Author Topic: The Big Green Egg  (Read 8509 times)

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Offline Bob Marino

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The Big Green Egg
« on: July 08, 2017, 09:55 AM »
 A while ago, I saw some postings on FaceBook from an old customer about the Big Green Egg.
http://biggreenegg.com/

 For those that own one, or those who chose not to own one, a few questions.
What makes it so special/pricey? Food taste any different than any other charcoal type grill? Thumbs up or thumbs down on your purchase?
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Offline RobBob

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #1 on: July 08, 2017, 10:42 AM »
I do not own one, but my take is that it is an expensive insulated charcoal grill that also doubles as a smoker.  Or maybe vise versa?  There are better charcoal grills and there are better smokers out there.

As a smoker, the insulation helps it to maintain the temperature over long smoker sessions, especially in cold climates.  My Weber Smokey Mountain holds its temperature just fine in the southern climate where I live.  Many competitive BBQ people use Smokey Mountain's because they work well, are light and easy to carry to an event, and are relatively inexpensive.

Do not be fooled into comparing the taste of food cooked in a gas grill with food cooked in a Big Green Egg.  Food cooked on a gas grill typically does not taste as good as food cooked over charcoal.

I am sure you will get many responses from people who completely disagree with me. 

P.S.  Big Green Egg corporate headquarters is located in the state where I live.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 12:01 PM by RobBob »

Offline Holzhacker

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2017, 10:48 AM »
I've looked into buying one of these but haven't due to price. I'm too cheap to spend that much on a grill. Rather spend the money on a motorcycle or more tools. I do know a few people who have them and swear by them. They definitely seem to do a nice job of grilling. I did read a bunch of reviews that ranged from this is great to overrated to being a finicky product.
If I can find a sale or something I may get one. Otherwise it just seems like someone reinventing the wheel and selling a bright shiny object. Doing the research it does seem like there are better products out there for the serious BBQ'er.
"The Code is not a ceiling to reach but a floor to work up from"

Offline justaguy

  • Posts: 106
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #3 on: July 08, 2017, 11:01 AM »
Big Green Egg grilles are Kamado style grills. There are many brands of Kamado style grilles with a broad range of prices. You might consider purchasing a lower cost brand and trying it for a while before buying one of the expensive models. Akorn grills at available at most home centers are usually around $300 and will last a couple of years before the plastic handles and other bits start to fail. A ceramic Kamado should last your lifetime and longer if cared for.

I have two Kamado grills. I start with a Bubba Keg (now sold as a Broil King) which is a double wall steel grill with insulation between the two walls. Several years later I added a Primo Oval XL ceramic.

As noted, Kamado grills are a compromise between a grill and a smoker. For me I consider it a good compromise. I can load charcoal and indirect smoke a pork shoulder for 12 hours at a consistent 250 temp. I can adjust the two vents and grill chicken in an hour at 375. I can crank the vents wide open and grill steak on the cast iron grills at over 850 temp. Not many other grill styles offer this flexibility.

You can drill a hole with a $50 drill or with a $500 drill. You can cook dinner with a $40 grill or a $1000 grill.

Offline mopo

  • Posts: 8
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2017, 11:11 AM »
A while ago, I saw some postings on FaceBook from an old customer about the Big Green Egg.
http://biggreenegg.com/

 For those that own one, or those who chose not to own one, a few questions.
What makes it so special/pricey? Food taste any different than any other charcoal type grill? Thumbs up or thumbs down on your purchase?

I don't own one, but two major advantages to the BGE are one, significantly more heat than gas grills (great for pizza), and two, food cooked on the BGE tends to be more moist than food cooked on gas.

Gas grills, on the other hand, have the advantage of a larger cooking surface, as well as ease of use, especially if the gas grill is hooked up to a home's natural gas line. You can light a gas grill in seconds and don't have to deal with bags of charcoal and empting of ashes.

I think it basically comes down to the convenience and ease of use of gas vs the increased versatility and potentially better tasting food cooked on the BGE. If you regularly cook for larger groups you might want the larger cooking area of gas grills, whereas if you're an experienced cook wanting the best and don't mind a bit of extra effort you'd probably be happier with the BGE.


Offline Sparktrician

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2017, 11:18 AM »
I bought one a year ago.  I really like that food cooked doesn't have the after-taste that propane sometimes leaves.  Slow cooking is terrific once the temperature is stabilized.  One filling of charcoal* can last pretty much all day if you're cooking at 180° to 200°.  It's really hard to go wrong with the BGE. 

*Charcoal as sold by BGE, not the Kingsford briquettes that are loaded with petroleum products.   
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2017, 11:36 AM »
I've used a Weber kettle for the last 35 years and am completely sold...................until it comes to cooking something low & slow, then it's a PITA. If I want to cook at 200º and maintain that temp it's almost impossible. Add 3 pieces of charcoal and sometimes it's too much, sometimes too little. If I'm cooking a brisket the temperature fluctuates by 100º and you need to constantly keep your eye on it. It takes away a lot of the fun.

I think that's where the Green Egg comes in. If you're doing ribs, brisket, pork shoulder anything that needs to cook at a low temp for a very long time then the insulated egg philosophy wins.


Offline RobBob

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2017, 11:50 AM »
Ruth's Chris Steakhouse is an expensive steak restaurant with a great reputation.  I have eaten there probably 4 or 5 times.  Their steaks are cooked in a 1800-degree broiler.

Personally, I do not like Ruth's Chris steaks.  For best flavor, I prefer my steaks cooked over charcoal.  Also, I do not like the high heat sear or high heat for cooking steaks in general.

When your steak is brought to your table by the waitron at Ruth's Chris, it is literally sizzling and literally too hot to eat.  So, by the time you let the steak cool off enough to eat, the steak has continued to cook and is now over cooked.  Plus, the high heat destroys the flavor.

Just my preference and something else to consider when buying a grill/smoker.  YMMV

Mythbusting: Searing Steaks Seals in the Juices
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 12:07 PM by RobBob »

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2017, 11:58 AM »
Allow me to chime in here. I have just a bit of experience with the Big Green Egg, the Weber 22" Kettle, the Weber Smoky Mountain, and a Weber propane.

First I find it more than a bit hypocritical for anyone on this forum, of all places, to denounce the BGE for its price. I guess if that's your reason for knocking it down you should sell your Festools and save some money and pickup DeWalt, Makita, etc.

I paid $400 4 years ago for my Weber propane. Fast forward to today and the original grate is gone, rusted through. The flavorizer bars need replaced, rusted through. The outside is in need of love. The door is rusted. I don't enjoy using it but it's a necessary evil when I need something cooked in under 20 minutes.

I branched out to the Weber kettle a year after the propane. I fought with it for two years maintaining 225-275 for cooking ribs, pork butt, you name it I probably tried it. Raining? Forget about it. Cold? Nope. And you have to use a water pan that acts as a grease catcher. Have fun disposing of that after every cook.

I now own a large Big Green Egg along with the kettle and propane. The kettle is dedicated to rotisserie duty which it excels at. If I have the choice I cook on the Big Green Egg. I've regretted a lot of purchases over the years but this is not one of them. And if it breaks in 10 years guess what, I won't spend any money. Lifetime warranty. Over the past two weeks I cooked a 12lb packer brisket on it maintaining 275 for 10 hours without adding any lump charcoal or really doing anything and a 7lb pork butt at 250 with the same experience. Because it has very little airflow during long cooks the food stays more moist and you don't need to mess with a water pan.

For steaks I don't do high heat until the end. Reverse sear is the only way to go. Buy 1" thick well marbled ribeyes and cook them 225 until they're near desired temp. Then open the vents and let the egg get up to 600 or more and sear it for ~30s per side. If you haven't tried it this way you need to.

Like any tool you get what you pay for. It has a learning curve like anything else but I couldn't do without mine.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 12:02 PM by DynaGlide »

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2017, 12:18 PM »
  Interesting about searing steaks first to "lock in the flavor" not being the best way to go. I always thought that was the way to go. Will try it the reverse way next time. Well, how hard is it to change temps quickly on the BGE to accomplish that?
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Offline leakyroof

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2017, 12:48 PM »
  Interesting about searing steaks first to "lock in the flavor" not being the best way to go. I always thought that was the way to go. Will try it the reverse way next time. Well, how hard is it to change temps quickly on the BGE to accomplish that?
  Fast Temp changes are not always easy with a BGE grill unless you're wanting to lower it[ just open the lid]
 To raise the temp, you don't have the ease of a gas grill where you just add more gas/turn a knob, but you get there eventually with enough charcoal in the grill already lit and your upper vent slide turned to a fully position plus you can play with the lower vent in the bottom of the grill for air flow into the grill.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1935
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2017, 12:51 PM »
Allow me to chime in here. I have just a bit of experience with the Big Green Egg, the Weber 22" Kettle, the Weber Smoky Mountain, and a Weber propane.

First I find it more than a bit hypocritical for anyone on this forum, of all places, to denounce the BGE for its price. I guess if that's your reason for knocking it down you should sell your Festools and save some money and pickup DeWalt, Makita, etc.

I paid $400 4 years ago for my Weber propane. Fast forward to today and the original grate is gone, rusted through. The flavorizer bars need replaced, rusted through. The outside is in need of love. The door is rusted. I don't enjoy using it but it's a necessary evil when I need something cooked in under 20 minutes.

I branched out to the Weber kettle a year after the propane. I fought with it for two years maintaining 225-275 for cooking ribs, pork butt, you name it I probably tried it. Raining? Forget about it. Cold? Nope. And you have to use a water pan that acts as a grease catcher. Have fun disposing of that after every cook.

I now own a large Big Green Egg along with the kettle and propane. The kettle is dedicated to rotisserie duty which it excels at. If I have the choice I cook on the Big Green Egg. I've regretted a lot of purchases over the years but this is not one of them. And if it breaks in 10 years guess what, I won't spend any money. Lifetime warranty. Over the past two weeks I cooked a 12lb packer brisket on it maintaining 275 for 10 hours without adding any lump charcoal or really doing anything and a 7lb pork butt at 250 with the same experience. Because it has very little airflow during long cooks the food stays more moist and you don't need to mess with a water pan.

For steaks I don't do high heat until the end. Reverse sear is the only way to go. Buy 1" thick well marbled ribeyes and cook them 225 until they're near desired temp. Then open the vents and let the egg get up to 600 or more and sear it for ~30s per side. If you haven't tried it this way you need to.

Like any tool you get what you pay for. It has a learning curve like anything else but I couldn't do without mine.
   THIS ...^^^^  I sold my rebuilt 3 row burner Weber Genesis Grill once I got my Big Green Egg in 2008. 
I changed the stock 4" casters on my BGE to larger 5" versions from Mc-Master Carr since the 5" ones roll better on rough concrete for me.
 
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Online retfr8flyr

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #12 on: July 08, 2017, 02:03 PM »
I'll jump in here, I am new to the forum but an old hand at cooking on a Kamado, as I have been cooking on a Kamado style grill since 1963, when I was 18 and my father brought one back from Japan. I currently have a Kamado Joe Big Joe, Chargriller Akorn and Akorn Jr. also a Camp Chef Flat Top Griddle. The greatest advantage of a Kamado style grill, like the Big Green Egg, is the moisture retention of the cooked foods. It is also very versatile, in that you can grill, smoke, bake and high temp sear all on one device.

You really can't beat the taste and quality of the food that comes off a Kamado grill and if you haven't had the ability to try it, you should try and make the effort, you will not be disappointed. As for steaks I don't do reverse sear on anything less than 2 inches thick. I just don't think thinner stakes gain from the procedure because it's very difficult to do the sear on a thin steak and not over cook it but I like my steaks med rare. Now you take a nice 2 inch cut Ribeye, season it up and let it cook on indirect heat at 225°, until the internal temps reach 125°. Then pull it off, wrap it in foil and raise the temp on grill to about 600°-650°. When the temps are up, remove it from the foil, pat it dry with a paper towel and put it on the grill for 30 seconds and then turn it 90° for another 30 seconds, then flip it over and repeat. The steak will come out with a perfect med rare 135° internal temp and it will be the best steak you have ever cooked.

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #13 on: July 08, 2017, 04:36 PM »
@Bob Marino - talk about a slippery slope... Here goes:

My first experience with an Egg was 35 years ago, a friend's father was a Pan Am pilot on the NY/London/Tokyo route and somehow he stashed a Kamado in his flight bag. Loved the chicken and steaks but I was 18 at the time so many years passed but never forgot it.

Fast forward 15 years and my new-ish wife thought it was a silly extravagance until she really wanted the Buttercup couch so I bartered a $500-ish Large BGE for a $5K couch and figured I came out ahead.

A few years later we bought the shore house and equipped it with the small egg, which has too many compromises to be very useful. Sold that when we made Brigantine our year-round home and moved the original egg down.

5 years ago the original BGE cracked thru operator error and we could not imagine living without one so I started my research on the replacement. By then the Primo, Kamado Joe and other lesser versions were all available. Went with the large Kamado Joe.

We also have a gas grill (belongs to the FIL) a Pit Barrel Cooker & a Weber Kettle that an over-grilled friend gifted me with. they get used seldom. Soooo...

My [2cents] is that the quality Kamado's are hands down the most versatile cooker I have ever used and are worth every penny. The BGE is the "standard" for the genre, and KJ has the same level of quality but is more innovative. Primo is similar in overall quality to BGE/KJ. KJ have updated components twice since I have been aware of them while the BGE is basically the same as the first time I set eyes on one. Versatility-wise:
  • I can grill normal chicken/burgers/sausage/dogs with a 15 minute setup time and get flavor we don't achieve on the propane grill. Grill Grates are the best.
  • With the grill extender I can fit 4 racks of ribs, total prep time for egg & ribs is an hour and then they cruise @ 225-250 on autopilot for 4+ hours.
  • Indirect cooking, with the reverse sear, lets me slow cook beef roasts or pork loin to 80% done & then go direct and finish off the exterior to get a nice char. Acme has Round Eye roast for $2.88/# this week, I am picking up several to cook tomorrow & slice thin & vacuum bag/freeze for sammiches. Dump the frozen meat in Au Jus and heat for a few hours then serve for a fast meal that all carnivores love.
  • To reverse sear a steak cook indirect to 120-ish then remove and open it up wide, mine reaches 900 quickly then I finish off the steak.
  • Yep, pizza. Rube Goldberg setup of racks/stones/etc. and I can preheat to 700+ then cook a pie in 5 minutes. This takes some practice.
  • Lastly pork butt, indirect setup around 225-250 and once it is tuned in & loaded with lump/wood chunks I can go to bed and forget about it. I've powered thru the stall in 8 hours recently, more common is 10-12 hours. No need to foil wrap which ruins the bark IMHO.
Couple prior yaps from the FOG:

http://festoolownersgroup.com/general-friendly-chat/smokin'-the-storm-out/msg326569/#msg326569
http://festoolownersgroup.com/general-friendly-chat/the-reverse-sear/msg360034/#msg360034
http://festoolownersgroup.com/general-friendly-chat/schmokin'-birds/msg229816/#msg229816

And a few visual enticements.

RMW
Add-on products for Festool @ www.ripdogs.com
Discounts for FOG members @ www.ripdogs.com/fog-discount/

Offline Kevin D.

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #14 on: July 08, 2017, 04:55 PM »
I've wanted a BGE for a very long time.  A few years ago, I bought the floor model of a Weber charcoal cheapie unit just to have a charcoal flavoured BBQ versus my NG big Napoleon for a change.  Guess what?  Wife and son both disliked the taste of charcoal flavored BBQ. Go figure.  Didn't anticipate that at all.

I may still get a BGE one day, but this was a cheap lesson learned that the rest of the family will probably not like what I cook on it. 
Kapex, CT36AC, TS75, MFT 1080, MF-SYS/2, PS300 EQ-Plus, Parallel Guides Set, LR32 SYS, RO 150FEQ-Plus, OF1400 EQ Plus, DOMINO 500 Q-Plus,  MFK 700 EQ-Set, FS-SYS/2, CT22 w/hose storage, D36HW-RS-Plus, FS 1900/2, FS 3000/2, FS 1080/2-LR32, FS 1400/2-LR32, Gecko, Festool Hat, Festool T-Shirt (2), Festool Floor Mat, Festool Stein, Multi-Tool, tape measure, large and small Festool floor mats (foam rubber).

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2017, 05:34 PM »
Bob,

The BGE is a quality unit.  Don't look at the smallest unit as stated previously.

I have 11 grills now (down from 14) ranging from the Cobb (6 pieces of charcoal and can grill on the hood of your car) to a La Caja China (plywood but can a cook a pig in 4 hours).  I even have an IKEA grill!

For most of my grilling I use my 3 Weber kettles.  For smoking I use my horizontal barrel smoker with offset fire box.  For grilled pizzas I use my old Costco gas grill that burns unusually hot.  The most versatile is my Kamado style Bubba Keg which can do it all.  I am lucky that I bought mine at a Home Depot end of season sale for $199 instead of $399 and got the model that has a way to attach it to a trailer hitch for tailgating.

If I were only allowed to have two grills I would have a 22" Weber with the rotisserie ring and setup and a Kamado grill.

Peter
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline Nick561

  • Posts: 52
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #16 on: July 08, 2017, 07:13 PM »
Here is some Festool and BGE porn mixed togeather for what it's worth. [eek]

Best grills around


Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #17 on: July 08, 2017, 07:20 PM »
Here is some Festool and BGE porn mixed togeather for what it's worth. [eek]

Best grills around

(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

Bob Marino is so screwed now  [big grin].

Peter
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline Dane

  • Posts: 292
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #18 on: July 08, 2017, 08:21 PM »
Like many here, I've been through the gamut of grill types and brands.  I've owned Kamados, have owned the BGE XL and L, broil king keg and a Viking branded Primo.  I have whittled down the the herd to the Broil King Keg and a Weber Summit gasser.  I think that the Broil King is the most versitile and functional of the kamados.  It is better insulated, uses less charcoal, is more durable, and gets hotter for searing and pizza.  As to the temp change question- I can get it from 300 to 900 in a matter of minutes.  The charcoal quality matters more than most folks think.  If you're committed to the ceramic variety, I would buy the oval Primo over the BGE.  Green Egg is the most common brand, but as we Festool addicts know, common is not the benchmark for quality.  The oval Primo lets you go grill lid open with a two level fire like a traditional Weber set up while still having the insulation factor of a Kamado when wanted.  Another sweet grill that doesn't get enough respect is the PK Grill.  Talk about a legacy.  Google it.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 09:58 PM by Dane »

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1935
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #19 on: July 08, 2017, 08:28 PM »
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline HarveyWildes

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #20 on: July 08, 2017, 09:32 PM »
Here is some Festool and BGE porn mixed togeather for what it's worth. [eek]

Best grills around
...

I love it!  Just seeing how you did the table makes me want to buy a BGE.  I never thought of tying food and woodworking together quite like that.


Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #21 on: July 08, 2017, 11:25 PM »
 Wow, thanks for all the replies and Matt for the phone call.
 Nick - incredible job with the wooden base.

 So, today I went and put down a deposit on LBGE in a nearby store, but after reading these posts and many online comparisons, I am seriously considering cancelling and getting the Kamado Joe. The BGE website is certainly better and has a huge following with all sorts of social events, magazines, etc.   Seems though that KJ has some nicer design elements than the BGE. Where are these grills made? Not made up my mind yet though. Decisions, decisions.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2017, 11:35 PM by Bob Marino »
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Online retfr8flyr

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #22 on: July 09, 2017, 12:09 AM »
I would definitely go with a Kamado Joe over the BGE. The KJ is much more versatile, with the Divide & Conquer system and the new hinge system on the II series is fantastic, just look at the hinge on the BGEXL. KJ actually has a better warranty than BGE or Primp. With the BGE, if you use any non BGE items in your grill your warranty is void. That was a deal breaker for me with the BGE. With the Primo grill you have to pay return shipping for all warranty items. That could get very expensive if your top or bottom cracked.  I think the Kamado Joe is the best bang for the buck available. Now true Festool users should just skip all these companies and get a Kamodo Kamado.  https://komodokamado.com/

Offline antss

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #23 on: July 09, 2017, 12:14 AM »
@Bob Marino

K Joe is made in China
BGE is made in Mexico
Primo is made in the USA
All are headquartered in Atlanta , GA

You may want to check out Costco. Next week KJ is having their roadshow up in Norwalk, CT. You should be able to see them and save a few bucks too. 

Offline egmiii

  • Posts: 37
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #24 on: July 09, 2017, 12:21 AM »
I think a lot depends upon what you plan to use the cooker for. Kamado style cookers excel at smoking. While also excellent for grilling, their somewhat smaller diameter is probably the biggest complaint. BGE and Kamado Joe are two sides of the same coin. Whichever one has better dealer support/pricing in your region is likely the better candidate.

Personally, I use a Weber Q120 for weeknight grilling. It heats up insanely fast and burns very little propane. I get 40-50 hours from a 20# tank. I run a Komodo Kamado for smoking. It's a true insulated kamado made from refractory cement. It seems to be a popular misconception that the BGE is insulated. That is certainly not the case. It's just glazed ceramic. Nothing wrong with that, just want to get the facts straight. I have their large model at my vacation home and love it, but place your hand on the dome and you will be visiting the ER.

Check out the Komodo Kamado if your serious into smoking. It may not be within your budget, but the website is informative and the forum members are quite helpful.

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #25 on: July 09, 2017, 06:38 AM »
Bob,  I have a large sized BGE and am a huge proponent.  It is a kamado type grill and there are other cheaper alternatives as the same there are for Festool tools.  I have zero regrets buying one.  The great thing about the BGE is that it is very easy to maintain a low-slow cook temperature by regulating the air intake/ outtake vents.  Once you get the temperature just right for a slow cook, say 250 degrees, it is very easy to maintain this temperature, just like a kitchen oven.   I haven't tried it, but you can actually bake cookies on it.  The second great part of the BGE, or any other kamado, is that is uses lump charcoal which is carbonized wood.  There is nothing like the taste of meat cooked on a wood fire.  As I mentioned before, I have the large size. (18" grill).  They make an XL and even an XXL grill but I've read the large size is easiest to regulate the temperature. 

Egghead Forum is a good source for ideas and answers.

Edit:  I believe those bashing the BGE are like guys in other WW forums saying don't waste your money on Festool, Dewalt is better.  I'd also recommend arranging delivery and setup, the large weighs nearly 200 lbs. ---worth the extra coin.
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 06:44 AM by Jim Kirkpatrick »

Offline PaulH99

  • Posts: 22
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2017, 06:40 AM »
I'm going to provide an alternative idea: buy a pellet grill!

Last year around Father's Day I bought a Green Mountain Grills "Daniel Boone"/. This is the smallest of their mains-powered models. I buy really good pellet fuel from Amazon.

A pellet grill works like an oven: Set the temperature and walk away. Last weekend I smoked two pork shoulders (16 pounds total) for a cookout at a friend's house. I believe this took about 12 hours at 250 degrees Fahrenheit. I've been using a rub and instruction from Amazing Ribs for a while now and have not been disappointed in the least.

Last night I grilled split chicken breasts at 400 degrees Fahrenheit and they were perfectly moist when done.

Just "food for thought" as they say  [big grin]
-Paul
CT 26 • DF 500 • ETS 125 • KS 120 • OF 1400 • PS 430 • RO 125 • TS 55 R

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 26
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #27 on: July 09, 2017, 06:56 AM »
Bob,  I have a large sized BGE and am a huge proponent.  It is a kamado type grill and there are other cheaper alternatives as the same there are for Festool tools.  I have zero regrets buying one.  The great thing about the BGE is that it is very easy to maintain a low-slow cook temperature by regulating the air intake/ outtake vents.  Once you get the temperature just right for a slow cook, say 250 degrees, it is very easy to maintain this temperature, just like a kitchen oven.   I haven't tried it, but you can actually bake cookies on it.  The second great part of the BGE, or any other kamado, is that is uses lump charcoal which is carbonized wood.  There is nothing like the taste of meat cooked on a wood fire.  As I mentioned before, I have the large size. (18" grill).  They make an XL and even an XXL grill but I've read the large size is easiest to regulate the temperature. 

Egghead Forum is a good source for ideas and answers.

Edit:  I believe those bashing the BGE are like guys in other WW forums saying don't waste your money on Festool, Dewalt is better.  I'd also recommend arranging delivery and setup, the large weighs nearly 200 lbs. ---worth the extra coin.

Just so you know i was able to get the large into my garage from my driveway by myself. It comes in two boxes. From there i unpacked and carried everything upstairs and put it together. I bought potlifters and a friend and i lifted it into the nest.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3292
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #28 on: July 09, 2017, 08:02 AM »
Hey, Bob, do you have three of them yet???   [big grin]  Peter was right - you are SOOOOOO screwed!!!  BA-HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!   
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1893
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2017, 11:26 AM »
Dagnabit now I'm hungry!

Now I gotta put some meat in the Traeger  [drooling]
+1

Offline BJM9818

  • Posts: 97
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #30 on: July 09, 2017, 12:49 PM »
Moved into a new house 18 months ago. Ran a NG line to the yard figuring I would do a lynx or similar. Before we moved in I decided to expand and incorporate a green egg. Started to build a dual cooking station for the egg and gas grill. The built in grill budget got used up at first for furniture so I just bought a Large BGE.  Fast forward to now and Im Ripping out the entire thing and will be making a best with drawers for the egg.

Bob get one you will not be disappointed.

If anybody has plans for a egg nest that incorporates a ton of storage drawers in a 6' or less table let me know. City townhouse so storage space is tight.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3473
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #31 on: July 09, 2017, 03:10 PM »
If nobody else managed to get to "Uncle" Bob to be sure he got hooked onto a slippery slope, I was certain that sooner or later Richard (RMW) would very definitely get him hooked. Once I got down to his post, ... well, I am now very hungry.  @Richard/RMW, whenever you get onto your Green Egg and cooking, I wish you would leave your camera out of the equasion.  [unsure] [wink]
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 26
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #32 on: July 09, 2017, 03:26 PM »
Here's some more food porn to get you off the fence

Prime ribeye roast
Brisket
Wings and brats
Ribs
« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 03:28 PM by DynaGlide »

Offline PaulH99

  • Posts: 22
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #33 on: July 09, 2017, 03:37 PM »
All right, since people are resorted to posting food porn, I'll show you why a pellet grill (and pork shoulder) is a thing of beauty...
-Paul
CT 26 • DF 500 • ETS 125 • KS 120 • OF 1400 • PS 430 • RO 125 • TS 55 R

Offline antss

  • Posts: 1017
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #34 on: July 09, 2017, 03:43 PM »
All those grills are really too expensive.

This is just as good for only a few dollars :      [big grin]


Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #35 on: July 09, 2017, 05:58 PM »
If nobody else managed to get to "Uncle" Bob to be sure he got hooked onto a slippery slope, I was certain that sooner or later Richard (RMW) would very definitely get him hooked. Once I got down to his post, ... well, I am now very hungry.  @Richard/RMW, whenever you get onto your Green Egg and cooking, I wish you would leave your camera out of the equasion.  [unsure] [wink]
Tinker

@Tinker Too late Wayne...  [poke]

As mentioned Acme had eye round roast on sale, 6# was <$18. Very lean cut but tough as an old boot. Now it's smoked roast beef  waiting to be sliced thin and will end up melt-in-your-mouth tender when simmered in some Au Jus for a couple hours.

Fire prep on the kamados is critical. I load up a chimney with 15-20 large chunks of lump and use a couple fire starter paraffin pulp squares to get them roaring, lay it out in the KJ and cover with smaller pieces of lump to partly smother it & add chunks of apple. This give me a good low heat to start and with enough lump will burn for 12+ hours untended.



Indirect setup using the KJ Divide & Conquer rig with bottom vent open ~2" and top only about 1/8" give me a 225-ish dome temp:





Cooked the roasts to 120-something & removed then swapped the deflectors for the grates & let the temp come up before putting the roasts back on. The idea here is to caramelize the outside without overcooking the inside. To do this I keep the lid open, if I were to close it the interior air temp would ramp up and start cooking the roast again rather than just having the (I guess) infrared heat char them.





With the bottom vent opened wide and the lid open it took 5+ minutes to get up to blast-furnace temps. "Hi" on this thermometer is anything above the top reading limit of 1,050 degrees.

Inside temp was 138 when finished, after 10+ minutes of charring.
 


Since the KJ was hot I tossed on 3# of Italian sausages, first bringing the temp back down by smothering the coals with some small bits of lump left over from a previous cook & tossing the Grill Grates on top of the KJ grill rig.



The Grill Grates prevent flareup and add flavor by trapping/vaporizing the drippings and smoking the food in its own juice. The smoke escaping the KJ is all from drippings.



Just have to wait for the roasts to cool enough that I can pop them into the fridge to firm up before slicing. Guess we'll have'ta eat sausage until then... [drooling]

RMW




 



« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 06:00 PM by Richard/RMW »
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #36 on: July 09, 2017, 06:11 PM »
Hey, Bob, do you have three of them yet???   [big grin]  Peter was right - you are SOOOOOO screwed!!!  BA-HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

Sparky, you are a bad man. Giggle.

RMW
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #37 on: July 09, 2017, 06:25 PM »
Here is some Festool and BGE porn mixed togeather for what it's worth. [eek]

Best grills around

(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

Bob Marino is so screwed now  [big grin].

Peter

Nah, Pete. I've been screwed before, this ain't that.
Little confusing maybe, but all good fun.
Festool  Dealer since 2002; user well before that!
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #38 on: July 09, 2017, 06:28 PM »
Hey, Bob, do you have three of them yet???   [big grin]  Peter was right - you are SOOOOOO screwed!!!  BA-HAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

Willy,

Nope, the problem is I want just one - the right one.
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #39 on: July 09, 2017, 06:36 PM »
If nobody else managed to get to "Uncle" Bob to be sure he got hooked onto a slippery slope, I was certain that sooner or later Richard (RMW) would very definitely get him hooked. Once I got down to his post, ... well, I am now very hungry.  @Richard/RMW, whenever you get onto your Green Egg and cooking, I wish you would leave your camera out of the equasion.  [unsure] [wink]
Tinker

@Tinker Too late Wayne...  [poke]

As mentioned Acme had eye round roast on sale, 6# was <$18. Very lean cut but tough as an old boot. Now it's smoked roast beef  waiting to be sliced thin and will end up melt-in-your-mouth tender when simmered in some Au Jus for a couple hours.

Fire prep on the kamados is critical. I load up a chimney with 15-20 large chunks of lump and use a couple fire starter paraffin pulp squares to get them roaring, lay it out in the KJ and cover with smaller pieces of lump to partly smother it & add chunks of apple. This give me a good low heat to start and with enough lump will burn for 12+ hours untended.

(Attachment Link)

Indirect setup using the KJ Divide & Conquer rig with bottom vent open ~2" and top only about 1/8" give me a 225-ish dome temp:

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

Cooked the roasts to 120-something & removed then swapped the deflectors for the grates & let the temp come up before putting the roasts back on. The idea here is to caramelize the outside without overcooking the inside. To do this I keep the lid open, if I were to close it the interior air temp would ramp up and start cooking the roast again rather than just having the (I guess) infrared heat char them.

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

With the bottom vent opened wide and the lid open it took 5+ minutes to get up to blast-furnace temps. "Hi" on this thermometer is anything above the top reading limit of 1,050 degrees.

Inside temp was 138 when finished, after 10+ minutes of charring.
 
(Attachment Link)

Since the KJ was hot I tossed on 3# of Italian sausages, first bringing the temp back down by smothering the coals with some small bits of lump left over from a previous cook & tossing the Grill Grates on top of the KJ grill rig.

(Attachment Link)

The Grill Grates prevent flareup and add flavor by trapping/vaporizing the drippings and smoking the food in its own juice. The smoke escaping the KJ is all from drippings.

(Attachment Link)

Just have to wait for the roasts to cool enough that I can pop them into the fridge to firm up before slicing. Guess we'll have'ta eat sausage until then... [drooling]

RMW




 


Wheh, I can see that these are way more involved - but the results much more satisfying than a typical gas grill. There is a learning curve for sure and hope I don't ruin too much food while learning.
Maybe leaning more to a large KJ - as I like some of the updates they have done recently. NOT TO GET POLITICAL but I'm not thrilled to spend this type of coin on a product made in China.
That aside, I just may go check one out on Norfwalk next week.
Festool  Dealer since 2002; user well before that!
            http://bobmarinosbesttools.com
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Offline antss

  • Posts: 1017
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #40 on: July 09, 2017, 06:42 PM »
I feel the same way Bob.   90% of these things are made offshore giving us little choice though.

The costco deal is pretty sizable, which might help ease the angst. 

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1893
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #41 on: July 09, 2017, 06:45 PM »
All right, since people are resorted to posting food porn, I'll show you why a pellet grill (and pork shoulder) is a thing of beauty...
(Attachment Link)

What's your temp and fav pellets?
+1

Offline magellan

  • Posts: 132
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #42 on: July 09, 2017, 07:06 PM »
I love this thread.  I've always thought about BGE and now a friend showed me the pallet grills.  Wow this is confusing.  Ceramic/refractory vs pallet grills.  I'm thinking I may not want to learn all the tricks to the BGE and other ceramic grills.  You fellows are food artists    I've been cooking on a Tech for 15 years or so.  It's a great grill but it was not really meant to smoke in. 

Keep the information coming.

Thanks all


Offline Dogberryjr

  • Posts: 87
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #43 on: July 09, 2017, 07:27 PM »
Y'all are killing me.

Couple of questions for the BGE folks:
  • If I want to use it as a grill to do some quick burgers, what's the time involved, that is, fixing the fire and getting it up to temperature?
    If there's unused charcoal in the grill when I'm done, and I shut off the airflow, will that preserve at least some of that unspent fuel?
    How much fuel is burned in a slow cook, say a ~10 hour pork butt at 230 or so?

Offline m1sanbo

  • Posts: 10
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #44 on: July 09, 2017, 08:00 PM »
I have 3 BGE, 2 Large and a small. I can get one up and running in less than 15 minutes.  When I am done cooking, I shut it down, and use leftover lump for the next time.  For a slow cook, 10-18 hours, there usually isn't much leftover, and at the end, usually will raise temperature to clean plate setter, grill etc from droppings. I have had mine up to 1500 degrees at times, and have also kept it at a temperature of 225 for 36 hours.  IMHO there is nothing better than cooking on a BGE, it ruins you for restaurant food. just my two cents, but I couldn't be happier with them. On another note, their customer service is second to none.  I broke a lid, called the mother ship, and went to nearest dealer, and had another one in less than an hour. 

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #45 on: July 09, 2017, 08:08 PM »
Y'all are killing me.

Couple of questions for the BGE folks:
  • If I want to use it as a grill to do some quick burgers, what's the time involved, that is, fixing the fire and getting it up to temperature?
    If there's unused charcoal in the grill when I'm done, and I shut off the airflow, will that preserve at least some of that unspent fuel?
    How much fuel is burned in a slow cook, say a ~10 hour pork butt at 230 or so?


My  [2cents]:

- Quick cook takes 20 minutes to get the grill started and up to temp using a chimney or just starter squares in a pile of lump.
- Yes - close off the vents and the fire will die out.
- I buy 34# bags of whatever lump BJ's has on sale for around $16-$18, a full load in the KJ is perhaps 1/4 bag and it will burn for 12+ hours at low temp.

If you try to save lump you end up with a bunch of 3/4" clinkers, which are not much use when lighting a new fire. I nearly always empty them out into a small galvanized can and start with fresh lump. The small stuff is handy when going low/slow (layered over some fresh lump already lit) but it can accumulate on you.

I often skip saving the lump and just stack my dirty grates and stones inside the egg open the vent up and let it go until the fire dies on its own. Basically bakes the crud off the grates.

RMW
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Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 983
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #46 on: July 09, 2017, 08:21 PM »
Y'all are killing me.

Couple of questions for the BGE folks:
  • If I want to use it as a grill to do some quick burgers, what's the time involved, that is, fixing the fire and getting it up to temperature?
    If there's unused charcoal in the grill when I'm done, and I shut off the airflow, will that preserve at least some of that unspent fuel?
    How much fuel is burned in a slow cook, say a ~10 hour pork butt at 230 or so?

That's another great thing about the BGE.  After you're done cooking, there is a ceramic cap that you apply to the chimney to snuff it out.  Close the bottom vent and you can reuse the remaining coal.  For a long cook you simply fill the "smoke box" with coal and it lasts for the whole cook. 
I light my BGE two ways:  For a hot fire, like for steaks and burgers, I use a charcoal chimney and start it using the auxillary burner on my Weber propane grill.  Barring that you can just use some newspaper to get it going.
For slow burns, I use a small wax burner square that I buy at my local grocery store.

A great YouTube source for me is Malcom Reed's How to BBQ Right
Every recipe of his I've use we've loved.  Notables are his garlic butter filet mignon, bbq bake beans and his firecracker chicken.  phenomenal!

An after market accessory I highly recommend is BBQ Guru's DigiQ controller.  It makes your egg like a true oven, you never have to obsess about the temp.

Here's some BGE porn:







Here's a picture of me putting my hand firmly on a 400 degree egg.  Warm but not hot.

« Last Edit: July 09, 2017, 09:18 PM by Jim Kirkpatrick »

Online retfr8flyr

  • Posts: 7
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #47 on: July 09, 2017, 09:36 PM »

Wheh, I can see that these are way more involved - but the results much more satisfying than a typical gas grill. There is a learning curve for sure and hope I don't ruin too much food while learning.
Maybe leaning more to a large KJ - as I like some of the updates they have done recently. NOT TO GET POLITICAL but I'm not thrilled to spend this type of coin on a product made in China.
That aside, I just may go check one out on Norfwalk next week.


If you are going to check out the Costco Roadshow, then be aware of the Special. If you are the first one to the display on the first day, you can get the display model Big Joe and the Joe Jr. for the price of the Big Joe only. The only problem is you have to wait until the show is over, so it would require a second trip to Costco. This is a fabulous deal, as the roadshow price for the Big Joe is already a great deal. I repeat you have to be the first one there and ask for the special.

If you want to learn more about the Kamado Joe and Kamado cooking,this is a great forum for Kamado's.  https://www.kamadoguru.com/

Offline jlt23

  • Posts: 4
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #48 on: July 09, 2017, 11:34 PM »
I have a large BGE and I like it. I just wish I went with the XL. Check out this place for awesome accessories. https://ceramicgrillstore.com

Offline deepcreek

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #49 on: July 10, 2017, 12:37 AM »
Hank Hill - Propane & Propane Accessories

Joe Adams
TimberFire Studio
Houston, Texas

http://www.facebook.com/timberfire

Offline PaulH99

  • Posts: 22
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #50 on: July 10, 2017, 05:32 AM »
I posted that on the previous page :-)

All right, since people are resorted to posting food porn, I'll show you why a pellet grill (and pork shoulder) is a thing of beauty...
(Attachment Link)

What's your temp and fav pellets?
-Paul
CT 26 • DF 500 • ETS 125 • KS 120 • OF 1400 • PS 430 • RO 125 • TS 55 R

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #51 on: July 14, 2017, 09:19 AM »
Still mulling this over. Any Primo owners here?
Festool  Dealer since 2002; user well before that!
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Offline antss

  • Posts: 1017
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #52 on: July 14, 2017, 10:12 AM »
The principle differences between all of them are:
  - stainless grates (egg, kj) vs. porcelain coated on the primo
   - kj and primo feature tiered, sectional cooking; whereas egg is just a single level and is not divided
   - primo's oval shape may appeal more to some forms of cooking


basically they are just tools to do a job.  All of them will get it done, but you may prefer a red one to a black or green one.  Or country of origin may be important to you.  The tiered /divided cooking arrangement may be of value to you or not.  And maybe one of the forums appeals to you more than another - though none are as good as the FOG  [big grin]

They are all nice grills.

 

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 26
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #53 on: July 14, 2017, 10:28 AM »
@antss Well said.

I bought the egg, did my homework and paid 799 nest included and skipped any accessories they offered. Bought a , imo, better tiered cooking system than the KJ from ceramic grill store. All in I'm right around the same price for a KJ but with a more useful cooking setup. I didn't need the side tables so wasn't a factor. I've never regretted my purchase.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #54 on: July 14, 2017, 10:29 AM »
And now through BLAZE grills into the mix........ Soooooo many choices.
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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 26
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #55 on: July 14, 2017, 10:43 AM »
And now through BLAZE grills into the mix........ Soooooo many choices.

Bob i think you're going to be paralyzed by too many choices. Pick a known quality brand with a dealer nearby and run with it. Since you're new to all this try to go with something that has a lot of YouTube videos demonstrating how to setup for different cooks. I know down by me there's Dizzy Pig and they teach classes using the BGE. Never been to one but i might this year.

End of the day they're just tools. A good BBQ cook can make a nice meal with just about anything.

Offline Dane

  • Posts: 292
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #56 on: July 14, 2017, 11:37 AM »
Following on my post above.  If I had the cash, the aluminum Blaze or the Caliber Pro Kamado would top my list.  I have the Broil King, which is sort of a poor man's version of the higher end metal Kamados.  But, I think it functions just as well, or better, given the insulation between the double wall construction.  The ultimate, in my mind, would be an oval shaped, double walled, aluminum Kamado...alas, doesn't exist.  The new Weber Summit charcoal gets close.  You should check that out.  There's a good write up on it at Amazing Ribs: http://amazingribs.com/bbq_equipment_reviews_ratings/grill-smoker-combination-grill-smoker/weber-summit-charcoal-grill

As to the Primo question- I've owned one of their round versions.  High Quality- USA made, would recommend them.

Offline mikeyr

  • Posts: 52
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #57 on: July 14, 2017, 12:03 PM »
I have 11 grills now (down from 14) ranging from the Cobb (6 pieces of charcoal and can grill on the hood of your car) to a La Caja China (plywood but can a cook a pig in 4 hours).  I even have an IKEA grill!
My new Hero !!! I have 6 grills and constantly get told I have 5 too many by both my wife and daughter (son-in-law is starting to tell me also but he is careful).
 My favorite grill is my Weber kettle grill with propane start, a small burner to get the coals going.  My gas grill I only use for rotisseries and things like that.  A pellet smoker (need a new and much better one).  A wood only grill and last is a wood burning pizza oven that i use like a BGE.
ex-cabinet maker, now I just play with wood

Offline Green Mojo

  • Posts: 31
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #58 on: July 15, 2017, 07:48 AM »
++ on the DigiQ. I would consider it a mandatory accessory for the BGE.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1935
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #59 on: July 15, 2017, 05:53 PM »
And now through BLAZE grills into the mix........ Soooooo many choices.
. You BUY the Green Egg..... Its Green.... You sell Green Festools..... What could be better .... [poke] [poke] [poke]
Seriously, all kidding aside, you pick the one that fits your budget and has features that appeal to you.  Worst case, you sell it and buy another of your choices that you didn't go with originally .
Post pictures of the food you create with it.... [thumbs up] [thumbs up] [popcorn] [popcorn]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline antss

  • Posts: 1017
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #60 on: July 15, 2017, 09:45 PM »
Costco's warranty is going to be hard to beat.  If that's important to you.

I don't think there are many issues with these grills where that becomes an important consideration.

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 983
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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #61 on: July 16, 2017, 07:20 AM »
Bob, I'm surprised you're still agonizing over this decision.  For me it's a no brainer.  The BGE is elegant in it's simplicity. 
I used to be a Harley guy.  Whenever I've met with friends or acquaintances that have newly purchased a Japanese bike that very closely resembles a HD, the first thing out of their mouths are, "it was 5k cheaper than a Harley".  The same holds true for power tools. I find it particularly ironic, a man who makes his living selling Festools is laboring over this decision.  I think you'll be that same guy if you buy the Costco knockoff.  "I saved $300".  Get the BGE!  It's a rare day when you ever seen a BGE listed on CL.  There's a reason.  Everyone loves them.
My standard reply I say with a wink, whenever a friend whistles over the price of my power tools, grilling devices or motorcycles is: "It's not for everyone."  [wink]

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #62 on: July 16, 2017, 08:25 AM »
Costco's warranty is going to be hard to beat.  If that's important to you.

I don't think there are many issues with these grills where that becomes an important consideration.

 Agree, thinking if anything goes wrong, it usually will happen in the couple of years.
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #63 on: July 16, 2017, 09:36 AM »
Bob, I'm surprised you're still agonizing over this decision.  For me it's a no brainer.  The BGE is elegant in it's simplicity. 
I used to be a Harley guy.  Whenever I've met with friends or acquaintances that have newly purchased a Japanese bike that very closely resembles a HD, the first thing out of their mouths are, "it was 5k cheaper than a Harley".  The same holds true for power tools. I find it particularly ironic, a man who makes his living selling Festools is laboring over this decision.  I think you'll be that same guy if you buy the Costco knockoff.  "I saved $300".  Get the BGE!  It's a rare day when you ever seen a BGE listed on CL.  There's a reason.  Everyone loves them.
My standard reply I say with a wink, whenever a friend whistles over the price of my power tools, grilling devices or motorcycles is: "It's not for everyone."  [wink].

 Jim,

 Good points, but let me elaborate a bit as there are a few things going on.
 First is I have a decent Weber gas grill, at least I can do basic grilling, so I am in no immediate rush to get another Kamado or pellet grill/smoker - though I am liking what they all do. And it seems the more snooping I do, other possibilities open up. So I am doing my due diligence - even though some would say, I am over analyzing it. And I would agree - all the grills - and others - would be more than suits my needs, all have a slight learning curve, but just like Festool tools - the tools may be of higher quality but it's the man behind the tool/kamado/smoker that makes the larger difference. Each and every offering here is costly, vis a vis a standard grill/smoker, so I really wanted to do my homework. That aside, here are some of my findings/opinions.

 The BGE is the grandaddy of komodos here in the USA. And I like that they were the first to introduce the kamado to the mainstream; I give them points for that.They have an incredible product, tons of accessories, loyal following and blogs that offer a zillion recipes and support. But they have not seemed to have changed over time, incorporating IMHO improved features. Regarding the Kamado Joe, I don't see it as a cheap knockoff and side to side  with the BGE, I like some of their features better - steel gasket rather than felt, larger thermometer, way better hinge, nicer top vent, dual height grates standard, etc. I don't imagine actual quality of either are too different. Not thrilled with KJ being made in China though.

 The Primo - I like the oval design and that it is made here in the USA. As per mention here I checked out the Blaze. Aluminum and stainless steel - aesthetically looks like a spaceship, rather than a traditional looking ceramic kamado. But seems to be incredibly sturdy, certainly can never chip or crack, like how there is no need for gaskets, heavy grates, etc. Virtually comes assembled. Very much more coin than the BGE and KJ.  Not thrilled that that is also made in China.

 Enter the Memphis Grill  - not a Kamado, but a wood pellet grill/smoker/oven. But even with the current sale, more money than the other Kamados.
 https://memphisgrills.com/shop/cart-models/memphis-advantage/
 But it  looks like a traditional modern grill, not the egg shaped traditional kamado which I find appealing. And the kamados offer a bit of mystique and charm that no modern looking grill/smoker offers. Many modern conveniences for the Memphis grill  and points that it is USA made. I'm thinking that with this grill (pellets) I can probably sell my Weber Genesis gas grill, not so much if I get a kamado. Oh, yeah, the NJ dealer who returned my call about the Blaze - which they can order for me, brought the Memphis grill to my attention and if it matters, said they installed 4 for NJ's Cake Boss - Buddy something or other. No biggie, but a nice endorsement.  And I liked that the dealer did not push anything; that it was simply another offering to check out.

 Again, each and every grill/smoker here will outperform my capabilities, last a lifetime and make some darn nice meals.

 
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Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #64 on: July 16, 2017, 09:42 AM »
Bob, I'm surprised you're still agonizing over this decision.  For me it's a no brainer.  The BGE is elegant in it's simplicity. 
I used to be a Harley guy.  Whenever I've met with friends or acquaintances that have newly purchased a Japanese bike that very closely resembles a HD, the first thing out of their mouths are, "it was 5k cheaper than a Harley".  The same holds true for power tools. I find it particularly ironic, a man who makes his living selling Festools is laboring over this decision.  I think you'll be that same guy if you buy the Costco knockoff.  "I saved $300".  Get the BGE!  It's a rare day when you ever seen a BGE listed on CL.  There's a reason.  Everyone loves them.
My standard reply I say with a wink, whenever a friend whistles over the price of my power tools, grilling devices or motorcycles is: "It's not for everyone."  [wink].

I've checked all three of those boxes. Expensive hobbies for sure.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #65 on: July 16, 2017, 09:48 AM »
I guess it's just the DIY'er in me but I could never own a pellet smoker or a digital temperature controller for smoking. Fire management is half the fun, at least for me. I will probably get an offset wood cooker some day.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #66 on: July 16, 2017, 09:56 AM »
I guess it's just the DIY'er in me but I could never own a pellet smoker or a digital temperature controller for smoking. Fire management is half the fun, at least for me. I will probably get an offset wood cooker some day.

 I hear you on that and besides the kinda quirky aesthetics of the Kamados - which I like, it is a bit more Zen to stoke and manage  that fire than the immediacy of pellets. But - pellets are wood soooooooooooo that smokey flavor is there over a gas grill and you are still smoking the same amount of time (hours) for the roast. briskets, etc.
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #67 on: July 16, 2017, 10:45 AM »
FWIW I had (still have) a very early digital controller for the BGE, the Stoker. Not nearly as refined as the DigiQ but it has basically the same function. I used it 2-3 times a year for several years and then retired it when I finally got control of low/slow temps via the vents. These controllers are used not only on the Kamados but also Weber smokers etc. and my view is they are more necessary on smokers that are tough to otherwise maintain temp on.

My [2cents] would be it's probably not necessary if you have a quality Kamado and take the pains to learn to control it.

Pulled several vacuum sealed steaks from the freezer and dumped them into sous vide pot for 6-7 hours yesterday @ 120 then into the fridge. Plan to go from fridge direct to KJ tonight @ full blast furnace temp, testing whether the cold center will let me fully char the outside while not further cooking the center. Aiming for warm pink center.

@Tinker check back around 9:00 EDT for an update....  [poke]

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Offline antss

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #68 on: July 16, 2017, 12:54 PM »
BGE has recently changed it's hinge design. 

Ceramics (and these types of ovens) were produced in China long before the USA was a twinkle in an Englishman's eye.  So I wouldn't sweat it too much.  I am a fan of supporting local when practical so I'm not trying to talk anyone out of made in the USA.   

Some have commented that they think the ceramic and glazing is more refined on the BGE.  I'm not discerning enough to weigh in. 

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #69 on: July 16, 2017, 01:30 PM »
Bob,  I also have a Weber Genesis gas grill that I've had and wouldn't consider selling.  I still use it.  Not that the BGE takes more time to heat up than the Weber, but it is easier.  I use it for when I need something quick and easy like for some boneless chicken.  It's also good for roasting bbq veggie skewers.  It has a side burner for boiling water that I use to light my BGE chimney when I need a hot fire for steaks and chops.  Keep the Weber!

Offline mark60

  • Posts: 83
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #70 on: July 16, 2017, 05:06 PM »
For some reason, I never wander in this room.
Bob, I love to cook outside. Even in Buffalo I grill year round, snow and all. I built a picnic shelter thing to house my implements and close it up in the winter so I can grill in a blizzard. I've got an XL BGE, a Yoder pellet smoker, a Weber kettle, 2 ugly drum smokers, and a Weber gasser. The gasser gets used for hot dogs, that's about it. The pellet smoker and drum smokers do most of my smoking. The BGE excels at smoking but I have my smokers all set and I'm used to them. Burgers are ususlly done on the kettle but sometimes on the egg. I use the egg for steaks, fatties, baking bread, all kinds of stuff. I'll add a cooker, a Sous Vide. The best steaks I ever cook are done Sous Vide and then dropped into the coals on the Egg at nuclear temps. Perfect 132 degrees from one edge to the other no matter how thick with a beautiful sear on them. If you like to cook outside, genuinely enjoy grilling, then the BGE is worth the coin. If it's more of a casual thing you can do a lot with a Weber kettle. I'm a charcoal snob and have very little use for gassers these days if I'm being honest, charcoal grilled foods are really that much better to me.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #71 on: July 16, 2017, 06:18 PM »
Would there be any difference in taste between smoking with a kamado or with the traditional smoker? Would there be a difference in taste either by smoke or buy direct grilling when using charcoal or pellets?
 In other words, temps being the same, is there a difference in taste between cooking with pellets or charcoal?
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 06:27 PM by Bob Marino »
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #72 on: July 16, 2017, 06:43 PM »
I have now read a couple of mentions about Sous Vide in this thread.  That, in combination with all the grilling conversations should add an interesting aspect to Bob's decision process.  [poke] [poke]

Sous vide is great within its parameters.  But the meat (most proteins) need that final touch.  That touch could be any grill, charcoal starter, propane torch, hot pan, or even a hopped up kid on .... doing illegal things with fireworks or military spec flamethrowers.  [scared]

@Bob Marino - When I said earlier you were screwed - this is what I was talking about = the intro to a "new tool" and the discussions around a decision.

Peter
« Last Edit: July 16, 2017, 06:45 PM by Peter Halle »
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline PaulH99

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #73 on: July 16, 2017, 06:46 PM »
When smoking, the flavor is really due to the type of wood you use and the temperature, not so much the form that the wood is in. I bought a pellet smoker because I like being able to smoke a pork shoulder or brisket overnight without worrying about the temperature dropping or the fire going out. The convenience was worth it to me. The smoke ring inside the meat looks identical to anything else I've eaten, and the flavor is spot-on.

The down-side? You have to be near an outlet to run a pellet smoker/grill. But the ability to grill at 500 and smoke at 250 on the same appliance is awesome. I haven't started my propane Weber Genesis Silver in over a year.
-Paul
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #74 on: July 16, 2017, 07:45 PM »
I have now read a couple of mentions about Sous Vide in this thread.  That, in combination with all the grilling conversations should add an interesting aspect to Bob's decision process.  [poke] [poke]

Sous vide is great within its parameters.  But the meat (most proteins) need that final touch.  That touch could be any grill, charcoal starter, propane torch, hot pan, or even a hopped up kid on .... doing illegal things with fireworks or military spec flamethrowers.  [scared]

@Bob Marino - When I said earlier you were screwed - this is what I was talking about = the intro to a "new tool" and the discussions around a decision.

Peter

I hear ya Pete. Lots of choices.  Saw BGE for the first time today. Very impressive but I'm leaning more towards the convenience of a pellet stove. One that can grill, smoke and be an oven. The Memphis grills ar looking good to me
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Offline mark60

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #75 on: July 16, 2017, 08:40 PM »
Pellet smokers, in my opinion and most other's, don't impart as much smoke flavor as a more traditional smoker (wood fired or lump coal with wood chunks) A lot of us use additional methods to get a little more smoke (A-maze-n products smoke generator) I make some mean pulled pork on my pellet pooper but still make one or two shoulders a year in my drum smoker because sometimes I like a heavy smoke.  They're a great cooker and I'd never give mine up but they also won't reach the temps a kamado will. For searing steaks and making pizza's the higher temps attainable with a kamado are nice.
BGE has a great forum with a lot of passionate users but even a lot of folks over there would tell you a kamado joe or a primo vision are excellent values and the BGE may not have anything on them.
I think an egg or similar is the closest to a jack of all trades cooker that there is. Cook a little or cook a lot, they'll do it well. The ceramic grill store has a pile of accessories for kamados if you haven't found that place yet.

Offline otis04

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #76 on: July 16, 2017, 11:35 PM »
I currently own 3 Big Green Eggs and a Traeger.  I bought the Traeger for quick meals like hot dogs after work.  I don't use it for much else as the flavor just isn't as good.  My XL egg will hold a steady temp for 20 hours with no added fuel and very little fuss.
I saw the Komodo Joe at Costco today and must say, they look really good with some nice features, it would be hard to buy the BGE after looking at the features on the KJ.
Go ceramic, you will not be disappointed.  By the way, my first egg is 14 years old and still looks new except for the grease stains.  It is as close to a lifetime grill as you can get.

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #77 on: July 17, 2017, 01:41 AM »
Would there be any difference in taste between smoking with a kamado or with the traditional smoker? Would there be a difference in taste either by smoke or buy direct grilling when using charcoal or pellets?
 In other words, temps being the same, is there a difference in taste between cooking with pellets or charcoal?

Hmmnnn... I cannot comment on flavor, not having a pellet smoker. Also, not having one, I am not sure but am doubtful you can go from low/slow cook to blast furnace sear without switching cookers.

Always willing to learn though.

RMW

PS - Deferred finishing sous vide steaks to tomorrow after Sunday breakfast followed by unscheduled visit by nephew/GF and late lunch followed paddle board drifting in the bay.

@Tinker sametimesamechannel tomorrow...  ::)

RMW
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Offline Nick561

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #78 on: July 17, 2017, 02:29 AM »
More food porn.    Sous vide prime rib... 

And a sous view Kobe ribeye finished on the egg


Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #79 on: July 17, 2017, 02:31 AM »
Would there be any difference in taste between smoking with a kamado or with the traditional smoker? Would there be a difference in taste either by smoke or buy direct grilling when using charcoal or pellets?
 In other words, temps being the same, is there a difference in taste between cooking with pellets or charcoal?

Consider that not all pellets are created equal. I get different results from different brands of pellets let alone all the various wood options and even blends.
+1

Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #80 on: July 17, 2017, 02:33 AM »
More food porn.    Sous vide prime rib...  (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

And a sous view Kobe ribeye finished on the egg

(Attachment Link)

Nice, how do you do the sous vide?
+1

Offline Nick561

  • Posts: 52
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #81 on: July 17, 2017, 03:57 AM »
More food porn.    Sous vide prime rib...  (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

And a sous view Kobe ribeye finished on the egg

(Attachment Link)

Nice, how do you do the sous vide?

For the prime rib  I start with a whole 109 cut export rib which is 7 bones. I break that down to two -two bone rib roasts and make the rest streaks. I make them two bones because they fit in the vacuum bags. I put them in with my sansare set at 131 degrees for 18 hours. With garlic and soy sauce on it.  After that I sear on the grill when it's 1000+ degrees for a about a minute or so per side.  Slice and serve.

For the Kobe just a little salt and in the bag. 131 degrees for 2 hours then finish dear on the egg at 1000+.  Topped with a dab of butter

Offline mark60

  • Posts: 83
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #82 on: July 17, 2017, 06:24 AM »
More food porn.    Sous vide prime rib...  (Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)

And a sous view Kobe ribeye finished on the egg

(Attachment Link)


That's sexy.

Offline Paul G

  • Posts: 1893
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #83 on: July 17, 2017, 09:48 AM »
Thanks Nick561, been thinking of adding sous vide to my tool kit in the near future
+1

Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #84 on: July 17, 2017, 10:14 AM »
I never have been in this subforum (not that I have alot of posts anyway), but somehow BGE caught my eye. Also, I didn't read every comment, so if I'm reiterating something, I apologize...

I have a classic Kamado Joe that's about 4 years old.  If it was stolen tonight, I'd own another one tomorrow, price and driving distance to get it be damned.  I have literally cooked everything in it from pork butts at 225 for 15 hours to pizzas at 850 for 4 mins.  For me, I can get home from work, do my thing and have a grill ready to cook on in less than 30 mins for like burgers/dogs/steaks/etc.  For smoking, it takes me a little longer, but that's because I start (usually) with a full "new" load of lump and let that temp stabilize for an hour, then put on smoking wood and let that stabilize for at least 30 mins until you get the "thin, blue smoke".  I've cooked bread, cakes, side dishes, etc.  I love mine.  Also, if you are looking at a KJ, make sure you are looking at "version 2" of them.  Mine is "version 1" and it lacks many of the features that KJ has implemented with V2. 

All that said, if we are trying to get Bob Marino to spend more money, he really needs to be looking at the Komodo Kamado line.  Absolutely, the Rolls Royce/Bentley/Ferrari/Bugatti/etc of a Kamado cooker.  No affiliation, and can't afford one either, but Dennis makes a mean grill.

As for cooking methods...my two favorite for steaks are either 1) sousvide or 2) reverse sear

I like both methods for different reasons, but if I want a steak to taste like a steak, it's reverse sear for me all the way!  I'll throw my ribeyes on the grill with both of my heat deflectors on and get my temps to between 250-300 and cook them to within 10ish degrees of my target temp.  Then, I'll take them off, open everything up to where it goes nuclear (burying the needle on the thermometer) and lower the grates to as close to the coals as I can get them, and sometimes, I'll even go caveman and throw them right on the coals.  Then, it's about a min on each side.  What this does is, like sousvide, allow you to have a steak that is cooked med, med rare, well done, etc all the way through.  Eliminating the "gray band" of overcooked steak is the goal.  You cut into a perfectly cooked med steak...every time...
« Last Edit: July 17, 2017, 10:19 AM by smirak »

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #85 on: July 17, 2017, 11:42 AM »
I never have been in this subforum (not that I have alot of posts anyway), but somehow BGE caught my eye. Also, I didn't read every comment, so if I'm reiterating something, I apologize...
 
All that said, if we are trying to get Bob Marino to spend more money, he really needs to be looking at the Komodo Kamado line.  Absolutely, the Rolls Royce/Bentley/Ferrari/Bugatti/etc of a Kamado cooker.  No affiliation, and can't afford one either, but Dennis makes a mean grill.
 

 Yes, very impressive and it's kind of a kick that the owner - Dennis Linkletter is the grandson of Art Linkletter - boomers and olders will know who he was, millenials - not so sure. And he lives in Bali - wonder what heis cooking on? ;). I can't even imagine what the shipping charges would be on those monsters and no mention of where it ships from.
 I bought my house 20 years ago in less time. Pete was right - screwed with all those choices.  [unsure]
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #86 on: July 17, 2017, 02:09 PM »
I never have been in this subforum (not that I have alot of posts anyway), but somehow BGE caught my eye. Also, I didn't read every comment, so if I'm reiterating something, I apologize...
 
All that said, if we are trying to get Bob Marino to spend more money, he really needs to be looking at the Komodo Kamado line.  Absolutely, the Rolls Royce/Bentley/Ferrari/Bugatti/etc of a Kamado cooker.  No affiliation, and can't afford one either, but Dennis makes a mean grill.
 

 Yes, very impressive and it's kind of a kick that the owner - Dennis Linkletter is the grandson of Art Linkletter - boomers and olders will know who he was, millenials - not so sure. And he lives in Bali - wonder what heis cooking on? ;). I can't even imagine what the shipping charges would be on those monsters and no mention of where it ships from.
 I bought my house 20 years ago in less time. Pete was right - screwed with all those choices.  [unsure]

Aw comeon... let's not start comparing a house with something really important.  [poke]

RMW
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Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1935
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #87 on: July 17, 2017, 02:32 PM »
I never have been in this subforum (not that I have alot of posts anyway), but somehow BGE caught my eye. Also, I didn't read every comment, so if I'm reiterating something, I apologize...
 
All that said, if we are trying to get Bob Marino to spend more money, he really needs to be looking at the Komodo Kamado line.  Absolutely, the Rolls Royce/Bentley/Ferrari/Bugatti/etc of a Kamado cooker.  No affiliation, and can't afford one either, but Dennis makes a mean grill.
 

 Yes, very impressive and it's kind of a kick that the owner - Dennis Linkletter is the grandson of Art Linkletter - boomers and olders will know who he was, millenials - not so sure. And he lives in Bali - wonder what heis cooking on? ;). I can't even imagine what the shipping charges would be on those monsters and no mention of where it ships from.
 I bought my house 20 years ago in less time. Pete was right - screwed with all those choices.  [unsure]

Aw comeon... let's not start comparing a house with something really important.  [poke]

RMW
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Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #88 on: July 18, 2017, 02:57 AM »
I never have been in this subforum (not that I have alot of posts anyway), but somehow BGE caught my eye. Also, I didn't read every comment, so if I'm reiterating something, I apologize...
 
All that said, if we are trying to get Bob Marino to spend more money, he really needs to be looking at the Komodo Kamado line.  Absolutely, the Rolls Royce/Bentley/Ferrari/Bugatti/etc of a Kamado cooker.  No affiliation, and can't afford one either, but Dennis makes a mean grill.
 

 Yes, very impressive and it's kind of a kick that the owner - Dennis Linkletter is the grandson of Art Linkletter - boomers and olders will know who he was, millenials - not so sure. And he lives in Bali - wonder what heis cooking on? ;). I can't even imagine what the shipping charges would be on those monsters and no mention of where it ships from.
 I bought my house 20 years ago in less time. Pete was right - screwed with all those choices.  [unsure]

Never put 2 and 2 together on the last name!  As I don't own one, I can't comment on the delivery time.  They are handmade (ish) in Indonesia and are shipped to customers out of the California warehouse.  I do know several people that own them and state that shipping can exceed 2-3 months in some cases. 

Offline egmiii

  • Posts: 37
Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #89 on: July 18, 2017, 10:48 AM »
I have a 22" Komodo Kamado and a large BGE. If you have the budget, the Komodo Kamado in my opinion is worth the price of admission. All Komodo Kamados are hand build in Indonesia. Several are stocked in the California warehouse for immediate delivery. If you happen to like one of the models in stock, you can get it within a week or two, depending upon where you live in the country. If you prefer to order a tile combination not in stock, then it could be up to 5 months, depending upon the backlog. I can assure you, its worth the wait. If you would like more details, feel free to PM me. I'm more than willing to do a video FaceTime and walk you through the design and construction highlights. That way you can get a better idea of what makes it so special. FYI, I have no affiliation with KK, just a happy customer.

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #90 on: July 18, 2017, 10:59 AM »
After seeing comment from @smirak I HAD to go caveman and try the direct on the lump method to finish the sous vide steaks:





Straight from the fridge to the fire for 6-7 minutes. Very complete char yet still medium rare throughout. Double Yum!

RMW

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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #91 on: July 18, 2017, 11:47 PM »
I have a 22" Komodo Kamado and a large BGE. If you have the budget, the Komodo Kamado in my opinion is worth the price of admission. All Komodo Kamados are hand build in Indonesia. Several are stocked in the California warehouse for immediate delivery. If you happen to like one of the models in stock, you can get it within a week or two, depending upon where you live in the country. If you prefer to order a tile combination not in stock, then it could be up to 5 months, depending upon the backlog. I can assure you, its worth the wait. If you would like more details, feel free to PM me. I'm more than willing to do a video FaceTime and walk you through the design and construction highlights. That way you can get a better idea of what makes it so special. FYI, I have no affiliation with KK, just a happy customer.
Thanks. I actually did call the owner and it is just what you said - in stock a week or so shipping and he went over in detail why it's better - actually overbuilt and yeah - no expense spared. Sure are works of art and engineering, but if I were to dod a Kamado, it would be one of the more popular ones - BGE, KJ, Primo, Blaze. I was checking out the Memphis Grill and saw the BGE - it's pretty good quality in my eyes.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2017, 11:52 PM by Bob Marino »
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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #92 on: July 18, 2017, 11:54 PM »
 Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?
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Online tjbnwi

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #93 on: Yesterday at 12:00 AM »
I'm a direct on the coals guy.

They are a "little" warm.

I'm pretty annal about how the corn on the cob is prepared....

Try a pan fried, oven finished steak. Good stuff.

Tom

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #94 on: Yesterday at 12:17 AM »
I'm a direct on the coals guy.

They are a "little" warm.

I'm pretty annal about how the corn on the cob is prepared....

Try a pan fried, oven finished steak. Good stuff.

Tom

 893 degrees? Wow, that's hot! Don't know if I'd be so adventurous to tossing the meat directly on the coals though.
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Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #95 on: Yesterday at 01:04 AM »
Bob,

Being from the Deep South, pork is my go to. Any fruit wood for pork is fine. Currently, I'm burning through peach wood on ribs, homemade bacon and pork butts. For briskets/beef ribs, I go hickory or oak. For fish, I couldn't tell you. I'm not a huge fish fan, but cedar/alder planked salmon is hard to beat.

I second your comments about the KK. I'd love to own one just because they look nice and have great features, but I can't justify the price, especially considering I already own a KJ.

For an in depth study, google kamado guru and head to their forum. All major brands are represented on that forum. Also, google "man cave meals" and/or "John Setzler"...his videos got me into kamado cooking.

Also, as others have said, feel free to PM me if you have any questions at all.

Kevin

Offline quietguy

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #96 on: Yesterday at 01:23 AM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

It really depends on what you are cooking.  I generally stick with Oak or Hickory as a primary, but will mix in others to get a specific flavor.  For fish, I generally stick with Hickory and grill on a cedar plank. 

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #97 on: Yesterday at 09:55 AM »
Would there be any difference in taste between smoking with a kamado or with the traditional smoker? Would there be a difference in taste either by smoke or buy direct grilling when using charcoal or pellets?
 In other words, temps being the same, is there a difference in taste between cooking with pellets or charcoal?

Consider that not all pellets are created equal. I get different results from different brands of pellets let alone all the various wood options and even blends.

 So, what are your opinions on the different pellet brands?
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Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #98 on: Yesterday at 11:58 AM »
So, what are your opinions on the different pellet brands?

So far I've done well with Traeger pellets in my Traeger smoker, have used hickory, mesquite, apple and cherry, all of which impart very different flavors. I found that Sportsmans Warehouse also had some other brands and tried one in apple and hickory, the apple was a bit milder/weaker flavor than Traeger but the hickory left a bit of an ash tray note to the meat, not very appealing. I no longer have the bags and didn't write it down but will check the next time I visit. I'll keep trying other woods and brands to see how they work, fun to experiment.
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Offline Anodyne

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #99 on: Yesterday at 01:06 PM »

I hear ya Pete. Lots of choices.  Saw BGE for the first time today. Very impressive but I'm leaning more towards the convenience of a pellet stove. One that can grill, smoke and be an oven. The Memphis grills ar looking good to me
[/quote]

Bob, if you are investigating pellet grills (especially in the Memphis price range), I'd also give Mak Grills a look.  They have what is probably the best controller on the market.  I've got a 2 star general, and love it. 

Offline Sparktrician

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #100 on: Yesterday at 01:07 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #101 on: Yesterday at 01:47 PM »

I hear ya Pete. Lots of choices.  Saw BGE for the first time today. Very impressive but I'm leaning more towards the convenience of a pellet stove. One that can grill, smoke and be an oven. The Memphis grills ar looking good to me

Bob, if you are investigating pellet grills (especially in the Memphis price range), I'd also give Mak Grills a look.  They have what is probably the best controller on the market.  I've got a 2 star general, and love it.
[/quote]

 Nice.....
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Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #102 on: Yesterday at 01:49 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me.

Yea I heard that the lump charcoal has dead trees in it....  [poke]

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Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #103 on: Yesterday at 01:51 PM »
I seem to recall that there was a controversy several years ago regarding tests finding residuals of used disposable diapers in certain brands of pellets.  It's probably been rectified by now, but I can't seem to lose that prejudice against pellets despite my son having had a pellet stove in his house 10+ years ago without any issues.  Hardwood charcoal for me.

 Yikes, Willy. Disposable diapers in the pellets? [eek] [scared] [eek]

I'm sure that has long ago been rectified (no pun intended) but I can understand your hesitation with that picture in mind.
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Online tjbnwi

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #104 on: Yesterday at 02:14 PM »
Make it easy---dig a hole, throw in a grate, add coals, light, wait a few minutes, start cooking.

Meat on a stick if you don't want it directly on the coals.

 [wink]

Tom

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #105 on: Yesterday at 03:39 PM »
Make it easy---dig a hole, throw in a grate, add coals, light, wait a few minutes, start cooking.

Meat on a stick if you don't want it directly on the coals.

 [wink]

Tom

 Yeah, yeah...
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Offline mark60

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #106 on: Yesterday at 06:50 PM »
Pellets get expensive unless you buy in bulk. I've been using perfect mix and sometimes hickory in my Yoder. Cookinpellets.com is where I get them from. Lumberjack pellets are also pretty popular and you can buy in bulk. I typically go through around a pound to 1 1/2 pounds per hour so it's not cheap to cook on.
The BGE in comparison is very cheap to cook on. When you're done cooking you snuff the fire and use the same coal for the next cook.
I used my Weber kettle today and had to empty the ash before I lit it up. I use regular Kingsford in that and a chimney of charcoal burns down to a lot of ash, every two or three cooks I have to clean it out. The lump in the BGE burns down  to almost nothing. I clean the ash out only occasionally.

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #107 on: Yesterday at 08:10 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]

Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #108 on: Yesterday at 09:51 PM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

I use a Weber 22" kettle.
A few years back I chopped down a plum and an apricot tree. Dried the wood and cut thin rounds with a band saw. I probably have enough juice to last 10-15 years.

On ocassion I install 3/4" hardwood floors. The oak & maple off-cuts are saved and cut into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last forever...

I've fabbed stuff from hickory and cherry. I save the off-cuts, slice them into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last a couple of years.

In every case, all of the tinder is soaked in water before it is added to the Weber.

I'm now in search of that terminal apple tree.  [cool]

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #109 on: Yesterday at 10:22 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]

  If things were that simple..... ;)
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Offline leakyroof

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #110 on: Yesterday at 10:29 PM »
Festools are green. BGE is green. I really don't see how this is complicated to decide.  [big grin]
. I already tried that approach with him.... Didn't work.... [embarassed]
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Offline smirak

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #111 on: Today at 04:35 AM »
Do you guys  - charcoal and pellets, have any favored wood preferences - mesquite, oak, hickory, etc? What do you prefer/use for grilling fish?

I use a Weber 22" kettle.
A few years back I chopped down a plum and an apricot tree. Dried the wood and cut thin rounds with a band saw. I probably have enough juice to last 10-15 years.

On ocassion I install 3/4" hardwood floors. The oak & maple off-cuts are saved and cut into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last forever...

I've fabbed stuff from hickory and cherry. I save the off-cuts, slice them into 1/2" thick chunks with a bandsaw. I probably have enough juice to last a couple of years.

In every case, all of the tinder is soaked in water before it is added to the Weber.

I'm now in search of that terminal apple tree.  [cool]

One thing I don't understand...why soak in water?  I've never done it on my Kamado Joe.  My smoking wood is very dry.  You only get smoke for about the first 30 mins anyway...your food won't absorb anymore, so why take the time to soak the wood?  More smoke overall doesn't equal more smoke in the meat?  Just curious...

Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #112 on: Today at 05:42 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

Offline Naildrivingman

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #113 on: Today at 06:25 AM »
Well...this is a website devoted to the worship of green.  I have to believe that any Festoolian grill master would have to have a BGE.  If for no other reason it augments our already out of control green addiction, for which I know of no treatment center or 12 step group.
Dance with who brung ya...

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #114 on: Today at 08:32 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

 Soooooo, what is the soaking myth?
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Offline miclee15

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #115 on: Today at 09:18 AM »
I've own a Large and Small BGE and cannot say enough great things about them.  My wife was going to kill me when I brought home my first BGE, until I cooked a spatchcock chicken. After one bite, she was sold.

One advantage to ceramic cooking is the moisture in the meats are not drawn out.  I'm not sure the technical term, but when meats are cooked in a metal kettle, the heat which is radiating out draws out moisture.  In a ceramic cooker much less as the heat barely escapes so the moisture stays in.  Same concept as the claypot chicken things you put in the oven.

Also, I'm surprised no one has thrown out cooking steaks using a Sous Vide.   You will get a perfectly cooked steak and impossible to over cook to your desired temp.    What I do is cook the steak with a sous vide, 1 hour prior to it finishing, fire up my small BGE wide open vents so it gets really hot.  Sear the outside for a few secs.  Total prep and actually doing the cooking about 5 mins.   Much easier when you have guests and not wanting to man the grill to ensure nothing is overcooked.   I'm sure this group wouldn't have an issue buying another "tool" to assist in the goal for a perfect steak  [big grin]

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #116 on: Today at 09:25 AM »
I've own a Large and Small BGE and cannot say enough great things about them.  My wife was going to kill me when I brought home my first BGE, until I cooked a spatchcock chicken. After one bite, she was sold.

One advantage to ceramic cooking is the moisture in the meats are not drawn out.  I'm not sure the technical term, but when meats are cooked in a metal kettle, the heat which is radiating out draws out moisture.  In a ceramic cooker much less as the heat barely escapes so the moisture stays in.  Same concept as the claypot chicken things you put in the oven.

Also, I'm surprised no one has thrown out cooking steaks using a Sous Vide.   You will get a perfectly cooked steak and impossible to over cook to your desired temp.    What I do is cook the steak with a sous vide, 1 hour prior to it finishing, fire up my small BGE wide open vents so it gets really hot.  Sear the outside for a few secs.  Total prep and actually doing the cooking about 5 mins.   Much easier when you have guests and not wanting to man the grill to ensure nothing is overcooked.   I'm sure this group wouldn't have an issue buying another "tool" to assist in the goal for a perfect steak  [big grin]

 If you go back a couple of pages, you will see the Sous Vide mentioned. This thread was the first I ever became aware of that though - just to show how much more  can be learned by a simple post.
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Offline DynaGlide

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #117 on: Today at 09:34 AM »
Amazing ribs debunked the soaking wood myth. It doesn't penetrate the wood enough to matter.

 Soooooo, what is the soaking myth?

Thought i covered it. Soaking wood doesn't prolong the burn of the wood.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #118 on: Today at 10:02 AM »
Ok, I will open up another can of worms (no not in the food ;)) but regarding sous vide and meats - if all you are doing after the sous vide (Yes I know suos vide makes the meats super, super tender) is very quickly searing the meats on high temps   can't that be done - just as effectively taste wise on a gas grill? Yes I know, gas may only get to 600-700 degrees or so rather than the 900+ from ceramic, but that means the difference in searing time is maybe a minute or so and when only searing for such a short time how can the benefits of  the smoky flavor be imparted on the food? 
 And wouldn't a good and properly reverse seared steak be more flavorful, not necessarily more tender, but more flavorful, than one cooked with sous vide?
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Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #119 on: Today at 10:05 AM »
For smirak & DynaGlide...

One of my favorite cuts is flank steak that has been marinated overnight in an olive oil/wine/herb mixture. When placing the steak above the hot charcoal, there is a tendency for the marinade drippings to start a fire.

So, when placing dry wood on hot coals and then adding a steak & marinade, that combination does provide for a lot more flame and a lot less smoke, and it burns rather than sears the surface. Soaking the wood controls the flame out problem and imparts a less bitter taste. When I used dried wood exclusively, the flavor of the meat was a bit more bitter/tart.
« Last Edit: Today at 10:11 AM by Cheese »

Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #120 on: Today at 10:20 AM »
Ok, I will open up another can of worms (no not in the food ;)) but regarding sous vide and meats - if all you are doing after the sous vide (Yes I know suos vide makes the meats super, super tender) is very quickly searing the meats on high temps   can't that be done - just as effectively taste wise on a gas grill? Yes I know, gas may only get to 600-700 degrees or so rather than the 900+ from ceramic, but that means the difference in searing time is maybe a minute or so and when only searing for such a short time how can the benefits of  the smoky flavor be imparted on the food? 
 And wouldn't a good and properly reverse seared steak be more flavorful, not necessarily more tender, but more flavorful, than one cooked with sous vide?

I have yet to try sous vide but I've read of many finishing methods, be it hot fry pan, broiler, grill of choice and even blow torch
+1

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #121 on: Today at 10:25 AM »
Ok, I will open up another can of worms (no not in the food ;)) but regarding sous vide and meats - if all you are doing after the sous vide (Yes I know suos vide makes the meats super, super tender) is very quickly searing the meats on high temps   can't that be done - just as effectively taste wise on a gas grill? Yes I know, gas may only get to 600-700 degrees or so rather than the 900+ from ceramic, but that means the difference in searing time is maybe a minute or so and when only searing for such a short time how can the benefits of  the smoky flavor be imparted on the food? 
 And wouldn't a good and properly reverse seared steak be more flavorful, not necessarily more tender, but more flavorful, than one cooked with sous vide?

I have yet to try sous vide but I've read of many finishing methods, be it hot fry pan, broiler, grill of choice and even blow torch

 Yep, but I'm thinking it will be very tender, but simply not as flavorful as a reverse sear steak. Other cuts of meat are probably different.
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Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #122 on: Today at 10:59 AM »
Yep, but I'm thinking it will be very tender, but simply not as flavorful as a reverse sear steak. Other cuts of meat are probably different.
From my understanding, sous vide followed by a blow torch, broiler, etc is an example of reverse sear (slow low heat to cook the inside followed by really high heat to sear the outside) so I'm not sure what method you're referring to exactly
+1

Offline miclee15

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #123 on: Today at 11:01 AM »
Ok, I will open up another can of worms (no not in the food ;)) but regarding sous vide and meats - if all you are doing after the sous vide (Yes I know suos vide makes the meats super, super tender) is very quickly searing the meats on high temps   can't that be done - just as effectively taste wise on a gas grill? Yes I know, gas may only get to 600-700 degrees or so rather than the 900+ from ceramic, but that means the difference in searing time is maybe a minute or so and when only searing for such a short time how can the benefits of  the smoky flavor be imparted on the food? 
 And wouldn't a good and properly reverse seared steak be more flavorful, not necessarily more tender, but more flavorful, than one cooked with sous vide?

IMHO, there is no difference if finishing on a charcoal grill after Sous Vide. The flavor is from the sear (unless you are doing a slow smoke eg real bbg not grilling). Once the steak gets on the hot grill there is plenty of smoke and I get plenty of flavor.   I agree there is a difference when using a blow torch or pan verse charcoal.    Some people actually sear first, then sous vide for a bit more, but the jury is out which is better.   

If you're only cooking a thin steak the benefits are marginal, but I enjoy a really thick cut. I'll have the butcher cut a 1 1/2" - 2".  I like med rare and to cook the center to that temp w/o over cooking the outside is next to impossible with just a grill.



I have yet to try sous vide but I've read of many finishing methods, be it hot fry pan, broiler, grill of choice and even blow torch

Online tjbnwi

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #124 on: Today at 11:02 AM »
Is dinner ready yet??????

Gezzzzzzz....

Tom

Offline Cheese

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #125 on: Today at 11:06 AM »

From my understanding, sous vide followed by a blow torch, broiler, etc is an example of reverse sear (slow low heat to cook the inside followed by really high heat to sear the outside) so I'm not sure what method you're referring to exactly


Sous vide is done in a water bath with only the final sear being exposed to smoke. I believe a reverse sear steak is exposed to smoke throughout the cooking process.

Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #126 on: Today at 11:23 AM »

From my understanding, sous vide followed by a blow torch, broiler, etc is an example of reverse sear (slow low heat to cook the inside followed by really high heat to sear the outside) so I'm not sure what method you're referring to exactly


Sous vide is done in a water bath with only the final sear being exposed to smoke. I believe a reverse sear steak is exposed to smoke throughout the cooking process.

https://www.kamadoguru.com/topic/24038-sous-vide-reverse-sear-ribeye/
+1

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #127 on: Today at 11:30 AM »
Yep, but I'm thinking it will be very tender, but simply not as flavorful as a reverse sear steak. Other cuts of meat are probably different.
From my understanding, sous vide followed by a blow torch, broiler, etc is an example of reverse sear (slow low heat to cook the inside followed by really high heat to sear the outside) so I'm not sure what method you're referring to exactly

 Ok, I was just questioning the fact that sous vide no doubt makes the steaks (and I am referring here only to steaks) extremely tender. Then it is followed by a quick sear by whatever method at hand. If seared by a ceramic or smoker grill - both at high temps since it's only on for a minute or two, why would there be any difference in taste and secondly, wouldn't a traditional reverse sear method on a ceramic or smoker grill be more flavorful, since the smoky flavor has now permeated the steak?
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Offline Paul G

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #128 on: Today at 11:41 AM »
Yep, but I'm thinking it will be very tender, but simply not as flavorful as a reverse sear steak. Other cuts of meat are probably different.
From my understanding, sous vide followed by a blow torch, broiler, etc is an example of reverse sear (slow low heat to cook the inside followed by really high heat to sear the outside) so I'm not sure what method you're referring to exactly

 Ok, I was just questioning the fact that sous vide no doubt makes the steaks (and I am referring here only to steaks) extremely tender. Then it is followed by a quick sear by whatever method at hand. If seared by a ceramic or smoker grill - both at high temps since it's only on for a minute or two, why would there be any difference in taste and secondly, wouldn't a traditional reverse sear method on a ceramic or smoker grill be more flavorful, since the smoky flavor has now permeated the steak?

Since I haven't yet done sous vide I can't compare it to anything, but I agree with your logic that a slow smoked piece of meat should taste different. I've read of people adding liquid smoke into the souv vide bag as well to impart those flavors if desired. Also have read of some folks smoking a bit after sous vide. Hopefully some of the sous vide aficionados here will chime in from their experience.
+1

Offline miclee15

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #129 on: Today at 12:50 PM »
There is a very big difference on how smoke "gets into the meat".   Smoking meats or BBQ is typically done at temp 200-250 degs.   This method you can get a very deep smoke taste and it does penetrate deeper (debatable-but I think it does) and allows you to have the meat sit in the smoke longer before the outer part of the meat is cooked.     Grilling is at temps higher than that (250) and most BBQ'er (not grillers) will agree that smoke doesn't penetrate at temps higher temps and as the meat cooks the less it accepts.  Also, if you burnt wood at higher temps you'll get a off taste.  Wood smoke needs to smolder not burn to avoid a bitter taste.  So the reality is your only imparting smoke to the outside when you grill.

I use both methods, and if you smoke a large steak (less then 250 deg, finish high sear), agree a deeper smoke flavor.
If you are going to Grill, minimal difference and having the outer layer of the steak over cooked is more undesirable for me then a touch more smoke.  Everyone has their likes so there is no right answer, but I have converted some die hard BBQ's and Grillers that Sous Vide for steak is the way to go.

Offline mark60

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #130 on: Today at 04:33 PM »
Unless you're 250 degrees or less you're not smoking, you're grilling or cooking and over 250 you won't really get any smoke flavor in your meat even cooked over an all wood fire.

I don't know for sure that sous vide makes steaks any more tender than any other methods unless you're in the sous vide for a long time, with steaks mine are only in the water bath for a couple hours. The benefit is that you cook them perfectly from edge to edge. I have two Anova sous vide units, the second one is useful when we have company and they like their steak somewhere past 132 degrees which is what I usually cook ours to. It's also excellent for lamb chops, those were always tricky for me to get right.

Food is ready to eat right out of the water bath but it isn't very presentable looking. The sear makes it look like we expect it to look and creates that great crust on a steak that's ready for the pat of seasoned butter. It's a little weird the first time or two but directly on red hot coals actually works and you somehow don't get a bunch of ash on your meat. A screaming hot cast iron frying pan works great too and gives a little different kind of crust.

Sorry Bob, the komado is a given but you'll have to add a sous vide too. Check out Anova and I'm sure they'll have 50 bucks off soon, they do it often. You use your own container and it can be as simple as a stockpot or as elaborate as you like. A smallish cooler works great because it helps keep the water hot on long cooks.

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #131 on: Today at 04:40 PM »
As a happy griller - see my posts above - and a sous vide fan (about 2.5 years) I can tell you that most steaks in my house are cooked sous vide.  Then dried off and seared by one of the following methods:

1.  Propane torch
2.  Cast iron pan
3.  Charcoal chimney starter with lit charcoal and a tiny grate on top.  Sometimes the chimney starter is turned upside down and fewer coals used.  Great for finishing sous vide hamburgers.

If it is a steak that has fat along the edges I prefer 2 or 3 above.  For filets generally it will be choice 1 or 2.

Sous vide is just another method and it is fun, but sometimes ridiculous to see on the web the length of time things are cooked like it is a goal.  There is a done point and then a safe range and then there is the degrade the meat towards mush.

1 to 2 hrs at 129 to 135 will work for most steaks.  Slightly tougher steaks - 3 hrs.

But of course this is just another cooking technique and is not recognized by all Public Health Safety Departments in all areas or states.  For instance, in my state of Virginia, it is ok to have a street cart that will serve hotdogs with accompanying regulations.  You can boil or steam them.  Can't grill or griddle them.  Also you can not sous vide them.

Peter

EDIT:  Love my Anova!
« Last Edit: Today at 04:42 PM by Peter Halle »
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline Bob Marino

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #132 on: Today at 04:52 PM »
As a happy griller - see my posts above - and a sous vide fan (about 2.5 years) I can tell you that most steaks in my house are cooked sous vide.  Then dried off and seared by one of the following methods:

1.  Propane torch
2.  Cast iron pan
3.  Charcoal chimney starter with lit charcoal and a tiny grate on top.  Sometimes the chimney starter is turned upside down and fewer coals used.  Great for finishing sous vide hamburgers.

If it is a steak that has fat along the edges I prefer 2 or 3 above.  For filets generally it will be choice 1 or 2.

Sous vide is just another method and it is fun, but sometimes ridiculous to see on the web the length of time things are cooked like it is a goal.  There is a done point and then a safe range and then there is the degrade the meat towards mush.

1 to 2 hrs at 129 to 135 will work for most steaks.  Slightly tougher steaks - 3 hrs.

But of course this is just another cooking technique and is not recognized by all Public Health Safety Departments in all areas or states.  For instance, in my state of Virginia, it is ok to have a street cart that will serve hotdogs with accompanying regulations.  You can boil or steam them.  Can't grill or griddle them.  Also you can not sous vide them.

Peter

EDIT:  Love my Anova!

 Ok, Pete, I'll ask you the same question - is there a difference in taste between doing the SV process and a reverse sear?
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Offline Peter Halle

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #133 on: Today at 05:24 PM »
Sous vide gives predictability and because it is cooked at a lower temperature nothing can go wrong quickly.  Fudge factor built in.

For instance, you want to cook a beef tenderloin for the holidays.  You can cook it any way you want at a temperature of 225 to 250 for whatever time needed to get you to within 10 degrees of the finished meat temp.  If you are cooking over something that produces smoke then you will have an added taste.  If you cook in the oven then nope.  Reverse sear it and then you are caramelizing the exterior and any juices that have already developed versus being solid fat or non-existent if you seared first.

When you go sous vide the same thing is happening as cooking it a lower temp on another device, but GENERALLY SPEAKING because you are cooking at the desired finish temp of the roast and in the relative absence of oxygen with better conductivity or heat thru water around the bag versus air wafting by, you can have a more predictable result pending finishing it off with then a reverse sear.

Hope I didn't confuse.

To me a steak cooked sous vide then seared versus a steak cooked by conventional methods then reverse seared is similar in taste unless in the cooking process there has been an introduction of smoke.  When you get to the sear process you are working on browning at a very high heat.

Peter

« Last Edit: Today at 05:29 PM by Peter Halle »
Scraps to Smiles.  To be continued.....  Stay Tuned.

Offline Motown

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #134 on: Today at 07:12 PM »
I love how I come to this website (which I love) and wind up spending lots of money on something green! LOL.

I am in the market for a Big Green Egg myself and following this thread with great interest.

Offline miclee15

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #135 on: Today at 09:08 PM »
There is another add on for the egg which I can't live without.  A BBQ Guru.  It's a electronically control fan to regulate the air flow to the egg thus controlling tempeture very well.  If you look at pictures of BBQ competitions you will find a lot of people use them.   

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Re: The Big Green Egg
« Reply #136 on: Today at 10:36 PM »
I have an Anova, along with my Kamado Joe and my Akorns. I also have the BBQ Guru WiFi controller. I got the BBQ for my Akorn, as temp control on it is fairly difficult but my Big Joe is so stable I hardly use it for temp control on the BJ. I still use it for remotely monitoring the cook, as it's great for pit and food temp observation from the comfort of the house. As to the reverse seared steaks, I have also done them both ways, Sous Vide and Big Joe. I prefer to cook them on the BJ at 225° with a little Hickory wood for flavoring. I think they have much better flavor then the Sous Vide steaks. Now if you take a cheaper cut of meat, like so called London Broil, really just top round and cook it at 125° for about 10 hours and then do the sear procedure. You will end up with a piece of meat that is as tender as Rib Eye, with a great flavor. It's one of my favorite things to do with the Anova. Chicken also comes out great, Sous Vide, is just another way to cook many things.