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OFF-TOPIC => General Friendly Chat => Topic started by: jonny round boy on July 04, 2011, 01:00 PM

Title: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: jonny round boy on July 04, 2011, 01:00 PM
The history of the Space Shuttle (http://www.theatlantic.com/infocus/2011/07/the-history-of-the-space-shuttle/100097/)

I can't accurately describe how truly amazing some of those images are.

As Jeremy Clarkson said when he stepped off the last ever Concorde flight, "that's one small step for a man, one huge leap backwards for mankind".
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: RJNeal on July 04, 2011, 03:29 PM
Thank you for sharing. They are truly amazing.
Rick
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Festool USA on July 04, 2011, 06:15 PM
Outer space is so beautiful, mysterious and fascinating. If I wasn't your friendly online FOG admin, I'd probably choose a career in the space field. Thanks for the pics, JRB.
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: justinmcf on July 04, 2011, 06:19 PM
thanks for link jrb.

great photos.

justin.
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Sal LiVecchi on July 04, 2011, 06:26 PM
JRB    These were simply amazing, Thanks
Sal
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Sean Ackerman on July 05, 2011, 08:48 AM
Wow, thanks so much for posting.  Gorgeous and awe inspiring. 
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Michael Kellough on July 05, 2011, 12:11 PM
The first photo of lift-off shows some of the billowing clouds of steam created by dumping massive amounts of water on the launch pad following ignition. My father was one of the designers of the earlier Gemini launch pads so I thought I knew a lot about this stuff but I only recently learned the purpose of the water is not fire suppression but noise attenuation. The steam effectively reduces the the sound vibrations which if un-buffered would shake the launch pad to pieces.
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Sean Ackerman on July 05, 2011, 12:14 PM
The first photo of lift-off shows some of the billowing clouds of steam created by dumping massive amounts of water on the launch pad following ignition. My father was one of the designers of the earlier Gemini launch pads so I thought I knew a lot about this stuff but I only recently learned the purpose of the water is not fire suppression but noise attenuation. The steam effectively reduces the the sound vibrations which if un-buffered would shake the launch pad to pieces.

Wow, very interesting.  It's amazing, if you keep your mind and eyes open, how simple a solution to a seemingly insurmountable problem can be.
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Greg Powers on July 05, 2011, 02:45 PM
very cool photos. The end of a 30 year program  [big grin]
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: d8b on July 05, 2011, 03:55 PM
The first photo of lift-off shows some of the billowing clouds of steam created by dumping massive amounts of water on the launch pad following ignition. My father was one of the designers of the earlier Gemini launch pads so I thought I knew a lot about this stuff but I only recently learned the purpose of the water is not fire suppression but noise attenuation. The steam effectively reduces the the sound vibrations which if un-buffered would shake the launch pad to pieces.

Here you can see a picture where they are testing this system

sound suppression (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sound_suppression_water_system_test_at_KSC_Launch_Pad_39A.jpg)

I got the link via a post on a pro sound forum (I earn my festool budget as a sound tech). You can read the post here:
pushing loudness to a whole different level (http://forums.prosoundweb.com/index.php/topic,1052.0.html)

greetz,

Philippe
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Michael Kellough on July 05, 2011, 10:04 PM
Thanks for the link Philippe. Very interesting to learn more about it.
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Tom Bellemare on July 05, 2011, 10:12 PM
I knew a guy from Titusville that said in the early days of the Apollo program, they were blowing chunks of the launch pad great distances. I never knew if it was true.


Tom
Title: Re: 61 Amazing Photographs
Post by: Michael Kellough on July 05, 2011, 10:37 PM
I knew a guy from Titusville that said in the early days of the Apollo program, they were blowing chunks of the launch pad great distances. I never knew if it was true.


Tom

I lived on Merritt Island and hadn't heard that but it could be true. Although the pads are on Merritt Island they're a lot closer to Titusville than the civilian half of MI.

When I was younger we lived in Huntsville where the Saturn V booster was designed and tested. The test pad was built into a massive vein of granite, just to be sure it didn't go anywhere, and they burned the things for the full 90 seconds. In an actual launch the thing is out of the atmosphere at 90 seconds but in Huntsville it was still there RUMBLING away. Our fathers would pass the word around what time a test would occur and we'd go out in the yard and gaze in the general direction. Then someone would see an orange flame reaching up beyond the distant tree line and we'd watch for several seconds before the ground started shaking and watch for several more seconds before we began to hear the crackling roar. 90 seconds is a long time to stare at an orange flame a dozen or more miles away. It was kind of hypnotic and then all of a sudden the flame would disappear, then the ground would settle down, and finally the noise faded away.

That vein of granite had a downside, those that lived on the same vein often suffered broken windows. They (NASA) just added repair reimbursement to the budget.