Author Topic: hospital technology  (Read 15486 times)

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Online Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology/eye spider webs & Retina detachment
« Reply #60 on: November 26, 2016, 08:04 PM »

A warning about Eye Spider Webs and Retina Detachment.

In the past 6 months I have had two Optomatrists tell me that eye spiders/webs [bottom image] are not a major concern and the brain will soon adjust and ignore them. You will find similar advice from Dr Google.

On October 25th the Retina of my left eye detached [see Top Image example: mine was actually from the bottom] and this week I will be having a second operation, this time for Retina tearing in my right eye.

My advice - if eye spiders and flashes occur suddenly, rather than gradually, seek referral to an eye specialist surgeon. If the Retina actually detaches, go straight to ER. Get someone else to drive you.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 10:22 PM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology/eye spider webs & Retina detachment
« Reply #61 on: November 27, 2016, 04:08 AM »

A warning about Eye Spider Webs and Retina Detachment.

In the past 6 months I have had two Optomatrists tell me that eye spiders/webs [bottom image] are not a major concern and the brain will soon adjust and ignore them. You will find similar advice from Dr Google.

On October 25th the Retina of my left eye detached [see Top Image example: mine was actually from the bottom] and this week I will be having a second operation, this time for Retina tearing in my right eye.

My advice - if eye spiders and flashes occur suddenly, rather than gradually, seek referral to an eye specialist surgeon. If the Retina actually detaches, go straight to ER. Get someone else to drive you.

Thanks for showing those pics.  They can be of service to anybody who finds a corresponding vision problem.  My eye problems have been many thru the years.  The symptoms are different from those you show, but anybody who does notice any change in vision should go immediately to a good eye doc.  I say "good" as there are a few out there who ain't so great.  I happen to be fortunate in having one who i think is one of the best.  I think, Stephen, you are lucky to have a great one as well.
 
Two years ago, my opthamoligist told me i was a candidate for Macular Degeneration. My father had it before he was 80 (I still have a few years to go  ::).) He told me what nutrients to take and how often.  I have been following his advice ever since and so far, the condition he spotted has not progressed.  He seemed very upset when he told me about the problem, but i told him I had expected the news a few years earlier.  When my dad had the problem, even tho he was doing very intricate and fine detailed work, he found ways to continue working for sometime after he was declared legally blind. (He inherited his cantankerous was from his eldest son)

(i have a bicycle story about my dad I will tell a little later after I finish my morning correspondences >>> and of course > my usual good big breakfast)

When the docs were prescribing all the meds I was to take following my heart attack, i told them I was not interested in taking anything that would mean discontinuing my eye meds. Heart problem was secondary to my thinking. They just looked at my eye pills and rolled their eyes saying they were nothing but vitamins.  Well, those vitamins have cleared up several eye problems that had been developing over the course of a year or so before my ARED showed its ugly head. So far, there has been no progression of the disease. Those vitamins, IMHO are doing a job keeping me going.

Do as your eye doc tells and you @Untidy Shop will do fine, I am sure.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #62 on: December 07, 2016, 10:51 PM »
@Tinker  @Peter Halle

Tinker

Had second op as scheduled on December 1. Eye sight is returning, but general healing is slower. This is because, although there was no actual detachment in this eye, there were more tears. Consequently I will be on light duties for two more weeks after I return to my part time position in hardware and timber sales. I return just in time for the last minute Christmas rush [eek].

On the home front the mowing is less urgent now as Spring has become Summer and rainfall has fallen away. Hope to start picking up some Festools for light work [but heavy for them [big grin]] next week.

I see from the publication and photographs referred elsware that you wore safety glasses both now and in the past. Big tick.   [cool]  Apart from safety glasses, I have now taken to wearing a brush cutter mask when mowing near trees with low branches and shrubs.


Thank you for your continued support.

Hopefully this thread can be set aside for many years now.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 11:03 PM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Kev

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #63 on: December 08, 2016, 03:50 AM »
Apart from safety glasses, I have now taken to wearing a brush cutter mask when mowing near trees with low branches and shrubs.

@Untidy Shop I've got the full house professional Stihl headwear and I stupidly just wear sunglasses and a cap when I'm using a line trimmer [embarassed]

...admittedly that's on a manicured suburban garden, but I need to alter my behaviour in prep for a bigger and less predictable terrain in the near future!

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #64 on: December 08, 2016, 04:09 AM »
@Untidy Shop Glad you are coming along ok.  I have filed the pics you showed before your surgery.  I had promised you I would send a story about a blind biker. I looked thru my files and finally found it. My dad was a stubborn type of guy.  I think he got that from his eldest son. The story is true and in retrospect, we all can see the humor of the situation, even tho a bit scary at the moment. It is interesting to know how much improvement in eye surgery has occurred in the last thirty years >>> or in the last 39 years  8)

 “Tink, you have to do something.”  It was my step mother at the other end of my phone.  She had called in an absolute panic and had explained that my dad, who lived on Long Island had found his way across town to a Sears store.  The trip involved several miles of main roads with fairly heavy weekend traffic. He had suddenly decided he wanted a bicycle.  Why he wanted a bike was a mystery.  After all, he was legally blind from the fairly advanced condition called macular degeneration.

He had explained his condition to me a couple of years before when it had first shown its ugly symptoms. Back in those days, practically prehistoric from 21st century, there was not much that could be done to eliminate such a problem.  I knew all about eye problems that could not be eliminated.  Let’s just say ‘I had been a maverick until at 12, I was operated on to correct my eye problem.'  The problem was only partially corrected in that cosmetically, I no longer had to fight my way thru life.  My peers no longer got such horrified looks when looking at me face to face.  Those problems all disappeared when the docs pulled the bandages off.  The main problem I was left with was double vision. I literally saw two of everything. Since that time, I had been to several eye docs who, always, told me I was about ten years too old for a “corrective operation”.  Ten years later, I was again ten years too old for any “correctional procedure”.  It always seemed the only progress in eye surgery was in the language of discouragement.  I decided I would live with my problem.

Dad was developing a progressive eye problem at a time when nothing could be done.  Now, somewhere around 30 years later, I am told that if caught early, the disease can not only be possibly stopped, but actually, in some situations, it can actually be reversed.  At the time of my stepmom’s panic stricken call, nothing could be done about the condition.  As soon as I got her calmed down, I called Sears. 

After getting a little bit of the good old fashioned “run-around” I finally got to talk with the manager of the bicycle department.  The attitude that came back to me was the bicycle was now my dad’s responsibility. “He is responsible for his own self and he is old enough to know whether or not he is capable to ride the bike home.”  I could almost see the smug look at the far end of the line.  That reply had come even after I had explained that my father was legally blind.  That little problem seemed inconsequential to the young manager.

“Before I hang up,” I calmly went on, “there is one more thing you need to know.”  I was becoming totally calm as I took a deep breath and a short pause so I was certain I had the man’s total attention.  “I am just a young landscaper (I had already been 39 years young for quite a few years) so I really don’t know much about people.  You must realize that my dad’s stepson is an insurance broker.”  Further pause while I let that sink in.  “I am sure he will have some thoughts about the matter.  If he is not able to come up with any ideas, my dad’s step son in law is an attorney whose brother happens to be a prosecutor in the New York City Court system.  You can ask my dad about those people.  I am sure he can expand with a little more information.”  I then wished the manager “…a good day with your thoughts,” and hung up.

All I had told the young manager was true with one exception.  There was no family connection to any prosecutor.  Oh well, when one gets to be 39, I guess some lee-way must be allowed now and then. Within 10 minutes, my stepmom called to tell me the bike was being delivered, along with my dad, of course.   Once unloaded in his garage, that bike never moved again as long as Dad lived.

Stephen, you and I are so very fortunate in that the medical proceedures have so far advanced from way back when.  Take good care of yourself and you will look back with a chuckle when you tell your story 30 years down the line.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #65 on: February 01, 2017, 07:08 PM »
Visited my eye surgeon for three and two month [depends which eye we are discussing] check yesterday. All as expected at this stage and I can continue to lift items up to 20kg. This is a single person weight limit at work anyway so all good there.

However a complication from Retina Detachmrnt sergery can be excellerated growth of cateracts. One is starting to form on the left eye which had the first op. I have a next appointment in two months when the eye will be scanned and any need for surgery assessed. One symptom of the cateract is that my near sight is actually improving. My A$200 proscription safety glasses have already  been replaced by A$30.00 clears when on the tools. [big grin]
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 07:11 PM by Untidy Shop »
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― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Online Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology - Cataract Surgery
« Reply #66 on: May 09, 2017, 12:19 AM »
Yesterday had Cataract Surgery on my left eye. Cataracts had grown on both eyes as a complication of the Retina Detachment surgery earlier in this thread.

Amaizing what I can see today, including the many weeds on our property!  [eek] Am almost afraid to look and see some of my recent projects - will they be as accurate as I thought?  [big grin]

Other eye will be operated on in 6-8 weeks.
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #67 on: May 10, 2017, 08:25 PM »
@Untidy Shop, It is amazing how much better you can se once you get rid of the cadilacs.  I got rid of my firs one (inner lense replacement) during a snow storm.  i went out plowing snow that same nite. I ended up plowing until after daylite.  The snow was actually white from mynew eye, or rather, I became aware that my left eye saw the  sow as yellow.  when I went for my checkup a week later, my eye doc asked if I had plowed that nite. I replid that I had plowed until late morning when it was brite sunshine.

"Did you wear dark glasses as I had told you?" I think he knew my answer before he even asked the question.

"No. It was dark when I went out and I did not ven think aboutdark glasses."

The doc went into an almost tyrade as he told me all the things that could happn if I did nnot wear dark glasses.

A month later, he operated on my other eye. Again, it was snowing.  Again, I went out plowing in the wee hours of the morning.  Again, I was plowing until well after daylite. Again, when I went in a week later for a checkup, Doc asked again if I wore dark glasses.  "You be I wore them," I replied.

"What made you change your mind?"

"You scared the H--- out of me."

he only problem I have now is that for a long time, when driving at nite, i saw haloes surrounding any brite lites.  I told my eye doc about that and he prescribed some vitamine pills for me to take. That has pretty much cleared up that problem. Before I started  taking them, I was afraid I would have to quit nite driving. I now have no problems with that.

The biggest problem I had after the cadilac ops was the inner lenses (each eye has an inner lense and an outer lense. They suck out the inner lense and replace with  a plastic with a set focus) do not focus.  That all happened at just about the same time my grandson got interested in playing catch with a ball.  I have always had problems with quick focus, but not, I lose sight  of the ball as it gets about 6 feet from my hand.  I could not play catch any more.  the one big plus, except for the dark glasses, I no longer wear glasses except for reading or close work(like woodworking.) That is a BIG plus
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #68 on: May 10, 2017, 10:32 PM »
Agree @Tinker re the eyesight improvement. Now I can see individual leaves on the trees at medium to longer distances away, something I have not been able to do since I was young,; ie your age!  [smile]

Can not wait to get my right eye done. It reminds me of why perhaps I should not have been driving in recent weeks. The only thing I miss about the cateract is that now when I look at the night sky and in particular the MilkyWay there are no longer billions and billions of disco balls across the sky.  [eek]   [mad]

Unlike the Retina surgery, I have been able to quickly get back to some woodwork, be it lighter stuff. Currently making rack supports etc., for the Mower Shed. Even have the Doc's approval to use a mower this weekend - mixed blessing there for sure, with rapid  Autumn grass growth.

At least where I live, snow is not an issue for ones eyesight!  [blink]  [smile]

Take care yourself,

Stephen
« Last Edit: May 10, 2017, 10:37 PM by Untidy Shop »
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“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #69 on: May 11, 2017, 03:35 AM »
@Untidy Shop  Now you will have no excuses for un-untydying your shop ::)
Wayne H. Tinker