Author Topic: New Dog in Northern Virginia  (Read 7577 times)

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Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
New Dog in Northern Virginia
« on: January 02, 2018, 07:26 PM »
This may not be the type of dog that you're thinking about.  I don't have a bench dog or anything else like that in mind.

Does anyone have any suggestions for adopting or buying a dog in the Northern Virginia area?  I checked the Fairfax County Animal Shelter this past Saturday and didn't see much.  I also checked Petland in Fairfax City, but I've heard some very bad puppy mill related stories from there (the puppies there were incredibly enticing though!).

They say adopting is the best thing - I was kind of expecting the dogs at the shelter to be jumping all over me (may be wrong mindset) so I was rather disappointed when the dogs didn't seem that interested in me.  Well I take that back - only 1 dog was interested, but it was a Staffordshire Terrier.  I guess they get a bad rap, but this dog didn't get along well with other dogs and my parents last dog also didn't like other dogs so I've more or less conditioned myself to run away any time I see another dog.
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Offline RobBob

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2018, 07:40 PM »
There are also many pure breed dogs that need to be adopted.  Most breeds have rescue websites.  Pick a breed that you like and google the rescue website associated with it.  Fill out the forms and let them know you are looking.  Usually, the rescue website will have pictures and some information about the dogs.

Typically, the rescue organization will send someone out to your house to make sure your situation is appropriate for the breed and the specific dog in question.  They want the dogs to be a good fit and try not to move the dogs around too much.  It is traumatic for them to change owners. 
« Last Edit: January 02, 2018, 07:42 PM by RobBob »

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #2 on: January 02, 2018, 08:02 PM »
There are also many pure breed dogs that need to be adopted.  Most breeds have rescue websites.  Pick a breed that you like and google the rescue website associated with it.  Fill out the forms and let them know you are looking.  Usually, the rescue website will have pictures and some information about the dogs.

Typically, the rescue organization will send someone out to your house to make sure your situation is appropriate for the breed and the specific dog in question.  They want the dogs to be a good fit and try not to move the dogs around too much.  It is traumatic for them to change owners.

Thank you for your reply!

Picking a breed that you like is the hard part!  My wife's cousin has a labradoodle (I know, I know it's not a pedigree, but it is a desirable hybrid breed), he is awesome!!  Labradors seems to make wonderful dogs from my experience!  I'd like to stay away from hound dogs as their noses seem to get them into too much trouble!

I think the whole home situation evaluation is something that I didn't like.  It seems all too intrusive, understandably so, but nevertheless too intrusive.  We don't have a yard to let the dog run around in so that may be negative against us.  There is a dog park fairly close by so long as the dog liked other dogs (my parents previous coonhound had a nose for trouble and didn't like other dogs so she was a real chore to walk).
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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 108
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #3 on: January 02, 2018, 08:29 PM »
Check a forever home and lost dog rescue. We have done both with great experiences.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #4 on: January 02, 2018, 08:33 PM »
How old was the dog that you got?

I really don't want to get too old of a dog - a lot of the dogs at the animal shelter were 6+ years old.
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Offline tjbnwi

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2018, 08:35 PM »
My brother has a shelter in Holland, MI if you're willing to travel.

(Shameless plug link below.....also---(another shameless plug) if you don't have a charity for Amazon Smiles Headin' Home is listed)

http://www.headinhomerescue.org

Tom

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2018, 08:37 PM »
Thanks for sharing your brother's shelter.  Michigan is a bit far for us to travel.
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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 108
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2018, 10:07 PM »
Mine was 9 weeks and my in laws was closer to a year. Had a good experience dealing with A Forever Home for our dog.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4458
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #8 on: January 02, 2018, 10:47 PM »
My wife's cousin has a labradoodle (I know, I know it's not a pedigree, but it is a desirable hybrid breed), he is awesome!!  Labradors seems to make wonderful dogs from my experience!

Don’t diss that doodle...my brother in law, his brother and his father are all huge bird 🦅 hunters. Between them over the years they’ve owned 8 or 9 black labs. Nothing better according to them... until my brother in law purchased a Golden Doodle. I think my sister must have put him in a hammerlock.   [tongue]

Long story short...my brother in law has stated that his Golden Doodle is the best bird dog he’s ever worked with. Ducks, pheasants, grouse and quail. He’s become a true believer along with his brother. A pretty impressive testimonial from a bunch of guys that have been hunting birds for over 80 years  [cool]



Offline jtwood

  • Posts: 225
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #9 on: January 02, 2018, 10:58 PM »
As has already been mentioned, picking a breed or type of dog is difficult.  One thing I have used in the past is the Animal Planet (the TV network) website:

http://www.animalplanet.com/pets/

On that page is a "Dog Breed Selector" where they ask you 10 questions about what you would like to have in a dog and what you don't want, and they suggest some breeds.  A lot of shelter dogs are mixed breed, but sometimes it can be fairly obvious what type of dog it is, if not the main breed.

I live in Southern California and most of the shelters are online, so you can look at pics of the dogs and get some info after you have decided on the type of dog you want.  Probably have the same thing in Northern Virginia.  I got my last two dogs this way.

Steve

Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #10 on: January 02, 2018, 11:51 PM »
Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3619
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #11 on: January 03, 2018, 04:42 AM »
Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #12 on: January 03, 2018, 04:48 AM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline sospan

  • Posts: 27
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #13 on: January 03, 2018, 05:08 AM »
I rescued one of these in the UK - it is a Boerboel, a South African Mastiff.  As breed they are very loyal, intelligent and excellent with kids. The one I got was never socialised or even walked and his previous owner never bothered to really train him so he came with lots of issues. However, 18 months down the line he is an absolutely fantastic dog far better than all the other large dog breeds I have had over the years.

There is a breed rescue in the US. They will make a good addition to the house and of course the ideal guardian for all that expensive Festool kit  [big grin]





Offline fatroman

  • Posts: 202
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #14 on: January 03, 2018, 08:28 AM »
We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.
El duende está lleno de mierda!

Offline jrb9

  • Posts: 13
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #15 on: January 03, 2018, 09:13 AM »
You could try Petfinder

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #16 on: January 03, 2018, 10:21 AM »
Don’t diss that doodle...my brother in law, his brother and his father are all huge bird 🦅 hunters. Between them over the years they’ve owned 8 or 9 black labs. Nothing better according to them... until my brother in law purchased a Golden Doodle. I think my sister must have put him in a hammerlock.   [tongue]

Long story short...my brother in law has stated that his Golden Doodle is the best bird dog he’s ever worked with. Ducks, pheasants, grouse and quail. He’s become a true believer along with his brother. A pretty impressive testimonial from a bunch of guys that have been hunting birds for over 80 years  [cool]

Golden doodles and labradoodles are very similar - hard to tell them apart even.  I just recently learned about the double doodle - the best of both worlds!

As has already been mentioned, picking a breed or type of dog is difficult.  One thing I have used in the past is the Animal Planet (the TV network) website:

http://www.animalplanet.com/pets/

On that page is a "Dog Breed Selector" where they ask you 10 questions about what you would like to have in a dog and what you don't want, and they suggest some breeds.  A lot of shelter dogs are mixed breed, but sometimes it can be fairly obvious what type of dog it is, if not the main breed.

I live in Southern California and most of the shelters are online, so you can look at pics of the dogs and get some info after you have decided on the type of dog you want.  Probably have the same thing in Northern Virginia.  I got my last two dogs this way.

Steve

That's a cool breed finder.  It recommended http://animal.discovery.com/breed-selector/dog-breeds/non-sporting/keeshond.html.  I've never even heard of that breed before.

Just got a little mini schnauzer chiauau mix. She was 5mos when we got her. The previous owner didn’t take very good care of her they said they had her for 2mos. She was skinny very hungry lloks lke they didn’t feed her very well, shaggy, no shots not fixed. Well the day we got Allie, she got a new bed, food my girls asked pet smart what is the best food for her and she got it plus plenty of toys .

Now for snacks my daughter went back to pet smart and dropped a lot of money on snacks and toys.

3 days later she was at the vet getting dewormed shots etc, Allies getting fixed and some more shots and chipped this Thursday. She hit the lottery when we got her👍. She has been some work and is some work trying to get her trained up. But slowly she is coming around. She’ll be up to speed in another month or so.

She is a sweety.

Sounds like a great find!

I rescued one of these in the UK - it is a Boerboel, a South African Mastiff.  As breed they are very loyal, intelligent and excellent with kids. The one I got was never socialised or even walked and his previous owner never bothered to really train him so he came with lots of issues. However, 18 months down the line he is an absolutely fantastic dog far better than all the other large dog breeds I have had over the years.

There is a breed rescue in the US. They will make a good addition to the house and of course the ideal guardian for all that expensive Festool kit  [big grin]


(Attachment Link)



Wow that's a big dog!

We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.

Thanks for those links, Lost Dog Rescue seems good.
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Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #17 on: January 03, 2018, 12:48 PM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker

Once I get a doggie they are not a pet, they become part of the family. Im still in mourning for one we lost over 2 years ago.
I treat them like my kids, after all they arent much different got to give them expectations and train them to do what they want. This one is a little stubborn but she'll be ok in a month or so

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3523
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #18 on: January 03, 2018, 01:02 PM »
We've used both of these rescue services in NoVA and I'd recommend them highly:

https://lostdogrescue.org/

https://www.homewardtrails.org/

There's also the shelter in Alexandria - https://alexandriaanimals.org/ - While I've not adopted through them, they have been very helpful.

I'd also add Virginia German Shepherd Rescue (http://VGSR.org).  I was a volunteer there for many years and adopted four dogs, all of which were just wonderful.  Lab Rescue (https://lab-rescue.org) is another really great organization in the NoVa area.  There's just something about rescued dogs - they just seem to know that they've been given a second chance and never fail to show their appreciation in one way or another. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline PatR

  • Posts: 186
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #19 on: January 03, 2018, 03:07 PM »


My two rescue Rotties, Evie on the left and Archie on the right on the banks of the Rhine. We have always had Rottweilers, but they are the first rescue dogs we have ever had in our family and are two absolute darlings. They travel all over Europe with us in our motorhome and we have never had any problems wild camping. [laughing]

Evie was dumped on Christmas Eve in 2013 as she was just about to give birth to a litter of Heinz 57 pups, all of who died. She was nursed, after an extremely difficult cesarian operation, by a wonderful woman called Ann Evans who runs a Rottie rescue centre in Oswestry, UK.

http://www.rottweilersinneed.co.uk/

Archie's owner died when he was 6 months old and Ann took him in and gave me first dibs as I always wanted another boy after my Simou died.

Love my rescue Rotts.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1833
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #20 on: January 03, 2018, 04:10 PM »
My wife and my first kids were a pair of brother Shih Tzus that lived to be 16 and 17.  When I was coaching soccer year round my daughter and I bought my wife a female to keep her company.  Seven years ago my other daughter, with a new baby and full time job bought a male at the Bloomsburg fair.  Less than two weeks later she realized her mistake and we inherited this one.  My wife's female pasted two years.  The woman that grooms our dogs is into rescue work and got my wife interested.  Next thing I know we're driving four hours to Ohio to pick up a four? year old, five pound Yorkie...did I mention that at the time of the trip I was surviving the flu?

P.S. To find out who really loves you unconditionally, lock your dog and significant other in the trunk of your car and after an hour see who is ecstatic to see you again [big grin]

Offline Cheese

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #21 on: January 03, 2018, 07:22 PM »
P.S. To find out who really loves you unconditionally, lock your dog and significant other in the trunk of your car and after an hour see who is ecstatic to see you again [big grin]

Funny...that's a no brainer. [scratch chin]

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3619
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #22 on: January 03, 2018, 07:51 PM »
Oops! Hit the wrong button.
Jobby, I hope the original OP read your post. He would learn a whole lot if he is thinking at the same time he reads. Your whole approach is so healthy. I think you might be the type who can get along with any dog and keep him/her happy and healthy.
Bravo
Tinker

Once I get a doggie they are not a pet, they become part of the family. Im still in mourning for one we lost over 2 years ago.
I treat them like my kids, after all they arent much different got to give them expectations and train them to do what they want. This one is a little stubborn but she'll be ok in a month or so

Any dog we bring home are our babies.  we have raised several. Two were raised for Guiding eye dogs. One was a purebred English setter that was given to us for free because she was the runt of the litter and could not be sold.  we even brought home a dog (Took into our house on a 20 below nite and he stayed until we finally had to put him down.)  The last puppy we got from Golden Rescue.  she had been abused to the point where, when we first brought her home she would cringe and cower in a corner when ever one of us moved our feet or even when i made a move to scratch me ear (no kidding-really) Every time she ran away from me, i would go into the corner with her and smooch and hug and especially scratch her neck.  Within two hours of repeating that treatment, she was my dog.  She went everywhere with me.  Why had she been mistreated? Because the owner felt he had to have a male dog and so he made life miserable for the puppy.  We got her at 7 months.  At 19 years old, we finally had to put her down. Every time we had to put a dog to sleep, I went in with the dog and held him/her in my arms while the vet gave the needle.  When our kids were small, we always let them know, as the dog was showing symptoms of too old, that one day when taking their friend to the vet, he/she might not be coming home with us.  We always prepared the children ahead of time. Today, they are both the same way. I grew up on a farm and was always taught that the animals were cared for first. 
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Wooden Skye

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #23 on: January 03, 2018, 08:16 PM »
We have a lab and beagle both are over 10 years old.  The lab kept his puppy behavior for a really long time.  He sheds like mad.  The beagle doesn't bark unless she needs to go out.  The dog in my avatar was a French Mastiff and she was the most down to earth dog, people would see her and be afraid, after meeting fear went away.  Even my mom felt that way.  She was protective of all the family.  One of my favorite stories was we were baby sitting our niece that was only a few months old.  My girlfriend forgot to close the gate on the first floor, and the baby was in her car seat thing and Skye ran over, smelled her feet, laid down and protected her.  Hardest day of my life was when we had to put her down.  Hope you find the right dog, they do make life good.
Bryan

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Offline DrD

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #24 on: January 04, 2018, 09:41 AM »
Great Thread!

I tried posting yesterday, but it somehow didn't make it.

We currently have an almost 2 year old Boerboel - she's my avatar, and a slightly younger Rottie (male).  Wouldn't take anything for either, they are both simply WONDERFUL.  We've always raise/bred large dogs, Great Danes, Rotties, and now Boerboels - love them all, but if you're ever around a Boerboel, you'll be hooked for life.  To coin a phrase from a local BBQ Rib Shack - "They ain't nothin' like 'em, nowhere."  Boerboels are very large dogs - not the largest of the Mastiffs - getting up to about 200 lbs, and as such, they require a firm, loving hand, and they are certainly not for everybody.  I first saw a Boerboel on the Outdoor Network, on a program hosted by Theresa Vail who was showing her Boerboel - Sarge. They are not quite as gentle as Great Danes, and they aren't as goofy as the Great Danes; they just simply - in my mind - are the greatest pet I have ever had, with Rotties a close second.

Enjoy the voyage, and whatever you get, I'm sure you'll be happy.
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Offline jobsworth

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2018, 09:42 AM »
Today, I have to take my little girl to the vet to get fixed. Im looking at her this mornig taking a nap sleeping next to me not knowing what shes in for today. Shes also getting her rabies shots and 2nd deworming and chipping. I might hold off on the chipping for another month or so. But then since shes under she wont feel the chip being implanted.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 264
Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #26 on: February 05, 2018, 06:40 PM »
We ended up getting a Mini Labaradoodle.  We named him Parker.  Attached are two pictures of him.  The first picture is the first day we brought him home, 3 weeks ago today.  The second picture is a more recent picture of him.  Don't let his cute looks fool you!  He's more than a handful.  He loves to bite us and bark at 1 and 4am.  We don't have kids, but I'm thinking that it's actually easier having kids than a puppy - babies aren't born with teeth and can't jump and bite!!
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #27 on: February 05, 2018, 07:03 PM »
I have to admit that I am a sucker for puppy pictures.  Congrats!  What a cutie.

When you think about pups versus kids I offer the following when people ask why have adopted numerous versus having human kids:

1.  Love is unconditional

2.  If they mis-behave you can put them in a cage (crate) without penalty.

3.  No college financial planning is involved.

4.  They don't talk or text on a cell phone.

...

Peter

Offline RKA

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #28 on: February 05, 2018, 07:47 PM »
Congrats!!  He’s super cute!  He will settle in in a few weeks, don’t worry.
-Raj

Offline greg mann

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Re: New Dog in Northern Virginia
« Reply #29 on: February 06, 2018, 12:34 AM »
When I met my wife she had a male greyhound. He succumbed to osteosarcoma a number of years ago and we have since rescued four more. We lost a second male to the same illness and had a third contract it about a month ago. He was failing quickly a week ago and my wife had made an appointment for him only to have him rally, and he has been holding his own. Sadly, one of our females, Gina, started limping only 3 days ago and virtually collapsed this morning, we had to put her down today and will soon lose our Moe, who is on borrowed time but comfortable for now. We still have another female, Noelle, and our wonderful German Shepard, Rommel, who is now almost 14 and still going to work with me every day.

The greyhounds are wonderful dogs, gentle and laid back, real couch potatoes. They are susceptible to sarcomas but all of ours were quite senior when their time has come. It is a shame their life spans aren’t a bit closer to our own but we can’t avoid giving our hearts over to them.

Like us humans they are all different, in breed and individually. I believe our GS is probably the smartest creature in the house, us humans included, and as gentle and affectionate as any dog I have ever known. He was three when our son rescued him. As an active duty Marine living off base he and Rommel would run five or six miles every day. Matt would joke that they could train anywhere in Long Beach or nearby without ever a care, day or night, although Matt was imposing enough that he really didn’t need a dog to be safe. Life brought changes for Matt, another tour in Iraq, and we wound up with Rommel nine years ago and he adjusted to yet another home. He follows along wherever I go and always keeps tabs on exactly where I am. The reality is I never spent a minute training him to do anything. He just figured out what I wanted from him.

Losing the greys as we have and knowing we will lose another any day now has been tough. I just hope Rommel can continue to beat the odds as long as possible.
Greg Mann
Oakland, Michigan