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Author Topic: Celebrate 7000 Members and Growing with the "Show Us Your Shop Giveaway"!  (Read 48795 times)
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deepcreek

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Location: Houston, Texas
Member Since: Apr 2009
Posts: 225



« Reply #60 on: October 09, 2009, 07:37 PM »

Joe,

Welcome to the FOG.  Now we need more photos of you shop.

Kreg is a great guy.  I asked him for advice on something and he offered to take the time to teach me.  Told me that others had taught him so he was just paying it forward.

Can't beat that.

Peter

Right now most of my shop is overrun with materials for a house I'm building for my Mom.  As soon as I reclaim it, I'll take some more photos (and make more sawdust).

Kreg is a great guy.  He has a nice article in Gary Katz's latest issue of "This is Carpentry".  Of course, knowing that Kreg is a great self-promoter (and I mean that in the best possible way) I imagine that everyone here already knows that!
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Joe Adams
Deep Creek Woodwerks
Houston, Texas
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« Reply #61 on: October 09, 2009, 07:48 PM »

I would love to show off our 400sqft shop outfitted mostly with Festool. I think it would be a great example to show people that you don't need 2000sqft to build kitchen cabinets/bed frames/ build in units AND make money!
So, why don't I post some pictures? Well. Even though we already put up some cabinets, they still don't have any doors, our new Kapex still hasn't arrived and therefore the worktable can't be completed. It just doesn't look good enough for a contest...

Anyhow, I started a topic on Talk Festool about moving the shop. http://www.talkfestool.com/vb/shops-storage/2449-story-moving-shop.html
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Peter Halle
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« Reply #62 on: October 09, 2009, 08:06 PM »

Kreg definitely knows the importance of promotion.  But get beyond that and he is true himself and has an interest in others who wish to learn and better themselves and their abilities.  Gary Katz has similar qualities.  I would bet that Tommy Silva also has those same qualities.


GO Guys!

Peter
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The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
deepcreek

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« Reply #63 on: October 09, 2009, 09:31 PM »

Tom Silva could not have been nicer during the few minutes we chatted after his seminar.  We ran into him the next day while he was checking out the exhibits and he recognized us so we visited a little more.  He's a good man.
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Joe Adams
Deep Creek Woodwerks
Houston, Texas
Russ Jr

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Location: Big Bear Lake, CA
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« Reply #64 on: October 11, 2009, 04:43 PM »

I always think my shop is pretty nice - until I see some REALLY nice shops!

I have a lot of Festool equipment and it ranks among my favorite equipment to use. I am a hobbyist, but spent a lot of years in construction and have a deep appreciation for tools and their value. Although Festool is not inexpensive, it provides value. If I were still in the trades I would find the portability of  hand tools but the quality of cut normally provided only by stationary tools invaluable.






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Peter Halle
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« Reply #65 on: October 11, 2009, 05:29 PM »

Russ,

Your shop is great.  I often ask this question around tax time.  After seeing your shop I was worried that someone else would beat me to it.  Are you looking to adopt a kid adult jealous woodworker for the tax benefits?  If so, just let me know.

Peter
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The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
Neill

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« Reply #66 on: October 12, 2009, 09:40 AM »

Russ,

Your shop is great.  I often ask this question around tax time.  After seeing your shop I was worried that someone else would beat me to it.  Are you looking to adopt a kid adult jealous woodworker for the tax benefits?  If so, just let me know.

Peter

Peter,

As an accountant and somewhat of a neat freak, I am often asked how I can get any work done, my office is just too neat, even during tax season.  I might say the same thing to Russ.  Too neat.

