Author Topic: Coffee Maker Recommendations  (Read 12774 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline serge0n

  • Posts: 63
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #30 on: July 18, 2018, 01:18 PM »
Would it be sort of foolish to buy such a high end coffee maker if I was going to use pre-ground beans?

You bring up a good point. I think it would be foolish. Don't get me wrong, Technivorm makes an awesome cup of coffee, but if you are using pre-ground, a cup from a Bonavita will be just as good for far less.

You sound like a person who likes a good cup of coffee, isn't a coffee snob, and values simplicity. My recommendation is to get the Breville Grind Control. Here is why.

I tried many, many drip coffee machines, including both Technivorm and Bonavita. I decided to return the Technivorm as pre-ground coffee tasted exactly the same from both machines. The only difference was that Technivorm was about 20% faster than Bonavita when brewing a whole pot and it looked way cooler (all those bubbles going up!).

Technivorm really shines when you grind your beans just before making a cup. I love the taste of freshly ground coffee, but I rarely have time to grab my grinder from the drawer, plug it in, add beans for 4 or 8 cups, wait for the grinder to complete it's work, find out that I forgot that I made espresso last night and had to change the setting to a coarser grind, throw away that batch, change the setting, make another batch, then finally add the freshly ground coffee to the filter while carefully measuring it teaspoon by teaspoon... It's a very tedious process. It can be enjoyable, when you have time.

Bonavita is a great machine, but, again, you have to either grind your coffee fresh (and Technivorm is better in this case) or settle with using pre-ground (not an option for me).

The Breville machine was perfect for me. You load it with beans, add water, insert a fresh filter, and then select if you want to brew a cup (you can select cup size from 8 options) or a full carafe, hit a single button and forget about it. The machine will measure the appropriate amount of beans, grind them, steep them in hot water (same temp as Bonavita or Technivorm) and pour the coffee into your cup.

You get a great cup of freshly ground coffee, no fuss, no muss.
There are a ton of settings where you can select coffee strength and aroma, schedule the machine to brew a cup at a certain time, etc., but you don't need to mess with any of it. Just set your preferred coffee strength and forget about it, it becomes a one button affair.

After I purchased the Breville, I had concerns about it's longevity. I've been using it every single day since 2012, still works perfectly fine. You do have to clean the coffee dispensing chute every 2-3 months, but that's not a big deal for me.


Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 223
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #31 on: July 18, 2018, 10:21 PM »
I would give a thumbs up to a Chemex, but just stick with "manual" version.  I had a cup machine for a good while (the Starbucks K-Fee, not the same as Keurig, but similar).  It's sold in Europe under various brands, but exclusive to Starbucks in the US.  It makes good coffee, and espresso and lattes too.  In general folks agree it does a better job than a Keurig, but the downside is you are locked into Starbucks cups, so it gets expensive and support by Starbucks seams to be intermittent.  So I bought a Chemex.  I do miss being able to push a button, keep getting around an then grab cup, verses 10 minutes preparing with the Chemex. I may get a non-manual grinder just to free up some time.   The flip side is hand grinding and doing it all does burn a few more calories in the morning and makes you feel like you are actually "making" something. But when your running late, it's just a pain.

Offline SouthRider

  • Posts: 149
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2018, 07:50 AM »
That looks like the same model we bought. On/off switch and 2 different hot plate temps (we've never turned it off of high).

We bought the hot candy apple red color and still love it.

Started with 8 O'Clock (the old A&P store brand) French Roast coffee. Dark roast - very flavorful, rich. Made it with 2 extra cups of water to tone it down. It got harder and harder to find. Winn Dixie stopped carrying, then hit or miss at other stores. Last place was Wal Mart grocery.

About the time that ended we both gave up any milk or creamers and sweeteners - so the dark roast was too strong for our taste.

Have finally settled on Community Coffee (a New Orleans brand) Amber Sunrise Blend, advertised as "smooth and vibrant". It delivers as advertised - very smooth to drink black.

We bought our pot from Seattle Coffee, and got as good or better a deal as Amazon. ended up with a couple free bags of their coffee, and didn't care for it much. But that could just be regional tastes, and not knowing the right proportions to brew it. They also sell fantastic coffee pot cleaner and de-scaler packets. Get some (also available on Amazon).

We tried grinding and all that stuff - and for daily use just buy the pre-ground.

Another feature of the Mocca Master that is easy to overlook - the basket has a built-in "hold" of the coffee for a few seconds that allows it to"steep" for want of a better word, making a richer blend than a basic coffee pot. Their advanced model allows the user to tune that hold some.

We didn't want to get into all that, and just bought their basic model. But it does have the built-in hold. We trusted their reputation on setting that timing for us and it has worked out just fine.
"We, the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible, for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, that we are now qualified to do almost anything, with nothing at all."

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #33 on: July 19, 2018, 01:01 PM »
Thanks everyone for the additional feedback.  I realized that I all I had to do was "brainwash" myself by watching some YouTube videos on the Technivorm Moccamaster - now I'm hooked.  I just picked up a 1.25L glass carafe model from the Williams-Sonoma Outlet at the terrific price of $254.36 with tax!

I also looked at the grinders there.  They had the Virtuoso for $183.96 before tax.  I believe that's a pretty good grinder?  They also had a Cuisinart Burr Grinder, The Breville Smart Grinder Pro and an OXO Barista Brain (I had no idea OXO even made kitchen electrics).  I figure I'll try out the Moccamaster with some freshly ground coffee from a store or some prepackaged coffee and see how it goes from there.  I might invest in a grinder soon.

Does anyone have any coffee recommendations that I can pick up locally from like a Starbucks or Peets or grocery store?  I've never bought whole bean coffee before - will Starbucks or Peets grind it for me?  I think grocery stores usually have a grinding machine there that you can use - or is that a bad idea since it's probably never cleaned?
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 116
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #34 on: July 19, 2018, 01:17 PM »
Thanks everyone for the additional feedback.  I realized that I all I had to do was "brainwash" myself by watching some YouTube videos on the Technivorm Moccamaster - now I'm hooked.  I just picked up a 1.25L glass carafe model from the Williams-Sonoma Outlet at the terrific price of $254.36 with tax!

I also looked at the grinders there.  They had the Virtuoso for $183.96 before tax.  I believe that's a pretty good grinder?  They also had a Cuisinart Burr Grinder, The Breville Smart Grinder Pro and an OXO Barista Brain (I had no idea OXO even made kitchen electrics).  I figure I'll try out the Moccamaster with some freshly ground coffee from a store or some prepackaged coffee and see how it goes from there.  I might invest in a grinder soon.

Does anyone have any coffee recommendations that I can pick up locally from like a Starbucks or Peets or grocery store?  I've never bought whole bean coffee before - will Starbucks or Peets grind it for me?  I think grocery stores usually have a grinding machine there that you can use - or is that a bad idea since it's probably never cleaned?

You're in. Soon you'll be lazily browsing through home roasting forums.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #35 on: July 19, 2018, 01:19 PM »
Oh no!  That's what I'm kind of afraid of.  I don't want to end being someone who can't drink regular drip coffee in a restaurant because it's not good enough.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 870
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #36 on: July 19, 2018, 03:14 PM »
This is the grinder you want. Don’t waste your cash on lesser ones. This will outlast you and gives consistent uniform results.

https://www.seattlecoffeegear.com/rancilio-rocky-coffee-grinder

Ron

Offline Goz

  • Posts: 91
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2018, 05:21 PM »
If you're not going to be grinding for espresso, the Baratza Encore is a great coffee grinder for the money.  If you need the extra consistency in the super fine espresso range, the Baratza Virtuoso or Rancilio Rocky would be better choices.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #38 on: July 19, 2018, 06:12 PM »
At this time I have no plans on brewing espresso.  I have my Nespresso for that - yeah I know to true coffee connoisseurs that's not really espresso, but it's easy.

What's suitable for the pour over range in terms of grinder?
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Goz

  • Posts: 91
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #39 on: July 19, 2018, 08:22 PM »
I have the Baratza Encore that I use with my French press, Chemex, Aeropress, and Bialetti stovetop espresso maker.  It's been great for all those. 

Oh, and I have a Nespresso, too.  That's my option for when I need caffeine fast.  [emoji6]

Offline Koamolly

  • Posts: 59
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #40 on: July 19, 2018, 11:59 PM »
At this time I have no plans on brewing espresso.  I have my Nespresso for that - yeah I know to true coffee connoisseurs that's not really espresso, but it's easy.

What's suitable for the pour over range in terms of grinder?

Really for drip coffee, you can get by with a $20 Krups blade grinder.  Do a medium grind and invert it (holding the top on) a couple of times while grinding.  Not the perfect grind but after spending $250 on the machine, it’s easier on wallet and it will be fine.  You could also use it later to grind spices.  You can use a blender, food processor, or mini food processor if you have one for spices already.  Your Technivorm’s doing the heavy lifting with temp and time.  You can close the brew basket until water has covered the grinds, stir it up so all grinds are infused, then open it.  Later if you get really into coffee more, splurge on the more expensive grinders.  It’s more important to have coffee ground fresh right before brewing even if it’s not perfect.  One drawback is you might have to grind two batches to get enough coffee for a full pot on the technivorm.  I use 2/3 cup of beans before grinding for a full batch with my technivorm (10 cup).  Unless you have extra money you need to get rid of!

Also you could check what Costco has in the way of a cheap burr grinder.  Costco by me was roasting their own beans.  Had a huge automated roaster in the a couple of stores.  But they seem to be scaling back on roasting their own beans now.  Still worth checking if you have a Costco near you.

My exwife is an entomologist working on coffee crops (coffee berry borer). Best coffee I’ve had was a crop she grew for research and processed one year.  We picked the beans,  processed them, roasted them. This was on Oahu.  Better than any Kona or Kau coffee I’ve ever had.  Next year was just ok.  You never know since there are so many variables in the whole chain.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #41 on: July 20, 2018, 10:54 AM »
Oh, and I have a Nespresso, too.  That's my option for when I need caffeine fast.  [emoji6]

You can't beat the Nespresso for speed or convenience.

Really for drip coffee, you can get by with a $20 Krups blade grinder.  Do a medium grind and invert it (holding the top on) a couple of times while grinding.  Not the perfect grind but after spending $250 on the machine, it’s easier on wallet and it will be fine.  You could also use it later to grind spices.  You can use a blender, food processor, or mini food processor if you have one for spices already.  Your Technivorm’s doing the heavy lifting with temp and time.  You can close the brew basket until water has covered the grinds, stir it up so all grinds are infused, then open it.  Later if you get really into coffee more, splurge on the more expensive grinders.  It’s more important to have coffee ground fresh right before brewing even if it’s not perfect.  One drawback is you might have to grind two batches to get enough coffee for a full pot on the technivorm.  I use 2/3 cup of beans before grinding for a full batch with my technivorm (10 cup).  Unless you have extra money you need to get rid of!

I have a Blendtec Blender and a food processor that I could use.  Needing to clean that everyday seems like a pain though.  I don't know if the grounds might get "contaminated" with any flavors or aromas left in the blender carafe or food processor bowl.  I suppose the grind is most important when making espresso as it needs to be a really consistently fine almost powder.

Also you could check what Costco has in the way of a cheap burr grinder.  Costco by me was roasting their own beans.  Had a huge automated roaster in the a couple of stores.  But they seem to be scaling back on roasting their own beans now.  Still worth checking if you have a Costco near you.

I see Costco is selling a Capresso grinder online for $89.99.  That seems like a good price.

My exwife is an entomologist working on coffee crops (coffee berry borer). Best coffee I’ve had was a crop she grew for research and processed one year.  We picked the beans,  processed them, roasted them. This was on Oahu.  Better than any Kona or Kau coffee I’ve ever had.  Next year was just ok.  You never know since there are so many variables in the whole chain.

Wow that's really cool - you got to do the whole coffee life-cycle.  I tried Kona coffee when I was in Hawaii 10 years ago.  That coffee was waaay too strong for me.  I tried the infamous luwak coffee when I was in Bali last year.  That was pretty good, but I seem to recall it being rather bitter.


I took my new Moccamaster on its maiden voyage this morning.  I used LavAzza Classico Medium Roast preground coffee.  It was on sale at the grocery store.  No idea how good or bad this coffee is, but I recognized the LavAzza brand.  I followed the Moccamaster instructions and used 7 scoops for 40 oz of water.  I was able to drink about 2 cups of coffee straight black.  I think this is the first time that I've ever been able to drink a full cup of coffee without milk or cream.  My stomach is hurting a little bit now so I think it's probably not the best idea for me to drink coffee black.  I know my former coworker was telling me that he buys low acid coffee from some coffee roaster online.

I loved the smell of the coffee when I first opened the bag.  I haven't smelled that aroma in a long time.  I was a little disappointed that the air wasn't perfumed from the brewing coffee like I had experienced with my old drip brewer.  All in all it's pretty good.  I suppose my experience would be all the better if I got some better beans and ground them fresh.

My wife took a cup of coffee with her to work.  She added half and half and sugar to hers.  She said it's "not bad."  I guess it didn't wow her socks off.





Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline RobBob

  • Posts: 1329
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #42 on: July 20, 2018, 11:04 AM »
That is what happens when people overhype something.  I told a friend of mine about a place that had the best hotdogs ever.  His expectations were so high that he was disappointed after trying the hotdogs.

How much better could they be and still be hotdogs?  Same with coffee.  How good can a cup of coffee be and still be coffee (especially after adding cream and sugar)?

Another friend loved sushi.  He always dunked evey piece in a mix of wasabi and soy sauce.  My argument was that every piece of sushi he ate tasted the same because he dunked every piece in the same wasabi/soy sauce mixture.

He later read an article that confirmed the same thing.  That green paste is not even real wasabi.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 11:13 AM by RobBob »

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #43 on: July 20, 2018, 11:13 AM »
Good point.  I always say - lower your expectations and you will never be disappointed.

Mmm, sushi.  I do love me some sushi!
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline adcolor

  • Posts: 74
    • MIkey's Millworks and More
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #44 on: July 20, 2018, 11:38 AM »
I should have read through to the end. Congrats on your maker. We've used the Bonavita 1800 (replaced by the 1900). One button, nothing else.  Just makes coffee.  Insulated carafe.  The newer model is way cheaper than the old one.  Insulated carafe is ok, but with two different coffees to brew (unleaded vs leaded) we also bought a thermos (vacuum glass) carafe.   

The real issue is that the cone filter seam requires folding it over.  Not a big deal, but an RTFM detail.  Maybe that's an issue for other brands too.  No idea. It is definitely better coffee than the previous Krups we had (wasn't bad -- this was definitely better).

Not connoisseur enough to require the <5% (to me) improvement of bean vs ground (presuming both are fairly fresh). Big cans will not be fresh over the course of using it up, and are usually of only medium quality at best. This coffee maker brings the quality up significantly for anything other than top notch coffee.  Not a knock, but great coffee and an upper quality unit gets harder to tell the difference in the end result (across coffee maker brands; like using a Mafell & Festool track saw -- takes a lot to get a debatable increase in quality).   For me, it's the difference a great maker gives to medium/low upper $ coffee.

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 223
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #45 on: July 20, 2018, 11:57 PM »

Does anyone have any coffee recommendations that I can pick up locally from like a Starbucks or Peets or grocery store?  I've never bought whole bean coffee before - will Starbucks or Peets grind it for me?  I think grocery stores usually have a grinding machine there that you can use - or is that a bad idea since it's probably never cleaned?

Just buy a bag at Starbucks.  Don't be fooled by the bags of say Starbucks sold in grocery stores or target that have a cheaper price,  they are smaller than the ones you get at the store,  price per unit the stuff in the stores is the same price to just a little cheaper.   Starbucks will grind it up, it's pretty much their default mode as many people have them grind it.  But their is a catch.  If you tell them "medium grind" they will come back and ask you what filter type you have.  Their machine uses filter symbols, say "fine, medium, course".  Of course those values are not based on an absolute either.  But the problem is if you say own a poor over like a Chemex and say "cone" in response, they then grind it up on cone which is a fine setting, and now basically the bag is worthless.   So yes, they grind coffee no issue, but you might not get the grind you wanted or your machine manufacture tells you to use.  On the other hand they might just nail it just the way your machine needs it and your good to go.

And no, I would never use the grocery store one.  It probably has never been cleaned since the store was opened and who knows what has been thru it.  It's only real purpose it to atomize some coffee into the air to make that area of the store smell really good.

If you haven't brewed coffee, you might want to get small bags of various brands early on till you find what you like.  Keep in mind some stuff is ok when you buy it someplace (say a cup of Duncan Donuts coffee from the store), but when you buy the beans and make it at home it can end up awful.


Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 223
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #46 on: July 21, 2018, 12:02 AM »

I took my new Moccamaster on its maiden voyage this morning.  I used LavAzza Classico Medium Roast preground coffee.  It was on sale at the grocery store.  No idea how good or bad this coffee is, but I recognized the LavAzza brand.  I followed the Moccamaster instructions and used 7 scoops for 40 oz of water.  I was able to drink about 2 cups of coffee straight black.  I think this is the first time that I've ever been able to drink a full cup of coffee without milk or cream.  My stomach is hurting a little bit now so I think it's probably not the best idea for me to drink coffee black.  I know my former coworker was telling me that he buys low acid coffee from some coffee roaster online.

I loved the smell of the coffee when I first opened the bag.  I haven't smelled that aroma in a long time.  I was a little disappointed that the air wasn't perfumed from the brewing coffee like I had experienced with my old drip brewer.  All in all it's pretty good.  I suppose my experience would be all the better if I got some better beans and ground them fresh.


I've tried the Lavazza, wasn't impressed, which to others point, you can get let down. I think between the name, and the packaging and so forth I expected more.  I like black coffee, so I general stick to Starbucks Italian roast.  I also am good with Blondes, but for some reason medium roast just haven't been working for me.   Don't cave to contaminating the sacred liquid yet. Just try other coffee first.  The great thing with sticking to straight black coffee is the lack of nutrition, it's super healthy.

Offline SouthRider

  • Posts: 149
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #47 on: July 21, 2018, 06:31 AM »
Sushi? They call that stuff bait where I'm from..............
"We, the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible, for the ungrateful. We have done so much, for so long, with so little, that we are now qualified to do almost anything, with nothing at all."

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 474
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #48 on: July 21, 2018, 07:29 AM »
Lavazza, being Italian, is almost always a darker roast — more suitable for espresso. You should check out a real coffee shop where knowledgable people will quiz you on your expectations and preferences; that way you will get to taste stuff that is more to your liking.

That’s the way I discovered my favourite of the last few years (Ethiopian bio, small coöps).
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #49 on: July 21, 2018, 07:37 AM »
Just buy a bag at Starbucks.  Don't be fooled by the bags of say Starbucks sold in grocery stores or target that have a cheaper price,  they are smaller than the ones you get at the store,  price per unit the stuff in the stores is the same price to just a little cheaper.   Starbucks will grind it up, it's pretty much their default mode as many people have them grind it.  But their is a catch.  If you tell them "medium grind" they will come back and ask you what filter type you have.  Their machine uses filter symbols, say "fine, medium, course".  Of course those values are not based on an absolute either.  But the problem is if you say own a poor over like a Chemex and say "cone" in response, they then grind it up on cone which is a fine setting, and now basically the bag is worthless.   So yes, they grind coffee no issue, but you might not get the grind you wanted or your machine manufacture tells you to use.  On the other hand they might just nail it just the way your machine needs it and your good to go.

And no, I would never use the grocery store one.  It probably has never been cleaned since the store was opened and who knows what has been thru it.  It's only real purpose it to atomize some coffee into the air to make that area of the store smell really good.

If you haven't brewed coffee, you might want to get small bags of various brands early on till you find what you like.  Keep in mind some stuff is ok when you buy it someplace (say a cup of Duncan Donuts coffee from the store), but when you buy the beans and make it at home it can end up awful.

Wow I didn't know specifying the grind could also be so complicated.  I was at a grocery store last night and couldn't even find a coffee grinder - at least it wasn't on the coffee aisle or in the front of the store.  I'll steer clear of ones in store should I find a store that even has one.  How small of a bag are you talking?  I thought the bag I bought was about as small as you can get.  I actually thought about buying a small bag of ground Dunkin Donuts Coffee from the grocery store, but I chose LavAzza instead.  I figured it wouldn't be as good as the actual cup you buy from Dunkin Donuts.  I researched the Dunkin Donuts K Cups a while back and found out they don't use the same coffee at all, I think someone said Maxwell House or someone like that actually makes the K Cups.  I also learned that Dunkin Donuts uses light cream and not half and half.

I've tried the Lavazza, wasn't impressed, which to others point, you can get let down. I think between the name, and the packaging and so forth I expected more.  I like black coffee, so I general stick to Starbucks Italian roast.  I also am good with Blondes, but for some reason medium roast just haven't been working for me.   Don't cave to contaminating the sacred liquid yet. Just try other coffee first.  The great thing with sticking to straight black coffee is the lack of nutrition, it's super healthy.

Fortunately I didn't have super high hopes for the LavAzza.  It just seemed more "premium" than Maxwell House or Folgers.  I am actually a little afraid to buy Starbucks beans.  Their drip coffee really bothers my stomach for whatever reason, but I can drink a Starbuck's latte which is made from espresso no problem.  I know exactly what you mean.  When I first started drinking coffee I used cream and sugar.  I realized that drinking 2 cups+ a day of cream and sugar can't be good for me so I stopped using sugar.  At one point I switched from half and half to milk.  I also tried coconut milk half and half when my cholesterol reading was high one time.  I eventually just went back to regular half and half.  It would be really awesome if I were able to drink my coffee black.  I would never have to worry about running out of half and half again and it would be healthier.  My grandparents always drank their coffee black but my parents always needed cream.  I always get a kick out of watching old tv shows like I Love Lucy or The Andy Griffith Show and seeing them always drink their coffee black.  Maybe just a little sugar, but always black.

Sushi? They call that stuff bait where I'm from..............

LOL!

Lavazza, being Italian, is almost always a darker roast — more suitable for espresso. You should check out a real coffee shop where knowledgable people will quiz you on your expectations and preferences; that way you will get to taste stuff that is more to your liking.

That’s the way I discovered my favourite of the last few years (Ethiopian bio, small coöps).

I did notice it was Italian and questioned how good that would be for drip coffee.  I also saw Illy coffee at the grocery store - is that also more known for espresso?  I've seen the cans and signs ("we proudly serve Illy cofffee" or something like that) at some local bakeries.

I might fail the quiz  [wink].
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1296
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #50 on: July 21, 2018, 08:36 AM »
You can get 1/2 lb bags to try in some places.  Below is a link to a guilty pleasure every time I stroll through the village in NYC.  Talk to them and explain the sensitivity to acidity and have them give you a selection of small bags to try.  And if you visit NYC, there is nothing like the smell of 25 or 30 full burlap sacks of coffee out on the floor and something brewing in the background.  It’s heaven!

https://portorico.com/store/
-Raj

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 223
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #51 on: July 21, 2018, 11:51 AM »

Wow I didn't know specifying the grind could also be so complicated.  I was at a grocery store last night and couldn't even find a coffee grinder - at least it wasn't on the coffee aisle or in the front of the store.  I'll steer clear of ones in store should I find a store that even has one.  How small of a bag are you talking?  I thought the bag I bought was about as small as you can get. 

I did notice it was Italian and questioned how good that would be for drip coffee.  I also saw Illy coffee at the grocery store - is that also more known for espresso?  I've seen the cans and signs ("we proudly serve Illy cofffee" or something like that) at some local bakeries.


It probably depends on the machine and filter and or lack of filter.  Pour over wants medium to courser grind, other wise it ends up tasting like "coffee sand".   Fine grinds are more for being packed together and put in an espesso machine (like you see them dumping out from the machines at Starbucks).  Just follow what the machine says and what the bag says for the type of machine you have.

They do make some smaller bags, but most stuff is 8/9oz. some 12oz and then the big Starbucks 16oz bags.   Still, if a big bag is overall cheaper, just buy it.   I have some of the illy tins, the coffee was ok. But I use them to store coffee in verses dealing with the bag every days.   

I stop in a Starbucks almost every day, so it's easy for me to just grab a bag there when I know I'm getting low, so keeps things fresh.  Also try different ones from time to time.

Based on some of your comments, I'd give a Starbucks blonde roast a try.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #52 on: July 22, 2018, 12:03 PM »
Thanks for that recommendation.  I will try that Blonde Roast ("Flat Bottom" grind for drip) from Starbucks when I finish the LavAzza.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1084
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #53 on: July 22, 2018, 04:58 PM »
Late to the party, but: Get a french press.

Inexpensive (both in initial expense and per use), relieable, makes good tasting coffee and works as long as you have access to hot water (whatever source, might be a campfire). Available in different sizes, down to one cup per press in case you're not a heavy coffee addict.

