Author Topic: Serious as a Heart Attack  (Read 11889 times)

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Offline cliffp

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #30 on: August 12, 2017, 07:44 AM »
@deepcreek, Twelve years ago I had a bad back that caused me to be off work for 4 months and taking NSAIDs was causing havoc with my stomach and I had to stop taking them. Initially the back pain was very bad but after a few days it went away. Hopefully the same will happen for you. Hope things improve for you...
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Offline Rusty Miller

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #31 on: August 12, 2017, 09:07 AM »
@Holmz Amen to that!
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Offline HowardH

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #32 on: September 07, 2017, 06:33 PM »
So here I am reading this thread feeling a little sorry for myself since I have to get a colonoscopy tomorrow morning.  Let's just say I'm probably going to be interrupted a few times while I type this.  Like most people, I hate the day before, the prep is awful.  I should be cleaner than a hounds tooth by tomorrow morning but it's really nothing compared to what you guys have gone through.  My wife is ready to divorce me about all the complaining I have been doing, I'm reverting back to being a 6 year old, but I know it's for the best.  No more complaining!  I'm going to suck it up and power through this evening.. as I'm running to the bathroom... gotta go!!!   [scared] [scared] [scared]
Howard H
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Offline Untidy Shop

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #33 on: September 07, 2017, 08:00 PM »
So here I am reading this thread feeling a little sorry for myself since I have to get a colonoscopy tomorrow morning.  Let's just say I'm probably going to be interrupted a few times while I type this.  Like most people, I hate the day before, the prep is awful.  I should be cleaner than a hounds tooth by tomorrow morning but it's really nothing compared to what you guys have gone through.  My wife is ready to divorce me about all the complaining I have been doing, I'm reverting back to being a 6 year old, but I know it's for the best.  No more complaining!  I'm going to suck it up and power through this evening.. as I'm running to the bathroom... gotta go!!!   [scared] [scared] [scared]

@HowardH
My mother died from Bowel Cancer so I have a Colonoscopy every three years. So I share your feelings at this 'special time'  [big grin]. For tomorrow may I wish you all the best in hearing excellent results from your specialist.

Sounds like you have been through this before. Unlike 10 plus years ago when the products I used kept me up all night, I find the newer cleansing products allow some good sleep after 3-5 movements and before a few final movements in the morning. Anyway enjoy the sandwich and coffee afterwards!  [smile]
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 08:07 PM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2017, 08:41 PM »
So here I am reading this thread feeling a little sorry for myself since I have to get a colonoscopy tomorrow morning.  Let's just say I'm probably going to be interrupted a few times while I type this.  Like most people, I hate the day before, the prep is awful.  I should be cleaner than a hounds tooth by tomorrow morning but it's really nothing compared to what you guys have gone through.  My wife is ready to divorce me about all the complaining I have been doing, I'm reverting back to being a 6 year old, but I know it's for the best.  No more complaining!  I'm going to suck it up and power through this evening.. as I'm running to the bathroom... gotta go!!!   [scared] [scared] [scared]

 Ok Howard,

 I've had a few colonoscopies and the prep is never pleasant. But take heart, it's a good diagnostic tool and it will be over before you know it. Just make sure your urologist doesn't send you a bouquet of roses the next day :o [scared] [blink] :-X. And noooooooooooooo, no flowers for me.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2017, 08:46 PM by Bob Marino »
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Offline HowardH

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #35 on: September 07, 2017, 09:40 PM »
this is my third time, maybe fourth? I try to block out the unpleasant experiences in my life.  As soon as its over, I'm already dreading the 3-5 years that are going to go by when I will have to do it again.  My GE guy is bit archaic in his approach.  He doesn't like trying new prep methods that are a lot less problematic than trying to force down 4 liters of foulness.  After this, it's time to go find another doc who actually keeps up with the literature...
Howard H
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Offline HowardH

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #36 on: September 08, 2017, 11:56 AM »
Well, just got back, got the ole feet up in the recliner and a snooze is in the offing!  No power tools today!  Got a few small polyps, nothing unexpected and he said he'll see me again in 5 years.  I've started the countdown clock..   [big grin]
Howard H
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Offline deepcreek

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #37 on: September 08, 2017, 02:07 PM »
Glad to hear everything went well.
Joe Adams
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Houston, Texas

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Offline HowardH

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #38 on: September 08, 2017, 02:47 PM »
You too!  I'm sorry, I didn't mean to hijack the thread...  I should go by another Festool to celebrate!   ;D
Howard H
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Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

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Offline Rusty Miller

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #39 on: September 08, 2017, 06:00 PM »
Great outcome Howard!  I know those colonoscopies are a pain but the alternative can be a lot worse. (Experience talking)

Rusty
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Offline HowardH

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #40 on: September 08, 2017, 06:37 PM »
Thanks.  This seems to be my month for seeing docs.   On the 29th of this month I go in for a L4-L5 laminectomy and fusion.  Got a great neurosurgeon and he said my golf swing will be good as new in 3-4 months.  I'm really lucky tho.  At 59, this will be the first time I have ever had to spend the night in a hospital. 
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, Trion, MFT/3, T15, OF 1400, RO150FEQ, TS55, RTS400, CT22, CT36E, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, CSX, Vecturo, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, CMS GE

Offline deepcreek

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2017, 06:47 AM »
I managed to end up back at the ER and then in the hospital CCU with fluid on my heart aka congestive heart failure.  Believe me, breathing is underrated.  Friday through Monday - A four day weekend filled with boredom, misery, and urination.  They pulled off a ton of fluid with diuretics and ran me through the Cath lab to clear a couple of lingering blockages.

The cause is being attributed to a number of factors.  I'd been working long hours in the shop for weeks trying to meet a deadline.  Lots of stress.  Losing too much weight too fast.  (Forty pounds in three months.)  Who knew!  Not eating enough for my level of activity.  (My A1C dropped from 8.9 to 5.6 in the same period and my cholesterol is down to 93.)  And last but not least, skipping my diuretic last Wednesday for a 10 hour round trip in the car.  "Didn't cause it but didn't help."

I'm feeling better now and going to continue to eat healthy and try to make the most of this second (or third) chance at life.
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2017, 09:24 AM »
Joe,

Sorry to hear about your additional challenges.  TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF! (shouting was intentional)

Work is just that.  Life is precious. 

Thinking of you I remembered a Simon and Garfunkel song and thought an adaptation of lyrics might be appropriate:

Slow down you move too fast.  Gotta make your lifetime last.  Not kicking down that tomb stone; looking for fun and feeling Dominoey.

Hope you feel better soon.

Peter

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2017, 10:12 AM »
 Joe,

 What Peter said. Meeting that deadline on a project isn't worth it if you are not around to finish it. Slow it down, your priority is your health. Please do take care.
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Offline Tinker

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2017, 11:39 AM »
Joe, It is great that you can, and do work. That keeps you going. But, you gotta slow down once in a while.

Years ago, I was pouring and finishing a concrete floor for a friend who had done my excavaton work for many years. As we were waiting for the concrete to cure for the next operation, we were sitting at his kitchen table enjoying a couple of cold ones.  The phone rang.  My friend answered and soon, he replied, "Obviously you don't need me," and hung up.  He told me, "That guy needed somebody immediately. I just don't move that fast."  There comes a time when we all should adapt that atitude.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Knight Woodworks

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #45 on: November 02, 2017, 05:28 PM »
What these guys said!!

Take good care.

John

Offline deepcreek

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #46 on: July 17, 2018, 09:33 AM »
Yesterday was my 1st "Birthday" after surviving a major heart attack a year ago on July 16th, 2017.

Praise God for more time to enjoy life and try to be a blessing to others.

Joe
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #47 on: July 17, 2018, 11:32 AM »
Glad you made it through, Joe.  Here's to many more birthdays in your future!   [birthday song]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Tinker

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #48 on: July 17, 2018, 02:22 PM »
2-1/2 weeks from today (Aug 3) will be my second anniversary after my heart attack.  I have been working nearly every day. What the heck, work is therapy to me. I have just about quit going to Cardiac Rehab. I was getting soreness in nearly every joint from the repetitious movements.  I have had several injuries in my earlier life that were becoming unbearable thru the  nites and I was losing too much sleep. The aches and pains I attribute to repetitious and heavy lifting during 30+ years of mason contracting. The receptions of pushing against resistance on those machines in rehab were aggravating my old injuries. I have not been to rehab since mid January and almost all of the pains have gone away.  I got a little bad news in late February that caused me to almost completely alter my diet to hopefully compensate for the sad news, but also, I think my heart problems are a thing of the past.  In Feb., I was diagnosed to be in early stages of AMD.  I hadn't even realized I had been studying for a MD. I had not even attended pre med school, and here I am told I already had A MD. I did study, or at least, read a whole lot of info. My wife is now getting tired of cooking up a batch of spinach, kale or swiss chard every evening. I even have her fix enuf that I can have some for breakfast in the morning. I don't know if I will head off the finals tests, but nearly all of my aches and pains have disappeared. I attribute that to my AMD diet. I am optimistic that I can stave off blindness.

When I got out of the hospital after my heart attack, a fortunate coincidence with the editor of a local magazine put one of my stories into the magazine. I have followed up with two more and have two in the pipeline. She has asked that i keep them coming.  I even have been getting paid for my stories. The biggest problem for me is cutting them back to the specified word count. I spend more time cutting the word count than writing the original story. I have maybe 200 or 300 stories in my files. Some are only a sentence or two, while others take up 20 or more pages.  If I have to quit driving ( that has not happened yet, but my retina specialist is sitting over my shoulder), I am very fortunate that I seem to have a new project to keep me busy. My dad was legally blind in his mid seventies, so I have a long time to go. (y'all know I am only 39) As with my heart attack, the docs and nurses told me my attitude got me thru. I am now looking forward (well, a sneaky peek around the corners) to a new project.

In a previous post, I said it is important to have the right attitude. Joe @deepcreek has the right attitude. It is important that a good attitude is there when ever hard times they are a commin' (I don't know who to credit that quote, or even if it is a direct quote, but it does pull one thru)
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline deepcreek

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #49 on: July 17, 2018, 02:53 PM »
@Tinker - Glad to hear you're going to be TWO!  Happy Birthday to you!

As far as I'm concerned, the heart attack gave me a chance at a do-over and I'm making the most of it.  Kreg the @Builtinking started this new birthday stuff first.  He's probably a teenager by now.

I'm sorry to hear about the age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  I had to look that abbreviation up.  Keep eating your carrots!  I'm praying for you.  My Dad lost most of his sight in both eyes (ischemic optic neuropathy) for a couple of years and then got most of it back.  Miracles do happen.

I just finished three months of intense cardiac rehab earlier this year.  I managed to achieve massive gains in my aerobic fitness level.  The exercise physiologist said I was a model patient and crushed the goals they had set on day one.

I'm still working out at home every night even when I'm tired after a long day on my feet in the shop.  My doctor told me that's work, not exercise.
Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

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Offline Tinker

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #50 on: July 17, 2018, 03:44 PM »
@Tinker - Glad to hear you're going to be TWO!  Happy Birthday to you!

As far as I'm concerned, the heart attack gave me a chance at a do-over and I'm making the most of it.  Kreg the @Builtinking started this new birthday stuff first.  He's probably a teenager by now.

I'm sorry to hear about the age-related macular degeneration (AMD).  I had to look that abbreviation up.  Keep eating your carrots!  I'm praying for you.  My Dad lost most of his sight in both eyes (ischemic optic neuropathy) for a couple of years and then got most of it back.  Miracles do happen.

I just finished three months of intense cardiac rehab earlier this year.  I managed to achieve massive gains in my aerobic fitness level.  The exercise physiologist said I was a model patient and crushed the goals they had set on day one.

I'm still working out at home every night even when I'm tired after a long day on my feet in the shop.  My doctor told me that's work, not exercise.

@deepcreek, I would argue with your doc. What he calls "exercise" is to you, "enjoyment". It has been said many times, if you enjoy what you do to earn a living, you will never work a day. Perhaps not the exact quote, but close enuf.

I am very interested in what you mentioned about your dad. Quote:My Dad lost most of his sight in both eyes (ischemic optic neuropathy) for a couple of years and then got most of it back.  Miracles do happen. I was aware of my impending condition a year before my heat attack.  In mid January of this year, I noticed a wavy horizontal line (a beam in my house that I had checked along with many other horizontal lines since my eye doc had warned me.) two days before I was to go to Florida to visit my favorite cuz and best friend fr his birthday. e had ben in a battle with cancer for just about a year. He made it until 5 days past his 80th birthday. When I got home, I went to my eye doc with knowledge of what he would probably tell me.  after shining his bride, very bride, little flash lite into my eyes, he sent me to a retina specialist. By that time, i had already read up on AMD and had informed my dear wife about certain foods I needed to add to my diet >>> EVERY DAY. I had, by the time I went to the specialist, wavy vision  from my left eye. Within a couple of weeks, I had occasional blurry vision in my right eye. Since March, my left eye is less wavy in vision, but things are further away. As long as I get good nite sleep, I don't find any distortion from my right eye. Without proper rest, the eye does get blurry. I have friend who is in his 60's who was legally blind at 52. He and I have had long conversations about our eye problems. (his is from a different problem with same type of symptoms.) My dad had AMD and was legally blind in mid seventies, He just got worse and worse.

I am resigning myself to the uninteresting fact that I might become blind. I am, at real time age of 87, finally giving up my sno plowing route I have had for 62 years. I have not, in all those years, missed plowing for any storm but one. That was the day I had a bunch of rusty old iron, nuts, bolts, screws and a bone chip inserted in my neck. If I had enough cotton to block out the screaming from a certain fine lady who happens to live with me for the past 52 years, I probably would have plowed that nite s well.  I have read that sometimes one might beat the rap of AMD. Did your dad do anything different than what has been rcommended by the AMDA association?

I don't wish to rob this thread. Perhaps you could PM me and we could start a new thread or just discuss between us. I think to start a new thread would be best. If you have any info about what your dad did to beat AMD, we should let others know. I do know it is rare to ever get improvement, but it is possible to hold it back. I am trying the hold back route. As you have said, "Miracles do happen."
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline deepcreek

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #51 on: July 17, 2018, 04:06 PM »
@Tinker - My dad had ischemic optic neuropathy which is very different than macular degeneration.

As I understand it, there was a blockage in the blood vessel that supplies the optic nerve.  Like a stroke of sorts.  He woke up one morning, virtually blind in one eye.  Within a few months, it also happened to the other eye.  He said it was like looking though a straw.

At the time which was over 20 years ago, he was referred to a neuro-opthamologist.  This was a rare specialty (and may still be) as there were reportedly only two in Texas.

As far as I know, he didn't do anything special to regain his sight.  He was scheduled to undergo experimental surgery but woke up the morning he was supposed to go in with markedly improved vision.  It continued to improve to the point that he could see as well as he always had with only minor loss of peripheral vision.

The doctor cancelled the surgery and told him it was nothing short a miracle.  We had a lot of people praying for him and completely agreed with her assessment. 

As it turned out, the experimental surgical procedure for this condition was a complete failure.  Every patient who underwent it lost all of their remaining sight.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2018, 04:08 PM by deepcreek »
Joe Adams
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Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #52 on: July 17, 2018, 05:19 PM »
@Tinker and @deepcreek, I'm somewhat in the same boat regarding AMD.  My optometrist uses some pretty amazing test equipment and saw the beginnings of AMD in my eyes.  She recommended a product called MacuHealth to diminish the possibilities for getting AMD.  You may want to look into this.  I have no relationship with this company, nor does my optometrist. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Tinker

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #53 on: July 18, 2018, 04:32 AM »
@Tinker and @deepcreek, I'm somewhat in the same boat regarding AMD.  My optometrist uses some pretty amazing test equipment and saw the beginnings of AMD in my eyes.  She recommended a product called MacuHealth to diminish the possibilities for getting AMD.  You may want to look into this.  I have no relationship with this company, nor does my optometrist.

@Sparktrician THANKS FOR THAT INFO. My eye doc had put me on ARED-2 and fish oil pills three years ago. I read your message early this morning and have looked into MacuHealth and MacuHealthPlus. Very interesting. My vision seems ok one day and not so ok another day. With each session of being not ok, I seem to recognize another symptom. Since I have been turned over to a "retina specialist", I seem to be out of the information loop. My eye doc does not answer my questions any more. I cannot even get an appointment with him. The "retina specialist" is not the communicative type at all.

@deepcreek Thanks for your info.
@Tinker - My dad had ischemic optic neuropathy which is very different than macular degeneration.

As I understand it, there was a blockage in the blood vessel that supplies the optic nerve.  Like a stroke of sorts.  He woke up one morning, virtually blind in one eye.  Within a few months, it also happened to the other eye.  He said it was like looking though a straw.

At the time which was over 20 years ago, he was referred to a neuro-opthamologist.  This was a rare specialty (and may still be) as there were reportedly only two in Texas.

As far as I know, he didn't do anything special to regain his sight.  He was scheduled to undergo experimental surgery but woke up the morning he was supposed to go in with markedly improved vision.  It continued to improve to the point that he could see as well as he always had with only minor loss of peripheral vision.

The doctor cancelled the surgery and told him it was nothing short a miracle.  We had a lot of people praying for him and completely agreed with her assessment. 

As it turned out, the experimental surgical procedure for this condition was a complete failure.  Every patient who underwent it lost all of their remaining sight.

I am learning more about AMD and related issues nearly every day. My friend who is blind has had a condition that his doctors don't even know the cause. He has been to specialists all over USA, not for a cure, but for observation. He has had the advancing condition since childhood. I was talking with him on Friday and he told me he could see I was in front of him (about 3 feet away) as a shadow. He has prism type glasses that he uses for reading. With those, he can see no further than two feet, but he can read, but with difficulty.

To me, approaching blindness IS more serious as a Heart Attack.
Tinker

@Peter or Seth, Can we transfer the eye part of this discussion to another thread? AMD is a leading cause of blindness. Some sites suggest it is the leading cause of blindness. There are other causes. In my case, I seem to have lost personal contact with my long term eye doc. The specialist does not seem interested in any type of communication with out the use of a wrecking bar to pry it out of her.  What i have learned has been from the internet. deep creek and Sparktrician have been more informative than either of my eye docs.  I think the info from them is valuable. I am trying to keep up with a history of my experiences. For all kinds of info about almost any subject, The FOG has been, for years, the place to go.
WHT
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #54 on: July 18, 2018, 06:30 PM »
@Tinker and @deepcreek, I'm somewhat in the same boat regarding AMD.  My optometrist uses some pretty amazing test equipment and saw the beginnings of AMD in my eyes.  She recommended a product called MacuHealth to diminish the possibilities for getting AMD.  You may want to look into this.  I have no relationship with this company, nor does my optometrist.

@Sparktrician THANKYOU WILLEY. I have just waded thru a whole wad of info found on MacuHealth.com. I don't grasp all that it tells, but I seem to have wasted a whole lot of valuable time with my using my presently prescribed pills.  I will look into MacuHealth further and will be thinking seriously of making some changes.

How long have you had AMD? 
Are you detecting any improvement since taking the 10-10-2 pills?
All other sites I have read seem to say it is only luck of the draw to note improvement.
The explanations I have just read seem reasonable and sensible.  Are they true?
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #55 on: July 18, 2018, 07:13 PM »
@Tinker and @deepcreek, I'm somewhat in the same boat regarding AMD.  My optometrist uses some pretty amazing test equipment and saw the beginnings of AMD in my eyes.  She recommended a product called MacuHealth to diminish the possibilities for getting AMD.  You may want to look into this.  I have no relationship with this company, nor does my optometrist.

@Sparktrician THANKYOU WILLEY. I have just waded thru a whole wad of info found on MacuHealth.com. I don't grasp all that it tells, but I seem to have wasted a whole lot of valuable time with my using my presently prescribed pills.  I will look into MacuHealth further and will be thinking seriously of making some changes.

How long have you had AMD? 
Are you detecting any improvement since taking the 10-10-2 pills?
All other sites I have read seem to say it is only luck of the draw to note improvement.
The explanations I have just read seem reasonable and sensible.  Are they true?
Tinker

@Tinker, In my case, it's just the very early beginnings.  I've been using the MacuHealth stuff for the last six months with the intent to stave off the advance of AMD.  It's just too early to tell if they're fully effective.  We'll see how things are developing in another six months.  If you choose to try it, I hope it works well for you. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline adcolor

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Re: Serious as a Heart Attack
« Reply #56 on: July 20, 2018, 12:03 PM »
FWIW, your local hospital (or other public oriented health program; we even have a couple of news stations that compete with a community health program) may offer occasional heart calcium CT scan for a reduced price/promotion.  No pain, just a walk in and get under the machine (pretty much integrated into a modern X ray machine).   Too easy to not get once in a while -- even if it only gives you a baseline for blockage oriented heart problems (it is not a replacement for EKGs, etc, but an additional tool).   For you guys & gals that think "I'm too young to worry about it". 

Now to implement improvements in my own life (not sure why it's a 'style'); aerobics, get on board with my PT (see him more than my MD) for aches and pains from poor body use/patterns, lower my A1C (fyi, that's the insulin resistance -diabetic- calculation diagnostic).    Don't under estimate the value of a good PT; way smarter than a gym rat, not a lot more money.  Plus, they know the results of the local ortho's when you need one; and whom they can work with afterwards.  Teaming.

Happy Birthday by the way!