Neill
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Kapex, Domino, MFT/3, Rotex 150 FEQ, CT 22E, TS 55, C12 Drill, 1400 Router, Rotex 90 DX, Rotex 125 FEQ, LS 130 EQ Linear, Parallel Guide Set, Deltex 93 E, Trion 300 Barrell Grip, ETS 150/3 EQ, ES125 EQ, Guide Rail Accessory Kit, Sanding Block, various rails, systainers, sortainers, vacuum hoses and accessories for various tools.
Chuck Kiser

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Finish Carpenter in the Southside of Chicago


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« Reply #67 on: October 13, 2009, 07:44 AM »

I always enjoy looking at other shops and workspaces. I am amazed at the quantity and quality of work that can be produced in less than ideal situations. I am lucky enough to have a 37 x 24 garage/shop that my lovely bride allows me full use of.

http://picasaweb.google.com/KnollwoodConstruction/ShopPics#

My sig line details my Festool 'holdings'. I say holdings because I treat them like a investment.

Everything in my shop is portable. If I am able to build in my shop I will. If the work is on-site, then the entire shop gets loaded into my 16ft toy chest on wheels. The nice part about having the shop on wheels is the ability to store all the extra tools that are not needed in the wood shop on a day-to-day basis. It really frees up the floor space.

The best reason for me to use the the Festool system is the 'portable precision' that it provides. The quality that used to come only from stationary tools in a shop can now be performed on-site. Of course, the dust collection is a nice bonus for myself AND the customer.
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Life is too short for bad wine or cheap tools.

FS2700, FS1400(2), TS55, TS75, CT Midi, CT 22 w/ boom, ETS150/5, RO150, DF500, OF1400, OF1010, MFT1080(3), PS300, DX93, LR32, MFS700, MFS400, MFK700, ETS125, RTS400, RS2E, KAPEX, MFT/ KAPEX
rnt80

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« Reply #68 on: October 14, 2009, 11:42 PM »

My shop doubles as our garage.  Luckily for about the last 3-4 months we've been able to use our former neighbors garage to park our cars in so I've been able to leave all of my equipment set up.  The garage is roughly 20X20 and while it feels cramped at times I remember back to the days when I was working on our apartment balcony...that makes my current situation a lot more enticing.
My assembly table is based off of TWW design with a few modifications.  It houses my CT22 and I built a boom arm out of pvc to keep the hose and cord at bay.  I do all of my sanding (ETS150), routing (1010, 1400), dominoing, shelf hole drilling (LR32) and cutting of sheet goods (TS55) on the table.  I drilled some 20mm holes on each end that offer a variety of clamping options.  The skirt on the front has a t-slot routed in it so that I can clamp pieces vertically.
I built the wings for my Kapex station 6-8 months ago.  They are based Gary Katz's design and have served me well.  The saw is close enough to my assembly table that I can just switch the vac hose and cord out whenever I need to use it. 
While there isn't a logical flow to where everything is placed I can move about the shop without having to move any of the equipment.


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Russell Tribby
Gilbert AZ
www.agapewooddesign.com
justinmcf

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Queensland Builder


« Reply #69 on: October 15, 2009, 12:48 AM »

here's my shop. 3 metres wide by 3.2 metres long!

it is also the laundry room and gym.

i have made 38 restaurant tables, 155 bench seats, 8 bar tops,  25 book shelves, 6 computer desks, 2 king size beds and 4 bedside cabinets.
all in this beautiful roomy workshop!

people are always amazed when they see how small the area is.
 i need to buy more tools, but there is no more room.

i will be very excited when we buy a house at christmas time. i dont care what the house looks like.
my priority is a big, big garage!

i do envy the other peoples workshops, but i must congratulate them also, it is a labour of love, and takes a lot of time and money to build a decent workshop.
i am inspired also, and will take some of the great ideas i have seen here and put them to good use when i upgrade to a larger house.

regards, justin.







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Russ Jr

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« Reply #70 on: October 15, 2009, 12:48 AM »

Peter and Peter,

There is no such thing as "too neat"! LOL. I have a small space by some standards, and yet quite ample by others. I really, really like to buy and to use my tools. I am not a "collector" as it may appear from the pictures. I just can't work in a mess and HATE looking for things. My shop does get messy and cluttered when I am making things, but admittedly I clean up as I go along. My wife says that I am obsessive compulsive. I think of myself as simply neat. LOL

Also, I have no sons only daughters. That said, however, my son in law has made it clear that he is first in line... Sorry Peter.

Russ

Russ,

Your shop is great.  I often ask this question around tax time.  After seeing your shop I was worried that someone else would beat me to it.  Are you looking to adopt a kid adult jealous woodworker for the tax benefits?  If so, just let me know.

Peter

Peter,

As an accountant and somewhat of a neat freak, I am often asked how I can get any work done, my office is just too neat, even during tax season.  I might say the same thing to Russ.  Too neat.

Neill



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Peter Halle
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« Reply #71 on: October 15, 2009, 01:24 AM »

Neill,

Sorry that I couldn't be of assistance.  Just trying to be helpful. Grin Grin Grin Grin

Peter
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The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
Charimon

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Tool and Tile Junkie


« Reply #72 on: October 15, 2009, 02:13 AM »

Russel what are you using for a Table saw?   

Justin Great use of a small space.  My work area is about the same size xcept I use the trailer to store many of my tools.

Craig
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rnt80

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« Reply #73 on: October 15, 2009, 08:47 AM »

Russel what are you using for a Table saw?   

Justin Great use of a small space.  My work area is about the same size xcept I use the trailer to store many of my tools.

Craig


I have a Ridgid 3650 that I took off of the base.  It sits atop a workstation that includes two router tables and an outfeed table.  My assembly bench serves as an infeed table.  I've had the saw for about 6 years and while it's served me well at some point I'd like a cabinet saw.


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Russell Tribby
Gilbert AZ
www.agapewooddesign.com
B.L.M.

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« Reply #74 on: October 15, 2009, 12:20 PM »

I am working on a very big project right now, so I thought I submit my Jobsite-Workshop. It is a 2 car garage 24 x 38.

These are the Festools I use:

2 MFT/3; Kapex with extensions; MFT/3 extension table: CT 33; TS 75; Trion PSB 300EQ; Domino DF 500 Q; MFK 700 EQ; OF 1400 EQ; OF 2200 EB; Rotex RO 150; EHL 65; T15+3; MFS 700;VS 600; CMS Modul OF; CMS Modul TS; CMS Modul PSB; Systainer Port;


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kullervo

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« Reply #75 on: October 15, 2009, 06:02 PM »

We've got a small shop out here on Kauai, and we love it! My parents built a house out here, and we made a space for a woodworking shop. On the first of July it was empty. By the first of August, my father and I had built this. I had no previous woodworking experience, and was a bit intimidated by the idea, but the Festools were so straightforward and so safe-- and my father's instruction was so good-- that I had no problems at all. I loved it. See all that perfect trim? That's all mine!

You can see the systainers-- we have most of the major players except the Kapex and the Domino (hubba-hubba). My personal favorite is the plunge-cut saw. To go from near-phobia to confidence in a day was rather dazzling. I made a pair of sawhorses in my first two days "on the job." From there the shop just came together-- literally. We even got wildly confident and made drawers, and they work! We did have some fun with the router, which I now call Fang. Turns out when they say routing plywood sucks, they're right. It also turns out when they say "clamp everything down really well first," they are also right. But we had some good laughs out of it.

At the end of the day we have a beautiful, functional shop. The dust recovery system means that the tradewinds don't swirl sawdust through the house and the neighborhood (my house is downwind). I'm planning my next projects, and my father can't wait to get back here!

Mahalo nui loa,

Lorelei


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Shane Holland
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« Reply #76 on: October 16, 2009, 09:45 AM »

We have had some fine examples of shops posted here.  I would just like to bump the thread to remind anyone who has not made an entry that the final day for accepting entries is tomorrow.  I will be randomly selecting our four winners from those entries and announce the winners no later than Monday.  Good luck to everyone!
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Shane Holland | Festool USA | Sales: 888-337-8600 | Service: 800-554-8741 | TS 55 REQ Recall Hotline: 855-784-9727| sho@festoolusa.com



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EcoFurniture

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« Reply #77 on: October 16, 2009, 02:38 PM »

Thanks for the reminder Shane!

