Author Topic: New Dog in Northern Virginia  (Read 6840 times)

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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2018, 05:56 PM »
I have heard that retrievers have "soft" mouths.  I wondered if that was automatic or if they had to be taught that.

I've tried using my finger to both push down under and over his tongue while gripping his lower jaw.  He'll stop biting when I do that, but then he'll go back to biting me.  I haven't tried with the roof of his mouth and top of his muzzle.

I kinda started with the whole muzzle in my mouth technique.  He seems to get scared when I do that or just when I bear my teeth and growl in general.  But neither are a permanent solution.  I think - "Ah I fixed him!" only to have him start biting me shortly there after.  I was actually afraid to bear my teeth and/or growl as I thought that might make him more aggressive or give him some other behavioral issue like him not liking me.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2018, 06:59 PM »
I guess I might not be as weird as I thought.  The roof of the mouth is hard but surprisingly sensitive.  As anyone who has novacaine injected by the dentist there.

He will get it.  Repeat as necessary.  Firm.  He will shown discomfort and squirm.  Wait for yelp.  The idea is not to hurt but to be firm and show control.  He has to learn thru repetition.  He is still a baby after all.

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Just my 2 cents.

Peter


Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2018, 07:07 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

Offline Bohdan

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2018, 07:20 PM »

I have also - and I don't recommend this for the squeamish - stuck their entire muzzle in my mouth, clamped down, looked them in their eyes and growled softly but deeply.

Peter

I had a German Shepard pup that bit me with those razor sharp teeth. I grabbed him, held him so that he couldn't escape and while growling, slowly bit him on the nose. After that, any time that his teeth accidentally touched me, his tail would disappear and he would drop to the ground.

You have to teach them who's the boss.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2018, 07:51 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

---And ten minutes later they are sleeping snuggled against each other? 

MY wife just remembered that the term we use is "gentle mouth" not soft mouth.  Both of us would chant that will doing the roof of the mouth thing.

I am not a dog trainer by any means.  Most of our dog training has been thru osmosis via a previously trained dog.  Moose trained Zorro.  Zorro trained Shadow, Blazer, and Goldie.  Goldie trained MacGyver.  MacGyver is training Indiana Jones. 

One thing that our dogs have done is really key into eyes and facial expressions.  Mac for example will lie on the dogs bed in the kitchen and constantly scan both of our faces while we are standing at the kitchen island.  i.e "is there something you want me to do?"  Indie will sit and stair at faces.

Recently I read that dogs respond to eyes - particularly left eyes.  I have tried blinking with the left eye while they were studying my face and it seems to be true.

Also I read that hugging your dog isn't so good.  Dogs lean just like cats brush legs.  Instead of a hug take one arm and press your friend against the side of your leg and hold it there.  It is pretty cool to see them then applying the pressure to your leg.

Just another 1 cent.

Peter 

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #65 on: February 09, 2018, 08:39 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

An exception:
I had a situation with a customer's dog one time.  The owner was an ex army colonel.  His dog was named Major.  I guess the owner did not want to be outranked by his dog. The Major was mean. Whenever I drove into the yard, the dog would jump up onto the hood of my Willys Jeep pickup truck.  It had that flat hood so it was easy for him.  Once on the hood, he continued barking and would attck the windshield, banging his teeth loudly against the glass.  I would wait for the Colonel to put the major into the house before i would get out of the truck. Hey, i was only a PFC!

One day,I had to check driveways for ice while my crews loading the truck with sand. (That was in the days of using loaders with hickory booms to load trucks) The house was high on a hill with three other houses at the bottom of the hill. I parked between the three driveways at the bottom of the hill and started walking up the driveway that was protected by the major.  Before heading up the driveway, i checked to be sure major was not patrolling so early in the morning.  Good.  I started walking until I was half way between the house and my truck.  Suddenly, here comes major in full voice.  i looked at major, looked at my truck. There was no way i could get back to my truck before receiving disciplinary measures from the major.  So, I just stood there until major got within maybe 30 feet from me.  At that point, i dropped to my hands and knees, started yipping and sticking out my tougue like I wanted to lick him and play. He came straight at me and just started licking my face.  By the time the Colonel showed up, the major was actually playing with the non-com.  From that point on, the two of us got along fine with no further hostilities. Of course, when i told my crew what had happened, there were a few suggestions that the PFC should be escorted to the mental ward.
Tinker
 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #66 on: February 10, 2018, 08:52 AM »
Great story Tinker... [big grin]

All of the goldens we've had were huggers. Throw your arms around them and they'll take it for literally hours. Jackson needs to touch you when he lies down. If I sit on the couch lengthwise, he jumps up and buries his head between my leg and the back of the couch, thus insuring a tight fit. After 5 minutes he moves forward some more now generating a press fit. [eek] 

You're right Peter, 10 minutes later they're lying next to one another sleeping or trying to share a toy.

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #67 on: February 10, 2018, 08:53 AM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl... 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 08:58 AM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

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Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #68 on: February 10, 2018, 09:01 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.


You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.
  Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl...
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #69 on: May 08, 2018, 09:34 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]


Online leakyroof

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #70 on: May 08, 2018, 10:15 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]

(Attachment Link)
  DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #71 on: May 08, 2018, 10:30 AM »
DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]

That's funny...you forget what they originated from until they open up their mouths, it then becomes obvious. 

And here they are literally 30 seconds later.

Online RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #72 on: May 08, 2018, 12:56 PM »
Wow, great shot Cheese!!! 

My golden tolerates my wife's hugging.  He would much rather be a lap dog if we would let him. 
-Raj