
Why use a CT-SYS or any other vac in blower mode?
My work history contains time inside environments where a slight spark could have brought a fair chance of a whole building spontaneously vanishing. The demonstration (basically

with a bigger baloon to really drive home the point) given to me at training was impressive enough for me to never again taking any chances when it comes to ignition of flammable gas / air mixes (which most solvents for spraying will turn into when evaporating and while spraying).

Might sound a bit over-cautious, but since then I simply don't operate any non-EX gear in such environments... which lead to the reasoning to have the vac itself in a non-contaminated area where it can run safely.

Offline wptski

  • Posts: 354
Re: Ventilation
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2017, 08:00 AM »

with a bigger baloon to really drive home the point) given to me at training was impressive enough for me to never again taking any chances when it comes to ignition of flammable gas / air mixes (which most solvents for spraying will turn into when evaporating and while spraying).

Might sound a bit over-cautious, but since then I simply don't operate any non-EX gear in such environments... which lead to the reasoning to have the vac itself in a non-contaminated area where it can run safely.
I'm not and won't be using any solvent based materials where a explosion proof motor and grounded duct work is needed.  In cases like that everything in the area must be explosion proof even light switches.
Bill
Most Confused!