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Offline Bob Marino

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In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« on: July 02, 2018, 10:35 PM »
 
   Continuing the culinary threads, what about pots and pans?

  I know there's a zillion to choose from. And if truth be told most of us don't need all that many of them and if you look around there are bargains and a half to be found.

  I have an older set of AllClad - which serve their purpose, though some of the newer ones I have are much better. I have a couple of their nonstick pans which I really don't care for. I bought that Copper looking non-stick ceramic pan that's advertised on TV for $20.00 and like that one better. I like Le Crueset for stews and risottos. Of course a trusty old cast iron pan gets used a lot.

 I have an 8" copper French fry pan that I am waiting to try out. But my favorite pan is the William's Sonoma's  "Essential Pan" - https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/ws-signature-thermo-clad-stainless-steel-essential-pan/?pkey=ccookware-williams-sonoma%7Cws-thermo-clad-stainless-steel&isx=0.0.1497
It's extremely heat reactive, cooks/fry/sautes evenly and is large enough for most portions I'm working with.
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Offline Joe Felchlin

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2018, 11:00 PM »
Early on, I figured if my wife - A gourmet chef - Wanted to do the cooking -
The least we could do is buy her top of the line “good ‘tools’”.
So... Years ago -
When mac and cheese, bologna and PBJ’s were no longer the mainstays of our budget -
We started buying All-Clad’s LTD Series.
(Not uncoincidently - This was right about the time I started my Festool collection.) [smile]
She has her “tools” - I have mine.

I also made an All-Clad list for our adult kids - Who are always looking for gift ideas.
Eventually, we pretty much acquired almost every kind and size of pot, frying pan, sauce pan, wok, cake pans, roasting pan, cookie sheets, griddles, etc., available.
She loves ‘em - And uses ‘em every day...
Except when she “cooks with our MasterCard” (chef’s nights out at local eateries). [wink]

Newest addition: Instant Pot Ultra 6 Qt Programmable Pressure Cooker.
And YES Bob...
I wish we’d have hung onto that old cast iron skillet. The cast iron dutch oven, too. [sad]
« Last Edit: July 02, 2018, 11:41 PM by Joe Felchlin »
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Offline rvieceli

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2018, 11:06 PM »
Here's a shot of my kitchen. You might notice that I'm rather fond of All-Clad as well. Although for a non stick skillet I'm currently using this one from (gasp) Walmart.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-10-Commercial-Non-Stick-Restaurant-Fry-Pan/20665942

For Dutch ovens I prefer Staub over Le Crueset. I like Staub's matt black interior much better than the light Le Crueset interior.

Ron

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2018, 11:58 PM »
I use Lodge cast iron, All Clad pots and pans and Kaiser backing pans.

Tom

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #4 on: July 03, 2018, 04:55 AM »
Here's a shot of my kitchen. You might notice that I'm rather fond of All-Clad as well. Although for a non stick skillet I'm currently using this one from (gasp) Walmart.

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Tramontina-10-Commercial-Non-Stick-Restaurant-Fry-Pan/20665942

For Dutch ovens I prefer Staub over Le Crueset. I like Staub's matt black interior much better than the light Le Crueset interior.

Ron

 Nice looking kitchen, Ron.

 I've been looking at the Staubs. they are certainly aesthetically nicer than the LC's, but I have enough of them, so another enameled cast iron pot would be redundant. I have chipped a couple of them and one was replaced since it cracked. Is the black interior functional?
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Offline rvieceli

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #5 on: July 03, 2018, 07:31 AM »
Thanks. I just think the white interior shows stains more.

Offline Knight Woodworks

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2018, 09:12 AM »
Another vote for All-clad pots and pans and Lodge for cast iron. I like the T-Fal Professional non stick frying pans. We primary use them for eggs, they last us about three years.

John

Edit to add: the T-Fall professional series pans.
« Last Edit: July 03, 2018, 10:22 AM by Knight Woodworks »

Offline Holzhacker

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2018, 09:18 AM »
Started out with all the cheap stuff years ago of course. Started buying Calphalon when I became an adult (sort of). We still have some Calphalon but I don't buy anymore.
Love the old All Clad LTD series, wish they still made it the same. Wife got a full set of the All Clad copper core for our 10th wedding anniversary. She doesn't use anything else anymore. If you can afford it the copper core all clad is the way to go. I wouldn't recommend the all clad non-stick series though. We bought one, its somewhere in the house doing something.
If you like Le Creuset I would suggest looking into Staub. We have a few of both and I prefer the Staub.
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2018, 09:57 AM »
For Dutch ovens I prefer Staub over Le Crueset. I like Staub's matt black interior much better than the light Le Crueset interior.

Concur wholeheartedly!  The dimples inside the top drop condensed juices right back on what is being cooked, almost eliminating the need to baste.  Le Creuset domed tops let the condensed juices run down the sides, and don't help to keep things moist and properly basted. 
- Willy -

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Offline rvieceli

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #9 on: July 03, 2018, 10:31 AM »
Lodge makes some really interesting small pieces for the industry. Makes for great individual presentation pieces. Think wood fired mac and cheese etc.

https://www.webstaurantstore.com/47869/cast-iron-cookware.html?filter=type:mini-servingware&vendor=Lodge

Ron

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #10 on: July 03, 2018, 01:01 PM »
Great idea starting a new thread for cookware.

Our primary set of cookware is a Kirkland brand Hard Anodized set that I got from Costco 10 years ago.  It's pretty beaten up and it's definitely lost its non stick properties, but we still use it.  At one point, Costco sold just a little 2 piece skillet set we bought to replace the 2 worn out skillets that came with the original set.  I originally got the set because it was relatively cheap - probably around $150 at the time for I think a 15 piece set.  Being inexpensive meant I could feel comfortable really using and abusing the set - I didn't need to worry about babying it.  I'd like to get a new set, but the design and shape of the pots and pans isn't as good as the set I got in 2008.  Here's a link to the current set: https://www.costco.com/Kirkland-Signature-Hard-Anodized-15-piece-Cookware-Set.product.100290381.html.

Here's a list of most of the cookware that we own including links to help visualize if anyone was interested:


There are a few other pieces of cookware that I'm probably forgetting.

I think my favorites out of all those are the 12QT Multicooker, the Hello Home pans, 9QT Le Creuset, 8QT All-Clad Dutch Oven, and the 12.5" Swiss Diamond Fry Pan.  The large chicken fryer pan that came in the Kirkland set is always super handy when you need to cook a large amount of something.  I wouldn't mind picking up a whole set of Swiss Diamond cookware, but it's very expensive.  We love going to the Williams Sonoma Outlet Store.  If you time it right (like tomorrow, 4th of July sale) you can find some good deals on individual pieces.  This is where we picked up the 12.5" Swiss Diamond Skillet, the 8QT All-Clad Stock Pot, and the Scanpan Dutch Oven.  The best part is that you can piece-meal different pots and pans so you can get exactly what you want/need and not be stuck with something that you'll never use - like maybe a grill pan or some awkwardly sized pot that's just not that useful.

While not a pot or pan per se, we also have a Cuisinart Electric Pressure Cooker: https://www.cuisinart.com/products/specialty_appliances/cpc-600/ and an All-Clad Electric Griddle: https://www.healthyhomeandkitchen.com/shop/electrics/grills-and-skillets/all-clad-99014gt-electric-griddle/.  I sometimes wish the griddle didn't have a nonstick surface so I could use a set of metal spatulas like you'd see being used on a commercial flat top like at a diner.  In the future I may like to get this all metal top: https://www.surlatable.com/product/PRO-3221900/, but it's quite a bit more expensive than the All-Clad even when it's 20% off.  The pressure cooker is great for pretty easy and fast 1 pot meals.  My only complaint about it is that it's a bit small (only 6QT).  I absolutely love the All-Clad Griddle.  It's awesome for making breakfast and steak and cheese and just about anything else you can think of.

America's Test Kitchen recommended T-Fal Professional Series skillet.  They said that no matter the manufacturer, all non stick coatings in pans will eventually fail - so you should buy a relatively inexpensive non stick pan and just toss it when it starts to stick or the coating starts to flake off.

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Offline Koamolly

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #11 on: July 03, 2018, 02:01 PM »
I have mostly All Clad and the cheap $20 on sale for three sizes Costco Teflon pans that are disposable.  Recently bought a few Mauviel black steel pans to try out.  Once seasoned they work very well.  Really like their crepe pan.  Also like the single induction burners you can plug in anywhere.  Since my stove is on other side, I can now face guests that are waiting for their crepes.



Consider setting an alert at slick deals site for All Clad or any cookware you’re interested in.  Lots of deals and discounts come up for these.  There’s also the All Clad outlet that has sales periodically on seconds, near perfect pieces. 

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #12 on: July 03, 2018, 03:24 PM »
I just saw this 13 piece set of Calphalon at Costco for only $129.99: https://www.costco.com/Calphalon-13-piece-Commercial-Cookware-Set.product.100080835.html.  The shape and design of the pans is pretty much exactly what I'm looking for in terms of a replacement for my current 10 year old Kirkland set.  You can't really beat the price either.
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Offline tjbnwi

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #13 on: July 03, 2018, 07:26 PM »
I make crepes by having an All Clad frying pan upside down over the burner (gas), pour the batter until it just flows down the edge of the pan, count to 60, lift off with a fork along the crepe edge. They’re paper thin and easy to remove this way.

Tom

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2018, 07:38 PM »
You triggered my "wait, does all-clad still make my stuff? every few year alert system".

I have a bunch of the D5 stuff, what bugs me is you never know where All-clad is going.  When I bought mine they made it sound like the previous stainless was going away.  Then it was, if you want polished you had to get D3, if you want brushed you had to go D5.  Now I see D5 exist in both.  Also I had a pot that came warped,  All-clad was a huge PITA on a return, then claimed they couldn't get me a new one because they had been discontinued, then claimed they do me a favor and found in in the factory...   And now many years later I see they still sell the supposedly discontinued pot.

I wish they would focus and not go off on special editions of stuff.  I did get the unique to William Sonoma omelette pan, which I will say has done well, and ironically was polished, not brushed when nothing else came in polished.  The non-stick has held up well on the 2 non-stick pans I have.

There is always the stuff you bought and don't use and the stuff you wish you had more off.  Like more than one veggie steamer pan/basket thing.  Need to see if they have made one yet that fits D5 properly.

Overall it's all aging well, has the right amount of used look.  What mattered to me was being able to buy the exact same bits many years down the road as I decided what I want.

So mini-poll.   Polished or Brushed outside?  I have brushed, figured it would age nicer (with grace).

Offline DeformedTree

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #15 on: July 03, 2018, 07:44 PM »

America's Test Kitchen recommended T-Fal Professional Series skillet.  They said that no matter the manufacturer, all non stick coatings in pans will eventually fail - so you should buy a relatively inexpensive non stick pan and just toss it when it starts to stick or the coating starts to flake off.

I don't disagree with them, but there are caveats to this.  The coatings are getting better and more durable, so the base statement is slowly becoming less true.  I think a better way to phrase it is "no matter how expensive the non-stick pan, eventually it's owner will stab it with a metal utensil, so just buy cheapie".   I didn't want a lot of non-stick for concern of it holding up, so I just own 2, both have held up well, but I also make sure not to hit it with metal.  Closest call was one accidentally go left on a stove set to high for a while, there is a strange little dark spot now, but still holds up just fine. I'm more willing to buy more non-stick now.  But still, not going start thinking I can sear a steak in a nonstick.

Offline Dogberryjr

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #16 on: July 03, 2018, 07:55 PM »
One large All-Clad for general cooking, one T-Fal non-stick, replaced every so often, two Lodge skillets—one large for frying, one small for cornbread—a LC Dutch oven, a LC sauce pan,and an Instant Pot (two, actually, but that's another story).

Those are the mainstays, but there are a bunch of odds and ends, to include a copper cataplana, that I've yet to use. Maybe this is the year.

My one want at this point: a good wok. Any suggestions?

Offline macrutt

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #17 on: July 03, 2018, 08:06 PM »
Try the Wok Shop in San Francisco.
http://www.wokshop.com/store/main.php

George

Offline tjbnwi

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #18 on: July 03, 2018, 08:14 PM »
My vote for the poll—-what ever our children get ME for Christmas (my wife, their mother is not allowed to touch the All Clads or Schmitt Brother knives).

Tom

Offline GoingMyWay

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #19 on: July 03, 2018, 08:40 PM »
So mini-poll.   Polished or Brushed outside?  I have brushed, figured it would age nicer (with grace).

I was really attracted to the brushed finish of our 8QT All-Clad Stock Pot.  It seemed less showy to me and easier to maintain, but having said that though - I'm not concerned about trying to have a consistently matching style of cookware.  Brushed gets my vote in any event.

I don't disagree with them, but there are caveats to this.  The coatings are getting better and more durable, so the base statement is slowly becoming less true.  I think a better way to phrase it is "no matter how expensive the non-stick pan, eventually it's owner will stab it with a metal utensil, so just buy cheapie".   I didn't want a lot of non-stick for concern of it holding up, so I just own 2, both have held up well, but I also make sure not to hit it with metal.  Closest call was one accidentally go left on a stove set to high for a while, there is a strange little dark spot now, but still holds up just fine. I'm more willing to buy more non-stick now.  But still, not going start thinking I can sear a steak in a nonstick.

Their recommendation for T-Fal was several years ago so I'm sure the coatings have gotten better.  Still, I don't think it's just a matter of avoiding metal utensils in and of itself.  Even if you only used wooden or plastic utensils - heat damaged and broke down the non stick coating.  Certainly very high heat absolutely destroyed the coating in no time, but I think even lower more moderate temperatures was slowly eroding the non stick properties.

My one want at this point: a good wok. Any suggestions?

I failed to mention in the earlier post that we also have a wok.  Ours is very cheap and I got it from a restaurant supply house.  I think it was $15 or $20.  I just had to go through the process of burning off the nasty coating that came from the factory and then season the wok.
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Offline DeformedTree

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2018, 09:48 PM »
So mini-poll.   Polished or Brushed outside?  I have brushed, figured it would age nicer (with grace).

I was really attracted to the brushed finish of our 8QT All-Clad Stock Pot.  It seemed less showy to me and easier to maintain, but having said that though - I'm not concerned about trying to have a consistently matching style of cookware.  Brushed gets my vote in any event.


My care is more about interchangeability. It's no different than tool systems like Festool, having bits and pieces interchange matters.  I don't like "sets" where it's 1 of each size, because of this. I prefer to have many of the same size pot, thus same lids for all, plus pot lids that fit on the fry pans too, no pre-planning what is going to get cooked in what so I don't come up without the right pot/pan available midway thru cooking a meal. I can put my veggie steamer in any number of my pots (though it looks like they still haven't designed one to be fully fitting right with the D5 lip design).   I'm fine with having different brands of cookware, but I really like being able to buy the same stuff forever and add stuff that fits in with what I have (I could buy more 3 or 4 L pots and still find reasons to need more).  Buy bigger pots so you have more room to prevent messes, you just shove more in there, back to the same point as having the smaller.

Some of my stuff looks almost new, some looks like it's been in a commercial kitchen for a while, it's fine, I think cookware is one of those things that should look well used.  That's why I got brushed, I figured it would age well and I think it has. 

Offline jasen

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2018, 08:05 AM »
I've read this thread with great interest and looked up som of the brands mentioned as most are unknown in Australia.

I'm not a cook by any means but enjoying cooking. I previously used junk teflon (IMO) then moved to Stainless steel pots and cast iron pan.

I've always longed for a "good", "healthy" and "sustainable" pan. I don't mind paying for something that is quality and works. This is how I ended up on this forum. Four years ago I would have laughed that I would spend some much on a tool let alone another tool to assist it (Rotex90 and Midi Vac). Fast forward 3 years and now I have a large collection.

My point? Festool has opened my eyes to quality products that I believe in. I have found this in cookware! Solidteknics. As soon as I heard about the brand I Youtubed and read - WOW. I love the philosophy and vision of this engineer - not a chef.

Anyway I have a 30cm (12") Aus-Ion pan and a 35cm (14") Sautese\WOk pan. It is half the weight of traditional cast iron BUT the incredible thing is that they are one piece! Thats right, the handle is part of the pan - not riveted or screwed.

I'm just a buyer and have no financial interest but my reaction to this cookware is the same when I saw Festool :)

I use my pans on a gas oven and it is unbelievable to cook on, non stick, very easy to clean, cooks with great control and the best thing - my petite wife can use because its half the weight of traditional cast iron.

Go have a look and let me know what you think as I'd be curious on your thoughts

Cheers
   

Offline aloysius

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #22 on: July 04, 2018, 09:56 AM »
There's something immediately apparent in comparison to my own domestic culinary apparatus:  there's an astonishing preponderance of frypans being used in seppo-land, and remarkably few steamers....

Why is it so?  Don't you eat vegetables in North America?  If so, the how are they prepared & cooked?  Do you deep-fry your vegs?  Or microwave them?  I can't imagine any civilised race would still boil vegetables any more:  cave-man style!  Or do all the vegetables end up as soup?

What are all your frypans used for?  Frying, obviously (duh!) but frying what?  Meat/s?  Vegs?  If so, what?  Roots?  Pulses?  Leafy greens?  Salads (heaven forbid)!  Don't you use overhead or vertical grills to reduce fat consumption?  With all the ballyhoo about the conversion of monounsaturated fats (rapeseed, canola, olive & sesame oils etc) to deadly trans-fats @ high (i.e. frying) temp, surely nobody would still be frying meats any more.

Do you still roast joints of meat or birds?  If so, where?  Oven or Stove-top?  Do you ever use pressure cookers for stews, soups, bully-beef etc.?  Do you parboil (pre-steam) your roots for roasting?  Do you Yorkshire-Pud your beef?

I only ever had 3 stainless saucepans, but each has 2 separate steamers to allow simultaneous "intense" & "gentle" steaming of vegs.  Spuds (& occasionally swedes & turnips) for mashing are the only vegs that I ever peel & immerse in water.  Even then, I've had friends & family sneer & snigger at my "stone aged" cooking ineptitude.  I guess they're onto something:  boiled vegs are pretty bland & otherwise ruined from this intense nutrient leaching.  Great for soups & stews, useless for everything else.  Six years of boarding school has left an indelible legacy of intolerance of stupid or lazy cooking techniques such as boiling vegetables.

I still use the evaporative method of rice cooking too, in an old cast aluminium uncovered saucepan.  Ultra-low temperatures & always reliable consistency provided the volumetric 1-2 ratio of rice to water is observed.  In fact, I've disposed of all my old Le Creuset & Chasseur Cast Ironwear.  Not a single piece remains.  It's primitive, crude, difficult to maintain & subject to burning.  Not to mention ridiculously heavy too. 

Cast Aluminium rules, in my opinion.  2 Frypans large & small, (plus a tiny raw iron one for individual egg-snack fryups on toast), the small abovementioned saucepan for all those "sticky" dishes such as baked beans & other canned reheats, rice, scrambled egg etc., a medium oval casserole & a nice thick wok.  Where Aluminium is at its best is in its remarkable heat dispersion (right up the sides, unlike the alternatives) &  retention, dimensional stability under even intense heat, non-stick coating and lightweight easy care & handling.  Where it fails is in having handles that get way too hot in normal cooking (unlike the rest) as a product of its remarkable heat transmission characteristics.  Apparently it's all to do with how the individual molecular electron in the outer valency ring easily "excite" their colleagues & neighbours into vibratory ecstasy.  Other common metallic elements (Fe, Cu etc) have far more less excitable electrons orbiting in their outer orbital rings....

You folks in seppo-land likewise have some pretty weird culinary nomenclature:  what on earth is broiling?  An illegitimate offspring of boiling perhaps?  How do you grill?  Overhead  or side heat (like an oversized toaster) or on a "griddle" - what I'd call a BBQ plate, with the process likewise being called BBQing. 

Do you tend to deep or shallow fry or adopt the more contemporary oil-free method afforded by modern PFOA-free non-stick coatings these days?  Do any of you use any of those ludicrously expensive steam ovens, & for what?  Are they any good, or about as gimmicky & useless as I suspect? Is there anybody still using microwaves for cooking?  Is so, for what?

In all fairness, you'd probably consider our Antipodean culinary habits pretty weird too!  Damper & roast spuds in the ashes anybody?  Poached fish (in garlic, lemon & butter) from the top shelf of the dishwasher?  Spit-roasted Mutton-Bird fledglings dripping in fish-oil?
FOG-wit since '95:  Some say since birth...

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #23 on: July 04, 2018, 10:31 AM »
WOW!  Lots of questions in that one.  And everyone here will have different answers.

So to wade in:  I tend to use mostly two sauce pans and one of 4 skillets / frying pans.  I tend to use stainless steel if I am browning / searing meat and then finishing it off in the oven.

I have plenty of other pots, and pans, of all sorts of materials including cast aluminum roasters with racks and lids, cast iron, clay (Schlemmer-Topf), etc.  Pressure cooker, solve vide circulator, separate single burner portable stove, portable induction burner, and then my 10+ outdoor grills of mostly the charcoal variety but with couple of gas thrown in along with a pellet grill.  All tools that get used in my effort to have fun cooking (I hate to eat.)

Vegetables can be grilled, sautéed with minimal oil, or steamed.  I never use the microwave as the principal cooking method for anything but I will cook ears of corn in the oven and once done zap them for 30 seconds so that the core of the corn absorbs heat and keeps everything hot longer.  Potatoes are usually baked in my household.  Yes, on occasion I will fry my own fries and boil potatoes for potato salad.  Corn on the grill is coated with oil and then coarse salt.

Broiling is placing food in the oven close to the top element so that the cooking is only from the top versus baking which typically has heat from the bottom or top and bottom.

For proteins I tend to either cook them outside on a grill or cook them sous vide and finish them off in a cast iron pan (browning them only) or use a torch.

Pizza - a major food group here - is done in my household from scratch and favorite way is on the outdoor grill.

I personally do not worry about what I eat because I tend to only eat one meal a day.  My weight doesn't normally vary 3 pounds in a 6 month period.

Hop this helps although it only tends to reflect my personal habits.

Peter

Offline Cheese

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Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #24 on: July 04, 2018, 11:48 AM »
Don't you eat vegetables in North America?  If so, the how are they prepared & cooked?  Do you deep-fry your vegs?  Or microwave them?  I can't imagine any civilised race would still boil vegetables any more:  cave-man style!  Or do all the vegetables end up as soup?

Poached fish (in garlic, lemon & butter) from the top shelf of the dishwasher? 

Here's my preferred method...it also saves on washing pots & pans. [big grin]

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 187
Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #25 on: July 04, 2018, 12:32 PM »
I think Peter hit a lot of the points.  But I will add a few.

If you walked thru a neighborhood and went in each house, you would see very different cooking patterns in each house.  And from region to region very different cooking.  There is also a big generational gap.

A lot of Boomers cook a lot of stuff with the microwave.  When they became standard appliances in the late 70s early 80s, there were cookbooks showing you how to cook everything in the microwave.  I'm from later generation, so I don't and it's fair to say the younger you get in the US, the more you see a shift to cooking on stove and microwaves reserved for just re-heating leftovers.  A lot of old trends come back with gen X'ers and Millennials.  Pressure cookers have made come backs.  Canning of foods is now a huge thing again after disappearing for a long time.  Also the general trend to organic/local grown/home gardens making comebacks with younger folks (but also older folks too).

Yes we eat veggies.  If your under 40, you probably fully embraced steamers.  Older generations do a lot of cooking veggies in the microwave, they even sell frozen veggies in bags that tell you to just toss the whole thing in a microwave and "steam" it in the bag.  I think it's a horrible idea.  You also have a lot of older folks who will cook veggies to death in a pot of water.

Far as fry pans.  Depends on the person greatly.  I don't use them much, but I didn't grow up in a house that fried anything.  Lots was cooked in microwave and other stuff was done on grill outside.  I've had to learn how to cook stuff in fry pans in adult life since I never grew up with their use. 

Best I can tell, cooking has made a big comeback in the US after largely becoming a burden/hassle to the Boomer generation.  Stores that sell high end cooking wares have boomed,  places that teach cooking have taken off. Your high end grocery stores have boomed. A lot of this tends to have a trend driven by the younger people in the country.

Far as broilers.  They are a random pan that comes with your oven that you just shift around in the cabinets and never use and just hope when you move out of a rental place you don't accidentally pack it up with your stuff and get dinged for taking it.  I might have seen one used once, but maybe I was drunk and seeing things.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3570
Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #26 on: July 04, 2018, 12:55 PM »
Re reply #25,   [blink]

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3662
Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2018, 04:06 PM »
I'm truly surprised the so few have mentioned pressure cookers.  I have two; one from Kuhn Rikon and an older one from Fagor.  Both are wonderful, but I tend to use the Kuhn Rikon more frequently.  They have changed markedly since Tinker and I were kids back in the Dark Ages.  My mom had one when I was a little kid.  I was upstairs in my room doing homework when I heard a loud "BANG" from the kitchen.  I ran downstairs to find mom looking at the ceiling which had turned orange from the carrots that covered it.  She was too short to get up on a ladder to clean the carrots off and wouldn't let me do it.  We had to wait for my dad to get home from work to clean the ceiling.  That pressure cooker went to the dump soon thereafter.  I still laugh about that scene.   [big grin]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline DeformedTree

  • Posts: 187
Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #28 on: July 04, 2018, 05:47 PM »
I grew up with some ancient thing that was well...scary looking.  I think many people got scared of them or grew up watching their mothers use them and thought "no".  And this goes hand in hand with the demise of canning probably around the mid 80s.   But now pressure cookers have had a resurgence and I think it in part has to do with return of Canning, not sure which is chicken which is egg.  But also you now have a lot of popular cooking shows on tv that have people using them to do stuff so that too got people back into them.   I don't have one but someday probably will.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5060
Re: In the kitchen again - pots and pans
« Reply #29 on: July 04, 2018, 07:23 PM »
Re reply #25,   [blink]

Hey Michael, I remember Car & Driver first did an article about cooking on your exhaust manifold 30-40 years ago. They planned a 4-5 day road trip in the Southwest and cooked every meal on the exhaust manifold and used the intake manifold as a warming drawer of sorts.  [cool]
Fish, eggs, chicken, coffee you name it. I think they even cooked rattle snake.  🐍

Obviously, a V8 engine gives you more burners than an I6.  [blink]
« Last Edit: July 04, 2018, 09:05 PM by Cheese »