Author Topic: New Dog in Northern Virginia  (Read 10681 times)

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Online GoingMyWay

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New Dog in Northern Virginia
« on: January 02, 2018, 07:26 PM »
This may not be the type of dog that you're thinking about.  I don't have a bench dog or anything else like that in mind.

Does anyone have any suggestions for adopting or buying a dog in the Northern Virginia area?  I checked the Fairfax County Animal Shelter this past Saturday and didn't see much.  I also checked Petland in Fairfax City, but I've heard some very bad puppy mill related stories from there (the puppies there were incredibly enticing though!).

They say adopting is the best thing - I was kind of expecting the dogs at the shelter to be jumping all over me (may be wrong mindset) so I was rather disappointed when the dogs didn't seem that interested in me.  Well I take that back - only 1 dog was interested, but it was a Staffordshire Terrier.  I guess they get a bad rap, but this dog didn't get along well with other dogs and my parents last dog also didn't like other dogs so I've more or less conditioned myself to run away any time I see another dog.
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Online RobBob

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 07:40 PM »
There are also many pure breed dogs that need to be adopted.  Most breeds have rescue websites.  Pick a breed that you like and google the rescue website associated with it.  Fill out the forms and let them know you are looking.  Usually, the rescue website will have pictures and some information about the dogs.

Typically, the rescue organization will send someone out to your house to make sure your situation is appropriate for the breed and the specific dog in question.  They want the dogs to be a good fit and try not to move the dogs around too much.  It is traumatic for them to change owners. 
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 07:42 PM by RobBob »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 08:02 PM »
There are also many pure breed dogs that need to be adopted.  Most breeds have rescue websites.  Pick a breed that you like and google the rescue website associated with it.  Fill out the forms and let them know you are looking.  Usually, the rescue website will have pictures and some information about the dogs.

Typically, the rescue organization will send someone out to your house to make sure your situation is appropriate for the breed and the specific dog in question.  They want the dogs to be a good fit and try not to move the dogs around too much.  It is traumatic for them to change owners.

Thank you for your reply!

Picking a breed that you like is the hard part!  My wife's cousin has a labradoodle (I know, I know it's not a pedigree, but it is a desirable hybrid breed), he is awesome!!  Labradors seems to make wonderful dogs from my experience!  I'd like to stay away from hound dogs as their noses seem to get them into too much trouble!

I think the whole home situation evaluation is something that I didn't like.  It seems all too intrusive, understandably so, but nevertheless too intrusive.  We don't have a yard to let the dog run around in so that may be negative against us.  There is a dog park fairly close by so long as the dog liked other dogs (my parents previous coonhound had a nose for trouble and didn't like other dogs so she was a real chore to walk).
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Online DynaGlide

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 08:29 PM »
Check a forever home and lost dog rescue. We have done both with great experiences.

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 08:33 PM »
How old was the dog that you got?

I really don't want to get too old of a dog - a lot of the dogs at the animal shelter were 6+ years old.
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Offline tjbnwi

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2018, 08:35 PM »
My brother has a shelter in Holland, MI if you're willing to travel.

(Shameless plug link below.....also---(another shameless plug) if you don't have a charity for Amazon Smiles Headin' Home is listed)

http://www.headinhomerescue.org

Tom

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 08:37 PM »
Thanks for sharing your brother's shelter.  Michigan is a bit far for us to travel.
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Online DynaGlide

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2018, 10:07 PM »
Mine was 9 weeks and my in laws was closer to a year. Had a good experience dealing with A Forever Home for our dog.

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2018, 10:47 PM »
My wife's cousin has a labradoodle (I know, I know it's not a pedigree, but it is a desirable hybrid breed), he is awesome!!  Labradors seems to make wonderful dogs from my experience!

Don’t diss that doodle...my brother in law, his brother and his father are all huge bird 🦅 hunters. Between them over the years they’ve owned 8 or 9 black labs. Nothing better according to them... until my brother in law purchased a Golden Doodle. I think my sister must have put him in a hammerlock.   [tongue]

Long story short...my brother in law has stated that his Golden Doodle is the best bird dog he’s ever worked with. Ducks, pheasants, grouse and quail. He’s become a true believer along with his brother. A pretty impressive testimonial from a bunch of guys that have been hunting birds for over 80 years  [cool]



Offline jtwood

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2018, 10:58 PM »
As has already been mentioned, picking a breed or type of dog is difficult.  One thing I have used in the past is the Animal Planet (the TV network) website:

http://www.animalplanet.com/pets/

On that page is a "Dog Breed Selector" where they ask you 10 questions about what you would like to have in a dog and what you don't want, and they suggest some breeds.  A lot of shelter dogs are mixed breed, but sometimes it can be fairly obvious what type of dog it is, if not the main breed.

I live in Southern California and most of the shelters are online, so you can look at pics of the dogs and get some info after you have decided on the type of dog you want.  Probably have the same thing in Northern Virginia.  I got my last two dogs this way.

Steve

Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2018, 11:51 PM »
Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2018, 04:42 AM »
Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2018, 04:48 AM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline sospan

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2018, 05:08 AM »
I rescued one of these in the UK - it is a Boerboel, a South African Mastiff.  As breed they are very loyal, intelligent and excellent with kids. The one I got was never socialised or even walked and his previous owner never bothered to really train him so he came with lots of issues. However, 18 months down the line he is an absolutely fantastic dog far better than all the other large dog breeds I have had over the years.

There is a breed rescue in the US. They will make a good addition to the house and of course the ideal guardian for all that expensive Festool kit  [big grin]





Offline fatroman

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2018, 08:28 AM »
We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.
El duende está lleno de mierda!

Offline jrb9

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2018, 09:13 AM »
You could try Petfinder

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2018, 10:21 AM »
Don’t diss that doodle...my brother in law, his brother and his father are all huge bird 🦅 hunters. Between them over the years they’ve owned 8 or 9 black labs. Nothing better according to them... until my brother in law purchased a Golden Doodle. I think my sister must have put him in a hammerlock.   [tongue]

Long story short...my brother in law has stated that his Golden Doodle is the best bird dog he’s ever worked with. Ducks, pheasants, grouse and quail. He’s become a true believer along with his brother. A pretty impressive testimonial from a bunch of guys that have been hunting birds for over 80 years  [cool]

Golden doodles and labradoodles are very similar - hard to tell them apart even.  I just recently learned about the double doodle - the best of both worlds!

As has already been mentioned, picking a breed or type of dog is difficult.  One thing I have used in the past is the Animal Planet (the TV network) website:

http://www.animalplanet.com/pets/

On that page is a "Dog Breed Selector" where they ask you 10 questions about what you would like to have in a dog and what you don't want, and they suggest some breeds.  A lot of shelter dogs are mixed breed, but sometimes it can be fairly obvious what type of dog it is, if not the main breed.

I live in Southern California and most of the shelters are online, so you can look at pics of the dogs and get some info after you have decided on the type of dog you want.  Probably have the same thing in Northern Virginia.  I got my last two dogs this way.

Steve

That's a cool breed finder.  It recommended http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selector/dog-breeds/non-sporting/keeshond.html.  I've never even heard of that breed before.

Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.

Sounds like a great find!

I rescued one of these in the UK - it is a Boerboel, a South African Mastiff.  As breed they are very loyal, intelligent and excellent with kids. The one I got was never socialised or even walked and his previous owner never bothered to really train him so he came with lots of issues. However, 18 months down the line he is an absolutely fantastic dog far better than all the other large dog breeds I have had over the years.

There is a breed rescue in the US. They will make a good addition to the house and of course the ideal guardian for all that expensive Festool kit  [big grin]


(Attachment Link)



Wow that's a big dog!

We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.

Thanks for those links, Lost Dog Rescue seems good.
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Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2018, 12:48 PM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker

Once I get a doggie they are not a pet, they become part of the family. Im still in mourning for one we lost over 2 years ago.
I treat them like my kids, after all they arent much different got to give them expectations and train them to do what they want. This one is a little stubborn but she'll be ok in a month or so

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2018, 01:02 PM »
We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.

I'd also add Virginia German Shepherd Rescue (http://VGSR.org).  I was a volunteer there for many years and adopted four dogs, all of which were just wonderful.  Lab Rescue (https://lab-rescue.org) is another really great organization in the NoVa area.  There's just something about rescued dogs - they just seem to know that they've been given a second chance and never fail to show their appreciation in one way or another. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline PatR

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2018, 03:07 PM »


My two rescue Rotties, Evie on the left and Archie on the right on the banks of the Rhine. We have always had Rottweilers, but they are the first rescue dogs we have ever had in our family and are two absolute darlings. They travel all over Europe with us in our motorhome and we have never had any problems wild camping. [laughing]

Evie was dumped on Christmas Eve in 2013 as she was just about to give birth to a litter of Heinz 57 pups, all of who died. She was nursed, after an extremely difficult cesarian operation, by a wonderful woman called Ann Evans who runs a Rottie rescue centre in Oswestry, UK.

http://www.rottweilersinneed.co.uk/

Archie's owner died when he was 6 months old and Ann took him in and gave me first dibs as I always wanted another boy after my Simou died.

Love my rescue Rotts.

Offline rst

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2018, 04:10 PM »
My wife and my first kids were a pair of brother Shih Tzus that lived to be 16 and 17.  When I was coaching soccer year round my daughter and I bought my wife a female to keep her company.  Seven years ago my other daughter, with a new baby and full time job bought a male at the Bloomsburg fair.  Less than two weeks later she realized her mistake and we inherited this one.  My wife's female pasted two years.  The woman that grooms our dogs is into rescue work and got my wife interested.  Next thing I know we're driving four hours to Ohio to pick up a four? year old, five pound Yorkie...did I mention that at the time of the trip I was surviving the flu?