Given no gravity assisted encounter with the floor (for the models made out of glass) it'll likely outlast any electric thingy.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #54 on: July 22, 2018, 05:07 PM »
Good points, but I tried some French press coffee once and I didn't like it. It was very strong and I think there were some grounds in my cup. I might be misremembering the grounds being in my cup though.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1084
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #55 on: July 22, 2018, 05:23 PM »
Good points, but I tried some French press coffee once and I didn't like it. It was very strong and I think there were some grounds in my cup. I might be misremembering the grounds being in my cup though.
Strength of the resulting brew depends on the ratio between amount of ground coffee and water.
Grounds in the cup with a french press stem from pressing too greedy (seal at the wall fails with too much pressure), but should you ever have been exposed to polish style coffee (put ground coffee into cup, add boiling water, stir and wait for the coffee to settle - sounds *bah* but actually tastes good) the few grounds that might escape in a french press shouldn't be an issue ;)

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3616
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #56 on: July 22, 2018, 05:52 PM »
Polish coffee sounds like Texas coffee. The only difference is you drop a few bits of egg shell into the Texas coffee, which is supposed to make the coffee grounds fall out of suspension faster.

Offline Dane

  • Posts: 354
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #57 on: July 23, 2018, 12:29 AM »
GoingmyWay- Glad you landed on the Moccamaster, it's a great machine. Sorry that your first go round didn't blow your mind- but I think the quality of the coffee is to blame.  Just like your Festool track saw isn't going to improve the outcome if you are using Chinese birch plywood from Home Depot, even the best coffee maker can't do a lot with commodity grade beans.  Supermarket coffee is problematic- you have no idea how long it's been sitting around, the major players, Starbucks, Lavazza, etc, long ago shifte to commodity grade beans and now just torch the crap out of the beans to flatted out the flavor and make a consistent, albeit subpar, product.  That's why it's called Charbucks these days.

I, like you, went around the bend with researching and trying out a lot of different iterations of coffee and coffee makers about 10 years ago.  All I really wanted was a decent drip coffee that was on par with what I was getting at the local, high-quality, coffee shop.  All coffee snobs are brewing a medium body, low acid coffee these days that should go easy on your stomach- my wife has similar issues and our coffee is fine with her.  I finally landed on it and thought I would give you what I wish I had- a formula for good coffee.  There are so many differences that grind, ratio of coffee to water and bean type make.

To start off, I strongly disagree that you can get by with a blade grinder- it just doesn't do the job.  Consistent particle size is key- any dust muddies the brew and blades have no ability to dial in the particle size- they just blast it. If you are going to make espresso, then you really need a very high-end machine, but we are talking about a decent drip here.  So, the Barattza Vituoso is the most cost-effective grinder that you can get that will get you great quality medium bodied drip brew.  For convenience, you can grind an entire weeks worth of beans and store the ground coffee in the freezer with minimal loss in quality.  As an alternative, you can go to a local coffee shop that roasts beans daily and have them grind the bag for drip- ask for a medium body brew.  Assuming that you are going to get a grinder- here is what will get you great results with the Moccamaster:

Coffee: Blue Bottle Beta Blend- order it online.  We live in the middle of nowhere and we get bi-weekly deliveries of Beta Blend that makes this whole thing so convenient- they have a subscription service that saves a couple of bucks a bag.

Ratio: Grind 60 Grams of coffee and fill water to #8 on the Moccamaster

Grind: Set the Barattaza Virtuoso to setting #19

Brew and Enjoy.

Once you land on something that works for you you can iterate, but getting to good right off the bat is helpful.  This formula will get you there.  Everyone who drinks our coffee comments on how good it is.

