Author Topic: New Dog in Northern Virginia  (Read 10462 times)

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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2018, 05:56 PM »
I have heard that retrievers have "soft" mouths.  I wondered if that was automatic or if they had to be taught that.

I've tried using my finger to both push down under and over his tongue while gripping his lower jaw.  He'll stop biting when I do that, but then he'll go back to biting me.  I haven't tried with the roof of his mouth and top of his muzzle.

I kinda started with the whole muzzle in my mouth technique.  He seems to get scared when I do that or just when I bear my teeth and growl in general.  But neither are a permanent solution.  I think - "Ah I fixed him!" only to have him start biting me shortly there after.  I was actually afraid to bear my teeth and/or growl as I thought that might make him more aggressive or give him some other behavioral issue like him not liking me.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2018, 06:59 PM »
I guess I might not be as weird as I thought.  The roof of the mouth is hard but surprisingly sensitive.  As anyone who has novacaine injected by the dentist there.

He will get it.  Repeat as necessary.  Firm.  He will shown discomfort and squirm.  Wait for yelp.  The idea is not to hurt but to be firm and show control.  He has to learn thru repetition.  He is still a baby after all.

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Just my 2 cents.

Peter


Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2018, 07:07 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

Offline Bohdan

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2018, 07:20 PM »

I have also - and I don't recommend this for the squeamish - stuck their entire muzzle in my mouth, clamped down, looked them in their eyes and growled softly but deeply.

Peter

I had a German Shepard pup that bit me with those razor sharp teeth. I grabbed him, held him so that he couldn't escape and while growling, slowly bit him on the nose. After that, any time that his teeth accidentally touched me, his tail would disappear and he would drop to the ground.

You have to teach them who's the boss.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2018, 07:51 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

---And ten minutes later they are sleeping snuggled against each other? 

MY wife just remembered that the term we use is "gentle mouth" not soft mouth.  Both of us would chant that will doing the roof of the mouth thing.

I am not a dog trainer by any means.  Most of our dog training has been thru osmosis via a previously trained dog.  Moose trained Zorro.  Zorro trained Shadow, Blazer, and Goldie.  Goldie trained MacGyver.  MacGyver is training Indiana Jones. 

One thing that our dogs have done is really key into eyes and facial expressions.  Mac for example will lie on the dogs bed in the kitchen and constantly scan both of our faces while we are standing at the kitchen island.  i.e "is there something you want me to do?"  Indie will sit and stair at faces.

Recently I read that dogs respond to eyes - particularly left eyes.  I have tried blinking with the left eye while they were studying my face and it seems to be true.

Also I read that hugging your dog isn't so good.  Dogs lean just like cats brush legs.  Instead of a hug take one arm and press your friend against the side of your leg and hold it there.  It is pretty cool to see them then applying the pressure to your leg.

Just another 1 cent.

Peter 

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #65 on: February 09, 2018, 08:39 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

An exception:
I had a situation with a customer's dog one time.  The owner was an ex army colonel.  His dog was named Major.  I guess the owner did not want to be outranked by his dog. The Major was mean. Whenever I drove into the yard, the dog would jump up onto the hood of my Willys Jeep pickup truck.  It had that flat hood so it was easy for him.  Once on the hood, he continued barking and would attck the windshield, banging his teeth loudly against the glass.  I would wait for the Colonel to put the major into the house before i would get out of the truck. Hey, i was only a PFC!

One day,I had to check driveways for ice while my crews loading the truck with sand. (That was in the days of using loaders with hickory booms to load trucks) The house was high on a hill with three other houses at the bottom of the hill. I parked between the three driveways at the bottom of the hill and started walking up the driveway that was protected by the major.  Before heading up the driveway, i checked to be sure major was not patrolling so early in the morning.  Good.  I started walking until I was half way between the house and my truck.  Suddenly, here comes major in full voice.  i looked at major, looked at my truck. There was no way i could get back to my truck before receiving disciplinary measures from the major.  So, I just stood there until major got within maybe 30 feet from me.  At that point, i dropped to my hands and knees, started yipping and sticking out my tougue like I wanted to lick him and play. He came straight at me and just started licking my face.  By the time the Colonel showed up, the major was actually playing with the non-com.  From that point on, the two of us got along fine with no further hostilities. Of course, when i told my crew what had happened, there were a few suggestions that the PFC should be escorted to the mental ward.
Tinker
 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #66 on: February 10, 2018, 08:52 AM »
Great story Tinker... [big grin]

All of the goldens we've had were huggers. Throw your arms around them and they'll take it for literally hours. Jackson needs to touch you when he lies down. If I sit on the couch lengthwise, he jumps up and buries his head between my leg and the back of the couch, thus insuring a tight fit. After 5 minutes he moves forward some more now generating a press fit. [eek] 

You're right Peter, 10 minutes later they're lying next to one another sleeping or trying to share a toy.

Online Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #67 on: February 10, 2018, 08:53 AM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl... 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 08:58 AM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

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Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #68 on: February 10, 2018, 09:01 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.


You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.
  Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl...
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #69 on: May 08, 2018, 09:34 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]


Offline leakyroof

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #70 on: May 08, 2018, 10:15 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]

(Attachment Link)
  DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #71 on: May 08, 2018, 10:30 AM »
DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]

That's funny...you forget what they originated from until they open up their mouths, it then becomes obvious. 

And here they are literally 30 seconds later.

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #72 on: May 08, 2018, 12:56 PM »
Wow, great shot Cheese!!! 

My golden tolerates my wife's hugging.  He would much rather be a lap dog if we would let him. 
-Raj

Offline ilovesunshine

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #73 on: July 28, 2018, 08:45 PM »
Hey lovely thread.
Just wanted to post this to the guy with the greyhounds:
https://www.truthinadvertising.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Dogs-Cats-diseases_.pdf

There’s an amazing product called transfer factor. I’m in no way affiliated with them. Our young cat developed a large mass in her mouth, vet prescribed the usual nonsense: biopsy, chemo, etc

My partner and I are big into natural medicine. So we took her to a holistic vet for a 2nd opinion.
We already had this as we take it ourselves when we need it. It basically naturally hugely boosts the immune system which then means the body - human, cat, dog, whatever, has a much better chance to heal itself. Treats the root cause rather than merely the symptoms.

Her lump is completely gone now. In around 3 months. Plus she was nursing 4 kittens at the time so we didn’t want her milk to be polluted with chemo crap. Didn’t believe the vet for a second when she said that wouldn’t be an issue.

He prescribed other things as well. But it all worked together. Pm me if you’d like more info. The exact product we used is this: https://www.4life.com/corp/product/transfer-factor-plus-tri-factor/89

Another cat had an abcess from a nasty bite. Before we adopted him. 4 rounds of 2 different antibiotics did sweet FA. Vet wanted to put him under general anaesthetic- cut his face open - see what was causing it - try to fix it. That’s how I first found it. A lovely lady on a cat forum was highly recommending it and had loads of helpful advice what had worked for her etc. 3 days later after a month of useless antibiotics his swelling went down and he completely cured himself with the help of transfer factor.

Final recommendations : partner had shingles. Took this. Hardly affected him except the nerve tingly pain every now and again. He could work. Write his reports etc. Really hope this helps your dogs. And please consider feeding raw food - most of the “premium” brands are full of crap.

There’s a great docu series “the truth about pet cancer” https://thetruthaboutpetcancer.com

All pet owners should watch it,

You all have beautiful happy looking dogs. So happy to hear they are so loved 🙂🙂


Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #74 on: July 28, 2018, 09:23 PM »
Wow, great shot Cheese!!! 

My golden tolerates my wife's hugging.  He would much rather be a lap dog if we would let him.

Thanks Raj...talking about lap dogs, here’s poor Jackson that’s been up for a solid 8 hours. A full 8 hours is way too tiring for a retriever so at 4:00 pm he decided to go to bed with his pink tennis ball.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 10:23 AM by Cheese »

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #75 on: July 28, 2018, 10:38 PM »
@Cheese
Lol!  Too funny!  Mine has a hangover when he’s been up that long.  Lasts 24 hours. Definitely not cut out to be a working dog!
-Raj

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #76 on: July 28, 2018, 11:39 PM »
@Cheese
Lol!  Too funny!  Mine has a hangover when he’s been up that long.  Lasts 24 hours. Definitely not cut out to be a working dog!

Ya Raj, dogs are funny. They definitely each have their own personality. We've also had a Puli and a miniature Aussie. Talk about junk yard dogs...both of them would work for 48/7 without union benefits or overtime...and they'd double down if a problem arises and refuse to take a vacation. That's understandable being herding dogs. However, as an owner, you were always in the prevention mode...antennae at max extension.

The retrievers we've had on the other hand, have always been so mellow, and living in the city, when you meet up with skateboarders, bicyclists, joggers, busses, other dogs and frenetic people, they just weather the storm. This makes life easier as you get older. They're still great guard dogs because they'll let you know when someone encroaches into their territory, at which time they will lick the intruder to death.  [big grin]
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 11:45 PM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #77 on: July 29, 2018, 04:47 PM »
Hey lovely thread.
Just wanted to post this to the guy with the greyhounds:
https://www.truthinadvertising.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Dogs-Cats-diseases_.pdf


@ ilovesunshine: I read the link and was reminded of the experience I had with my dog during highschool years. We had her for about a year and she came down with distemper. She first had diarrhea, then she nearly died. The vet told us she would not survive. Being that I was then a sophomore in high school, I knew it all. I refused to have her euthanized. I stayed home from school for over a week. I slept on the floor beside my  pal. I got up several times in the nite to let her do her business.  She was not able to stand, so i would carry her out side.  During the day, i handled my homework which my brother brought home from school to me. My Mom talked to my teachers who allowed me to stay home with my dog until she would get well.

Before she got sick, we used to play with myflashlite.  i would run the spot all around the floor, walls and ceiling.  She would go wild chasing the spot. One day, she was not interested. The next day she  was not interested in anything else either. Thru her sickness, she was not even opening her eyes. One day (evening), as I shined the lite around the room, she followed  it with her eyes.  She still wasn't moving, but her eyes told me she would get well. The next morning, I woke our vet up early, just to let him know to put away his needle. He was gruff old bird, but he laughed with me. Within a week, she was chasing that lite.  Not for long, but she was interested.

About three years later, i came home from work and Mom and my brother were tring to tie a cravat around my dogs muzzle. She had been run over by a truck and she tried to bite both of my family when they tried to move her to the car. I took the cloth off of her, picked her up very carefully so as not to break anything more. As I moved her, she licked my hand. My mom and brother could not believe that as she had been so very defensive when they tried to move her.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2018, 05:07 PM »
@ Cheese: That series of Goldeen pics are GOLDEN. I especially like the one where they are opening up the mouths so wide for dental inspection. At least some responder suggested such. And then they are resting with the toy in the two mouths. those picsshow true love

We have had three goldens; not all at the same time, but we loved them all. I have had two customers thru the years who had mean Goldens. One had to get rid of their dog.  Another, whose Golden was mean, worked with the dog.  He had been a rescue pup. The dog eventually straightened out and was actually friendly. Our third Golden was a rescue puppy and was very frightened when we brought her home the first day.  I worked with her all evening and by 9 or 10 o'clock, she was no longer cowering away from any in the family. She was, by then, MY dog. 

I have many stories about my dogs. I am trying to set up (edit) many of my stories to put into a book.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2018, 05:26 PM »
Thanks @Tinker

I like the book idea...[thumbs up]  And a great dog story for @ilovesunshine . [smile]
« Last Edit: July 30, 2018, 08:37 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #80 on: July 30, 2018, 09:50 AM »
I thought I'd give everyone an update on Parker.  Parker is now about 7 1/2 months old and probably close to 30lbs (we haven't weighed him for a while).  His growth seems to have slowed down and we don't think he is going to get much bigger. For a while he looked rather tall and lanky, but he's filled in nicely.  He still likes to bite me, but it's usually not that hard - more like just a play bite.  He is still a monster!  He tears up and destroys just about all of his toys.  He loves to find and pull out the plastic squeaker inside.  He devoured the Elk antler that he's had since we first got him.  That antler seemed so hard like it was going to be impossible to chew through, but just recently he really went to town on it and has become quite the power chewer.

He's just about 100% potty trained now - he rings the potty bells on the doggie gate to let us know when he wants to go outside. Sometimes we get some false rings, but he's really good about ringing the bell when he really has to go out.  This is very much to the delight of my wife who thought he was never going to be potty trained. I kinda secretly felt the same way. I normally work from home, but had to take a business trip for a week in May so we needed to hire a dog walking service to take him out during the day. That seemed to really help get him "on a schedule" for his potty breaks.

For the last 5 weeks we have been taking Parker to a "doggie swimming pool." At first we had no clue how he would react to the water. He definitely didn't like the few times we tried to bathe him.  Turns out he loves swimming.  He started out with a life jacket on but very quickly progressed to being able to swim on his own.  We thought the swimming would help tire him out,  but it really only made him stronger!  This past weekend was our last weekend swimming.   It was kinda expensive at $40/week so we decided to scale back.  Maybe we'll go once a month or something.

Parker has his own Instagram if anyone is interested: https://www.instagram.com/parkerhouserules/.

Here are some recent pictures of Parker:




















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Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #81 on: July 30, 2018, 03:24 PM »
What a face!  Love the video of him trying so hard to stay out of the pool until he just can’t help himself! Too funny! 

@Cheese
Here is Chili after a long day at the office. By that I mean, wake up, go out, eat breakfast, sleep for a few hours, wait for the dog walker, go out again, eat lunch, play, and now he’s exhausted and napping while his mamma works. An afternoon at the pool and he would collapse for the rest of the day (except meal times - those are not optional if you are a golden or lab).
-Raj

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #82 on: July 30, 2018, 03:33 PM »
Here's the video of Parker trying to wait in the pool: .  I shared it on another post, but forgot to include it here.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #83 on: August 01, 2018, 09:05 AM »
@Cheese
Here is Chili after a long day at the office. By that I mean, wake up, go out, eat breakfast, sleep for a few hours, wait for the dog walker, go out again, eat lunch, play, and now he’s exhausted and napping while his mamma works. An afternoon at the pool and he would collapse for the rest of the day (except meal times - those are not optional if you are a golden or lab).

Good looking dog!!! How old is Chili, he looks fairly young.  He also has "winter nose".  [huh]

We've had a couple of herding dogs and they NEVER sleep...there's always a job to do.

We've had several Goldens and they ALWAYS sleep...their only next job is to eat.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 09:12 AM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2018, 02:39 PM »
All of our dogs loved to go swimming except our second Golden. she was not afraid of the water, but she would only go wading as far into the water as she could go and still have her feet on the bottom and her chin at water level. As she would get to that point, she would just stand and blow bubbles. As she would make the bubbles, she would attempt to catch them before they would disappear. I finally got her to swim by taking advantage of her retrieving habit. While blowing her bubbles, I would find a stick, throw it out just beyond her reach. At first, she  paid no attention, but her retrieving instinct was too much for her to ignore.  Eventually, she enjoyed the retrieving from the water, but, always, the first thing she would do, I guess to warm up, was to wade until deep enough to blow her bubbles.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2018, 02:55 PM »
The first dog we had within a month of our marriage was the try, undersized English Setter.  She loved to run in the woods. Unfortunately, to run in our woods required that she first had to run and wade thru the swamp. Since I was allowing the activity, every time she waned to come into the house, I had to clean her off with the garden hose. Of course, once soaking wet from her cleanup, she still had to wait outside until reasonably dry. (Reasonably according to my wife was somewhat dryer than from my inspection) After dinner, was playtime, or more likely, tear the sleeves off my master's shirt.  Once the tearing up project was complete, I was exausted from my long working day and then from warding off my "gentle" pet. I would sack out on the lingroom sofa.  Soon, Buzzy would creep oto the couch between the sofa back and me.  She would go to sleep snuggled deep.  AND THEN, she  would start to stretch and PUSH. The became a battle that never ended.

With all that play, she was an exceptionally gentle dog with everyone else. She was especially gentle with the children. I think she saved all of her agressions for me. But in the end, it was me who she would listen to when called or ordered.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2018, 03:11 PM »
My brother and his wife got their first puppy at about a year or two after we got our first dog.  They had  an awful time housebreaking the puppy. We hated to visit. After they had the puppy for a year, they wanted to go on a trip and asked if we could take care of their dog. My wife's first reaction was, when I asked, a very emphatic, "NO!!!"

I told my wife that I would clean up any messes, but I was certain the dog could, and would, be trained. I am a light sleeper after the first couple of hours. I slept on the couch with dog in the kitchen close to the door.  When I realized the dog was moving around, restlessly, I would get up, take him outside and praise him when he did what he had to do. It only took two nites of this and he was totally housebroken. I was able to go to sleeep in our bed with my wife.  The dog found out he could go thru the nite with no accidents. At the end of the week, we were able to give a completely housebroken puppy back to my brother & SIL. Within a week, that puppy was back to his old habits. I told my brother that the dog should be training them.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #87 on: August 03, 2018, 05:01 PM »
LOL Tinker!  Your brother and his wife were doing something wrong.  I suspect that dog was letting them know in his own way, they just couldn't speak his language well enough to figure it out!  Poor dog.  :(  Great stories though!  They each have their own personalities, habits and quirks.

@Cheese
Yeah, he started with a black nose, but by the second spring, the black nose never returned.  He's 8 this month, so he's got his AARP card now.  His eyes and muzzle are starting to go white, but in his heart he's all puppy.  He can barely contain himself when he gets to meet a human on his daily walks.  "Humans...OMG OMG OMG!!"  My neighbor asked me 2 years ago, "when is he going to calm down?".  My reply..."this is it!".   :)
-Raj

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #88 on: August 03, 2018, 06:11 PM »
Every time we have brought a new dog into our home - now up to 6 over the years - I have had to housebreak them.  Yes, as Tinker says, it can be done in a matter of days if you devote yourself to the task at hand.  Harder to deal with the excited puppy piddle, but I was never really bothered by a puppy who was saying "I was so happy to see you that I accidentally peed."  I have yet to run across a human who had those same emotions.

Peter

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #89 on: August 03, 2018, 08:41 PM »
Our daughter had a Cairn Terrier. He was a wanderer and very time she brought him to our house (she lived in D.C. area) she would spend a lot of time searching the neighborhood to find him.  The fun part of her visits was when Murphy would play soccer on our driveway.  He would spend hours pushing a soccer ball to the top of our driveway, run full speed back to the bottom to trap the ball before it would get to the road. push the ball back up the driveway to run back down to the bottom and do it all over again.  We would throw sticks or balls for him, but he would never bring them back to us. His thing was soccer.  Somehow, he never let the ball get to the road. He never ran into the road when playing his solitary soccer game. nobody taught him. He just figured the whole thing out all by himself. He was a fiesty but fun little dog. He had a perpetual smile.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker