Author Topic: business terms and conditions  (Read 643 times)

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Offline Alan m

  • Posts: 3304
business terms and conditions
« on: December 18, 2014, 12:01 PM »
hi there.
im trying to prepare to go it on my own.

im trying to write up my terms and conditions.

iv go the normal ones about payment terms ect.

im looking for the ones that you only realise when its too late or you wish you had .
those ones are the ones that really matter in the day to day  running

ones like customer having all their stuff out of your way  etc


thanks alan
"A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty."
- Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

Offline Peter Halle

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  • Posts: 11560
Re: business terms and conditions
« Reply #1 on: December 18, 2014, 12:10 PM »
Ensure that there is electricity available.  (Nothing worse than discovering that there isn't anyplace to power up your dust collector.

Peter

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3664
Re: business terms and conditions
« Reply #2 on: December 18, 2014, 12:46 PM »
Ensure that there is electricity available.  (Nothing worse than discovering that there isn't anyplace to power up your dust collector.

Peter


And don't forget something like a portable loo (at a minimum) or running water and a real toilet.  The usual and customary clauses about payment being due upon receipt of the bill, with a penalty clause (I use an escalating 10% per month clause) as a penalty for late/non-payment.  I've had clients that want to use a 10% holdback for items that might fail, until I point out to them that the penalty clause applies to the entire bill, including the unpaid balance.  Then again, my best clients all know me well and know that I will make good on any failed items during the warranty period (and sometimes after), even at cost to myself.  There's also a clause that says all materials and supplies used to do the job will remain the property of the contractor until payment is received in full.  This makes it easier to exercise a mechanic's lien, should it become necessary. 

- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young