Although our new shop is not quite done... I thought I should take a quick video and show you guys around.




Festool we are using are:
TS55
3x MFT
OF1400
MFK 700
Domino
2x ETS125
Kapex
2x CT-Mini
And many other bits and pieces like guide rails, systainers and sortainers

Cheers,
Andreas
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Jesus Aleman

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« Reply #78 on: October 16, 2009, 06:56 PM »

I was finally able to get time to take some pictures of the 'workshop'.  My workspace is in a single car garage, but the square footage is variable.  There is an imaginary line that keeps creeping to the right of the first picture depending on the boss's mood.  I approximately have 5' x 14' of usable workspace.  From the pictures it seems that I have more, but the BBQ and patio furniture are stored in the garage during the winter.  As you can see only the jointer is cast iron.  All other tools are portable and primarily festool.  Once I have some time, I'll setup everything on casters or mobile bases.  What the festool system allows me is to maximize the use of this reduced space without much sacrifices in quality or productivity.  This is a hobby, but I also have limited time to enjoy it.  The other festool advantage is dust collection and noise.  I'm able to  use the tools after the kid has gone to bed with no complaints from my personal management or the neighbors.  I use a CT22 with a dust deputy for all my dust collection needs.  So far it works great with the planer and jointer when I use the 4" hose.  The limited space makes me think hard about work flow when I'm conceptualizing a project.  I currently only have one bench (MFT/3), but I plan on making a set of Joshua Finn benches that can be stored on the wall space above the MFT when not in use.    

I currently use the following festools: MFT/3, Domino, ROTEX 125, TRION, TS55, parallel guides, rails, and an assortment of accessories and consumables.  What I would really like to add is a set CMS module so I can have a very compact and versatile TS, "bandsaw", router table setup.  A Kapex would be nice, but so far I have a reliable method with the parallel guides for ripping and MFT for cross cutting.

Shane thanks for putting this giveaway together.


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Dan Rush

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Trim carpenter


« Reply #79 on: October 16, 2009, 08:23 PM »

 When packed up or ready to go into a job box for transport to an out of state (or country) job, the total footprint of my "field shop" is about 6 sq. ft.  This includes all compressor, nailers, saws (4), hand tools, modified mft, Kapex and shop built wings, hardware and screws, touch up box, tarps, and (16) 21" x 48" x 1/8" masonite panels to protect flooring.

I like to travel light!

I'll post more details in a bit.  Most of my set ups have posted elsewhere here.


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EquatorTwo

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« Reply #80 on: October 17, 2009, 12:47 AM »

I work out of a small 1-car garage stacked to the rafters with mouldings that I'm sure I will never use but can't bear to throw away. So it is vitally important that all of my tools are portable so I can do as much work as possible at the jobsite. Festools allow me to work quickly and quietly in the hope that I will be invited back. I have cherry picked some of the unique tools from Festool's lineup where a quality tool makes the job easier and faster. The first Festool I bought is my table saw replacement, the TS 55. I have driven the saw into the ground, let it cool down, and in a short while it's back making sawdust. Don't want the weight of the TS 75 when the 55 will do everything I ask of it. From there it was all downhill the slippery slope, with the Domino kit. It completely changed how I did joinery. Thanks to all of your posts and pictures on the FOG, I have used it in ways I would never have imagined. I vividly recall staring in amazement at a picture a member posted a year or two back of a heavy driveway gate he had fastened entirely with dominos. Never had one fail yet, and I use them by the bushel. Also use the ETS 125 sander, which you'd have to pry out of my hand to make me give up. It is ideal for paint prep. Know many of you don't like it, but it's the perfect balance of weight and size. My newest toy is the T15 drill, an absolute joy to use. Completely indefensible, but pure bliss to use everyday.


Thanks to all of you for the entertainment and information, and to Matthew Schenker for giving us his labor of love!

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neilc

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« Reply #81 on: October 17, 2009, 06:17 PM »

Attached are a few photos of my basement workshop.  Overall space is about 18 x 27 with a separate room for dust collector and air compressor.  Ceiling is about 9' high with plenty of flourescent as well as task lighting.  

You can see a coffee table that I am in the process of finishing in a couple of the photos.  I'll post in the projects thread when it's completed.

Festools include Kapex, Domino, MFT/3, MFT/Kapex, C12, T15+3, TDK12, CT22E, PS300, MFK700, OF1010, ETS150/3, TS55EQ, DTS400EQ, RO150EQ, rails, MFS set, clamps, the hole drilling set and assorted Systainers for additional storage.  Those and some 25 year old Inca's and an assortment of Bridge City and Lie Nielsen tools let me do the bulk of my work - furniture, remodeling, cabinetry, etc.  Most of the Festools are either in the two-sided base for the Inca jointer / planer, or one of the other cabinets or benches in the workshop.

neil


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alanz

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« Reply #82 on: October 17, 2009, 07:29 PM »

Ok, my turn

Now that the sons are out of the house, I doubled the size of the basement shop in our 100 year old house to include the area that was their playroom.

The shop is two rooms, with vaulting 6'3" ceilings.  Being short statured has its advantages!

The "saw" room is 8'x18', tThe "lathe" room is 12'x11'

Most of these photos are from the saw room.  Lathe room photos will follow, along with some text describing the equipment.

Full size photos can be found if you click here

The Festoolian equipment includes TS55, MFT/3, CT22, ETS150/3, OF1400, PSB300EQ

       

     

« Last Edit: October 17, 2009, 07:30 PM by alanz » Logged

Triton 2.25 router; CMT Industrio table; Jointech fence; SC planer; Dewalt miter; Delta 14" bandsaw; Festool TS55, MFT/3, CT22, ETS150/3, OF1400, PSB300EQ; Dewalt Scrollsaw; Nova DVR XP lathe, JJ-6CS jointer, Ryobi OSS; Grizzly 1023s cabinetsaw
Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #83 on: October 17, 2009, 10:26 PM »

.



Portrait of a Festool - Centric Shop as seen through the process of building a dining room table.......

I design and make furniture and architectural elements for a living here in Los Angeles.
My inside shop space is approximately 1500 square feet, spread over three rooms that are linked together like a train.
The first two rooms have a 12 foot "doorway" between them, the second and third rooms have a 5 foot doorway.
My first room has my large inca cabinet saw, the middle room is mostly devoted to assembly and Festool and the third room is crammed with a collection of bandsaws and sanding machines. (and more Festools)
My collection of Festools include all of their sanders, routers (except for the 2000), the TDK12, a bunch of rails, an MFS set up and a bunch of MFT1080's and 800's.
The position of the equipment in the first two rooms are fluid, depending of the project at hand.

Footnote,
The table you'll be seeing in the following posts measures 11' by 5' by 4" thick. (my client needed to seat 14 people)
The concept is a torsion box construction with solid core rails all around and a 1/4 " "veneer" mitered top.
......and all the edging around the table needs to curve inwards from the top edge an 1 1/4" to the bottom plane.






The photos above and below are showing my bandsaws (the light grey and green Inca bandsaw has a dedicated resaw blade and fence setup)
The two roller drumsander is below. (in the last posts I'll have more pics of this room)
That little black tablesaw to the left of the blue Inca (not the Inca 259 in the foreground) is a sweet little Byrnes Tablesaw - great for small fine cuts.
http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/tablesaw.html?id_mm=1018MM835011




Below is an Inca 2200 Cab. saw, to the left out of camera sight is a 12inch Delta compound miter saw.
The Ct22 with boom arm is hiding (almost) to the right of the clamp wall and it serves both rooms.





above and below you see the two -880 pound (each) motor lifts that I needed to install for this project.
As I basically work alone and I needed to flip that 11 foot puppy several times during the process.
(the table, not the white creature observing the whole process)












« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 02:59 AM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

Los Angeles, California
Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #84 on: October 17, 2009, 10:26 PM »





After the torsion box became a one sided box, (before the top was put on.) I moved from a four MFT1080 set up
to a two MFT 1080 set up. In the process of flipping the table over one needs to completely remove the tables and
bring it to the floor in order to re-work the belts, and after the table has structual integrity one only needs two tables.




Below I'm setting up the TS75 to cut one of my four miters over the double stacked top elements.
Together with the rails & the TS75 I came up with perfect miters for an 11' by 5' table.
In place of the thickness of the blade I then applied an inlay as you'll see in the later pics.






Above, I'm using the TS75 as a jointer as well as ripping my mahogany stock to be used for the
surrounding rails.
Below, I'm Domino-ing the solid rails to the composite substructure together.
I use 5' by 3' restaurant mats throughout the studio for a comfortable floor surface.





« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 03:05 AM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

Los Angeles, California
Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #85 on: October 17, 2009, 10:26 PM »









When gluing up 11' plus end rails to the torsion box construction the Bessey extentions for the K-bodies sure come in handy.
.....and yes those are the largest dominos I'm using throughout the table.
Adhesive of choice....Unibond 800.

Below, I'm using the TS75 to pre-cut the angle before hitting it with my "little" round over shaper bit in the 2200 Festool Router







In my middle room the motor hoists move back and forth on barn-yard door rails attached to the ceiling, and braced to the walls.
My #36 hose goes back and forth on the same principle which is fed through a U- clamp. (the U-clamps are used in the electrical world
for raceways for cables, etc.) The Festool Hose track is suspended & moveable on the two barn yard tracks.

Below I'm about to use my 2200 with a custom made round-over router/shaper bit, over the pre-cut edge.
The "bit" is 6 inches long with a 4 3/8" cutting edge.
The diameter at the widest is 3 1/2", with a 5/8" bearing.






« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 03:05 AM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

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Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #86 on: October 17, 2009, 10:27 PM »

.

And my guiding light was the Festool Rail system and micro-adjust guide coupled with a bridge system suspended on MFT 800's.
Note- When your using a bit that is a little over 3 1/2 inch at the base, which leaves about a fat 1/8" clearance to the routers side walls-
Break out you broom for the big stuff!

P. S. I went 32 linear feet without a hiccup. (.....and yes I have video for a later date/sysnotes)



Using the RS-2 to even out the top.
My Festool collection live mostly in their cases and partly in those two stainless cabinets.(the everyday sanders)




Using the RTS400 with a double pad to smooth out the contour.



Fine tuning with the ETS 150-3 (with Brilliant disks) . . .



With the finish coats  . . .



« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 03:00 AM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

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Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #87 on: October 17, 2009, 10:27 PM »

.

Working on one of the  bases with my TDK12.

Most of my lighting in the shop are with T-8 Fluorescents with a plastic cover. ( to protect against swinging timbers)
these.... http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=86124-13537-86124&lpage=none



To the right is the Eunemia Radial Arm Saw, with more Festools below,


Inca's 570 in Jointer mode & 570 in Planer mode.
Not in camera's POV is an edge sander & oscillating spindle sander.



Parting shot,,,

ps. the table stands fit into the recess of the table once the MFT's are removed.
(More photos of the table installed at a later date.)






« Last Edit: October 18, 2009, 03:00 AM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

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Roger Savatteri

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« Reply #88 on: October 17, 2009, 10:27 PM »

This space reserved while downloading photos............
« Last Edit: October 17, 2009, 10:30 PM by Roger Savatteri » Logged

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Jesus Aleman

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« Reply #89 on: October 17, 2009, 11:25 PM »

I'm speechless Roger.  What are the specs on that round-over bit?  I can see that the 2200 was built for that.
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