Good luck

Offline NL-mikkla

  • Posts: 277
  • www.m144h.com
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #58 on: July 23, 2018, 06:30 AM »
@Dane, I now want a cup of your coffee :-)

Anywa, I have the Cuisinart DBM8U grinder for over 10 years.
Super machine, still does what it needs to do with (too) little maintenance from my side it just keeps on going.
No opininon on the drippers

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 679
Re: Coffee Maker Recommendations
« Reply #59 on: July 23, 2018, 08:51 AM »

Strength of the resulting brew depends on the ratio between amount of ground coffee and water.
Grounds in the cup with a french press stem from pressing too greedy (seal at the wall fails with too much pressure), but should you ever have been exposed to polish style coffee (put ground coffee into cup, add boiling water, stir and wait for the coffee to settle - sounds *bah* but actually tastes good) the few grounds that might escape in a french press shouldn't be an issue ;)

That's true - I don't know what ratio or what kind of coffee he even used.  I just know it was too strong for my liking and I didn't like it.  He really liked his french press at the time.  I actually got him a portable french press travel mug for a present once.  He's now upgraded and I think he only uses his Rocky Rancilio espresso maker.

I'm a big baby when it comes to foreign matter in my mouth.  There'd occasionally be a stray coffee ground or 2 from my Keurig brewed cup that would bother me.  I don't eat crab cakes because I always find little bits of shell and I end up spitting out my whole mouth full.

Polish coffee sounds like Texas coffee. The only difference is you drop a few bits of egg shell into the Texas coffee, which is supposed to make the coffee grounds fall out of suspension faster.

I saw a video online of someone from making coffee with just coffee grounds, water, and egg or egg shells.  I think she might have cracked the whole egg in there.  Seemed like an interesting technique.

GoingmyWay- Glad you landed on the Moccamaster, it's a great machine. Sorry that your first go round didn't blow your mind- but I think the quality of the coffee is to blame.  Just like your Festool track saw isn't going to improve the outcome if you are using Chinese birch plywood from Home Depot, even the best coffee maker can't do a lot with commodity grade beans.  Supermarket coffee is problematic- you have no idea how long it's been sitting around, the major players, Starbucks, Lavazza, etc, long ago shifte to commodity grade beans and now just torch the crap out of the beans to flatted out the flavor and make a consistent, albeit subpar, product.  That's why it's called Charbucks these days.

I, like you, went around the bend with researching and trying out a lot of different iterations of coffee and coffee makers about 10 years ago.  All I really wanted was a decent drip coffee that was on par with what I was getting at the local, high-quality, coffee shop.  All coffee snobs are brewing a medium body, low acid coffee these days that should go easy on your stomach- my wife has similar issues and our coffee is fine with her.  I finally landed on it and thought I would give you what I wish I had- a formula for good coffee.  There are so many differences that grind, ratio of coffee to water and bean type make.

To start off, I strongly disagree that you can get by with a blade grinder- it just doesn't do the job.  Consistent particle size is key- any dust muddies the brew and blades have no ability to dial in the particle size- they just blast it. If you are going to make espresso, then you really need a very high-end machine, but we are talking about a decent drip here.  So, the Barattza Vituoso is the most cost-effective grinder that you can get that will get you great quality medium bodied drip brew.  For convenience, you can grind an entire weeks worth of beans and store the ground coffee in the freezer with minimal loss in quality.  As an alternative, you can go to a local coffee shop that roasts beans daily and have them grind the bag for drip- ask for a medium body brew.  Assuming that you are going to get a grinder- here is what will get you great results with the Moccamaster:

Coffee: Blue Bottle Beta Blend- order it online.  We live in the middle of nowhere and we get bi-weekly deliveries of Beta Blend that makes this whole thing so convenient- they have a subscription service that saves a couple of bucks a bag.

Ratio: Grind 60 Grams of coffee and fill water to #8 on the Moccamaster

Grind: Set the Barattaza Virtuoso to setting #19

Brew and Enjoy.

Once you land on something that works for you you can iterate, but getting to good right off the bat is helpful.  This formula will get you there.  Everyone who drinks our coffee comments on how good it is.

Good luck

Thanks for that coffee brand recommendation and your exact formula on how to make it.  I'm leaning toward buying that coffee and the grinder to try it out.

@Dane, I now want a cup of your coffee :-)

Anywa, I have the Cuisinart DBM8U grinder for over 10 years.
Super machine, still does what it needs to do with (too) little maintenance from my side it just keeps on going.
No opininon on the drippers


His description really does make me want to go out and try his recommended coffee using his instructions.  Sounds like a great cup!

The Williams-Sonoma Outlet sells the Cuisinart CBM-18 Grinder for $79.96 after the discount, but before tax.  I'm not sure how that grinder is different from the grinder that you recommended, but it sounds like a good price to me.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS