Author Topic: hospital technology  (Read 15114 times)

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Offline Untidy Shop

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hospital technology
« on: September 01, 2016, 01:48 AM »
Here I am in a brand new hospital using an over head bedside interactive screen.Thought I would check the FOG, and here I am even making a post.  [big grin]

Just had corretive surgery to a hammer toe. No pain yet,   [eek] but only out of recovery about an hour ago.

Wonder if my surgeon used a Festool Drill for the wire insert?  [tongue]  [smile]
« Last Edit: September 01, 2016, 01:51 AM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline six-point socket II

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #1 on: September 01, 2016, 02:07 AM »
Wishing you a speedy and as far as possible painless recovery!

Sounds like a nice hospital, maybe they used PB Swiss "OPERACE" Equipment? -> http://www.pbswisstools.com/en/medical-instruments-mi/surgical-instruments.html

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2016, 02:20 AM »
thanks @six-point socket II   Yes more likely the tools you linked.
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Online Peter Halle

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2016, 02:40 AM »
Wishing you a speedy recovery!

Peter

Offline Kev

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2016, 02:44 AM »
I need surgery on a joint in my food .. been putting it off and complaining about it for WAY TOO LONG [embarassed] [sad]

@Untidy Shop I hope yours comes good quickly and with the least pain possible.

Kev.

Offline DrD

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #5 on: September 01, 2016, 05:00 AM »
@Untidy Shop

Wishing you a speedy recovery and minimal pain!  I was in our local hospital emergency room last nite and found we too are advanced - we had indoor plumbing with running water and all!  It was an experience.

Best to ya!

DrD
Dr.D

Offline jobsworth

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #6 on: September 01, 2016, 03:20 PM »
now ya got time to watch all those festool videos on tube :>D
get well soon bud
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #7 on: September 02, 2016, 03:04 AM »
Thanks all,  for your best wishes and other comments. Now home. Lucky I recently finished a deck ramp.  [smile]

@jobsworth 
Yes it is certainly video catch up time. Must dig up the links from the last FOG video comp too.

@DrD 
To continue the satire, you mean your hospital actually has running water.  [smile] Trust all is well following your visit whether it be for yourself, family member or friend.

@Kev
Do not delay that operation, it won't hurt! [eek] [tongue] Best to get it done before the big move.

@Peter Halle
Trust your own health continues to be a positive recovery story.

@six-point socket II
Spoke to my Surgeon today. No hand drill  He used a brushless battery drill as we all here would have; wouldn't we!? [big grin]


« Last Edit: September 02, 2016, 03:11 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline jobsworth

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #8 on: September 02, 2016, 06:59 AM »
Pinterest and Ana white are great sites
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline DrD

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #9 on: September 02, 2016, 01:34 PM »
@Untidy Shop

Yeppers, it was pretty upscale, PLUS, didn't need to boil no water to get it hot, there was a plumb fancy handle, which when turned, pre-made hot water come gushin' out.  Got the ambulance ride & the whole thing - pretty exciting, thinking maybe heart attack, but, praise the Lord, it was just a really bad gall bladder attack; went home the same evening.  At 72, you can't take chest and jaw pain for granted.

Good to see you're chipper and hopefully on the road to good and better things.  Jobsworth is correct about Ana White, she's got some really great plans that even an old guy like me can follow.

Regards, DrD
Dr.D

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #10 on: September 02, 2016, 03:55 PM »
@Untidy Shop, recently I got the taxi ride.  Once they wheeled me in to leave me alone with all those beeeuuutiful nurses, I complained to the driver.  I told him I was very disappointed that he had NOT blown the siren all the way. That just took all of the excitement out of the trip. ::)
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #11 on: September 02, 2016, 06:41 PM »
@Untidy Shop, recently I got the taxi ride.  Once they wheeled me in to leave me alone with all those beeeuuutiful nurses, I complained to the driver.  I told him I was very disappointed that he had NOT blown the siren all the way. That just took all of the excitement out of the trip. ::)
Tinker

@Tinker
I would have thought the nurses were enough excitement for you in one day.[eek][big grin]

@DrD   And Tinker.
Good to know you are both on the mend/OK.  [smile]


« Last Edit: September 02, 2016, 06:46 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Online Peter Halle

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #12 on: September 02, 2016, 07:01 PM »
Thank was funny.

I love the nurses that took care of me.  But I admit that I tried to not make their lives heck.  I was going to be there for multiple weeks after all.  I had some drop dead gorgeous nurses that I was so glad that they double robed to prevent any possible contact with the chemicals going thru me.  I had nurses who had volunteered to be part of treating the ebola patients that were transported here for treatment.  I had those who cheered me on when I went on a 1 mile walk with my iv stand and then i sopped and encouraged others walking to go a little further.  When I ordered pizza in for them and remembered that some might be vegetarians they noticed.  I never told them but an anonymous thank you note told me that they knew who.

Every four months now I go back for a checkup and although I have no interaction with those angels I leave a note of thanks with a couple of doughnuts. 

God bless those who train to take of us with whatever comes to ail us.

Peter

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #13 on: September 02, 2016, 08:22 PM »
I have a couple off nurses in my family.  Also two of my very best friends married nurses.  I know what they have to go thru and the couple of times I have been in the hospital I have tried to entertain the nurses, and even the docs, who have worked with me.  A few years ago, I had to have a batch of extra bone and scrap metal inserted into my neck.  I was mighty nervous about the surgery, but had a great time kidding the nurses and telling them stories (as you all know, that really took great effort).  They laughed.  I thought the laughing was just being polite until one of the nurses, when she went off shift in the evening, came back to my room to tell me how much I had made her day.  I told her, "You just made MY day."  The two of us hugged.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology/Festool Convalescence
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2016, 01:45 AM »
@jobsworth

Today I spent some time  looking at some Anna White on UTube, and as well, I browsed the Festool Chanels.  Thanks to Ms White, Ms Untidy is looking at some glasshouse ideas.  [scared]

Looking at the Festool Channels  I visited and revisited some exceptional woodworkers and craft people  including –











Then there is this Aussie Timber mill.



And this on Japanese Carpentry



Caught up on some old FOG contest entries too. This one, from 2014,  surely has  to be the funniest entry –



Most of us, unless we really earn our living using Festool, might easily relate to the circumstances presented.
« Last Edit: September 03, 2016, 01:49 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2016, 03:23 AM »
@Untidy Shop, I only had time to look at that last one.  I will be laughing all day. 
Whenever I bring home a new "toy", I tell my Dearly Beloved how "...many thousands of dollaras I saved by ONLY bringing this ONE very fine item..."  I will have to remember that guy's approach. 
Untidy, you are putting your laid up time to very good use.  Keep it up and you will be good to go in no time.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline jobsworth

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #16 on: September 03, 2016, 05:12 AM »
That guy convincing his wife is a rookie. Me and Kev can give him lessons.
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #17 on: September 03, 2016, 06:10 AM »
That guy convincing his wife is a rookie. Me and Kev can give him lessons.

 [not worthy] [not worthy]
There is no doubt about that. That guy and I salute you both!  [big grin]


@jobsworth  @Kev


---------------
Re hugging nurses -
@Tinker , you old smoothie!

« Last Edit: September 03, 2016, 06:34 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #18 on: September 03, 2016, 09:40 AM »
@Untidy Shop, Are you dating yourself with that recording?

Hey, I even remember that old song.  I even remember when those old turntables were known as "Victrolas".   I have a cabinet that my dad built way back in the late twenties or early thirties to mount the victrola in.  I even remember using the hand crank on the side when the music started slowing down and getting ugly.  The Victrola had a curved megaphone on the top to increase the sound so you could hear the music.  The cabinet has morphosed over the years to house radios, radio/phonograph combinations, but the little hole in the side where the crank handle resided is still there and in the same place it always has been. 

Yeah! I know I date myself.  I still call phonographs "Victrola".  My kids and grandson look at me funny when i make such reference, the same as I still call a refrigeratot an "Ice Box". 

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology to deck mowing; a journey.
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2016, 12:52 AM »
Deck Mowing
Spring and  a sunny day  today.

Two weeks since my operation and the grass has certainly grown.

Yesterday my specialist removed my stitches and bandage  cast, replacing it with less bandaging. The wire/pin stays in the toe for another month but I can now walk with a hobble wearing an orthopaedic sandal.

So this morning AEST, I hobble to the mower shed and get stuck in to some mowing. At lunch time rather than hobble back to the house I drove  up the deck ramp to the door. 😀

I am sure @Tinker has never attempted this!  [big grin] [smile] [eek]

« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 06:55 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Cheese

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2016, 01:37 AM »
You do what you have to do...and that statement becomes more relevant the older we get.  [eek]

I like those aluminum vents, are they commercially available?

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology to deck mowing, a journey.
« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2016, 04:18 AM »
. . . .
I like those aluminum vents, are they commercially available?
@Cheese  [big grin] LOL.
I was wondering what 'vents' you were referring to!? Then I realised that you had been confused by the sunlight hitting the corrugated sheets of Colorbond Steel.  [smile]

I am sure you have this or similar in NA. Our roof, under decking and some ext walls are covered with this. http://colorbond.com/support
« Last Edit: September 17, 2016, 07:49 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Cheese

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2016, 08:54 AM »
Thanks @Untidy Shop, In that one picture the shadow lines are so strong that they look like angled louvers rather than rounded corrugated.

Offline Kev

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Re: hospital technology to deck mowing; a journey.
« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2016, 05:48 AM »

So this morning AEST, I hobble to the mower shed and get stuck in to some mowing. At lunch time rather than hobble back to the house I drove  up the deck ramp to the door. 😀


@Untidy Shop

So essentially you're a grass cutting version of Davros [eek] [big grin]

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2016, 08:47 AM »
Yep!  [eek] [smile]

@Kev


« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 08:58 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2016, 08:58 AM »
@Untidy Shop  I tried flying

Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2016, 09:01 AM »
@Tinker
Not a three point landing, but then it was a mower! [eek]

Did it hurt!?
The dog seems simewhat concerned!

Must admit I came down off the ramp a 'little' slower than going up.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2016, 09:04 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2016, 10:47 AM »
@ Untidy Shop  It hurt only my ego.  I was actually fortunate the car was there in the exact spot.  Had it not been there, or a couple of feet further from the wall ................

Luckily the owner had a sense of humor when I unformed him that, "Some body has parked a lawn mower on your car."

By the height of your deck, You were probably fortunate the mower did not tip back on you.  Been there and done that also.  I had a 3/4ton pickup that i had been hauling my mower (same style but less weight to the deck as the one i parked on that car)  I had a couple of aluminum ramps that I used with no problem during the first season I had used the truck. During the early winter I got a job where I would be putting a lot of fill into a tight space.  I had planned to get a small dump truck, but decided the picku would work with a dump body installed.  So i went that route and all went well.

In the following spring, i went back to using the same pickup for hauling my rider.  The first lawn I went to, I unloaded in the same spot as always duringg the previous season.  The mower went off fine, I mowed the lawn and came back to drive up the ramps.  The truck body was now 4-1/2" higher than it had been before. As I got fully onto the ramps, the front end of the mower just continued going towards the sky.  I did a quick calculatin and decided it would probably be a tad uncomfortable if that mower kept turning over and landed on top of me.  I also realised it might be a bit messy if my head were to put a crack in the flagsone walk it was heading for.  I tucked my head up and as the mower, all 500lbs of it, decended directly towards my foulded up body, my shoulders hit the walk.  I somehow gave a mighty heave with arms and legs and deposited the mower about three feet of to my side.  In attempting to keep my head from messing up the walk, I put a couple of tears in the ligaments that run up both sides of the front of my neck.  I had a couple of sore lumps there for a couple of weeks, but no other damage to any of ME.  I always figure my head is probably the least vulnerable part of my body anyhow.

When the dust had settled, I trid to turn the mower over, but it would not budge.  I had to go to another job where I had another crew working.  The biggest guy came with me to help my turn the mower back on its wheels.  Since that little problem, i have never tried to run a riding mower up onto any truck.  I went home and got my trailer (which I should have been using, but it was soooo much quicker to use the pickup with ramps  [eek]) and have used only a trailer for hauling my riders ever since.

@ Untidy, do be careful running your rider up onto your deck. I cringe to think what could happen.  Your head is probably not as hard as mine.  Better you irritate your toe than to irritate your dear wife when she has to come out and peal you off the grass.   
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online Peter Halle

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2016, 10:55 AM »
Glad to see you are recovering nicely!

Regarding ramps - not having anything to do with mowers - but being consistent with my philosophy to share stupid things that I have done so others do not...

One of my dogs - Blazer - was a white golden retriever that developed hip issues.  He was about 85 lbs.  I built a ramp for him to use instead of the steps to get from the rear porch down onto the deck and outside to use the bathroom. As he got older I learned the very hard way on numerous occasions that in icy - even frosty - weather that humans shouldn't carry 85 dogs down slippery slopes in such conditions.  He was never injured in these experiences;  I cushioned his falls.  Lucky him.

Peter

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology/deck mowing and ramps
« Reply #29 on: September 18, 2016, 03:35 PM »
Thanks Peter and Tinker for sharing your ramp experiences, and Tinker for your concern for my ramp welfare.

Love 'clever' dog stories.  [smile]

Tinker the ramp in question here is inbuilt and with a 1:7 gradient. Now a <1 metre edge drop with no car catch would have been 'interesting'. 

There was payback yesterday afternoon however. I got bogged! Normally I could have coped, but not this time. Just made it worse and it got a bit tangled in a wire fence. Yes, now there are barbed wire scratches on left panel! Had to hobble back to house and phone neighbour.    [embarassed]



@Tinker  @Peter Halle
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #30 on: September 19, 2016, 03:23 AM »
@Untidy Shop  Now I see the ramp, I feeel much better about your welfare.  A gentle pitch.  I don't know the weight distribution of your mower.  The mower i had my experience with was one of the earliest models.  I should have known better as I had already had experiences with it tipping back on steep lawn slopes a couple of times.  The mower I have now (the one in the picture)is much heavier.  The deck is way heavier.  I have tried to tip it up on a couple of very steep slopes with out success.  I still will not try running it up a ramp to my truck. 500+/-#'s  I could handle with a good flow of adrenalin.  1200#'s, not so much.

BTW: A very nice job on the ramp. I like that you put the sloping boards croswise for better traction. Do you have a smoth transition from ground to the lip of the ramp so the front of the mower does not bounce as it starts up the incline?
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology/ramp technology.
« Reply #31 on: September 19, 2016, 03:42 AM »
@Tinker
Thanks for your comments regarding the ramp. Yes there is a smooth transition to the ground, assisted by some pavers before the grass commences. For more ramp details you might want to visit- http://festoolownersgroup.com/member-projects/building-for-a-future-need-a-deck-ramp/msg476448/?topicseen#msg476448

Regarding the mower and mower ramps. One of the dealer's mechanics just collected it for a 100hrs service. Based on your experiences, if you had been here, the two of us would have held our breath as he drove it up some high ramps to the back of the ute tray. Both front anti scouring wheels rotated as the deck front edge just cleared the tray lip!  [eek]
« Last Edit: September 19, 2016, 03:49 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #32 on: September 19, 2016, 08:40 AM »
@Untidy Shop   It always amazes me to realize how many workers around machinery have no idea about certain laws of physics.  I cringe even when seeing a worker park a truck uphill on a slope, put down ramps and try to drive even a walk behind machine up those ramps that are starting at the bottom already from a steep incline.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #33 on: September 19, 2016, 10:18 AM »
Tinker, do these mowers have a reverse gear? If so, couldn't you go up a ramp in reverse with no risk of tipping over?

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #34 on: September 19, 2016, 10:42 AM »
They are ZERO TURN.  They can go forward, backward and spin 360º.  The problem with backing up a ramp, or hillside is the the drive wheels are in the back.  If the mower deck is mid mount or front mount, backing up becomes a problem if the drive wheels are upside.  Of course, @Untidy Shop, that would be no problem.  Everything is downside up in Oz anyhow.  My mower has a 61" deck and weighs about 200#'s.  The entire mower is a little over 1200#'s.  That takes a lot of traction to pull so much weight.  My old mower that tipped back on me years ago was around 500 to 600#'s with a much lighter deck.  That mower tipped back often but had a bracket that kept it from going all the way.  When i tipped it onto me, that bracket fit between the two ramps.  UGH! [scared]  the mower I have now, I have tried tipping over backwards on open hill sides with total stability.  It is so heavy that i have to be careful in going downhill frontwards.  When i "parked on the man's car, I had weights on front of the mower to hold front end down when using my leaf vacuum system. I had just removed the vac syatem 30 minutes before. The grass was wet.  A very bad combination. I have not made the same mistook again.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #35 on: September 19, 2016, 12:12 PM »
I don't really understand what you said...I know nothing about powered mowers. Don't waste your time trying to explain it to me.

I just hope you continue to stay active and avoid serious injury.

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #36 on: September 19, 2016, 12:32 PM »
I don't really understand what you said...I know nothing about powered mowers. Don't waste your time trying to explain it to me.

I just hope you continue to stay active and avoid serious injury.

@Michael Kellough

Just to give you a slight inkling.  [smile]


If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Cheese

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #37 on: September 19, 2016, 01:39 PM »
The problem with backing up a ramp, or hillside is the the drive wheels are in the back.  If the mower deck is mid mount or front mount, backing up becomes a problem if the drive wheels are upside. 

That's funny @Tinker...because when I was growing up, I had the exact opposite problem. My dad purchased a new riding mower to help ease my pain of having to mow weekly, a 2 acre yard with a 19 inch self-propelled walk behind mower. He purchased a front wheel drive model with a front mounted, 3-blade mower deck. The combination of a front mounted deck with front wheel drive prevented me from going up any hill forwards because of insufficient traction. I had to attack every hill in reverse, and if the hill was too steep, the lawnmower would start to wheelie and lift the rear wheels off the ground, but they were the ones that steered the contraption.  [eek]

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #38 on: September 19, 2016, 02:14 PM »
Untidy, that Cox looks pretty handy, and swift.
Almost makes me wish I had a lawn.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology/the end at last.
« Reply #39 on: October 07, 2016, 01:40 AM »
Good News Regarding My Hammer Toe Operation.
After five weeks the wire was removed today.

Bad News Regarding My Hammer Toe Operation.
I have been cleared for 'normal' activities.  [eek] [eek] [smile]

Interesting, that instead of some high tech surgical 'thing a me jig', my surgeon used a cheep pair of pliers; the sort you find at the $2 Shop or Aldi!  [eek]
« Last Edit: October 07, 2016, 01:46 AM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology/the end at last.
« Reply #40 on: October 07, 2016, 03:38 AM »
Good News Regarding My Hammer Toe Operation.
After five weeks the wire was removed today.

Bad News Regarding My Hammer Toe Operation.
I have been cleared for 'normal' activities.
  [eek] [eek] [smile]

Interesting, that instead of some high tech surgical 'thing a me jig', my surgeon used a cheep pair of pliers; the sort you find at the $2 Shop or Aldi!  [eek]


@ Untidy Shop, I recently took a forced vacation after a slight heart attack.  After a week out of the hospital, my regular MD told me i could go back to normal activities.  I replied "Just because I look a little older does not mean i don't believe i am only 39.  You better check on what my normal activities consist of."  When my cardiac MD told me i could go back to work, he knew what my "normal activities" consisted of.  One of his best friends, who is also one of my favorite customers, is a cardiac specialist and also his boss.  He was well clued in to the fact they should have been looking at my head.  Any how, i am back to work and enjoying every minute of it.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #41 on: October 08, 2016, 03:33 AM »
Thanks for you support here @Tinker. Trust your ticker is now giving you good health.

And Oh, how right you were about 'normal' activities.

My surgeon said that the toe would remain a bit swollen for 1-2 months. What he didn't tell me was that all that bandaging of the foot he had just removed had prevented the foot from swelling. Could hardly put the work boot on this morning [AEST]. Persevered though, did a little walking but mostly mowing. Will see what tomorrow brings. Supposed to return to work on Wed in Timber sales. Will see!

Beautiful day for mowing, first in many months due to the record rain we have had. There are even patches of our sloping land that I cannot mow due to long forgotten spring weeps. Lots of major flooding in the States of Sth Australia, Victoria, and New South Wales this Winter.

Now resting with foot elevated and thinking of a Saturday evening Shiraz in a few minutes. Probably not good for the foot, but will be for the pain! [smile]
« Last Edit: October 08, 2016, 03:53 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #42 on: October 08, 2016, 04:59 AM »
@ Untidy Shop sometimes, the docs just look at us and think we act our age, even with impediments that slow other (smarter) people down to a life of observing from a sitting position.  That is not for me and I see it's not yur cup-o-tea either.  When i had a bunch of scrap iron put into my neck a few years ago, the doc told me the same thing about I could back to normal activities the next day after the operation.  When my wife picked me up from the hospital, it was snowing.  I insistef the doc had told me I could 'go back to normal every day activities right away.

We had a big explosion and Wife called daughter >>> daughter called doctor and read riot act >>> I was grounded for a month.   This time, The Boss was with me both times the docs told me I could go back to "normal activities".  She was a witness.  The first doc who gave me the go a-head I ust explained what I would be doing and he decided to let the cardiologist tell me when i could get back to work. I did do a lot of walking, probably more than they might have expected. Now at Rehab, they put me on all sorts of machines and I push to my limits on each one. 

Yesterday, a male nurse (or intern) told me I am half way thru the rehab process and he will be writing a report to give to me and my MD about my progress.  I told him that since he was going to write the report, it would be only fair if I wrote a report on all of them.  We both laughed. He laughed because I don't think he realized I am going to write a report. I laughed because I realized i just might write a report.  (certainly NOT a bad report)  I'm working on it. 

All thru the process, I have been having fun with all of the cardiac department. 

@ Untidy Shop I am sad to know your toe is still giving you problems, but i am it is not stopping you completely. Just keep plugging.  I think it is fortunate that you walk upside down in Oz.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #43 on: October 25, 2016, 08:33 AM »

Just when things were getting back to normal after my toe op, I woke up this morning with what was later diagnosed this afternoon as a torn Retina in my left eye. Very little eyesight in that eye at the moment. Specialist says however that prognoses is good. Operation tomorrow afternoon which involves laser welding. Then around two weeks recovery.
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #44 on: October 25, 2016, 03:32 PM »

Just when things were getting back to normal after my toe op, I woke up this morning with what was later diagnosed this afternoon as a torn Retina in my left eye. Very little eyesight in that eye at the moment. Specialist says however that prognoses is good. Operation tomorrow afternoon which involves laser welding. Then around two weeks recovery.

@Untidy Shop, I'm sorry to hear that.  Can you still drive your mower?  and up the ramp? 
Will the doc wear a good welding helmet when he does that welding?
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #45 on: October 25, 2016, 04:30 PM »
Thanks @Tinker , re mowing do not know. This is my good eye so a but worried. Distorted vision in my right eye since a bleed 30 years ago. Anyway doc was reassuring, time will tell.
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“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #46 on: October 26, 2016, 03:03 AM »
Unntidy, I know the feeling of "good eye:bad eye".  I have been crosseted for all my life.  with my good eye, i have great vision.  With my bad eye, i have some serious vision problems.  I can see with the eye, but have no idea of depth perception with it.  If i get something in my good eye to upset the vision, I get very worried.  At twelve, I was operated on to straighten the eyes, but even tho partially corrected, I ended up with double vision.  I live with it, but do worry when something bothers the good eye.  I am sure your doc is giving you good info and you will be fine.  Just do as he tells you.  I know you will push the envelope from what you have told us about your toe.  Take it easy with the eye.  Keep us posted.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology/eye recovery
« Reply #47 on: November 02, 2016, 12:07 AM »
Well enough of the FOG [not really [smile]], Facebook and endless Podcasts and audio books!  [eek] Some depth perception is returning this morning, so it's down to the Untidy Shop for a few hours and a few 'light weight' activities.

So I completed -

. some tidying up, naturally.

. cutting in the edge strip on the new FSK 420 rail; glad the new HK55
  actually turned on/worked!  [smile]

. removed the bowed top from an old mass produced side table, cut out the bend with TS55 and rail, re- mortised with 4mm dominos, glued and clamped.

. counted fingers and thumbs. [eek]  All correct!   [smile]

Yes measuring was a challenge, even in metric!  [smile] Ended up cross checking steal ruler with adjustable square.

« Last Edit: November 02, 2016, 12:15 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3519
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #48 on: November 02, 2016, 03:26 AM »
@Untidy Shop,
I'm glad to see you are taking it real easy.

Well enough of the FOG [not really [smile]], Facebook and endless Podcasts and audio books!  [eek] Some depth perception is returning this morning, so it's down to the Untidy Shop for a few hours and a few 'light weight' activities.

So I completed -

. some tidying up, naturally.

. cutting in the edge strip on the new FSK 420 rail; glad the new HK55
  actually turned on/worked!  [smile]

. removed the bowed top from an old mass produced side table, cut out the bend with TS55 and rail, re- mortised with 4mm dominos, glued and clamped.

. counted fingers and thumbs. [eek]  All correct!   [smile]

Yes measuring was a challenge, even in metric!  [smile] Ended up cross checking steal ruler with adjustable square.



You say your depth perception is returning.  I read by that you have already had the repair.  That is great news.
Will you end up with totally normal vision eventually?

Tinker

Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #49 on: November 02, 2016, 11:23 PM »
Yes @Tinker , I had the op on Oct 26th. One of  those where you are slightly sedated and with BBlocker in the eye, and where you hear  and see most of what is going great on!  [eek]

Just  back from the Surgeon's rooms now. He has 'approved' mowing and other 'light' work. Still not to drive a car until more peripheral vision returns. Back to the TY/Hardware employment on  October 12th but with a 10kilo lifting limit for another week.

Thanks again for your words of support.  👍😇😀
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology/now the other eye.
« Reply #50 on: November 24, 2016, 05:08 AM »
Went to the eye surgeon for the one month review of my left eye following Retina re attachment surgery. Got him to check the right eye as I had noted an increase in spider webs. He found tearing and will operate next week. [eek]

At least this one was found before Retina seperation. If the overall eye sight improvement matches that so far experienced with my left eye, I will be very happy. Just got to go through the same surgery and recovery processes.

Certainly appreciate my surgeons skill and those who pioneered the use of surgical laser instruments.

And just  when I was getting back to using the Festools?    [sad]
« Last Edit: November 24, 2016, 05:10 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology/now the other eye.
« Reply #51 on: November 24, 2016, 09:38 AM »
Went to the eye surgeon for the one month review of my left eye following Retina re attachment surgery. Got him to check the right eye as I had noted an increase in spider webs. He found tearing and will operate next week. [eek]

At least this one was found before Retina seperation. If the overall eye sight improvement matches that so far experienced with my left eye, I will be very happy. Just got to go through the same surgery and recovery processes.

Certainly appreciate my surgeons skill and those who pioneered the use of surgical laser instruments.

And just  when I was getting back to using the Festools?    [sad]

I had a very good friend (no longer with us) who had all sorts  of health problems.  His attitude was: "life's a .  and then it gets worse."  His sence of humor always prevailed no matter what.

I pick up from your @Untidy Shop posts that you are keeping a positive outlook to all that is happening.  Sorry to hear all the rest, but keep the  positive attitude.  It is amazing how much surgery has progressed in the last 50 years or so.  To be able to "sew" a damaged  retina and expect to even see anything after is a miracle.  You will be able to see, probably better than ever when all is healed. 

I just completed my cardiac rehab.  As I was leaving, for hopefully, the  last time, I was talking with a couple of the  nurses.  First, i told them i was very glad to be leaving them.  I had been giving all of the personnel a hard time thruout.  They knew, by then, about my sense of humor and knew better than to be insulted.  I finally told them I had actually enjoyed my rehab. Especially since some of them had even laughed at some of my stories and jokes.  I also mentioned I hoped they had been laughing WITH me and not AT me.  We all got a good laugh and I was on my way.

I think you are just getting started with your upcoming season of mowing.  Good for you.  In about two weeks I should have all of my lawns tucked in for the winter and will proceed with my "snow dances".  The Boss would like it if I quit all of my work until I remind her i would be around ALL THE TIME.  That quiets all complaining.

Take care, my friend
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online Peter Halle

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #52 on: November 24, 2016, 10:20 AM »
Stephen,

I am sorry that you are having to go thru this again.  I am glad that your repaired eye is doing well and that your other eye has been diagnosed before it became worse.  I am glad to see you able to post here with your usual class.

Wayne,

You are like the Everyready Bunny.  Glad you are recovering well and glad to see the silence quieted.  Love to read your stories as do others.  In fact, in your down time, or less active time, you will find that a member enjoyed your stories so much that he set up a different thread devoted to just your stories.  Search my friend and ...

Thankful for both of you and your contributions.

Peter

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #53 on: November 24, 2016, 03:30 PM »
Stephen,

I am sorry that you are having to go thru this again.  I am glad that your repaired eye is doing well and that your other eye has been diagnosed before it became worse.  I am glad to see you able to post here with your usual class.

Wayne,

You are like the Everyready Bunny.  Glad you are recovering well and glad to see the silence quieted.  Love to read your stories as do others.  In fact, in your down time, or less active time, you will find that a member enjoyed your stories so much that he set up a different thread devoted to just your stories.  Search my friend and ...

Thankful for both of you and your contributions.

Peter

@Peter Halle,
Thanks for the heads up.  I found the thread started by RMW titled "Tinker's Tales"  I have written a reply there.  Y'all know how i hate writing long replies, so i am economizing by ending this reply to  save energy. [wink]  Also, my replies within this thread have been meant to encourage @Untidy Shop.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #54 on: November 24, 2016, 06:15 PM »
Thank you Peter and Wayne.

It is interesting to reflect that in this age of the internet and Social Media, one can be provided with cheer  and support from those we have never met and that are living so far from here.

Since the surgeon OK'd me for 'normal' activities after the first op, one task I have been enjoying was the use of my HK55 in constructing a deck extension. Fortunately the increased speed and accuracy provided by this resent purchase has meant that the stump, bearer and joist work for one section is complete and the project can safely lay dormant for 2-3 weeks.

There you go, Festool to the rescue again! Faster-Easier-Better [big grin]

@Tinker  @Peter Halle

Wayne, please read Tinkers Tales thread.  [smile]
« Last Edit: November 24, 2016, 06:21 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #55 on: November 25, 2016, 04:00 AM »
Last evening, we had our Thanksgiving dinner @ The Tinker household.  Besides my dear wife, Brigitte, our daughter, Andrea had helped with preparations nearly all day.  Our grandson attended and cme in his new Jeep somewhat used but already his tires have been expaaaannnnnded from standard size to 4 or 5 sizes larger. Our son, David came along with his newest (and we think best) girl friend along with her two lovely daughters.  the youngest is probably 10 or 11 yrs old.  The oldest daughter is probably about 19 and starting her second year of college.  She is very excited about her assignment for next year.  She is going to spend a semester in Downunder Oz.  I did give her the advice that she will definitely need to learn to walk upside down before she gets there.  She will be going somewhere in Queensland area. Not only will she have to walk upside down, but she will probably come home talking strange as well.   [wink] Oh well, she's very excited and i did manage to let her know I am excited for her as well.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #56 on: November 25, 2016, 05:47 AM »
Hi again Wayne,
The young women you mention might need this guide - https://thingsaussieslike.wordpress.com/speaking-aussie-style-2/

However her generation may find very little difference in the vanacular, at least in the cities. But we 'further' down south refer to Queensland as the Deep North, just as someone say in New York might refer to some Southern States as the Deep South. So she will find the accent even in Brisbane is broader than say in Melbourne, Adelaide or even Sydney.

The traditional Adelaide accent can sound very 'proper' and British. Sydeney and Melbourne due to cultural diversity are more cosmopolitan in accent. Northern Queensland, particularly away from cities such as Cairns is more like 'Crockodile Dundee'.  [big grin]

Hope she has a great time. Is she attending Uni in Brisbane, Cairns or Cooktown? Cairns and Cooktown, being close to the Barrier Reef are centres for Marine Research.

And walking upside down is normal. Just track the sun and all will be fine.  [smile]

@Tinker
« Last Edit: November 25, 2016, 05:58 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3519
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #57 on: November 26, 2016, 03:36 AM »
Hi again Wayne,
The young women you mention might need this guide - https://thingsaussieslike.wordpress.com/speaking-aussie-style-2/

However her generation may find very little difference in the vanacular, at least in the cities. But we 'further' down south refer to Queensland as the Deep North, just as someone say in New York might refer to some Southern States as the Deep South. So she will find the accent even in Brisbane is broader than say in Melbourne, Adelaide or even Sydney.

The traditional Adelaide accent can sound very 'proper' and British. Sydeney and Melbourne due to cultural diversity are more cosmopolitan in accent. Northern Queensland, particularly away from cities such as Cairns is more like 'Crockodile Dundee'.  [big grin]

Hope she has a great time. Is she attending Uni in Brisbane, Cairns or Cooktown? Cairns and Cooktown, being close to the Barrier Reef are centres for Marine Research.

And walking upside down is normal. Just track the sun and all will be fine.  [smile]

@Tinker


@Untidy Shop, Thanks for the info.  I have forwarded your post to the young lady. I am sure she will put to good use. 

I did get a chance to glance over the website you supplied as well. i'll probably get more chance today as I expect to get rained out on the yard work. It is always interesting to find so much variation to language from one area to another within a same country. I am not a linguist by any means, but the differences can be fasinating.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Xoncention

  • Posts: 111
  • Build a bridge and get over it...
Re: hospital technology
« Reply #58 on: November 26, 2016, 07:08 PM »
Hi again Wayne,

The traditional Adelaide accent can sound very 'proper' and British. Sydeney and Melbourne due to cultural diversity are more cosmopolitan in accent. Northern Queensland, particularly away from cities such as Cairns is more like 'Crockodile Dundee'.  [big grin]

@Tinker


Just to think that we have not paid much attention to the rabbit proof fence over here and Perth not to even get a holler from our neighbors in the East...

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology/linguistics
« Reply #59 on: November 26, 2016, 07:38 PM »
Hi again Wayne,

The traditional Adelaide accent can sound very 'proper' and British. Sydeney and Melbourne due to cultural diversity are more cosmopolitan in accent. Northern Queensland, particularly away from cities such as Cairns is more like 'Crockodile Dundee'.  [big grin]

@Tinker

Just to think that we have not paid much attention to the rabbit proof fence over here and Perth not to even get a holler from our neighbors in the East...


 [not worthy] [oops]

But it begs the question; what language do you guys speak over there?! [eek] [big grin]

@Xoncention @Tinker

« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 07:47 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: hospital technology/eye spider webs & Retina detachment
« Reply #60 on: November 26, 2016, 08:04 PM »

A warning about Eye Spider Webs and Retina Detachment.

In the past 6 months I have had two Optomatrists tell me that eye spiders/webs [bottom image] are not a major concern and the brain will soon adjust and ignore them. You will find similar advice from Dr Google.

On October 25th the Retina of my left eye detached [see Top Image example: mine was actually from the bottom] and this week I will be having a second operation, this time for Retina tearing in my right eye.

My advice - if eye spiders and flashes occur suddenly, rather than gradually, seek referral to an eye specialist surgeon. If the Retina actually detaches, go straight to ER. Get someone else to drive you.
« Last Edit: November 26, 2016, 10:22 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3519
Re: hospital technology/eye spider webs & Retina detachment
« Reply #61 on: November 27, 2016, 04:08 AM »

A warning about Eye Spider Webs and Retina Detachment.

In the past 6 months I have had two Optomatrists tell me that eye spiders/webs [bottom image] are not a major concern and the brain will soon adjust and ignore them. You will find similar advice from Dr Google.

On October 25th the Retina of my left eye detached [see Top Image example: mine was actually from the bottom] and this week I will be having a second operation, this time for Retina tearing in my right eye.

My advice - if eye spiders and flashes occur suddenly, rather than gradually, seek referral to an eye specialist surgeon. If the Retina actually detaches, go straight to ER. Get someone else to drive you.

Thanks for showing those pics.  They can be of service to anybody who finds a corresponding vision problem.  My eye problems have been many thru the years.  The symptoms are different from those you show, but anybody who does notice any change in vision should go immediately to a good eye doc.  I say "good" as there are a few out there who ain't so great.  I happen to be fortunate in having one who i think is one of the best.  I think, Stephen, you are lucky to have a great one as well.
 
Two years ago, my opthamoligist told me i was a candidate for Macular Degeneration. My father had it before he was 80 (I still have a few years to go  ::).) He told me what nutrients to take and how often.  I have been following his advice ever since and so far, the condition he spotted has not progressed.  He seemed very upset when he told me about the problem, but i told him I had expected the news a few years earlier.  When my dad had the problem, even tho he was doing very intricate and fine detailed work, he found ways to continue working for sometime after he was declared legally blind. (He inherited his cantankerous was from his eldest son)

(i have a bicycle story about my dad I will tell a little later after I finish my morning correspondences >>> and of course > my usual good big breakfast)

When the docs were prescribing all the meds I was to take following my heart attack, i told them I was not interested in taking anything that would mean discontinuing my eye meds. Heart problem was secondary to my thinking. They just looked at my eye pills and rolled their eyes saying they were nothing but vitamins.  Well, those vitamins have cleared up several eye problems that had been developing over the course of a year or so before my ARED showed its ugly head. So far, there has been no progression of the disease. Those vitamins, IMHO are doing a job keeping me going.

Do as your eye doc tells and you @Untidy Shop will do fine, I am sure.

Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #62 on: December 07, 2016, 10:51 PM »
@Tinker  @Peter Halle

Tinker

Had second op as scheduled on December 1. Eye sight is returning, but general healing is slower. This is because, although there was no actual detachment in this eye, there were more tears. Consequently I will be on light duties for two more weeks after I return to my part time position in hardware and timber sales. I return just in time for the last minute Christmas rush [eek].

On the home front the mowing is less urgent now as Spring has become Summer and rainfall has fallen away. Hope to start picking up some Festools for light work [but heavy for them [big grin]] next week.

I see from the publication and photographs referred elsware that you wore safety glasses both now and in the past. Big tick.   [cool]  Apart from safety glasses, I have now taken to wearing a brush cutter mask when mowing near trees with low branches and shrubs.


Thank you for your continued support.

Hopefully this thread can be set aside for many years now.
« Last Edit: December 07, 2016, 11:03 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Kev

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #63 on: December 08, 2016, 03:50 AM »
Apart from safety glasses, I have now taken to wearing a brush cutter mask when mowing near trees with low branches and shrubs.

@Untidy Shop I've got the full house professional Stihl headwear and I stupidly just wear sunglasses and a cap when I'm using a line trimmer [embarassed]

...admittedly that's on a manicured suburban garden, but I need to alter my behaviour in prep for a bigger and less predictable terrain in the near future!

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #64 on: December 08, 2016, 04:09 AM »
@Untidy Shop Glad you are coming along ok.  I have filed the pics you showed before your surgery.  I had promised you I would send a story about a blind biker. I looked thru my files and finally found it. My dad was a stubborn type of guy.  I think he got that from his eldest son. The story is true and in retrospect, we all can see the humor of the situation, even tho a bit scary at the moment. It is interesting to know how much improvement in eye surgery has occurred in the last thirty years >>> or in the last 39 years  8)

 “Tink, you have to do something.”  It was my step mother at the other end of my phone.  She had called in an absolute panic and had explained that my dad, who lived on Long Island had found his way across town to a Sears store.  The trip involved several miles of main roads with fairly heavy weekend traffic. He had suddenly decided he wanted a bicycle.  Why he wanted a bike was a mystery.  After all, he was legally blind from the fairly advanced condition called macular degeneration.

He had explained his condition to me a couple of years before when it had first shown its ugly symptoms. Back in those days, practically prehistoric from 21st century, there was not much that could be done to eliminate such a problem.  I knew all about eye problems that could not be eliminated.  Let’s just say ‘I had been a maverick until at 12, I was operated on to correct my eye problem.'  The problem was only partially corrected in that cosmetically, I no longer had to fight my way thru life.  My peers no longer got such horrified looks when looking at me face to face.  Those problems all disappeared when the docs pulled the bandages off.  The main problem I was left with was double vision. I literally saw two of everything. Since that time, I had been to several eye docs who, always, told me I was about ten years too old for a “corrective operation”.  Ten years later, I was again ten years too old for any “correctional procedure”.  It always seemed the only progress in eye surgery was in the language of discouragement.  I decided I would live with my problem.

Dad was developing a progressive eye problem at a time when nothing could be done.  Now, somewhere around 30 years later, I am told that if caught early, the disease can not only be possibly stopped, but actually, in some situations, it can actually be reversed.  At the time of my stepmom’s panic stricken call, nothing could be done about the condition.  As soon as I got her calmed down, I called Sears. 

After getting a little bit of the good old fashioned “run-around” I finally got to talk with the manager of the bicycle department.  The attitude that came back to me was the bicycle was now my dad’s responsibility. “He is responsible for his own self and he is old enough to know whether or not he is capable to ride the bike home.”  I could almost see the smug look at the far end of the line.  That reply had come even after I had explained that my father was legally blind.  That little problem seemed inconsequential to the young manager.

“Before I hang up,” I calmly went on, “there is one more thing you need to know.”  I was becoming totally calm as I took a deep breath and a short pause so I was certain I had the man’s total attention.  “I am just a young landscaper (I had already been 39 years young for quite a few years) so I really don’t know much about people.  You must realize that my dad’s stepson is an insurance broker.”  Further pause while I let that sink in.  “I am sure he will have some thoughts about the matter.  If he is not able to come up with any ideas, my dad’s step son in law is an attorney whose brother happens to be a prosecutor in the New York City Court system.  You can ask my dad about those people.  I am sure he can expand with a little more information.”  I then wished the manager “…a good day with your thoughts,” and hung up.

All I had told the young manager was true with one exception.  There was no family connection to any prosecutor.  Oh well, when one gets to be 39, I guess some lee-way must be allowed now and then. Within 10 minutes, my stepmom called to tell me the bike was being delivered, along with my dad, of course.   Once unloaded in his garage, that bike never moved again as long as Dad lived.

Stephen, you and I are so very fortunate in that the medical proceedures have so far advanced from way back when.  Take good care of yourself and you will look back with a chuckle when you tell your story 30 years down the line.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #65 on: February 01, 2017, 07:08 PM »
Visited my eye surgeon for three and two month [depends which eye we are discussing] check yesterday. All as expected at this stage and I can continue to lift items up to 20kg. This is a single person weight limit at work anyway so all good there.

However a complication from Retina Detachmrnt sergery can be excellerated growth of cateracts. One is starting to form on the left eye which had the first op. I have a next appointment in two months when the eye will be scanned and any need for surgery assessed. One symptom of the cateract is that my near sight is actually improving. My A$200 proscription safety glasses have already  been replaced by A$30.00 clears when on the tools. [big grin]
« Last Edit: February 01, 2017, 07:11 PM by Untidy Shop »
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“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology - Cataract Surgery
« Reply #66 on: May 09, 2017, 12:19 AM »
Yesterday had Cataract Surgery on my left eye. Cataracts had grown on both eyes as a complication of the Retina Detachment surgery earlier in this thread.

Amaizing what I can see today, including the many weeds on our property!  [eek] Am almost afraid to look and see some of my recent projects - will they be as accurate as I thought?  [big grin]

Other eye will be operated on in 6-8 weeks.
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #67 on: May 10, 2017, 08:25 PM »
@Untidy Shop, It is amazing how much better you can se once you get rid of the cadilacs.  I got rid of my firs one (inner lense replacement) during a snow storm.  i went out plowing snow that same nite. I ended up plowing until after daylite.  The snow was actually white from mynew eye, or rather, I became aware that my left eye saw the  sow as yellow.  when I went for my checkup a week later, my eye doc asked if I had plowed that nite. I replid that I had plowed until late morning when it was brite sunshine.

"Did you wear dark glasses as I had told you?" I think he knew my answer before he even asked the question.

"No. It was dark when I went out and I did not ven think aboutdark glasses."

The doc went into an almost tyrade as he told me all the things that could happn if I did nnot wear dark glasses.

A month later, he operated on my other eye. Again, it was snowing.  Again, I went out plowing in the wee hours of the morning.  Again, I was plowing until well after daylite. Again, when I went in a week later for a checkup, Doc asked again if I wore dark glasses.  "You be I wore them," I replied.

"What made you change your mind?"

"You scared the H--- out of me."

he only problem I have now is that for a long time, when driving at nite, i saw haloes surrounding any brite lites.  I told my eye doc about that and he prescribed some vitamine pills for me to take. That has pretty much cleared up that problem. Before I started  taking them, I was afraid I would have to quit nite driving. I now have no problems with that.

The biggest problem I had after the cadilac ops was the inner lenses (each eye has an inner lense and an outer lense. They suck out the inner lense and replace with  a plastic with a set focus) do not focus.  That all happened at just about the same time my grandson got interested in playing catch with a ball.  I have always had problems with quick focus, but not, I lose sight  of the ball as it gets about 6 feet from my hand.  I could not play catch any more.  the one big plus, except for the dark glasses, I no longer wear glasses except for reading or close work(like woodworking.) That is a BIG plus
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #68 on: May 10, 2017, 10:32 PM »
Agree @Tinker re the eyesight improvement. Now I can see individual leaves on the trees at medium to longer distances away, something I have not been able to do since I was young,; ie your age!  [smile]

Can not wait to get my right eye done. It reminds me of why perhaps I should not have been driving in recent weeks. The only thing I miss about the cateract is that now when I look at the night sky and in particular the MilkyWay there are no longer billions and billions of disco balls across the sky.  [eek]   [mad]

Unlike the Retina surgery, I have been able to quickly get back to some woodwork, be it lighter stuff. Currently making rack supports etc., for the Mower Shed. Even have the Doc's approval to use a mower this weekend - mixed blessing there for sure, with rapid  Autumn grass growth.

At least where I live, snow is not an issue for ones eyesight!  [blink]  [smile]

Take care yourself,

Stephen
« Last Edit: May 10, 2017, 10:37 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

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Re: hospital technology
« Reply #69 on: May 11, 2017, 03:35 AM »
@Untidy Shop  Now you will have no excuses for un-untydying your shop ::)
Wayne H. Tinker