Author Topic: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery  (Read 5551 times)

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5710
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #30 on: July 02, 2018, 08:44 PM »
My favorite knives are Schmitt Brothers, sharp as (well you know), and hold an edge forever.

Tom

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4945
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #31 on: July 03, 2018, 02:00 PM »
Here's a photo of the Epicurean cutting board and the 5 knives I use the most often. Three Shun's and two Wusthof's.

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #32 on: July 05, 2018, 03:28 PM »
Since I just sharpened our knives on Monday and we had a big tomato for our burgers I thought we'd play around a little and see just how sharp it was.  I normally test for sharpness using regular office paper or I actually prefer thin magazine paper if we happen to have any old magazines lying around.

It's not as sharp or as easy to just push slice as I've seen in some videos on YouTube, but I'm still pretty happy with the result.  The knife had also been used to cut some things after I sharpened it on Monday so it wasn't straight off of the sharpener.

I tried slicing first and couldn't do nearly as well as my wife.  She has better knife skills than me.



Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #33 on: July 16, 2018, 05:40 PM »
I had mentioned in my first post that I had acquired various gadgets that help me sharpen my knives.  I believe I learned about both of these products by watching Clay Allison's (Wicked Edge) YouTube videos

The first and probably most frequently used item is a lighted jewler's loupe:




I started out with basic non illuminated loupes and I discovered that I actually needed some closeup illumination to help see the blade edge.  It's amazing how you can see little microchips and other imperfections in the edge with 10x magnification.

The other item that I got is CATRA Blade Protractor:




It's basically a laser pointer that bisects the cutting edge to show you the angle that each bevel is sharpened at.  It's great for showing what angles a knife has previously been sharpened at if you want to match the angle exactly.  It can also show how polished the edge is and can show the type of grind that was applied to the edge.

I'll share the last gadget for measuring sharpness in my next post.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 15
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #34 on: August 01, 2018, 02:52 PM »
After reading this thread I decided to try out the Work Sharp Culinary E5. Today I've sharpened a couple of Zwillinge knives with it and I must say that I am quite happy with the results. I might be able to get my knives sharper by hand (I am a proficient sharpener if I may say so myself), but not in this little time, with so little effort, and with this much consistency.

So thanks FOG for recommending this tool!

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #35 on: August 01, 2018, 03:06 PM »
That's terrific and it looks like a neat product!  Was there any metal or abrasive dust left behind after you were done?  I read that it has a built in vacuum to suck up any debris.  The only slight downside to using the regular Work Sharp or Work Sharp Ken Onion Edition is the dust left behind on the counter.

I think the convenience and consistency are very important.  If it's quick, easy, and reliable then there's no reason not to use it. 

The Wicked Edge System is great but, thinking about needing to set it up and then go through the various grits by hand kinda makes me lose interest in sharpening very fast.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline hdv

  • Posts: 15
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #36 on: August 02, 2018, 11:15 AM »
I've attached 2 photo's. One shows the dust I removed from the device after sharpening about 10 knives. Half of them at the most aggressive setting. During normal use I've not noticed any dust on the counter. None at all.

The other shows a fan behind the belt. That fan creates a small draft. Enough for cooling and keeping any metal dust in the device, but definitely not enough to create suction. I am afraid there is no built-in vacuum. And from what I see I doubt that would be a wise feature for this device either. However the device is easily cleaned. I just remove the belt and clean the compartment with a stiff brush. That's all there is to it.

HTH

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #37 on: August 02, 2018, 12:42 PM »
Thanks for the pictures and the description of how it manages dust. 

The Amazon product description for the sharpener said it has a built in vacuum.  I suppose that's just their marketing spin or it's a matter of semantics if a draft is the same thing as a vacuum (bottom line is there's no mess left on the counter which is a good thing):

Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline vkumar

  • Posts: 349
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #38 on: August 13, 2018, 12:19 PM »
@GoingMyWay thank you for the great review on the different sharpeners.   I have an Apex pro but find it a pain to haul it out and set it up. And being a lazy guy that I am, I find the  Ken Onion appealing.

Is it possible to set up intermediate angles such as 17 or 18 degrees accurately on the Ken onion Worksharp?  And is it possible to do it consistently?

Vijay
Vijay Kumar

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #39 on: August 13, 2018, 08:47 PM »
Hi Vijay.  I'm glad you found the post helpful.  There is an intermediate setting in between 15 and 20 degrees on the Worksharp Ken Onion Edition.  That should approximate about 17-18 degrees.  I've never used that setting - I've only used 15 degrees.  The Blade Grinding Attachment will allow you to set a specific degree, but I question how accurate that really is since you're basically "freehand" sharpening with no guide.  You just "zero" the blade by placing it on the reference plate before each pass on the belt.

I like using the Blade Grinding Attachment for 2 reasons - the belt is wider and the side of the knife is not riding against an edge guide to get marred/scarred/scratched (this can probably be eliminated by taping the knife with tape).

I think one shouldn't get too hungup on a specific sharpening angle.  I'd venture to say that there is no precision when sharpening by hand with nothing more than a sharpening stone - that's not to say it's a bad thing, just no need.  The most important thing to do is to create an apex at the blade's edge.  Then it's not really important what angle or degrees you're at.

Honestly, I've always had the Worksharp Ken Onion Edition set at 15 degrees, but I think the blade protractor was showing more like 20 degrees+ and the angle was not even on both sides.  Nevertheless, the paper cut test was very good and I felt like it was a very sharp edge that I was able to achieve in the shortest amount of time possible.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline Kevin D.

  • Posts: 900
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #40 on: August 14, 2018, 12:19 AM »
I use my Tormek for really dull knives or ones that have nicks from cutting through bones. I use a steel to maintain the sharpness.

Same here.  No comparison.
Kapex, CT-SYS, SYS-Cart, Pro 5 Sander, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  Domino XL, MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline vkumar

  • Posts: 349
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #41 on: August 14, 2018, 02:13 PM »
Hi Vijay.  I'm glad you found the post helpful.  There is an intermediate setting in between 15 and 20 degrees on the Worksharp Ken Onion Edition.  That should approximate about 17-18 degrees.  I've never used that setting - I've only used 15 degrees.  The Blade Grinding Attachment will allow you to set a specific degree, but I question how accurate that really is since you're basically "freehand" sharpening with no guide.  You just "zero" the blade by placing it on the reference plate before each pass on the belt.

I like using the Blade Grinding Attachment for 2 reasons - the belt is wider and the side of the knife is not riding against an edge guide to get marred/scarred/scratched (this can probably be eliminated by taping the knife with tape).

I think one shouldn't get too hungup on a specific sharpening angle.  I'd venture to say that there is no precision when sharpening by hand with nothing more than a sharpening stone - that's not to say it's a bad thing, just no need.  The most important thing to do is to create an apex at the blade's edge.  Then it's not really important what angle or degrees you're at.

Honestly, I've always had the Worksharp Ken Onion Edition set at 15 degrees, but I think the blade protractor was showing more like 20 degrees+ and the angle was not even on both sides.  Nevertheless, the paper cut test was very good and I felt like it was a very sharp edge that I was able to achieve in the shortest amount of time possible.

Thank you @GoingMyWay for the detailed writeup. Looks like this will work for my intended use. About to spring for it.
Vijay Kumar

Offline GoingMyWay

  • Posts: 619
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #42 on: August 14, 2018, 02:57 PM »
You're very welcome!  I hope you share your feedback and results.
Inquiring Minds Want to Know

TS55, CT26, RO150, CXS, ETS 150/3, ETS EC 150/5, MFT/3, TS75, DF500, DTS400, OF1400, CT SYS

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Re: Sharpening Kitchen Cutlery
« Reply #43 on: August 14, 2018, 03:21 PM »
Hi,

In my very early days of collecting knives, I traded for a Spyderco Sharpmaker and it's what I use ever since. I use it at the pre-defined angles, I use it as bench stone and I use it on everything from my EDC knives, kitchen knives, razor to tools. Most meet a leather strop afterwards, one side with a super fine grit polishing paste, the other pure leather. I get the results I want/need with this setup and the sharpmaker itself and the rods are still the same I traded for over a decade ago ...

Btw: the rods are easily cleaned with an eraser.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver