Author Topic: The Big Green Egg  (Read 15333 times)

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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #90 on: July 18, 2017, 10:59 AM »
After seeing comment from @smirak I HAD to go caveman and try the direct on the lump method to finish the sous vide steaks:





Straight from the fridge to the fire for 6-7 minutes. Very complete char yet still medium rare throughout. Double Yum!

RMW

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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #91 on: July 18, 2017, 11:47 PM »
I have a 22" Komodo Kamado and a large BGE. If you have the budget, the Komodo Kamado in my opinion is worth the price of admission. All Komodo Kamados are hand build in Indonesia. Several are stocked in the California warehouse for immediate delivery. If you happen to like one of the models in stock, you can get it within a week or two, depending upon where you live in the country. If you prefer to order a tile combination not in stock, then it could be up to 5 months, depending upon the backlog. I can assure you, its worth the wait. If you would like more details, feel free to PM me. I'm more than willing to do a video FaceTime and walk you through the design and construction highlights. That way you can get a better idea of what makes it so special. FYI, I have no affiliation with KK, just a happy customer.
Thanks. I actually did call the owner and it is just what you said - in stock a week or so shipping and he went over in detail why it's better - actually overbuilt and yeah - no expense spared. Sure are works of art and engineering, but if I were to dod a Kamado, it would be one of the more popular ones - BGE, KJ, Primo, Blaze. I was checking out the Memphis Grill and saw the BGE - it's pretty good quality in my eyes.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 11:52 PM by Bob Marino »
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #92 on: July 18, 2017, 11:54 PM »
 Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?
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Online tjbnwi

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #93 on: July 19, 2017, 12:00 AM »
I'm a direct on the coals guy.

They are a "little" warm.

I'm pretty annal about how the corn on the cob is prepared....

Try a pan fried, oven finished steak. Good stuff.

Tom

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #94 on: July 19, 2017, 12:17 AM »
I'm a direct on the coals guy.

They are a "little" warm.

I'm pretty annal about how the corn on the cob is prepared....

Try a pan fried, oven finished steak. Good stuff.

Tom

 893 degrees? Wow, that's hot! Don't know if I'd be so adventurous to tossing the meat directly on the coals though.
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Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #95 on: July 19, 2017, 01:04 AM »
Bob,

Being from the Deep South, pork is my go to. Any fruit wood for pork is fine. Currently, I'm burning through peach wood on ribs, homemade bacon and pork butts. For briskets/beef ribs, I go hickory or oak. For fish, I couldn't tell you. I'm not a huge fish fan, but cedar/alder planked salmon is hard to beat.

I second your comments about the KK. I'd love to own one just because they look nice and have great features, but I can't justify the price, especially considering I already own a KJ.

For an in depth study, google kamado guru and head to their forum. All major brands are represented on that forum. Also, google "man cave meals" and/or "John Setzler"...his videos got me into kamado cooking.

Also, as others have said, feel free to PM me if you have any questions at all.

Kevin

Offline quietguy

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #96 on: July 19, 2017, 01:23 AM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

It really depends on what you are cooking.  I generally stick with Oak or Hickory as a primary, but will mix in others to get a specific flavor.  For fish, I generally stick with Hickory and grill on a cedar plank. 

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #97 on: July 19, 2017, 09:55 AM »
Would there be any difference in taste between smoking with a kamado or with the traditional smoker? Would there be a difference in taste either by smoke or buy direct grilling when using charcoal or pellets?
 In other words, temps being the same, is there a difference in taste between cooking with pellets or charcoal?

Consider that not all pellets are created equal. I get different results from different brands of pellets let alone all the various wood options and even blends.

 So, what are your opinions on the different pellet brands?
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Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #98 on: July 19, 2017, 11:58 AM »
So, what are your opinions on the different pellet brands?

So far I've done well with Traeger pellets in my Traeger smoker, have used hickory, mesquite, apple and cherry, all of which impart very different flavors. I found that Sportsmans Warehouse also had some other brands and tried one in apple and hickory, the apple was a bit milder/weaker flavor than Traeger but the hickory left a bit of an ash tray note to the meat, not very appealing. I no longer have the bags and didn't write it down but will check the next time I visit. I'll keep trying other woods and brands to see how they work, fun to experiment.
+1

Offline Anodyne

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #99 on: July 19, 2017, 01:06 PM »

I hear ya Pete. Lots of choices.  Saw BGE for the first time today. Very impressive but I'm leaning more towards the convenience of a pellet stove. One that can grill, smoke and be an oven. The Memphis grills ar looking good to me
[/quote]

Bob, if you are investigating pellet grills (especially in the Memphis price range), I'd also give Mak Grills a look.  They have what is probably the best controller on the market.  I've got a 2 star general, and love it. 

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #100 on: July 19, 2017, 01:07 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #101 on: July 19, 2017, 01:47 PM »

I hear ya Pete. Lots of choices.  Saw BGE for the first time today. Very impressive but I'm leaning more towards the convenience of a pellet stove. One that can grill, smoke and be an oven. The Memphis grills ar looking good to me

Bob, if you are investigating pellet grills (especially in the Memphis price range), I'd also give Mak Grills a look.  They have what is probably the best controller on the market.  I've got a 2 star general, and love it.
[/quote]

 Nice.....
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #102 on: July 19, 2017, 01:49 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me.

Yea I heard that the lump charcoal has dead trees in it....  [poke]

RMW
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #103 on: July 19, 2017, 01:51 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me.

 Yikes, Willy. Disposable diapers in the pellets? [eek] [scared] [eek]

I'm sure that has long ago been rectified (no pun intended) but I can understand your hesitation with that picture in mind.
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Online tjbnwi

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #104 on: July 19, 2017, 02:14 PM »
Make it easy---dig a hole, throw in a grate, add coals, light, wait a few minutes, start cooking.

Meat on a stick if you don't want it directly on the coals.

 [wink]

Tom

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #105 on: July 19, 2017, 03:39 PM »
Make it easy---dig a hole, throw in a grate, add coals, light, wait a few minutes, start cooking.

Meat on a stick if you don't want it directly on the coals.

 [wink]

Tom

 Yeah, yeah...
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Offline mark60

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #106 on: July 19, 2017, 06:50 PM »
Pellets get expensive unless you buy in bulk. I've been using perfect mix and sometimes hickory in my Yoder. Cookinpellets.com is where I get them from. Lumberjack pellets are also pretty popular and you can buy in bulk. I typically go through around a pound to 1 1/2 pounds per hour so it's not cheap to cook on.
The BGE in comparison is very cheap to cook on. When you're done cooking you snuff the fire and use the same coal for the next cook.
I used my Weber kettle today and had to empty the ash before I lit it up. I use regular Kingsford in that and a chimney of charcoal burns down to a lot of ash, every two or three cooks I have to clean it out. The lump in the BGE burns down  to almost nothing. I clean the ash out only occasionally.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #107 on: July 19, 2017, 08:10 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #108 on: July 19, 2017, 09:51 PM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

I use a Weber 22" kettle.
A few years back I chopped down a plum and an apricot tree. Dried the wood and cut thin rounds with a band saw. I probably have enough juice to last 10-15 years.

On ocassion I install 3/4" hardwood floors. The oak & maple off-cuts are saved and cut into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last forever...

I've fabbed stuff from hickory and cherry. I save the off-cuts, slice them into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last a couple of years.

In every case, all of the tinder is soaked in water before it is added to the Weber.

I'm now in search of that terminal apple tree.  [cool]

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #109 on: July 19, 2017, 10:22 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]

  If things were that simple..... ;)
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Offline leakyroof

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #110 on: July 19, 2017, 10:29 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]
. I already tried that approach with him.... Didn't work.... [embarassed]
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Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #111 on: July 20, 2017, 04:35 AM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

I use a Weber 22" kettle.
A few years back I chopped down a plum and an apricot tree. Dried the wood and cut thin rounds with a band saw. I probably have enough juice to last 10-15 years.

On ocassion I install 3/4" hardwood floors. The oak & maple off-cuts are saved and cut into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last forever...

I've fabbed stuff from hickory and cherry. I save the off-cuts, slice them into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last a couple of years.

In every case, all of the tinder is soaked in water before it is added to the Weber.

I'm now in search of that terminal apple tree.  [cool]

One thing I don't understand...why soak in water?  I've never done it on my Kamado Joe.  My smoking wood is very dry.  You only get smoke for about the first 30 mins anyway...your food won't absorb anymore, so why take the time to soak the wood?  More smoke overall doesn't equal more smoke in the meat?  Just curious...

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #112 on: July 20, 2017, 05:42 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

Offline Naildrivingman

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #113 on: July 20, 2017, 06:25 AM »
Well...this is a website devoted to the worship of green.  I have to believe that any Festoolian grill master would have to have a BGE.  If for no other reason it augments our already out of control green addiction, for which I know of no treatment center or 12 step group.
Dance with who brung ya...

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #114 on: July 20, 2017, 08:32 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

 Soooooo, what is the soaking myth?
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Offline miclee15

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #115 on: July 20, 2017, 09:18 AM »
I've own a Large and Small BGE and cannot say enough great things about them.  My wife was going to kill me when I brought home my first BGE, until I cooked a spatchcock chicken. After one bite, she was sold.

One advantage to ceramic cooking is the moisture in the meats are not drawn out.  I'm not sure the technical term, but when meats are cooked in a metal kettle, the heat which is radiating out draws out moisture.  In a ceramic cooker much less as the heat barely escapes so the moisture stays in.  Same concept as the claypot chicken things you put in the oven.

Also, I'm surprised no one has thrown out cooking steaks using a Sous Vide.   You will get a perfectly cooked steak and impossible to over cook to your desired temp.    What I do is cook the steak with a sous vide, 1 hour prior to it finishing, fire up my small BGE wide open vents so it gets really hot.  Sear the outside for a few secs.  Total prep and actually doing the cooking about 5 mins.   Much easier when you have guests and not wanting to man the grill to ensure nothing is overcooked.   I'm sure this group wouldn't have an issue buying another "tool" to assist in the goal for a perfect steak  [big grin]

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #116 on: July 20, 2017, 09:25 AM »
I've own a Large and Small BGE and cannot say enough great things about them.  My wife was going to kill me when I brought home my first BGE, until I cooked a spatchcock chicken. After one bite, she was sold.

One advantage to ceramic cooking is the moisture in the meats are not drawn out.  I'm not sure the technical term, but when meats are cooked in a metal kettle, the heat which is radiating out draws out moisture.  In a ceramic cooker much less as the heat barely escapes so the moisture stays in.  Same concept as the claypot chicken things you put in the oven.

Also, I'm surprised no one has thrown out cooking steaks using a Sous Vide.   You will get a perfectly cooked steak and impossible to over cook to your desired temp.    What I do is cook the steak with a sous vide, 1 hour prior to it finishing, fire up my small BGE wide open vents so it gets really hot.  Sear the outside for a few secs.  Total prep and actually doing the cooking about 5 mins.   Much easier when you have guests and not wanting to man the grill to ensure nothing is overcooked.   I'm sure this group wouldn't have an issue buying another "tool" to assist in the goal for a perfect steak  [big grin]

 If you go back a couple of pages, you will see the Sous Vide mentioned. This thread was the first I ever became aware of that though - just to show how much more  can be learned by a simple post.
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Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #117 on: July 20, 2017, 09:34 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

 Soooooo, what is the soaking myth?

Thought i covered it. Soaking wood doesn't prolong the burn of the wood.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #118 on: July 20, 2017, 10:02 AM »
Ok, I will open up another can of worms (no not in the food ;)) but regarding sous vide and meats - if all you are doing after the sous vide (Yes I know suos vide makes the meats super, super tender) is very quickly searing the meats on high temps   can't that be done - just as effectively taste wise on a gas grill? Yes I know, gas may only get to 600-700 degrees or so rather than the 900+ from ceramic, but that means the difference in searing time is maybe a minute or so and when only searing for such a short time how can the benefits of  the smoky flavor be imparted on the food? 
 And wouldn't a good and properly reverse seared steak be more flavorful, not necessarily more tender, but more flavorful, than one cooked with sous vide?
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Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #119 on: July 20, 2017, 10:05 AM »
For smirak & DynaGlide...

One of my favorite cuts is flank steak that has been marinated overnight in an olive oil/wine/herb mixture. When placing the steak above the hot charcoal, there is a tendency for the marinade drippings to start a fire.

So, when placing dry wood on hot coals and then adding a steak & marinade, that combination does provide for a lot more flame and a lot less smoke, and it burns rather than sears the surface. Soaking the wood controls the flame out problem and imparts a less bitter taste. When I used dried wood exclusively, the flavor of the meat was a bit more bitter/tart.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2017, 10:11 AM by Cheese »