P.S. To find out who really loves you unconditionally, lock your dog and significant other in the trunk of your car and after an hour see who is ecstatic to see you again [big grin]

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2018, 07:22 PM »
P.S. To find out who really loves you unconditionally, lock your dog and significant other in the trunk of your car and after an hour see who is ecstatic to see you again [big grin]

Funny...that's a no brainer. [scratch chin]

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2018, 07:51 PM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker

Once I get a doggie they are not a pet, they become part of the family. Im still in mourning for one we lost over 2 years ago.
I treat them like my kids, after all they arent much different got to give them expectations and train them to do what they want. This one is a little stubborn but she'll be ok in a month or so

Any dog we bring home are our babies.  we have raised several. Two were raised for Guiding eye dogs. One was a purebred English setter that was given to us for free because she was the runt of the litter and could not be sold.  we even brought home a dog (Took into our house on a 20 below nite and he stayed until we finally had to put him down.)  The last puppy we got from Golden Rescue.  she had been abused to the point where, when we first brought her home she would cringe and cower in a corner when ever one of us moved our feet or even when i made a move to scratch me ear (no kidding-really) Every time she ran away from me, i would go into the corner with her and smooch and hug and especially scratch her neck.  Within two hours of repeating that treatment, she was my dog.  She went everywhere with me.  Why had she been mistreated? Because the owner felt he had to have a male dog and so he made life miserable for the puppy.  We got her at 7 months.  At 19 years old, we finally had to put her down. Every time we had to put a dog to sleep, I went in with the dog and held him/her in my arms while the vet gave the needle.  When our kids were small, we always let them know, as the dog was showing symptoms of too old, that one day when taking their friend to the vet, he/she might not be coming home with us.  We always prepared the children ahead of time. Today, they are both the same way. I grew up on a farm and was always taught that the animals were cared for first. 
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2018, 08:16 PM »
We have a lab and beagle both are over 10 years old.  The lab kept his puppy behavior for a really long time.  He sheds like mad.  The beagle doesn't bark unless she needs to go out.  The dog in my avatar was a French Mastiff and she was the most down to earth dog, people would see her and be afraid, after meeting fear went away.  Even my mom felt that way.  She was protective of all the family.  One of my favorite stories was we were baby sitting our niece that was only a few months old.  My girlfriend forgot to close the gate on the first floor, and the baby was in her car seat thing and Skye ran over, smelled her feet, laid down and protected her.  Hardest day of my life was when we had to put her down.  Hope you find the right dog, they do make life good.
Bryan

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Offline DrD

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2018, 09:41 AM »
Great Thread!

I tried posting yesterday, but it somehow didn't make it.

We currently have an almost 2 year old Boerboel - she's my avatar, and a slightly younger Rottie (male).  Wouldn't take anything for either, they are both simply WONDERFUL.  We've always raise/bred large dogs, Great Danes, Rotties, and now Boerboels - love them all, but if you're ever around a Boerboel, you'll be hooked for life.  To coin a phrase from a local BBQ Rib Shack - "They ain't nothin' like 'em, nowhere."  Boerboels are very large dogs - not the largest of the Mastiffs - getting up to about 200 lbs, and as such, they require a firm, loving hand, and they are certainly not for everybody.  I first saw a Boerboel on the Outdoor Network, on a program hosted by Theresa Vail who was showing her Boerboel - Sarge. They are not quite as gentle as Great Danes, and they aren't as goofy as the Great Danes; they just simply - in my mind - are the greatest pet I have ever had, with Rotties a close second.

Enjoy the voyage, and whatever you get, I'm sure you'll be happy.
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Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2018, 09:42 AM »
Today, I have to take my little girl to the vet to get fixed. Im looking at her this mornig taking a nap sleeping next to me not knowing what shes in for today. Shes also getting her rabies shots and 2nd deworming and chipping. I might hold off on the chipping for another month or so. But then since shes under she wont feel the chip being implanted.

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #26 on: February 05, 2018, 06:40 PM »
We ended up getting a Mini Labaradoodle.  We named him Parker.  Attached are two pictures of him.  The first picture is the first day we brought him home, 3 weeks ago today.  The second picture is a more recent picture of him.  Don't let his cute looks fool you!  He's more than a handful.  He loves to bite us and bark at 1 and 4am.  We don't have kids, but I'm thinking that it's actually easier having kids than a puppy - babies aren't born with teeth and can't jump and bite!!
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #27 on: February 05, 2018, 07:03 PM »
I have to admit that I am a sucker for puppy pictures.  Congrats!  What a cutie.

When you think about pups versus kids I offer the following when people ask why have adopted numerous versus having human kids:

1.  Love is unconditional

2.  If they mis-behave you can put them in a cage (crate) without penalty.

3.  No college financial planning is involved.

4.  They don't talk or text on a cell phone.

...

Peter

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #28 on: February 05, 2018, 07:47 PM »
Congrats!!  He’s super cute!  He will settle in in a few weeks, don’t worry.
-Raj

Offline greg mann

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2018, 12:34 AM »
When I met my wife she had a male greyhound. He succumbed to osteosarcoma a number of years ago and we have since rescued four more. We lost a second male to the same illness and had a third contract it about a month ago. He was failing quickly a week ago and my wife had made an appointment for him only to have him rally, and he has been holding his own. Sadly, one of our females, Gina, started limping only 3 days ago and virtually collapsed this morning, we had to put her down today and will soon lose our Moe, who is on borrowed time but comfortable for now. We still have another female, Noelle, and our wonderful German Shepard, Rommel, who is now almost 14 and still going to work with me every day.

The greyhounds are wonderful dogs, gentle and laid back, real couch potatoes. They are susceptible to sarcomas but all of ours were quite senior when their time has come. It is a shame their life spans aren’t a bit closer to our own but we can’t avoid giving our hearts over to them.

Like us humans they are all different, in breed and individually. I believe our GS is probably the smartest creature in the house, us humans included, and as gentle and affectionate as any dog I have ever known. He was three when our son rescued him. As an active duty Marine living off base he and Rommel would run five or six miles every day. Matt would joke that they could train anywhere in Long Beach or nearby without ever a care, day or night, although Matt was imposing enough that he really didn’t need a dog to be safe. Life brought changes for Matt, another tour in Iraq, and we wound up with Rommel nine years ago and he adjusted to yet another home. He follows along wherever I go and always keeps tabs on exactly where I am. The reality is I never spent a minute training him to do anything. He just figured out what I wanted from him.

Losing the greys as we have and knowing we will lose another any day now has been tough. I just hope Rommel can continue to beat the odds as long as possible.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #30 on: February 06, 2018, 12:41 AM »
Greg, thanks for sharing that.

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #31 on: February 06, 2018, 11:36 AM »
My (our) most recent dog ws the Golden Rescued mentioned in a previous post. within a couple of weeks of bringing her into our family, I noticed that she ws walking a little oddly. We took her to our vet and he confirmed my suspicion that she had hip dispaysia.  He said it was severe enough that he wanted to bring in a specialist the look at her.  The specialist wanted to break her pip in three places and put her back together. I said "NO WAY".

 read up on her problem and discovered that some times the hip will heal with scar tissue buildup in the joint if the young puppy gets plenty of exercise.  We live in a small neighborhood where many dogs runn free in their yards.  I just let Maggie go where she pleased.  By that time, she was trained to come when called (I thought).  When i called her on the second day of her freedom, she did not come.  i searched the neighborhood and soon discovered her running and playing with two other pups about the same age and size.  i realized, after watching a few minutes, that thepuppieswere chasing each other, but not the same two chasing only one.  They were switching off who was chasing who.  I let them play for little while and finally called Maggie.  she paid no attention.  after calling a few times, I decided to go catch her.  As I started across the lawn, she stopped but still did not come.

I walked up to her, and cuffed her very lightly on her front shoulder.  She did not cower as she had done that first night.  She just walked along beside me, head high/tail high as if to tell the world "this is MY man". From then on, she nearly always came when called. I even took her on jobs with me and we developed a pattern where-by she would be familiarized with the boundaries of the property. Once established, I could let her run free all day and she would never go out of bounds. 
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #32 on: February 06, 2018, 12:23 PM »
I have to admit that I am a sucker for puppy pictures.  Congrats!  What a cutie.

When you think about pups versus kids I offer the following when people ask why have adopted numerous versus having human kids:

1.  Love is unconditional

2.  If they mis-behave you can put them in a cage (crate) without penalty.

3.  No college financial planning is involved.

4.  They don't talk or text on a cell phone.

...

Peter

Good points.

Congrats!!  He’s super cute!  He will settle in in a few weeks, don’t worry.

I sure hope he settles down!  We've only had him 3 weeks and I think my wife is sick of him.  6 months until hopefully fully potty training is a long time to go!  At least he slept through most of the night last night without waking up barking.

He is a real cutie, that's the main reason why we picked him.  In hindsight, maybe we should have picked his quieter brother (who we origially wanted to begin with).  We picked Parker because he was super friendly when we first met him.

Losing the greys as we have and knowing we will lose another any day now has been tough. I just hope Rommel can continue to beat the odds as long as possible.

Sorry to hear about your greyhounds.

My (our) most recent dog ws the Golden Rescued mentioned in a previous post. within a couple of weeks of bringing her into our family, I noticed that she ws walking a little oddly. We took her to our vet and he confirmed my suspicion that she had hip dispaysia.  He said it was severe enough that he wanted to bring in a specialist the look at her.  The specialist wanted to break her pip in three places and put her back together. I said "NO WAY".

 read up on her problem and discovered that some times the hip will heal with scar tissue buildup in the joint if the young puppy gets plenty of exercise.  We live in a small neighborhood where many dogs runn free in their yards.  I just let Maggie go where she pleased.  By that time, she was trained to come when called (I thought).  When i called her on the second day of her freedom, she did not come.  i searched the neighborhood and soon discovered her running and playing with two other pups about the same age and size.  i realized, after watching a few minutes, that thepuppieswere chasing each other, but not the same two chasing only one.  They were switching off who was chasing who.  I let them play for little while and finally called Maggie.  she paid no attention.  after calling a few times, I decided to go catch her.  As I started across the lawn, she stopped but still did not come.

I walked up to her, and cuffed her very lightly on her front shoulder.  She did not cower as she had done that first night.  She just walked along beside me, head high/tail high as if to tell the world "this is MY man". From then on, she nearly always came when called. I even took her on jobs with me and we developed a pattern where-by she would be familiarized with the boundaries of the property. Once established, I could let her run free all day and she would never go out of bounds. 
Tinker


Great story.  Thanks for sharing.
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #33 on: February 06, 2018, 01:13 PM »
We don't have kids, but I'm thinking that it's actually easier having kids than a puppy - babies aren't born with teeth and can't jump and bite!!

Then again, you don't have to worry about your dogs drinking and driving or enjoying recreational chemicals, or knocking up (or getting knocked up by) a classmate.   [scared]   I vote for dogs any day.  Dogs grow up quicker.  Dogs are more loyal.  Dogs don't try to drive their trikes down the stairs to the basement.   [big grin]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #34 on: February 06, 2018, 03:02 PM »
@GoingMyWay

Congrats on the new puppy.  I'm going to give you a hint on getting the young pup to stop biting.  Next time he bites or nips at you, bite his ear just until he makes a whimpering noise.  Generally you and your wife will only have to do this once each.  This trick was told to me by a vet when I was breeding German Shorthair Pointers.  Basically a young puppy gets disciplined by its mother by biting, and young dogs tend to think of humans as mom for about 1 year.  I have never had a dog try to bite me after doing this. 
Bryan

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Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #35 on: February 06, 2018, 04:26 PM »
Then again, you don't have to worry about your dogs drinking and driving or enjoying recreational chemicals, or knocking up (or getting knocked up by) a classmate. 

Well, to be fair, it's not socially acceptable to have your kids "fixed".   [wink]  As to the drinking and recreational chemicals...my dog is worse than a curious toddler or teenager.  He will eat or swallow anything (except medicine)...completely senseless. 
-Raj

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #36 on: February 06, 2018, 05:57 PM »
We don't have kids, but I'm thinking that it's actually easier having kids than a puppy - babies aren't born with teeth and can't jump and bite!!

Then again, you don't have to worry about your dogs drinking and driving or enjoying recreational chemicals, or knocking up (or getting knocked up by) a classmate.   [scared]   I vote for dogs any day.  Dogs grow up quicker.  Dogs are more loyal.  Dogs don't try to drive their trikes down the stairs to the basement.   [big grin]

Then again, you don't have to worry about your dogs drinking and driving or enjoying recreational chemicals, or knocking up (or getting knocked up by) a classmate. 

Well, to be fair, it's not socially acceptable to have your kids "fixed".   [wink]  As to the drinking and recreational chemicals...my dog is worse than a curious toddler or teenager.  He will eat or swallow anything (except medicine)...completely senseless. 

Maybe babies are only "easier" in the short term, but not the long run.  We'd like to have kids too.

@GoingMyWay

Congrats on the new puppy.  I'm going to give you a hint on getting the young pup to stop biting.  Next time he bites or nips at you, bite his ear just until he makes a whimpering noise.  Generally you and your wife will only have to do this once each.  This trick was told to me by a vet when I was breeding German Shorthair Pointers.  Basically a young puppy gets disciplined by its mother by biting, and young dogs tend to think of humans as mom for about 1 year.  I have never had a dog try to bite me after doing this. 

I recently discovered the dog trainer Zak George.  He's apparently the most popular dog trainer on YouTube.  I also bought his book.  I think he's really great.  He's only about positive reinforcement, nothing negative so I have been trying to avoid inflicting any type of negative reinforcement and definitely no physical correction.  We're enrolled in a training class at PetSmart and the trainer told us to shout/yell "AH AAAAAH, NO" when the dog does something we don't want him to do.  The whole "positive only training" sure sounds good on paper, but I now realize (the vet also suggested) that sometimes you have to mix it up a little.  Try different approaches from different trainers.  We don't have to only listen to Zak George or only Caesar Milan or whoever.  We've since adopted the "AH AAAAH, NO!" technique since the whole redirection thing - "chew this, not that" doesn't really seem to work.  This too is having limited results.  I already tried the "ouch" and yelping when he bites me.  When I yelp he usually stops and lets go, but then goes right back to biting me.  This morning he was really excited and he bit me quite hard.  We may need to try the bite his ear trick.
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Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #37 on: February 06, 2018, 10:12 PM »
It does work.  A guy I used to work with got 2 dogs, they both bit him and his wife, told him this, he did it and never bit him again.  His wife wasn't thrilled with the method, so she decided not to try it.  A month later after being bit almost daily she did it, dogs never bit her again.  Good luck with the training, finding the method that works is almost as hard as the training at times.
Bryan

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Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #38 on: February 07, 2018, 04:48 AM »
Another trick in training a puppy:  We raised a couple of Guiding Eye puppies.  One actually graduated to leading a blind man.  The second was decided to be kept for a brood mother. We whelped two litters with her. That is another long story. During training, we had to go to classes every week. I think two classes per week. We had to subject our trainees to all sorts of problems they might be faced with in the real world. One problem we found difficult to set up in class was chasing cars. Our instructor suggested that as we walked our dogs at home, or wherever, the puppy,if so inclined, would try chasing cars while on their leash. If voce command did not work, do not punish by slapping. Do not actually give the command to stop chasing a car as it whizzes past.  Just give the leash a little soak whn you know the problem is going to happen. As the puppy gets full steam to go after the car, yank on the leash and continue walking s if nothing has happened. Don't even say anything. ddon't admonish and don't praise. Every time the puppy goes after the car, do the same thing. Some dogs, it only takes one time.  Others, it might take three or four times, but they will quit very soon. Our first trainee took only a couple of sestions to break her. Our second trainee was easily trained with just he very first, and firm "NO".  Maggie was trained with the very first yanking incident.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #39 on: February 07, 2018, 10:13 AM »
Be patient, he's just a puppy, they play with their mouths, so what we perceive as biting is usually just play.  What they need to learn is not to apply pressure and it may take some time for him to understand how hard is too hard.  He's also got sharp pointy teeth, so it's not entirely his fault that even the slightest pressure is a bit too much.  A loud "OUCH" serves to startle and get his attention, then stop the play and attention for a minute. 

As they get older (4-6 months), if you don't want them being mouthy, the same technique works, just stop the play and tell them no.  But the play/attention stops for longer intervals (15 mins) as they get older.  They will learn what not to do.  Don't underestimate the reward value of play and attention.

-Raj

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #40 on: February 07, 2018, 10:44 AM »
It does work.  A guy I used to work with got 2 dogs, they both bit him and his wife, told him this, he did it and never bit him again.  His wife wasn't thrilled with the method, so she decided not to try it.  A month later after being bit almost daily she did it, dogs never bit her again.  Good luck with the training, finding the method that works is almost as hard as the training at times.

I kinda started to try the technique last night, but I didn't bite down hard or long enough for him to yelp.

Another trick in training a puppy:  We raised a couple of Guiding Eye puppies.  One actually graduated to leading a blind man.  The second was decided to be kept for a brood mother. We whelped two litters with her. That is another long story. During training, we had to go to classes every week. I think two classes per week. We had to subject our trainees to all sorts of problems they might be faced with in the real world. One problem we found difficult to set up in class was chasing cars. Our instructor suggested that as we walked our dogs at home, or wherever, the puppy,if so inclined, would try chasing cars while on their leash. If voce command did not work, do not punish by slapping. Do not actually give the command to stop chasing a car as it whizzes past.  Just give the leash a little soak whn you know the problem is going to happen. As the puppy gets full steam to go after the car, yank on the leash and continue walking s if nothing has happened. Don't even say anything. ddon't admonish and don't praise. Every time the puppy goes after the car, do the same thing. Some dogs, it only takes one time.  Others, it might take three or four times, but they will quit very soon. Our first trainee took only a couple of sestions to break her. Our second trainee was easily trained with just he very first, and firm "NO".  Maggie was trained with the very first yanking incident.
Tinker

Thanks for that suggestion.  Right now he's scared of cars and other loud noises.  For some reason he doesn't even like going out into the garage even with no cars in it.  I was working on luring him out into the garage with treats last week so he wouldn't be afraid of the garage.  I guess right after he overcomes his fear of cars he'll start wanting to chase them.

Be patient, he's just a puppy, they play with their mouths, so what we perceive as biting is usually just play.  What they need to learn is not to apply pressure and it may take some time for him to understand how hard is too hard.  He's also got sharp pointy teeth, so it's not entirely his fault that even the slightest pressure is a bit too much.  A loud "OUCH" serves to startle and get his attention, then stop the play and attention for a minute. 

As they get older (4-6 months), if you don't want them being mouthy, the same technique works, just stop the play and tell them no.  But the play/attention stops for longer intervals (15 mins) as they get older.  They will learn what not to do.  Don't underestimate the reward value of play and attention.

I suppose patience is key.  We've only had him 3 weeks.  Since he's a mix of 2 pretty intelligent breeds I suppose my expectations are a little bit high.  He does seem to know:

  • Look
  • Sit
  • Sit + Wait (albeit a very very brief duration and I don't walk very far away)
  • Down
  • Shake (I think I'm most happiest that he knows shake since none of our previous dogs knew that for some reason)

pretty well at home anyway.  At home is the easy part though.  Last week in training he didn't want to listen to or do anything.  I have been getting kind of conflicting stories about whether the biting is good or not.  I have read about the importance of teaching bite inhibition when they're young.  I have been letting him very gently "mouth" my hand with his teeth.  Sometimes it's very soft so I don't mind.  It seems that when he gets excited that he bites much harder.  Others say the dog should never have to actually bite you to teach bite inhibition.
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Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #41 on: February 07, 2018, 01:12 PM »
One thing you need to do in training a puppy, especially if it is a very strong willed puppy, is be consistant with your commands.  verybody in the house should use the same commands.  If there is no consistency, the dog will be inconsistent in his reactions.

About the biting, some of the biting is the same as a child cutting teeth.

We have always supplied our puppies with chew toys. Some puppies are gentle and a toy will last a long time.  Others are very aggressive and a toy might last no more than a day or so. Wetry to observe and the supply to match the personality.

Our first puppy (a gift from a friend who's business was raising English Setters)was always very playful and loved to chew. The thing was, she mostly chewed on ME.  I always played with her every evening.  Almost all of my sweat shirts were tattered from the elbows down from her rambunctious play and biting. But she never bit my hand. My wife would play with the same puppy, and never had her sleeves torn. Not a thread. Our children, who actually came along after we acquired the puppy, could play with her for hours and she would be ever so gentle,no matter how rough the kids got.  We had to teach our children how to be gentle with the puppy, not the other way around.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #42 on: February 07, 2018, 01:30 PM »
Yup the consistency is also hard to maintain.  That's one of the reasons why we started off by using the clicker to praise the dog.  We haven't used that as much lately since even though we have 4 clickers, it's not always on or near us.

We have lots of chew toys of varying consistencies and textures.  Rope toys, antlers, teething nylabones, kongs, animal toys, etc.  I noticed yesterday that some of this molars are coming in the back.  Parker also discovered the fun he can have chewing on an empty plastic water bottle.  I was amazed that he was able to unscrew the cap - not once but twice.  I will say that he doesn't bite his toys very aggressively.  All of his chew toys are still whole (he did manage to break one squeaker, but they're not very robust to begin with).  I've known other dogs that absolutely destroy anything you give them - like stuffing ripped out all over the place.

I guess the dog can mostly tell who he can "boss" around and who he can't.  He likes to hump both my wife and I's legs.  I know Zak George is very much against the dominance, alpha, pack leader mentality, but both the PetSmart trainer and the vet said it sounds like he's trying to dominate us.  It seems like he might in fact trying to dominate us.
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #43 on: February 07, 2018, 04:39 PM »
Depending on where you live in NoVa, Dulles Gateway Obedience Training Club might be a good option for you.  As for the dominance thing, give him "the buzzer" when he tries humping.  It's worked on my dogs for that and other undesirable behaviors. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #44 on: February 07, 2018, 05:17 PM »
I live just outside of the Fairfax City limits.  Do you have to become a member of the Dulles Gateway Training Club in order to get training?  Loudoun County is a little bit far, although my wife's family lives out in Leesburg.

What is "the buzzer?"

On a side note, do people have opinions on pet health insurance?  I heard that Consumer Reports did not recommend it.  I think I can get a discount on pet insurance through my employer, but I'm not sure if it's a good deal or not.  This seems like one of those situations when you need a crystal ball to know what's going to happen in the future.

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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #45 on: February 07, 2018, 06:24 PM »

On a side note, do people have opinions on pet health insurance?  I heard that Consumer Reports did not recommend it.  I think I can get a discount on pet insurance through my employer, but I'm not sure if it's a good deal or not.  This seems like one of those situations when you need a crystal ball to know what's going to happen in the future.

If you can afford it without reservation then get pet insurance.  Otherwise don't do it.  I have never bought it.

Now to a story:  Many years ago my vet - now retired - asked me if I was interested in buying pet insurance.  I looked at him squarely in the eyes and said "not until I have insurance."

Years later he would recount that as being one of his favorite reactions.

I loved Gene Moon as a vet.  He was old school and would do surgery versus sending you to a specialist.  He removed a fatty tumor from Zorro that was as large as three grapefruits and also a tumor from Shadow that was about 9 lbs and the size of a gallon milk jug.  His tumor was bigger than mine and he only stood knee high.  Doctor Gene was so concerned about his recovery that he came in over the weekend and sat with him in his kennel.  Later I saw him give a kiss on the forehead and a whisper in his ear.

He also prevented me from putting Mr. Moose down 18 months before his time.  I was sorry to hear he retired.

Shadow "gave" Dr. Moon a Christmas present after his surgery.  It was a Clothtique casting of Santa as a vet holding a black puppy.  I heard later that it was the first gift in 40 years as a vet from a patient and that he placed it on his piano at Christmas.

Go find a good vet.

Peter

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #46 on: February 07, 2018, 06:31 PM »
I live just outside of the Fairfax City limits.  Do you have to become a member of the Dulles Gateway Training Club in order to get training?  Loudoun County is a little bit far, although my wife's family lives out in Leesburg.

What is "the buzzer?"

On a side note, do people have opinions on pet health insurance?  I heard that Consumer Reports did not recommend it.  I think I can get a discount on pet insurance through my employer, but I'm not sure if it's a good deal or not.  This seems like one of those situations when you need a crystal ball to know what's going to happen in the future.


Years ago they offered classes at Frying Pan Park through Fairfax County.  That is no longer the case, although I think classes are available through Fairfax County Parks.  DGOTC was well-managed and had some good instructors.  I took one dog through the Fairfax County class, and was very disappointed.  The instructor was more into running her mouth and not so much into guiding group and individual exercises. 

The buzzer is a loud vocalization that sounds like a buzzer.  If you can't imagine that, PM me your phone number and I'll call you with a demo.   [big grin]   

I wish I'd had health insurance for one of my dogs that contracted hemangiosarcoma.  His illness was very costly. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #47 on: February 07, 2018, 11:45 PM »

Go find a good vet.


Amen...that’s probably even more important than finding yourself a good doctor. You’ll probably survive to the next day...your pet, not so much.

I’m serious...

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #48 on: February 07, 2018, 11:55 PM »
Our 2 most recent family members. Jackson and his 15 month old daughter Kylee. Which one’s which?
« Last Edit: February 08, 2018, 09:16 AM by Cheese »

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #49 on: February 08, 2018, 12:04 AM »
Fortunately or not, there are specialists for your dog that will treat just about anything and meds are available to manage chronic conditions.  How far you go is limited by your wallet and the quality of life you expect to maintain for your pet.  Once upon a time, that wasn’t the case and you put them down. 

So as much as I hate purchasing insurance, next time we probably will.  This time we did not.  It’s cost us dearly since he was 18 months old.  He’s made it to seven (which is nearly a miracle) and still running the tab.  As long as he can still live a good life we can’t put him down.
-Raj

Offline deepcreek

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #50 on: February 08, 2018, 05:11 AM »
I'm sure the quality varies store by store but I would recommend taking some training classes at Petsmart.

I have trained dogs before but it helped refresh me on commands and I learned a few new things.

The biggest benefit was that my puppy learned to be comfortable around other dogs AND other people of both genders and all races.

This is more important than you might think in avoiding inadvertently raising a "prejudiced" dog.
Joe Adams
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Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #51 on: February 08, 2018, 09:49 AM »

On a side note, do people have opinions on pet health insurance?  I heard that Consumer Reports did not recommend it.  I think I can get a discount on pet insurance through my employer, but I'm not sure if it's a good deal or not.  This seems like one of those situations when you need a crystal ball to know what's going to happen in the future.

If you can afford it without reservation then get pet insurance.  Otherwise don't do it.  I have never bought it.

Now to a story:  Many years ago my vet - now retired - asked me if I was interested in buying pet insurance.  I looked at him squarely in the eyes and said "not until I have insurance."

Years later he would recount that as being one of his favorite reactions.

I loved Gene Moon as a vet.  He was old school and would do surgery versus sending you to a specialist.  He removed a fatty tumor from Zorro that was as large as three grapefruits and also a tumor from Shadow that was about 9 lbs and the size of a gallon milk jug.  His tumor was bigger than mine and he only stood knee high.  Doctor Gene was so concerned about his recovery that he came in over the weekend and sat with him in his kennel.  Later I saw him give a kiss on the forehead and a whisper in his ear.

He also prevented me from putting Mr. Moose down 18 months before his time.  I was sorry to hear he retired.

Shadow "gave" Dr. Moon a Christmas present after his surgery.  It was a Clothtique casting of Santa as a vet holding a black puppy.  I heard later that it was the first gift in 40 years as a vet from a patient and that he placed it on his piano at Christmas.

Go find a good vet.

Peter

I guess I should check and see how much the insurance would actually cost.  I have no idea what it goes for.  Dr. Moon sounds like a great vet.
I live just outside of the Fairfax City limits.  Do you have to become a member of the Dulles Gateway Training Club in order to get training?  Loudoun County is a little bit far, although my wife's family lives out in Leesburg.

What is "the buzzer?"

On a side note, do people have opinions on pet health insurance?  I heard that Consumer Reports did not recommend it.  I think I can get a discount on pet insurance through my employer, but I'm not sure if it's a good deal or not.  This seems like one of those situations when you need a crystal ball to know what's going to happen in the future.


Years ago they offered classes at Frying Pan Park through Fairfax County.  That is no longer the case, although I think classes are available through Fairfax County Parks.  DGOTC was well-managed and had some good instructors.  I took one dog through the Fairfax County class, and was very disappointed.  The instructor was more into running her mouth and not so much into guiding group and individual exercises. 

The buzzer is a loud vocalization that sounds like a buzzer.  If you can't imagine that, PM me your phone number and I'll call you with a demo.   [big grin]   

I wish I'd had health insurance for one of my dogs that contracted hemangiosarcoma.  His illness was very costly. 

I wouldn't have liked an instructor that loved the sound of her own voice that much.  I can't stand people like that.

I think i get the idea of what it sounds like  ;).

Insurance seems best for serious illnesses.  I wonder though, would the hemangiosarcoma been covered?  I haven't done much research into pet insurance, but I seem to recall one of the main complaints being that a lot of stuff wasn't covered.


Go find a good vet.


Amen...that’s probably even more important than finding yourself a good doctor. You’ll probably survive to the next day...your pet, not so much.

I’m serious...

We picked Town and Country Animal Hospital, which is super convenient as it is just down the street from where we live.  They also have a sister 24/7 location for emergencies.

Our 2 most recent family members. Jackson and his 15 month old daughter Kylee. Which one’s which?

The older dog must be on the right with the lighter colored nose.  They do almost look like twins.

Fortunately or not, there are specialists for your dog that will treat just about anything and meds are available to manage chronic conditions.  How far you go is limited by your wallet and the quality of life you expect to maintain for your pet.  Once upon a time, that wasn’t the case and you put them down. 

So as much as I hate purchasing insurance, next time we probably will.  This time we did not.  It’s cost us dearly since he was 18 months old.  He’s made it to seven (which is nearly a miracle) and still running the tab.  As long as he can still live a good life we can’t put him down.

It is rather amazing to me that there is even such a thing as a pet specialist.  I don't know that we'd want to spend thousands and thousands of dollars trying to treat something.  I know my wife thought her friend was crazy when she said her dog needed some kind of treatment that cost I think maybe $3 or 5k.  My wife's opinion will likely change when it's our own dog though.

I'm sure the quality varies store by store but I would recommend taking some training classes at Petsmart.

I have trained dogs before but it helped refresh me on commands and I learned a few new things.

The biggest benefit was that my puppy learned to be comfortable around other dogs AND other people of both genders and all races.

This is more important than you might think in avoiding inadvertently raising a "prejudiced" dog.

Right, it really ultimately depends on the trainer.  We're currently enrolled at PetSmart and I guess our trainer is okay.  At first I didn't care much for her, but I've warmed up to her.  It seems like I had already been training Parker on all the stuff that she showed us.  It seems super easy to learn how to do just about anything nowadays with the internet and especially YouTube.  I agree that the biggest benefit from the class is the interaction and socialization with other dogs.  Parker wasn't even scared of the border collie in the class or the HUGE anatolian shepherd that showed up last week.  That is a big dog!!  The other good thing about having a real life trainer is that she was able to correct me when I mixing up what tone of voice I should be using.  I was using the higher pitched excited voice when I was supposed to be using the commanding voice when I was telling the dog to look or sit.  I guess it is more a matter of training the owner and not the dog.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #52 on: February 08, 2018, 10:02 AM »

The older dog must be on the right with the lighter colored nose.  They do almost look like twins.


You're right, Jackson has winter nose, the vet said it'll go away come this spring/summer.

You're smart to have chosen a vet that has ties to 24/7 service.  [thumbs up] 

Our vet will actually make house calls if the situation arises.  [smile]

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #53 on: February 08, 2018, 01:01 PM »
You're right, it's all about training the owners!  Dogs pick up relatively quickly, but humans take a little time.  Dogs also pick up on the the tone of your voice, your body language and visual cues as you found out.  Humans are very verbal which take a little more time for dogs.  Initially it can be a little difficult for us to communicate, but eventually both human and dog find a way to bridge the gap.

On the costs for medical treatment, sometimes it doesn't come all in one blow.  Think about healthcare from your perspective.  Something is wrong, you go to the doc, that refers you to a specialist, who runs some tests.  Maybe they know what to do, maybe they don't and want to try some things.  Maybe they determine it can be managed with medications, diet, and regular check ins.  So you get over that hurdle (eventually), time passes and there is a new development a year down the road.  Could be related, could be a reaction to the medication, could be something completely new.  Back to the doctor, rinse and repeat.  It's complicated, and even if you remove emotions from the equation, there is so much more you can't control. 

I say all this after going into this thinking anthing over $5K is rediculous for a "pet".  It's probably unlikely to happen and if it did, that bill would make the decision easy.  So I passed on the insurance knowing full well that absorbing up to a $5K bill was okay, but beyond that is excessive.  The joke was on me because it did get complicated.  We slowly paid out for each test and doctor's visit, then found a solution we thought would allow him to live a good life.  As time went on, we discovered more than one issue, found ways to manage them, decided it wasn't too much of a financial strain, and again, decided his quality of life was still good.  That rollercoaster has gone on for some time, some months better than others.  His lifetime tab is many multiples of that simple limit I foolishly thought was the answer to any dilemma that we should face.  I also underestimated my principles.  It turns out, I can put a dog down if he's suffering too much.  But if he can be a happy puppy 95% of the time, I can't do it.  I've tried to convince myself that money could help a lot of other animals, but instead it benefits just one.  Doesn't make a difference.  Any my wife, her principles are even stronger as is her attachment.  When the day comes, I don't know how she will come to terms with a "decision".

Sorry, don't mean to be long-winded.  Sometimes things aren't as simple as we perceive.  Go in with your eyes open, it's not exactly the same as considering whether you're getting an extended warranty on your TV.
-Raj

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #54 on: February 08, 2018, 02:20 PM »
@RKA, You are describing our daughter's problem with her last puppy to the letter.  She had a huge Yellow Lab that as she would point out, "He was my million..., oops! make that two million dollar baby." Every time she visited us, she was describing another expensive problem. That went on for maybe three years.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #55 on: February 08, 2018, 03:34 PM »

The older dog must be on the right with the lighter colored nose.  They do almost look like twins.


You're right, Jackson has winter nose, the vet said it'll go away come this spring/summer.

You're smart to have chosen a vet that has ties to 24/7 service.  [thumbs up] 

Our vet will actually make house calls if the situation arises.  [smile]

Oh it's a winter nose - I assumed the nose got lighter because of age.

I didn't actually consciously make the decision because they have a 24/7 location.  More like just a coincidence.

Wow a house call would be nice.  There's a mobile vet around here who covers the DC Metro area.  He came to my mom's house to put her dog to sleep.  He also does regular veterinary services too.

You're right, it's all about training the owners!  Dogs pick up relatively quickly, but humans take a little time.  Dogs also pick up on the the tone of your voice, your body language and visual cues as you found out.  Humans are very verbal which take a little more time for dogs.  Initially it can be a little difficult for us to communicate, but eventually both human and dog find a way to bridge the gap.

On the costs for medical treatment, sometimes it doesn't come all in one blow.  Think about healthcare from your perspective.  Something is wrong, you go to the doc, that refers you to a specialist, who runs some tests.  Maybe they know what to do, maybe they don't and want to try some things.  Maybe they determine it can be managed with medications, diet, and regular check ins.  So you get over that hurdle (eventually), time passes and there is a new development a year down the road.  Could be related, could be a reaction to the medication, could be something completely new.  Back to the doctor, rinse and repeat.  It's complicated, and even if you remove emotions from the equation, there is so much more you can't control. 

I say all this after going into this thinking anthing over $5K is rediculous for a "pet".  It's probably unlikely to happen and if it did, that bill would make the decision easy.  So I passed on the insurance knowing full well that absorbing up to a $5K bill was okay, but beyond that is excessive.  The joke was on me because it did get complicated.  We slowly paid out for each test and doctor's visit, then found a solution we thought would allow him to live a good life.  As time went on, we discovered more than one issue, found ways to manage them, decided it wasn't too much of a financial strain, and again, decided his quality of life was still good.  That rollercoaster has gone on for some time, some months better than others.  His lifetime tab is many multiples of that simple limit I foolishly thought was the answer to any dilemma that we should face.  I also underestimated my principles.  It turns out, I can put a dog down if he's suffering too much.  But if he can be a happy puppy 95% of the time, I can't do it.  I've tried to convince myself that money could help a lot of other animals, but instead it benefits just one.  Doesn't make a difference.  Any my wife, her principles are even stronger as is her attachment.  When the day comes, I don't know how she will come to terms with a "decision".

Sorry, don't mean to be long-winded.  Sometimes things aren't as simple as we perceive.  Go in with your eyes open, it's not exactly the same as considering whether you're getting an extended warranty on your TV.

Thanks for that thoughtful post.
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #56 on: February 08, 2018, 03:41 PM »
You're right, it's all about training the owners!  Dogs pick up relatively quickly, but humans take a little time.  Dogs also pick up on the the tone of your voice, your body language and visual cues as you found out.  Humans are very verbal which take a little more time for dogs.  Initially it can be a little difficult for us to communicate, but eventually both human and dog find a way to bridge the gap.

Right on the button!!!  Dogs are smart, but sometimes it's difficult for them to overcome humans' lack of comprehension. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #57 on: February 08, 2018, 04:22 PM »
Parker seems pretty smart already.   He's already figured out that he doesn't need to chase me all the way around the kitchen island.  He'll just stop and turn around and then I'll run right into him.  He's also figured out that he can bring his chew toy over to the steps and chew there.  I think he's chewing on the steps and about to yell at him only to see he's chewing on his toy.  I turn around for another minute to find he's now actually chewing on the steps!
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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #58 on: February 09, 2018, 04:48 PM »
I finally tried biting his ear until he yelped when he was biting me.  Unfortunately, it didn't work.  He's still biting me.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #59 on: February 09, 2018, 05:43 PM »
Most of my last dogs have been retrievers known for their "soft" mouths.  I have used two techniques on mine for biting.  I have taken my thumb inside their mouths and placed it against the roof of their mouths and rest of my hand on top of their muzzle and applied pressure.  All the while saying "no" while looking them in their eyes.

I have also - and I don't recommend this for the squeamish - stuck their entire muzzle in my mouth, clamped down, looked them in their eyes and growled softly but deeply.

My dogs are more human now than I am dog.

To each their own.

Peter

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #60 on: February 09, 2018, 05:56 PM »
I have heard that retrievers have "soft" mouths.  I wondered if that was automatic or if they had to be taught that.

I've tried using my finger to both push down under and over his tongue while gripping his lower jaw.  He'll stop biting when I do that, but then he'll go back to biting me.  I haven't tried with the roof of his mouth and top of his muzzle.

I kinda started with the whole muzzle in my mouth technique.  He seems to get scared when I do that or just when I bear my teeth and growl in general.  But neither are a permanent solution.  I think - "Ah I fixed him!" only to have him start biting me shortly there after.  I was actually afraid to bear my teeth and/or growl as I thought that might make him more aggressive or give him some other behavioral issue like him not liking me.
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #61 on: February 09, 2018, 06:59 PM »
I guess I might not be as weird as I thought.  The roof of the mouth is hard but surprisingly sensitive.  As anyone who has novacaine injected by the dentist there.

He will get it.  Repeat as necessary.  Firm.  He will shown discomfort and squirm.  Wait for yelp.  The idea is not to hurt but to be firm and show control.  He has to learn thru repetition.  He is still a baby after all.

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Just my 2 cents.

Peter


Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #62 on: February 09, 2018, 07:07 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

Offline Bohdan

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #63 on: February 09, 2018, 07:20 PM »

I have also - and I don't recommend this for the squeamish - stuck their entire muzzle in my mouth, clamped down, looked them in their eyes and growled softly but deeply.

Peter

I had a German Shepard pup that bit me with those razor sharp teeth. I grabbed him, held him so that he couldn't escape and while growling, slowly bit him on the nose. After that, any time that his teeth accidentally touched me, his tail would disappear and he would drop to the ground.

You have to teach them who's the boss.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #64 on: February 09, 2018, 07:51 PM »
If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.

Ain’t that the case [big grin]

I was just watching our two go at it, mouths opened, low level of growling, you’d think they were going to kill each other but it’s just dad teaching his daughter the rules of the road.

I just have to wipe his daughters head off and remove all of the slobber.  [tongue]

---And ten minutes later they are sleeping snuggled against each other? 

MY wife just remembered that the term we use is "gentle mouth" not soft mouth.  Both of us would chant that will doing the roof of the mouth thing.

I am not a dog trainer by any means.  Most of our dog training has been thru osmosis via a previously trained dog.  Moose trained Zorro.  Zorro trained Shadow, Blazer, and Goldie.  Goldie trained MacGyver.  MacGyver is training Indiana Jones. 

One thing that our dogs have done is really key into eyes and facial expressions.  Mac for example will lie on the dogs bed in the kitchen and constantly scan both of our faces while we are standing at the kitchen island.  i.e "is there something you want me to do?"  Indie will sit and stair at faces.

Recently I read that dogs respond to eyes - particularly left eyes.  I have tried blinking with the left eye while they were studying my face and it seems to be true.

Also I read that hugging your dog isn't so good.  Dogs lean just like cats brush legs.  Instead of a hug take one arm and press your friend against the side of your leg and hold it there.  It is pretty cool to see them then applying the pressure to your leg.

Just another 1 cent.

Peter 

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #65 on: February 09, 2018, 08:39 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

An exception:
I had a situation with a customer's dog one time.  The owner was an ex army colonel.  His dog was named Major.  I guess the owner did not want to be outranked by his dog. The Major was mean. Whenever I drove into the yard, the dog would jump up onto the hood of my Willys Jeep pickup truck.  It had that flat hood so it was easy for him.  Once on the hood, he continued barking and would attck the windshield, banging his teeth loudly against the glass.  I would wait for the Colonel to put the major into the house before i would get out of the truck. Hey, i was only a PFC!

One day,I had to check driveways for ice while my crews loading the truck with sand. (That was in the days of using loaders with hickory booms to load trucks) The house was high on a hill with three other houses at the bottom of the hill. I parked between the three driveways at the bottom of the hill and started walking up the driveway that was protected by the major.  Before heading up the driveway, i checked to be sure major was not patrolling so early in the morning.  Good.  I started walking until I was half way between the house and my truck.  Suddenly, here comes major in full voice.  i looked at major, looked at my truck. There was no way i could get back to my truck before receiving disciplinary measures from the major.  So, I just stood there until major got within maybe 30 feet from me.  At that point, i dropped to my hands and knees, started yipping and sticking out my tougue like I wanted to lick him and play. He came straight at me and just started licking my face.  By the time the Colonel showed up, the major was actually playing with the non-com.  From that point on, the two of us got along fine with no further hostilities. Of course, when i told my crew what had happened, there were a few suggestions that the PFC should be escorted to the mental ward.
Tinker
 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #66 on: February 10, 2018, 08:52 AM »
Great story Tinker... [big grin]

All of the goldens we've had were huggers. Throw your arms around them and they'll take it for literally hours. Jackson needs to touch you when he lies down. If I sit on the couch lengthwise, he jumps up and buries his head between my leg and the back of the couch, thus insuring a tight fit. After 5 minutes he moves forward some more now generating a press fit. [eek] 

You're right Peter, 10 minutes later they're lying next to one another sleeping or trying to share a toy.

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #67 on: February 10, 2018, 08:53 AM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl... 
« Last Edit: February 10, 2018, 08:58 AM by Sparktrician »
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #68 on: February 10, 2018, 09:01 PM »
You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged. A Jack Russel you probably cannot get close enough to hug. They will most likly be constantly on the move. Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.


You need to know something about the breed who you try to hug or not to hug.  Goldens are dogs you can hug but you don't want to hug a german shepard or a border collie. A lab just doesn't care to stand still to be hugged.
  Not all dogs in  a particular breed show the same characteristics, but you can figure the odds if you understand the background.

HA!  My German Shepherds love to be hugged.  One (no longer with me) used to come to me in the evening, and in his own way asked for snuggle time.  I'd slide down off the couch and he'd curl up along my side and rest his head on my thigh while I stroked him and whispered to him.  He just loved that.  And the Lab that was the love of my life would roll on her back in the middle of the floor.  I'd sit with my legs straddling her head, lean over and give her belly rubs as long as my back would allow, all while gazing into her deep brown eyes.  She would take that as long as I would offer it.  It was a wonderful bonding experience with both of them.  When the Lab was spayed, my ex and I (both Reiki practitioners) went to the vet's place and did a good Reiki session for her while she was still loopy from the sedative.  When I picked her up the next day, she was running around just as if nothing had happened to her.  Any time after that when my ex or I had a Reiki client come over, she would do ANYTHING to lie under the Reiki table while we did our work.  As soon as the session was over, she was up and running like a puppy again.  She loved to get Reiki until she died almost 10 years ago.  Man, do I miss that sweet girl...
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #69 on: May 08, 2018, 09:34 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]


Offline leakyroof

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #70 on: May 08, 2018, 10:15 AM »

If I could ever shoot a video of my two goldens doing their wrestling and pack training episodes it would illustrate aspects of control that they naturally understand.  The posturing, the widely opened mouths, the shark faces, etc.


Here you go @Peter Halle , I took this a few weeks ago. [big grin]

(Attachment Link)
  DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #71 on: May 08, 2018, 10:30 AM »
DENTAL CHECK...all good..... [poke]

That's funny...you forget what they originated from until they open up their mouths, it then becomes obvious. 

And here they are literally 30 seconds later.

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #72 on: May 08, 2018, 12:56 PM »
Wow, great shot Cheese!!! 

My golden tolerates my wife's hugging.  He would much rather be a lap dog if we would let him. 
-Raj

Offline ilovesunshine

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #73 on: July 28, 2018, 08:45 PM »
Hey lovely thread.
Just wanted to post this to the guy with the greyhounds:
https://www.truthinadvertising.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Dogs-Cats-diseases_.pdf

There’s an amazing product called transfer factor. I’m in no way affiliated with them. Our young cat developed a large mass in her mouth, vet prescribed the usual nonsense: biopsy, chemo, etc

My partner and I are big into natural medicine. So we took her to a holistic vet for a 2nd opinion.
We already had this as we take it ourselves when we need it. It basically naturally hugely boosts the immune system which then means the body - human, cat, dog, whatever, has a much better chance to heal itself. Treats the root cause rather than merely the symptoms.

Her lump is completely gone now. In around 3 months. Plus she was nursing 4 kittens at the time so we didn’t want her milk to be polluted with chemo crap. Didn’t believe the vet for a second when she said that wouldn’t be an issue.

He prescribed other things as well. But it all worked together. Pm me if you’d like more info. The exact product we used is this: https://www.4life.com/corp/product/transfer-factor-plus-tri-factor/89

Another cat had an abcess from a nasty bite. Before we adopted him. 4 rounds of 2 different antibiotics did sweet FA. Vet wanted to put him under general anaesthetic- cut his face open - see what was causing it - try to fix it. That’s how I first found it. A lovely lady on a cat forum was highly recommending it and had loads of helpful advice what had worked for her etc. 3 days later after a month of useless antibiotics his swelling went down and he completely cured himself with the help of transfer factor.

Final recommendations : partner had shingles. Took this. Hardly affected him except the nerve tingly pain every now and again. He could work. Write his reports etc. Really hope this helps your dogs. And please consider feeding raw food - most of the “premium” brands are full of crap.

There’s a great docu series “the truth about pet cancer” https://thetruthaboutpetcancer.com

All pet owners should watch it,

You all have beautiful happy looking dogs. So happy to hear they are so loved 🙂🙂


Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #74 on: July 28, 2018, 09:23 PM »
Wow, great shot Cheese!!! 

My golden tolerates my wife's hugging.  He would much rather be a lap dog if we would let him.

Thanks Raj...talking about lap dogs, here’s poor Jackson that’s been up for a solid 8 hours. A full 8 hours is way too tiring for a retriever so at 4:00 pm he decided to go to bed with his pink tennis ball.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2018, 10:23 AM by Cheese »

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #75 on: July 28, 2018, 10:38 PM »
@Cheese
Lol!  Too funny!  Mine has a hangover when he’s been up that long.  Lasts 24 hours. Definitely not cut out to be a working dog!
-Raj

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #76 on: July 28, 2018, 11:39 PM »
@Cheese
Lol!  Too funny!  Mine has a hangover when he’s been up that long.  Lasts 24 hours. Definitely not cut out to be a working dog!

Ya Raj, dogs are funny. They definitely each have their own personality. We've also had a Puli and a miniature Aussie. Talk about junk yard dogs...both of them would work for 48/7 without union benefits or overtime...and they'd double down if a problem arises and refuse to take a vacation. That's understandable being herding dogs. However, as an owner, you were always in the prevention mode...antennae at max extension.

The retrievers we've had on the other hand, have always been so mellow, and living in the city, when you meet up with skateboarders, bicyclists, joggers, busses, other dogs and frenetic people, they just weather the storm. This makes life easier as you get older. They're still great guard dogs because they'll let you know when someone encroaches into their territory, at which time they will lick the intruder to death.  [big grin]
« Last Edit: July 28, 2018, 11:45 PM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #77 on: July 29, 2018, 04:47 PM »
Hey lovely thread.
Just wanted to post this to the guy with the greyhounds:
https://www.truthinadvertising.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Dogs-Cats-diseases_.pdf


@ ilovesunshine: I read the link and was reminded of the experience I had with my dog during highschool years. We had her for about a year and she came down with distemper. She first had diarrhea, then she nearly died. The vet told us she would not survive. Being that I was then a sophomore in high school, I knew it all. I refused to have her euthanized. I stayed home from school for over a week. I slept on the floor beside my  pal. I got up several times in the nite to let her do her business.  She was not able to stand, so i would carry her out side.  During the day, i handled my homework which my brother brought home from school to me. My Mom talked to my teachers who allowed me to stay home with my dog until she would get well.

Before she got sick, we used to play with myflashlite.  i would run the spot all around the floor, walls and ceiling.  She would go wild chasing the spot. One day, she was not interested. The next day she  was not interested in anything else either. Thru her sickness, she was not even opening her eyes. One day (evening), as I shined the lite around the room, she followed  it with her eyes.  She still wasn't moving, but her eyes told me she would get well. The next morning, I woke our vet up early, just to let him know to put away his needle. He was gruff old bird, but he laughed with me. Within a week, she was chasing that lite.  Not for long, but she was interested.

About three years later, i came home from work and Mom and my brother were tring to tie a cravat around my dogs muzzle. She had been run over by a truck and she tried to bite both of my family when they tried to move her to the car. I took the cloth off of her, picked her up very carefully so as not to break anything more. As I moved her, she licked my hand. My mom and brother could not believe that as she had been so very defensive when they tried to move her.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #78 on: July 29, 2018, 05:07 PM »
@ Cheese: That series of Goldeen pics are GOLDEN. I especially like the one where they are opening up the mouths so wide for dental inspection. At least some responder suggested such. And then they are resting with the toy in the two mouths. those picsshow true love

We have had three goldens; not all at the same time, but we loved them all. I have had two customers thru the years who had mean Goldens. One had to get rid of their dog.  Another, whose Golden was mean, worked with the dog.  He had been a rescue pup. The dog eventually straightened out and was actually friendly. Our third Golden was a rescue puppy and was very frightened when we brought her home the first day.  I worked with her all evening and by 9 or 10 o'clock, she was no longer cowering away from any in the family. She was, by then, MY dog. 

I have many stories about my dogs. I am trying to set up (edit) many of my stories to put into a book.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #79 on: July 29, 2018, 05:26 PM »
Thanks @Tinker

I like the book idea...[thumbs up]  And a great dog story for @ilovesunshine . [smile]
« Last Edit: July 30, 2018, 08:37 AM by Cheese »

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #80 on: July 30, 2018, 09:50 AM »
I thought I'd give everyone an update on Parker.  Parker is now about 7 1/2 months old and probably close to 30lbs (we haven't weighed him for a while).  His growth seems to have slowed down and we don't think he is going to get much bigger. For a while he looked rather tall and lanky, but he's filled in nicely.  He still likes to bite me, but it's usually not that hard - more like just a play bite.  He is still a monster!  He tears up and destroys just about all of his toys.  He loves to find and pull out the plastic squeaker inside.  He devoured the Elk antler that he's had since we first got him.  That antler seemed so hard like it was going to be impossible to chew through, but just recently he really went to town on it and has become quite the power chewer.

He's just about 100% potty trained now - he rings the potty bells on the doggie gate to let us know when he wants to go outside. Sometimes we get some false rings, but he's really good about ringing the bell when he really has to go out.  This is very much to the delight of my wife who thought he was never going to be potty trained. I kinda secretly felt the same way. I normally work from home, but had to take a business trip for a week in May so we needed to hire a dog walking service to take him out during the day. That seemed to really help get him "on a schedule" for his potty breaks.

For the last 5 weeks we have been taking Parker to a "doggie swimming pool." At first we had no clue how he would react to the water. He definitely didn't like the few times we tried to bathe him.  Turns out he loves swimming.  He started out with a life jacket on but very quickly progressed to being able to swim on his own.  We thought the swimming would help tire him out,  but it really only made him stronger!  This past weekend was our last weekend swimming.   It was kinda expensive at $40/week so we decided to scale back.  Maybe we'll go once a month or something.

Parker has his own Instagram if anyone is interested: https://www.instagram.com/parkerhouserules/.

Here are some recent pictures of Parker:




















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Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #81 on: July 30, 2018, 03:24 PM »
What a face!  Love the video of him trying so hard to stay out of the pool until he just can’t help himself! Too funny! 

@Cheese
Here is Chili after a long day at the office. By that I mean, wake up, go out, eat breakfast, sleep for a few hours, wait for the dog walker, go out again, eat lunch, play, and now he’s exhausted and napping while his mamma works. An afternoon at the pool and he would collapse for the rest of the day (except meal times - those are not optional if you are a golden or lab).
-Raj

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #82 on: July 30, 2018, 03:33 PM »
Here's the video of Parker trying to wait in the pool: .  I shared it on another post, but forgot to include it here.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #83 on: August 01, 2018, 09:05 AM »
@Cheese
Here is Chili after a long day at the office. By that I mean, wake up, go out, eat breakfast, sleep for a few hours, wait for the dog walker, go out again, eat lunch, play, and now he’s exhausted and napping while his mamma works. An afternoon at the pool and he would collapse for the rest of the day (except meal times - those are not optional if you are a golden or lab).

Good looking dog!!! How old is Chili, he looks fairly young.  He also has "winter nose".  [huh]

We've had a couple of herding dogs and they NEVER sleep...there's always a job to do.

We've had several Goldens and they ALWAYS sleep...their only next job is to eat.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2018, 09:12 AM by Cheese »

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2018, 02:39 PM »
All of our dogs loved to go swimming except our second Golden. she was not afraid of the water, but she would only go wading as far into the water as she could go and still have her feet on the bottom and her chin at water level. As she would get to that point, she would just stand and blow bubbles. As she would make the bubbles, she would attempt to catch them before they would disappear. I finally got her to swim by taking advantage of her retrieving habit. While blowing her bubbles, I would find a stick, throw it out just beyond her reach. At first, she  paid no attention, but her retrieving instinct was too much for her to ignore.  Eventually, she enjoyed the retrieving from the water, but, always, the first thing she would do, I guess to warm up, was to wade until deep enough to blow her bubbles.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2018, 02:55 PM »
The first dog we had within a month of our marriage was the try, undersized English Setter.  She loved to run in the woods. Unfortunately, to run in our woods required that she first had to run and wade thru the swamp. Since I was allowing the activity, every time she waned to come into the house, I had to clean her off with the garden hose. Of course, once soaking wet from her cleanup, she still had to wait outside until reasonably dry. (Reasonably according to my wife was somewhat dryer than from my inspection) After dinner, was playtime, or more likely, tear the sleeves off my master's shirt.  Once the tearing up project was complete, I was exausted from my long working day and then from warding off my "gentle" pet. I would sack out on the lingroom sofa.  Soon, Buzzy would creep oto the couch between the sofa back and me.  She would go to sleep snuggled deep.  AND THEN, she  would start to stretch and PUSH. The became a battle that never ended.

With all that play, she was an exceptionally gentle dog with everyone else. She was especially gentle with the children. I think she saved all of her agressions for me. But in the end, it was me who she would listen to when called or ordered.
Tinker
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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2018, 03:11 PM »
My brother and his wife got their first puppy at about a year or two after we got our first dog.  They had  an awful time housebreaking the puppy. We hated to visit. After they had the puppy for a year, they wanted to go on a trip and asked if we could take care of their dog. My wife's first reaction was, when I asked, a very emphatic, "NO!!!"

I told my wife that I would clean up any messes, but I was certain the dog could, and would, be trained. I am a light sleeper after the first couple of hours. I slept on the couch with dog in the kitchen close to the door.  When I realized the dog was moving around, restlessly, I would get up, take him outside and praise him when he did what he had to do. It only took two nites of this and he was totally housebroken. I was able to go to sleeep in our bed with my wife.  The dog found out he could go thru the nite with no accidents. At the end of the week, we were able to give a completely housebroken puppy back to my brother & SIL. Within a week, that puppy was back to his old habits. I told my brother that the dog should be training them.
Tinker
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Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #87 on: August 03, 2018, 05:01 PM »
LOL Tinker!  Your brother and his wife were doing something wrong.  I suspect that dog was letting them know in his own way, they just couldn't speak his language well enough to figure it out!  Poor dog.  :(  Great stories though!  They each have their own personalities, habits and quirks.

@Cheese
Yeah, he started with a black nose, but by the second spring, the black nose never returned.  He's 8 this month, so he's got his AARP card now.  His eyes and muzzle are starting to go white, but in his heart he's all puppy.  He can barely contain himself when he gets to meet a human on his daily walks.  "Humans...OMG OMG OMG!!"  My neighbor asked me 2 years ago, "when is he going to calm down?".  My reply..."this is it!".   :)
-Raj

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #88 on: August 03, 2018, 06:11 PM »
Every time we have brought a new dog into our home - now up to 6 over the years - I have had to housebreak them.  Yes, as Tinker says, it can be done in a matter of days if you devote yourself to the task at hand.  Harder to deal with the excited puppy piddle, but I was never really bothered by a puppy who was saying "I was so happy to see you that I accidentally peed."  I have yet to run across a human who had those same emotions.

Peter

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #89 on: August 03, 2018, 08:41 PM »
Our daughter had a Cairn Terrier. He was a wanderer and very time she brought him to our house (she lived in D.C. area) she would spend a lot of time searching the neighborhood to find him.  The fun part of her visits was when Murphy would play soccer on our driveway.  He would spend hours pushing a soccer ball to the top of our driveway, run full speed back to the bottom to trap the ball before it would get to the road. push the ball back up the driveway to run back down to the bottom and do it all over again.  We would throw sticks or balls for him, but he would never bring them back to us. His thing was soccer.  Somehow, he never let the ball get to the road. He never ran into the road when playing his solitary soccer game. nobody taught him. He just figured the whole thing out all by himself. He was a fiesty but fun little dog. He had a perpetual smile.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #90 on: August 05, 2018, 09:21 PM »
Yeah, he started with a black nose, but by the second spring, the black nose never returned. 

I hope Parker doesn't lose his black nose!  His is just sooooo cute, I love it!!

Every time we have brought a new dog into our home - now up to 6 over the years - I have had to housebreak them.  Yes, as Tinker says, it can be done in a matter of days if you devote yourself to the task at hand.

Matter of days??  It really seemed hopeless for us for the first 6 months, but finally it seems like he's housebroken.

Our daughter had a Cairn Terrier. He was a wanderer and very time she brought him to our house (she lived in D.C. area) she would spend a lot of time searching the neighborhood to find him.  The fun part of her visits was when Murphy would play soccer on our driveway.  He would spend hours pushing a soccer ball to the top of our driveway, run full speed back to the bottom to trap the ball before it would get to the road. push the ball back up the driveway to run back down to the bottom and do it all over again.  We would throw sticks or balls for him, but he would never bring them back to us. His thing was soccer.  Somehow, he never let the ball get to the road. He never ran into the road when playing his solitary soccer game. nobody taught him. He just figured the whole thing out all by himself. He was a fiesty but fun little dog. He had a perpetual smile.
Tinker

I had always thought that labs and golden retreivers would automatically fetch something that you threw, but then I learned that's not always the case.  Fortunately, Parker seems to like to retrieve pretty much anything we throw.  I just wish our house was longer or I could throw the ball farther in the dog park to really work him to the max.  He never seems to be tired!

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Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #91 on: August 06, 2018, 11:05 AM »

I hope Parker doesn't lose his black nose!  His is just sooooo cute, I love it!!

I just wish our house was longer or I could throw the ball farther in the dog park to really work him to the max.  He never seems to be tired!

The more sunshine he gets, the less his nose will lighten up.

Purchase a Chuckit, you'll be able to launch that tennis ball over 200 feet. They come in various lengths that will launch the ball various distances. A shorter one for city lots and a longer one for the parks.  [big grin]

https://www.chewy.com/chuckit-classic-launcher-color/dp/38347?utm_source=google-product&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=hg&utm_content=Chuckit%21&utm_term=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIlJz2stbY3AIVFMRkCh2Q1w5AEAQYASABEgLFRPD_BwE

Online GoingMyWay

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #92 on: August 06, 2018, 11:34 AM »
More sunshine is better - that's interesting.  I'd have thought the nose might "fade" from the sun.  We don't take him out that long - he doesn't really like walking on a leash that much.

Thanks for that suggestion.  We actually purchased the 26M Chuckit from a local pet store a while back.  We haven't had a chance to use it because it's been too hot outside and/or seemingly non-stop rain.  I hope to get out there and use it soon.
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Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #93 on: August 06, 2018, 11:40 AM »
More sunshine is better - that's interesting.  I'd have thought the nose might "fade" from the sun. 

That's the reason it's called "Winter Nose" because most dogs are kept inside more of the time in the winter and the days are shorter.

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #94 on: August 06, 2018, 12:25 PM »
It's not a problem if his nose turns.  It's more important to give him the outlets he needs and for physical exercise it's hard to do that indoors without driving the entire family crazy. 

One thing you can add to his regime is adding exercises and activities that are mentally challenging.  You would be surprised how well that works to wear them out and it's great to have in the back pocket when the weather isn't cooperative.  That could be working on his training, puzzles (treats buried in a toy that he has to "figure out" to release the treat), "find it" games (you need to start simple so he gets the idea of using his nose to track something down). 
-Raj

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #95 on: August 06, 2018, 01:13 PM »
That's the reason it's called "Winter Nose" because most dogs are kept inside more of the time in the winter and the days are shorter.

That makes perfect sense now!

It's not a problem if his nose turns.  It's more important to give him the outlets he needs and for physical exercise it's hard to do that indoors without driving the entire family crazy. 

One thing you can add to his regime is adding exercises and activities that are mentally challenging.  You would be surprised how well that works to wear them out and it's great to have in the back pocket when the weather isn't cooperative.  That could be working on his training, puzzles (treats buried in a toy that he has to "figure out" to release the treat), "find it" games (you need to start simple so he gets the idea of using his nose to track something down). 

Not a problem, but his solid black nose looks so cute.  It looks like a plastic stuffed animal nose!

We got him this cheap MDF puzzle:  https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0038WP1YC/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1.  It's starting to fall apart from being licked and it was kinda too easy for him.  I saw this plastic puzzle: https://www.amazon.com/Outward-Hound-Ottoson-Brick-Puzzle/dp/B0711Y9XTF/ref=sr_1_5?s=pet-supplies&ie=UTF8&qid=1533575540&sr=1-5&keywords=puzzle that looked more difficult, but my wife didn't really want to buy it.  Maybe I'll buy it anyway.

One of his tennis balls managed to partially split in half.  Yesterday I stuffed some doggie treats inside.  He did struggle but he eventually got them out.  I should do that again.
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Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #96 on: August 07, 2018, 08:42 PM »
Be careful with plastic toys (wood also). When the dog chews, they soon learn how to tear toys apart. Plastic and wood will splinter and cut their mouth, gullet and even their stomach and intestines. One of our Goldens would worry and chew on her soft toys seemingly forever. My wife would wash her toys. The dog would wear out her toys, not from chewing, but we always thought from loving. She saved the heavy chewing attacks for her meat bones and rubber doggy bones.

The dog who adopted us was a chewer. The hardest bone would disappear within a day. We tried giving him toys to play with. Forget it. They were gone in minutes. The vet told us he was part german shepard and part malemute with probably a few other brews thrown in. He had exceptionally strong jaws but extremely gentle. He  loved to be outside.  When it snowed, he would lie out on our hillside and be covered with snow. you could see a mound with a black nose sticking out to the weather. Towards the end, he did want to come inside when it got down to 20ºF.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #97 on: August 08, 2018, 08:45 AM »
Parker ate part of his chicken flavored teething toy.  I thought he was smart enough to not eat plastic/paper/wood - I thought he just liked tearing it up, but I guess he occasionally swallows some too.  I guess we should have thrown the teething toy away once his adult teeth came in, but he still enjoyed chewing on it so we let him keep it.  I think some of the plastic got stuck in his stomach because he had been trying to throw up the other day.  It looks like eventually a piece of plastic came up.

We were careful to throw away some of his other bones/antler when it got too small as we were afraid he might choke on it.  We got him this "jumbo" antler from Amazon.



So far he's chewed away about 2 or 3 inches from the end of it.  We also had bought him a split antler, but he seems to like the whole one more.
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Offline rst

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #98 on: August 08, 2018, 09:20 PM »
In the early 70s, I was raising Huskies at one point and was part time farming while working a 50 hour a week job.  So I had two money siphons going at the same time.  My first dog was a Alaskan Malamute that I bought from a Air Force airman that was being deployed overseas.  Kayak when full grown weighed in at 140 lbs and was the gentilest dog ever born.  I used to butcher a couple pigs every year as I was raising feeders at the same time so I would throw all the bones and waste into the pen with the dogs.  After a week or two at most the only thing left were the teeth.  I had made a large house from 3/4" ply...Kayak ate it and lived in a hole he had dug underneath.  I had chain link fence 8' high.  He would go into the corner and climb out by going up cati-corner, so I had fencing across the corners to keep him secured.  When he escaped I would chase him and he would run about 25 yards and sit there until I got close then he would run,stop, and wait for me to get close and repeat the process.  The only way I could catch him was to get my pickup and open the door.  He loved the toddler boy next door.  Kayak would grab his belt from behind and spin him in circles until the boy was dizzy and then stop and watch him stagger about.  The two of them would  play like this for and hour or so.

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #99 on: August 09, 2018, 04:04 AM »
The Malamue-Shepard-and other blends that adopted us would  destroy any bones we gave him. Wihin a day, there would be no trace. We first met him via our kids paper route. They would come home with the story that they would not go near this big dog who would bark at them. He was chained, but they were still afraid. They left the paper at the edge of the lawn. One afternoon, i had come home early (rained out) so I went to the house with the big dog with my  son. Sure enough, the dog was barking. I sensed he as not mean and walked right  up to him. I let him smell my hand (probably covered with cement and lime ---I was still a mason contractor). He  licked it. I realized his water container was empty, so found a faucet and filled same. He devoured the water. I told David that hereafter, whoever was delivering paper (the two switched per week) should check Barny's water dish.  within a week, Barney showed up on our hillside. We ook him back to his own house, found his collar broken, left a note for the owner that his dog was at our house. Somehow, every couple of days, Barney would break his collar or chain and appear on our hillside. He was waiting for our son.  David would leave a note for Barney's owner.  Owner would tie his dog and sooner  or later, Barny would show up again waiting for David. One Christmas Eve or NewYears Eve, it was supposed to get  down well below zero and as we were ready to leave to visit my brother and his family, there was Barney waiting, not on the hillside, but at our door. I told david to put Barney in the car. The dog needed no coaxing. He jumped right in. My wife and I both decided that we would not take Barney home that nite so took him with us. Barney never left us again. He would wait for David and follow him to the bus stop, come back home to "David's House" an wait in the yard until bus time and go wait for David at the bus stop. We never had to tie him up. His "owner" told us we might as well keep the dog. I don't think any of us had a choice. Barney just knew where he belonged. We kept him for mayby five or six years until we finally had to put him to sleep.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker