Author Topic: Cutting Board Update  (Read 3325 times)

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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Cutting Board Update
« on: February 26, 2018, 10:55 AM »
I’m posting the final chapter of my cutting board project saga.  We last left off with me trying to make a router sled plane to flatten my glue-up: http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-how-to/uneven-router-sled-planing-53818/.

I gave up on trying to make a router plane sled.  Instead, I sanded with the RO150 (40 grit granat made very quick work of the bulk unevenness removal) and used a small block plane to get the glue-up as flat as I thought I could.  I later learned that you need a really long plane like a #7 jointer if you want to get something flat since a short plane will for the most part just follow the unevenness of the surface.  I went ahead and cut the strips for the end grain cutting board after I felt like I had done the best I could – if I had kept trying to get it flatter it would end up being so thin there’d be nothing left.

After cutting the strips, I flipped every other piece end over end and discovered that I had a major problem.  Each piece was slightly curved, which created a decent gap. 276129-0 There was no way I’d be able to glue these pieces together, even with a ton of clamping pressure.   I went out and bought a Ridgid belt sander and mounted it horizontally in an attempt to flatten the strips, but that didn’t really work at all.  I had given up on this whole cutting board project for a while.  I was just about to hang my hat up in defeat when I realized that I could use a hand bench plane to flatten out some of the unevenness.

I bought a 4 1/2 Woodriver plane and I also got a Veritas straight edge and a few other accessories that I can't remember specifically, but they all assisted me in getting each strip more straight and flat and ultimately being able to salvage the cutting board from what was seeming to become destined to "burn pile." 276131-1

It doesn't look so bad if you ignore the fact that not all of the joints line up, it's not perfectly flat on the top or bottom, the individual squares aren't all the same size, and the fact that the overall cutting board is not square. 276133-2

BUT hey, the cutting board sits flat with rubber feet so that it doesn't rock like our current Boos or our cheap bamboo cutting board do.  I also think it looks pretty good so long as you don't examine it too closely to see the multitude of imperfections.  It’s definitely “unique and one of a kind.”  I’d call this making lemonade from the lemons that hand selected.

I now realize the specific mistakes that I made during each step of the process.  I think most if not all of these problems were pointed out by other FOG members, but I didn’t listen.  Seeing is believing as they say.  I had to experience these things empirically myself in order to fully understand.

Lessons Learned:
  • This really should have been made with a table saw – I don’t have the space and insisted on being able to do it with a track saw.
  • The TS75 would have been better suited for trying to cut 8/4 stock as the dimensions are just at the maximum capacity and power for the TS55.
  • I should have been using the panther blade from the beginning – that definitely helped with the blade deflection that initially caused the unevenness in the cut edges and thus didn’t really leave a glue-up ready edge.  My solution for that was just clamp harder!  That leads to the next problem.
  • I applied so much clamping pressure to close up the gaps in the glue joints is what caused the overall glue-up to curve and bow, which led me down the path of trying to build a router sled plane to flatten it out.  It might have also been a good idea to do the glue-up in a couple smaller sections and also to have used cauls to help keep it flat.
  • Not all of the initial strips of maple and walnut were exactly the same width.  I tried in some cases making several passes in an attempt to clean up the uneven saw kerf marks, which resulted in slightly narrower strips.  Now the joints don’t like up perfectly.

I still have a bunch of wood leftover so I think I will attempt to make another cutting board again in the future knowing the things that I now know.

That was probably waaaay too long of a rambling post.  May be there will be a sequel to this story…
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Don T

  • Posts: 1824
  • Phoenix, Az
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2018, 11:07 AM »
Thanks for sharing your trials and tribulations.  It looks pretty darn good to me.  This is a future project that I want to take on once I get get my shop put back together.
RO150, C12, DF 500 Q, CT33, TS75, MFT3, Kapex 120, MFT3/Kapex, MFK 700, RO 90, ETS150/3, CT22, Centrotec Installers Kit, Parallel Guides & Ext, Carvex, OF1400, LR32 Set, MFS400 w/700 rails, KA UG Set, First Aid Kit, RTS 400 EQ, Vecturo OS400 Set, CT Wings, CT Drill Guide, Pro 5, CXS, C18, HL850, Vac Sys set

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2018, 11:11 AM »
Thanks!  At first glance it does look pretty good.  Just don't stare too long or you might change your mind [wink].
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 805
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2018, 02:03 PM »
Congratulations on your persistence!  Most people would have just chucked it, started over, and made at least some of the same mistakes the second time.  You learned a lot and end up with a board that, while maybe not a perfect match for the ideal in your head when you started, looks nice and will be serviceable.  And you must have gotten some satisfaction out of the process, or you wouldn't have kept at it.  So overall, I'd call that a successful project.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5147
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #4 on: February 26, 2018, 02:06 PM »
It looks fine...it’s a cutting board.  [smile]

Moreover, think 🤔 of how much you learned from the project. That’s invaluable first hand information.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #5 on: February 26, 2018, 02:53 PM »
Congratulations on your persistence!  Most people would have just chucked it, started over, and made at least some of the same mistakes the second time.  You learned a lot and end up with a board that, while maybe not a perfect match for the ideal in your head when you started, looks nice and will be serviceable.  And you must have gotten some satisfaction out of the process, or you wouldn't have kept at it.  So overall, I'd call that a successful project.

Thanks.  I kinda had no choice but to keep going.  I didn't want completely fail at this since I had the idea in my head that I should be able to make it work the "hard way" without using the standard tools one would use to make a cutting board.  I had also invested quite a lot of money in acquiring lots tools to make this work.  This was about a $4k+ cutting board LOL.

It was incredibly satisfying being able to chop some vegetables on the cutting board yesterday evening.

It looks fine...it’s a cutting board.  [smile]

Moreover, think 🤔 of how much you learned from the project. That’s invaluable first hand information.

That's true - it's only something to cut things on.  Not really that big a deal.

I really did learn a lot.  I'll have no problem sanding down this cutting board should the surface get too marred up.  I'll also have no problem rebuilding the cutting board should it develop a split or crack for whatever reason. 

With my new found experience, I'm planning on fixing the Boos cutting board that's pretty badly warped from lack of proper oiling maintenance and also sitting with moisture trapped under it.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline David

  • Posts: 402
  • Author/speaker/advisor to entrepreneurial experts.
    • A few pieces that I’ve built
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #6 on: February 26, 2018, 04:09 PM »
Good job! I'd have chucked it, too, so I admire your patience. :) Looks a bit like one I made awhile back. This picture shows the underside, where I routed out some finger holds.

https://www.burlforest.com/end-grain-woodblock/
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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2018, 04:23 PM »
Thank you.  Maybe more like cheapness rather than patience - I'd hate to waste any wood.  I try to keep all the little scraps of even cheap plywood.  You never know when they might come in handy.

That does look very similar to mine.  I deliberately didn't want to attempt to route anything since I could see that just one more area for disaster.  It might be less of a problem for finger holds, but I had heard trying to route a juice channel was easier said than done.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline mwildt

  • Posts: 421
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #8 on: February 26, 2018, 07:38 PM »
Great job. I'm certain I would have had same challenges with such a board. With so many pieces it would be hard to not have issues of one kind or another. Maybe I should try to make one.

On that note I always find things look good until one gets to the glue phase. Then it all starts slipping and sliding. Clamps and cauls help but there always seems to be some sort of movement. I do moderate the glue application ;-)

Any secret advice to share ?

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #9 on: February 26, 2018, 08:17 PM »
Wow you took the words right out of my mouth!

My second glue-up looked "great" until I saw the results of what happened after I glued it up and then applied clamps.  The whole thing was really bowed!

I thought my mistake was applying too much clamping pressure.  That might have been the case, but I think what also might have been a contributing factor was too much glue.  I was applying Titebond III with https://www.woodcraft.com/products/glue-bottle-with-2-1-2-glue-roller?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIuo7Su_DE2QIVD0wNCh2TDQotEAQYASABEgJhqvD_BwE.  I noticed mtmwood: http://www.youtube.com/user/mtmwood, who has made thousands and thousands of cutting boards uses a paint roller to spread out his glue.  I feel like rolling the glue out with a paint roller makes things slightly tackier and maybe less prone to moving?  I have also heard of people use salt to help with the movement, but that just seems odd to me.  I definitely feel like that's the exception and not the norm.

Hopefully, more experienced and knowledgeable woodworkers can chime in.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 1064
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #10 on: February 28, 2018, 04:35 PM »
One solution to make a glueup possible with such gaps is to use a TS on a rail, cutting both parts at the same time to have the kerf on both sides forms for a perfect joint. To fixate both parts with double-sided tape on a piece of scrap helps with them not moving, space them a little below blade kerf width so they are both fully cut over the whole length.

See http://festoolownersgroup.com/festool-tools-accessories/straight-line-rips-with-ts-7555/msg455744/#msg455744

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 670
Re: Cutting Board Update
« Reply #11 on: February 28, 2018, 04:55 PM »
Funny you should mention that.  That's sometimes called a "mirror cut" right?  I was just looking at some other posts today where they were talking about that technique.  I was pretty fascinated by the approach.

That technique might be easier said than done since I'm working with fairly narrow strips - about 1.75" by 1.75".  It was pretty challenging for me to even do the rip cuts with the Precision Parallel Guides.  They were supposed to be squares, but I ended up with rectangles since I kept trimming and sanding the wood down.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS