Festool Owners Group

OFF-TOPIC => General Friendly Chat => Topic started by: GoingMyWay on June 26, 2018, 06:32 PM

Title: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 26, 2018, 06:32 PM
Maybe this is way off base and most people are not at all interested. But I thought I'd give it a go.

Being a foodie and someone who likes to cook (I like to think that I'm a better cook than a woodworker), I thought it might be a nice to start a thread of people showing what they've been cooking.

Last night we made sous vide duck breast with broad bean tips, leftover scalloped potatoes, and jasmine rice:

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: DynaGlide on June 26, 2018, 07:26 PM
Last night's dinner was Angus filets cooked about an hour at 275 then seared over direct heat with asparagus. The down side to this is I'm always let down when I spend money on steak at a restaurant and it isn't even close to as tender.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 26, 2018, 07:35 PM
Reverse sear, nice!

I feel the same way about ordering an expensive steak in a restaurant - I could make something a lot better for a lot less.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Rob Z on June 26, 2018, 09:01 PM
Tonight's dinner was steaks, corn on the cob and avocados, all grilled on a Primo.  The avocados were topped with tomatoes, olive oil and basil. 

No pictures because it all disappeared too quickly.    [big grin]

All pictures above look quite tasty.  I do love duck and haven't had that for some time. 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 26, 2018, 09:38 PM
We gave up on restaurants about 15 years ago because we cook better food for 1/4 of the cost. The exception is the St. Paul Grill, that we have a yearly, never ending reservation for around the Holidays. Fantastic faire...you need to book it a year in advance or you’ll never get past the doorman.

FWIW, the recipe app I prefer is Paprika. I’ve been using it for the last 5 years. It’s so simple to copy and paste recipes, and it’s just so easy to save recipes and share recipes. Better yet, the app keeps evolving into improved versions every year.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: live4ever on June 26, 2018, 11:27 PM
Dang, you people eat well. 

+1 on Paprika.  Great app.  Have both the desktop and iOS versions and it is far better than any other recipe management I've ever tried.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 27, 2018, 12:53 AM
Hi!

Those of you who follow me on Instagram might have seen a couple of these, big time foodie here. :) I think we're cooking as much as we're going out for dinner/lunch - I don't always take pictures ...

Here's some stuff I've cooked/baked - please enjoy.

So this is - by far - our favorite starter for menus. It's quite simple as it's just tiger prawns with a cream sauce (shallots) made in the same pan the tiger prawns were roasted/seared in and a piece of puff pastry. Sometimes we add some mushrooms to the sauce.

(https://up.picr.de/33089459yz.jpg)

Another quick & easy favorite dish is pasta with salmon. Sometimes it is not quick - when we make our own pasta - but the salmon and sauce are easily and quickly made.

(https://up.picr.de/33089464kb.jpg)

We love oysters.

(https://up.picr.de/33089465oj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089466cw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089467vp.jpg)

And to stay in the water, here is a dish called "sailors dish".

(https://up.picr.de/33089468yq.jpg)

Crawfish on a bed of oven roasted/baked tomatoes and black olives.

(https://up.picr.de/33089469mm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089470zx.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089471qk.jpg)

This is called "veal chops like grandmother used to make them" (veal chops, shallots, bacon, mushrooms ... can be deglazed with cream)

(https://up.picr.de/33089474ug.jpg)

Sometimes we BBQ

(https://up.picr.de/33089480lw.jpg)

Vol-au-vent

(https://up.picr.de/33089482ew.jpg)

By far out most favorite autumn/winter dish: Bœuf bourguignon

(https://up.picr.de/33089483gw.jpg)

And finally, for the woodworking aspect/topic: "Baumkuchen" (pyramid cake) - baked layer for layer ... I take the time to do this in early December, and then the cake sits until Christmas. It's a good day of work all in all.

(https://up.picr.de/33089485jv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089486hk.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089487zt.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089488nf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089489wh.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33089490ex.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on June 27, 2018, 05:06 AM
 To All,

  Incredibly looking (and I'm sure, tasting) food.
 Makes me feel quite boring simply throwing on a steak or some chicken on the grill!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: magellan on June 27, 2018, 05:39 AM
Hello all

Ok. 5/6 months ago I believe it was Bob M. That started a thread about what grill to buy.  Well I followed that thread with great interest. I was sitting on the fence about a smoker or a Kamado style cooker.  With info given here and with my own research I decided to purchase a Kamado Joe cooker.   I’ve not regretted the choice, I’ve enjoyed learning about cooking in this fashion.  I was always concerned about using charcoal to do all this fancy cooking but have found it is quit simple to adjust and control the heat of a Kamado style grill. 

So thank you all for your opinions and knowledge of grilling.

That all said, I have to agree that I’m recently more interested in cooking than I am in being in my shop    Costs are similar, for example you have to purchase all the accessories for the grill, and covers for the grill, and in my case I had a small kitchen in our lower level of our home that we never used except to store financial records and other items.  So I cleaned it out and remodeled the kitchen completely new ceiling new flooring new lighting new appliances and sanded down the cabinets and repainted.  I bought a mixer to make pizza dough and now I’m accumulating cookbooks like I did with Woodworkering. 

I will say that’s it’s been fun this past 6 month learning a new hobby and a few pound added on


I enjoy this new thread and it comes at a good time when grilling is easier with the weather

Thank you all

So cooking can be just as expensive as woodworking.  And I have all of you to thank for it
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 27, 2018, 11:27 AM
+1 on Paprika.  Great app.  Have both the desktop and iOS versions and it is far better than any other recipe management I've ever tried.

I have the app on my iPhone so when I'm shopping for food I can pull up any recipe I want and purchase the ingredients on the spot. [cool]

I have the app on my iPad in the kitchen for cooking purposes. Once you've chosen a recipe, the iPad will not shut off automatically.  [cool]

I have the app on my MB Pro because it's a lot easier to update or edit recipes on a laptop.

The latest version lets you toggle between several recipes at the same time.

Here are a couple of my summer favorites:

Strawberry-Chicken Salad with Pecans & Feta

Tuna Steak Burgers and a fresh Beet Salad with Balsamic & Chèvre
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 27, 2018, 11:42 AM
The Paprika App costs $4.99?  I really cringe at the idea of having to pay for an App, but it sounds like this one is really good so it may be worth it.

I have the app on my iPhone so when I'm shopping for food I can pull up any recipe I want and purchase the ingredients on the spot. [cool]


A lot of our recipes are either printed out or handwritten.  That's fine and all until we decide we want to make something while at the grocery store and then I can't remember what all of the ingredients are!  Having cloud access to the recipe would be really useful then.

I have the app on my iPad in the kitchen for cooking purposes. Once you've chosen a recipe, the iPad will not shut off automatically.  [cool]

One of the reasons why I like having the recipe written down is that it's annoying that normally the iPad screen turns off if you're just looking at a recipe on a web page.  This would solve that problem.

I had thought about inputting my recipes into Evernote, but that's not a recipe manager per se.  There used to be a Evernote Food app, but that was shutdown for some reason.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Dane on June 27, 2018, 11:49 AM
Ok.  I’ll play.  Here’s our yearly Xmas Eve project.  Timpano.  I make all the ingredients except for the the ziti.  It’s definitely a multi-day affair, basically a huge pasta shell enclosing ziti, homemade meatballs cured meats and cheeses and hardboiled eggs.  If you’ve seen the movie Big Night, which you absolutely should if you like food, you’ve seen this.  This year the power went out- so I was hand mixing the pasta dough by lantern light.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 27, 2018, 01:12 PM
The Paprika App costs $4.99?  I really cringe at the idea of having to pay for an App, but it sounds like this one is really good so it may be worth it.

A lot of our recipes are either printed out or handwritten.  That's fine and all until we decide we want to make something while at the grocery store and then I can't remember what all of the ingredients are!  Having cloud access to the recipe would be really useful then.

After I used the app for a while, it worked out so slick that I decided to make a chalkboard for the side of the fridge so I could just take a picture. Between the app and the chalkboard photo, everything I need to purchase is on the phone. [cool] No more small scraps of paper in my pockets and scattered throughout the kitchen. Sometimes with 2 or 3 shopping lists, I couldn't remember which one was current.  [eek]

Two different colors of chalk. One for groceries and the other for Target, Menards, HD...whatever.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 27, 2018, 01:15 PM
I use Evernote for my shopping list(s).  1 list that's divided into sections - regular grocery store, Home Depot, Woodcraft, Costco, etc.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Upscale on June 27, 2018, 03:56 PM
All you home cooks are getting me aggravated. I rent an apartment and barbecues on the balcony are strictly prohibited. All I can do is head over to a friend's house every 3-4 weeks to use his barbecue.  [crying] [crying] [crying]

I do have some skill with the stove, but it just doesn't come close to a barbecue. And yeah, I've tried a whole pile of indoor barbecues, but they suck big time!!!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: RobBob on June 27, 2018, 05:16 PM
Reverse sear, nice!

I feel the same way about ordering an expensive steak in a restaurant - I could make something a lot better for a lot less.

Me, too.  Always disappointed when I order steak, even at expensive steak restaurants.  Cooked at home is better.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Koamolly on June 27, 2018, 08:25 PM
Assuming you have access to some good sashimi grade ahi, here’s a simple way to prepare it, even for people who don’t care for raw fish. I think you guys might like this.

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-KzxBZ3t/0/b3762050/M/497FD119-74D0-41FC-8AC9-F45496F6EC9E-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-c5FnQsK/0/699b5eea/M/43B38A90-1644-4122-B250-168F96501F31-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-mTmP57V/0/f725c3f8/M/7A742B20-E4FE-4FA7-8F71-588DC653C560-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-gnS8vXC/0/4013f572/M/A7AFE118-E4F6-4796-9259-AEC05BB7FA26-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-sMxPLLL/0/6f168666/M/BDB1DFF4-78CC-4E00-97CD-F31CF000340F-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-NZT39Zr/0/1a169b5a/M/908FBA82-7E59-4680-BB11-73637A085538-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-s93GMgd/0/474ad369/M/81F58473-29E8-4058-839F-182766D39242-M.jpg)

Ratio of shoyu to strained lemon juice is 1:1, but you can adjust to taste, but remember you are adding slivered lemon rind.

Outside of fish is barely cooked on low heat to whiten outside.  Can also put under broiler briefly if you keep an eye on it. You just want color. You don’t want to brown it.  Refrigerate it after taking it out of pan while you’re preparing lemons, green onions and marinade, it will be easier to slice.  Plate it on shallow plate. Let it marinate about an hour before serving.  Top with lemon rind and green onions.

If I’m taking it to a party, I’ll pour just enough marinade to moisten fish, to make transport less messy.  Assemble at party, add rest of marinade.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 27, 2018, 10:22 PM
Nice presentation @Koamolly , it looks delicious, love the Shun knives, however I used to be a fan of Kikkoman but switched to Tamari-Lite because it was less salty. That allowed the subtle flavor of the sushi to come through...a major improvement.

I’m also interested in why you’re mincing the rind instead of just zesting the skin. There’s a difference in bitterness levels.

Putting those nits aside...I could eat sushi 3 nights a week.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Koamolly on June 27, 2018, 11:06 PM
Nice presentation @Koamolly , it looks delicious, love the Shun knives, however I used to be a fan of Kikkoman but switched to Tamari-Lite because it was less salty. That allowed the subtle flavor of the sushi to come through...a major improvement.

I’m also interested in why you’re mincing the rind instead of just zesting the skin. There’s a difference in bitterness levels.

Putting those nits aside...I could eat sushi 3 nights a week.  [big grin]

Thanks.

My first wife, from years ago, was Japanese, this was her mom's recipe and she did it this way. A bit crunchier perhaps.  Need to be careful when peeling, for sure. Those pics are from a few years ago, I took for my daughter who was making this, to walk her through it.  Shuns are ok but I usually use cheap Japanese knives (sharpened)  I can abuse when hanging in the kitchen.   But, a good way to cut up fish is with a Olfa snap blade razor knife with the blade fully extended. ;)

I use lite shoyu but it’s whatever I have at the time I took pics.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 27, 2018, 11:42 PM
My first wife, from years ago, was Japanese, this was her mom's recipe and she did it this way. A bit crunchier perhaps.  Need to be careful when peeling, for sure. Those pics are from a few years ago, I took for my daughter who was making this, to walk her through it.  Shuns are ok but I usually use cheap Japanese knives (sharpened)  I can abuse when hanging in the kitchen.   But, a good way to cut up fish is with a Olfa snap blade razor knife with the blade fully extended. ;)
I use lite shoyu but it’s whatever I have at the time I took pics.

 I have an affinity to always follow the original recipe the first time around. After that... the world’s your oyster, so go forth.

Cooking is almost more creative than woodworking because you’re always creating every meal. That’s creativity and part of the thought process that’s being generated all day long.

I’ve always been a fan of Wusthof because they’re really tough knives. However recently, the Shuns with the 16 degree cutting angle are incredibly sharp and only need to be steeled every couple of days.



Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on June 28, 2018, 05:08 AM
Hello all

Ok. 5/6 months ago I believe it was Bob M. That started a thread about what grill to buy.  Well I followed that thread with great interest. I was sitting on the fence about a smoker or a Kamado style cooker.  With info given here and with my own research I decided to purchase a Kamado Joe cooker.   I’ve not regretted the choice, I’ve enjoyed learning about cooking in this fashion.  I was always concerned about using charcoal to do all this fancy cooking but have found it is quit simple to adjust and control the heat of a Kamado style grill. 

So thank you all for your opinions and knowledge of grilling.

That all said, I have to agree that I’m recently more interested in cooking than I am in being in my shop    Costs are similar, for example you have to purchase all the accessories for the grill, and covers for the grill, and in my case I had a small kitchen in our lower level of our home that we never used except to store financial records and other items.  So I cleaned it out and remodeled the kitchen completely new ceiling new flooring new lighting new appliances and sanded down the cabinets and repainted.  I bought a mixer to make pizza dough and now I’m accumulating cookbooks like I did with Woodworkering. 

I will say that’s it’s been fun this past 6 month learning a new hobby and a few pound added on


I enjoy this new thread and it comes at a good time when grilling is easier with the weather

Thank you all

So cooking can be just as expensive as woodworking.  And I have all of you to thank for it

 Yes, I started the conversation regarding grills - and got an awful lot of great info and recipes posted by members.   
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: magellan on June 28, 2018, 01:41 PM
Hello all

I don’t want to change the direction of this thread but if I may I’d like to ask a question about
knives.  We have a full set of Cutco knives for every day use, but I would like to acquire a few nice knives for my downstairs kitchen that I’m now using as my kitchen for grilling and making pizza dough.   

Knives are a bit of a mystery to me.  Stainless, carbon steel or whatever ever else they’re using to make knives.  Do you need to spend a lot of money or can it be a reasonable purchase.  Seriously I visited a high end kitchen store the other day and I had no idea of what to buy steel wise.  I knew I wanted a chef’s knife and a boning knife but I didn’t know what to buy.  They had so many knives it was confusing

What brought this to mind was the comment about the knife Cheese used in the photo

Thanks all
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 28, 2018, 01:50 PM
Here's a good article on the difference between Japanese & German knives.

For slicing tasks I use Shun.

For heavier duty tasks I use Wusthof.

If you purchase a premium knife, NEVER put it in the dishwasher and don't abuse it, it will outlive you. [big grin]

https://www.tastingtable.com/cook/national/japanese-versus-german-knives

For a boning knife I prefer the Wusthof Flexible version. It also does a real good job in removing the skin from salmon fillets.

http://www.wusthof.com/products/classic/6-flexible-boning-knife
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 29, 2018, 02:34 AM
Hi,

Personally, as a long term and die-hard handmade knife collector, I've been using a handmade knife from a German knifemaker for years now. It's basically a Japanese / German/European crossover with a medium size Gyuto style blade and a German / European handle. I use this for any and everything, I always keep a sink of hot water for rinsing. I won't bore you with the details about steel and so on ... For most it doesn't matter anyway. When I need a smaller knife I use another one of my handmade/custom knives ...

(https://up.picr.de/33106179ll.jpg)

Just FYI and before this sparks controversy: This is a picture I took after having great results/ great taste experience with the salt pictured, that one of my acquaintances produces - short message: This salt is addictive. The picture was used on their IG and FB, after I posted this to my private, back then, FB and IG Accounts - IIRC. This is no statement on drugs.

(https://up.picr.de/33106180oj.jpg)


(https://up.picr.de/33106317tk.jpg)


(https://up.picr.de/32928585md.jpg)


(https://up.picr.de/32928586pc.jpg)


The Shuns are great knives as are so many others all the way up to handmade/custom knives ... You can sink more $$$$ in one knife than a couple of Festool tools would cost. ...

And the truth is, that's plainly a personal decision and not a necessity. I would highly recommend to you to see what knives fit your hand well and you enjoy "working" with - and then probably buy a big, medium and small one + a bendy one. If it's the Shuns that's a great choice - as would be Wüsthof, Zwilling, Herder, Dick ... Also cool, especially their "bread knife" also referred to as "bread saw" is https://www.guede-solingen.de/de/ -> https://www.guede-solingen.de/en/knife-series/guede-bread-knife

I'm sure there are also interesting US manufacturers that offer a quality product.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on June 29, 2018, 07:02 AM
   

 I have the Wustoff Classic set for over 20 years and has served me well, though I should be a little better at sharpening. Well, last week my wife was using the 8" chef's knife to crack open a chicken - probably hacking the bones. Low and behold, when I went to clean the knife, I see that she also cracked some of the blade - beyond repair! Luckily I have a 10" Wustoff from about the same time ago and will use that in its place.
 I also have a Shun that I keep in it's own sheath and is off limits for use by anyone other than myself. Beautiful Shun, but they are fairly delicate.
 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 29, 2018, 09:42 AM

1. This is a picture I took after having great results/ great taste experience with the salt pictured, that one of my acquaintances produces - short message: This salt is addictive.

2. You can sink more $$$$ in one knife than a couple of Festool tools would cost. ...

3. Also cool, especially their "bread knife" also referred to as "bread saw" is https://www.guede-solingen.de/de/ -> https://www.guede-solingen.de/en/knife-series/guede-bread-knife


1. Hey Oliver, curious what's so special about the salt? It looks like fleur de sel.

2. A number of years ago, I came across some custom 8" chef knives that ranged from $750 to $1200 AND you were placed on a wait list for over a year. That immediately made me think about Randall knives.  [eek]

3. I have a Wusthof tomato knife and also their bread knife. I've used them for years and they work well. However, since I started using the Shuns, I now use their long slicer for both bread & tomatoes. They're just incredibly sharp. [cool]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Koamolly on June 29, 2018, 10:55 AM

1. This is a picture I took after having great results/ great taste experience with the salt pictured, that one of my acquaintances produces - short message: This salt is addictive.

2. You can sink more $$$$ in one knife than a couple of Festool tools would cost. ...

3. Also cool, especially their "bread knife" also referred to as "bread saw" is https://www.guede-solingen.de/de/ -> https://www.guede-solingen.de/en/knife-series/guede-bread-knife


1. Hey Oliver, curious what's so special about the salt? It looks like fleur de sel.

2. A number of years ago, I came across some custom 8" chef knives that ranged from $750 to $1200 AND you were placed on a wait list for over a year. That immediately made me think about Randall knives.  [eek]

3. I have a Wustof tomato knife and also their bread knife. I've used them for years and they work well. However, since I started using the Shuns, I now use their long slicer for both bread & tomatoes. They're just incredibly sharp. [cool]


Many years ago when I bought these knives there was a wait list of about a year.  Now I think it’s about six years for a Randall.  The carving set I’ve used quite a bit, but the dive knife I’ve never felt the need to take diving and I've been a commercial fisherman (reef fish)/diver for most my life.  Lots of cool stories about Randall made knives.

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-rDQsqNF/0/6d05145c/M/D410C111-EFFC-430A-AB60-4AAD1CE841AF-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-Wg2fQTn/0/1df2fe46/M/64C903BC-5B11-4535-A5E7-C0E13273FE66-M.jpg)

I think what Olivier said about seeing how a knife feels in your hand is pretty important especially if you’re going to be using it a lot.  I have many Shuns but usually reach for a smaller wood handle cheap Japanese knife.  Mainly just having a really sharp knife of any kind really helps.  There are many sharpeners, stones, ceramic sticks, etc. available.  Not to drift further but Edge Pro is worth considering.

http://www.edgeproinc.com/

Impressive knives Olivier.  Enjoying everyone’s photos too.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Joe Felchlin on June 29, 2018, 11:15 AM
You guys look like really great CHEFS. [smile] Wish I had your talent.
Fortunately, I married a gourmet chef.

We’ve had the complete set of -
Zwilling J.A. Henckels Pro Knives for 25+ years.
She like REALLY SHARP KNIVES.
I don’t even use my Tormek Sharpener to sharpen ‘em.
I keep ‘em “razor blade” sharp by hand.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on June 29, 2018, 11:17 AM
You guys look like really great CHEFS. [smile]
Wish I had your talent.
Fortunately, I married a gourmet chef.

We’ve had the complete set of -
Zwilling J.A. Henckels Pro Knives for 25+ years.

She like REALLY SHARP KNIVES.
I don’t even use my Tormek Sharpener to sharpen ‘em.
I keep ‘em “razor blade” sharp by hand.

 What’s your technique for that?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Joe Felchlin on June 29, 2018, 11:40 AM
Bob:
I use water stones -
Then increasingly finer sand paper grits (adhesive backed) on a flat granite stone block -
Finishing with a gentle leather stropping (accompanied with a small amount of honing compound.
I set it up like an assembly line on my work bench -
And do most of our knife set all at the same time.
Once the “production line” is set up (a few minutes) - The sharpening goes pretty fast.
And... Since I’m already “in business” -
It’s a great time to check/touch up my most used hand plane and chisel blades -
Which I normally sharpen on my Tormek sharpener.
On occasion, I leave things set up and tell friends coming over for dinner/BBQ -
To bring their kitchen knives. (No more than one or two couples)
Takes a few minutes - And “brings out the smiles”.  [wink]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 29, 2018, 02:20 PM

1. This is a picture I took after having great results/ great taste experience with the salt pictured, that one of my acquaintances produces - short message: This salt is addictive.

2. You can sink more $$$$ in one knife than a couple of Festool tools would cost. ...

3. Also cool, especially their "bread knife" also referred to as "bread saw" is https://www.guede-solingen.de/de/ -> https://www.guede-solingen.de/en/knife-series/guede-bread-knife


1. Hey Oliver, curious what's so special about the salt? It looks like fleur de sel.

2. A number of years ago, I came across some custom 8" chef knives that ranged from $750 to $1200 AND you were placed on a wait list for over a year. That immediately made me think about Randall knives.  [eek]

3. I have a Wustof tomato knife and also their bread knife. I've used them for years and they work well. However, since I started using the Shuns, I now use their long slicer for both bread & tomatoes. They're just incredibly sharp. [cool]

Hi cheese,

It's fleur de sel, from Germany's Ostsee (Baltic Sea).

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 29, 2018, 02:33 PM

1. This is a picture I took after having great results/ great taste experience with the salt pictured, that one of my acquaintances produces - short message: This salt is addictive.

2. You can sink more $$$$ in one knife than a couple of Festool tools would cost. ...

3. Also cool, especially their "bread knife" also referred to as "bread saw" is https://www.guede-solingen.de/de/ -> https://www.guede-solingen.de/en/knife-series/guede-bread-knife


1. Hey Oliver, curious what's so special about the salt? It looks like fleur de sel.

2. A number of years ago, I came across some custom 8" chef knives that ranged from $750 to $1200 AND you were placed on a wait list for over a year. That immediately made me think about Randall knives.  [eek]

3. I have a Wustof tomato knife and also their bread knife. I've used them for years and they work well. However, since I started using the Shuns, I now use their long slicer for both bread & tomatoes. They're just incredibly sharp. [cool]


Many years ago when I bought these knives there was a wait list of about a year.  Now I think it’s about six years for a Randall.  The carving set I’ve used quite a bit, but the dive knife I’ve never felt the need to take diving and I've been a commercial fisherman (reef fish)/diver for most my life.  Lots of cool stories about Randall made knives.

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-rDQsqNF/0/6d05145c/M/D410C111-EFFC-430A-AB60-4AAD1CE841AF-M.jpg)

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-Wg2fQTn/0/1df2fe46/M/64C903BC-5B11-4535-A5E7-C0E13273FE66-M.jpg)

I think what Olivier said about seeing how a knife feels in your hand is pretty important especially if you’re going to be using it a lot.  I have many Shuns but usually reach for a smaller wood handle cheap Japanese knife.  Mainly just having a really sharp knife of any kind really helps.  There are many sharpeners, stones, ceramic sticks, etc. available.  Not to drift further but Edge Pro is worth considering.

http://www.edgeproinc.com/

Impressive knives Olivier.  Enjoying everyone’s photos too.

That carving set is impressive! Thanks for sharing!

A Randall knife is a must have in my opinion, here's my #25. :) That's getting used in the kitchen, too. :)

(https://up.picr.de/33112332hn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33112334bq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33112336ds.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33112341xu.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on June 29, 2018, 03:17 PM
Many years ago when I bought these knives there was a wait list of about a year.  Now I think it’s about six years for a Randall.  The carving set I’ve used quite a bit, but the dive knife I’ve never felt the need to take diving and I've been a commercial fisherman (reef fish)/diver for most my life.  Lots of cool stories about Randall made knives.

Seeing as we're sharing photos...here's one of a Model 8 Trout & Bird. I purchased it about 40 years ago and it was a 1 year wait at that time. Interestingly enough, Randall's are "time stamped" by the number of, thickness of and order of the fiber stock spacers on the hilt. So in this case, 5 spacers, 4 thin red & white and 1 thick gray/black in the order of  Red...White...Gray...White...Red, places this knife in the mid-seventies to mid-eighties era.

I do know that Oliver owns a Randall but I can't remember the model.  [huh]
[attachimg=1]
[attachimg=2]
[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 29, 2018, 03:23 PM
Beautiful, love that blade shape!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on June 29, 2018, 04:15 PM
From the smoker ----------------------------

       Sweet Italian sausage around a hot Italian sausage core, wrapped all the way around with a bacon weave. Smoked for however long then heat  turned up to finish.  It's about 4" - 5" in diameter. Sliced like a loaf of bread and put on your favorite roll with some BBQ sauce or what ever else you like. 

   [attachimg=1]


Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 29, 2018, 04:32 PM
Wow that kinda reminds me of turducken.  That looks great.  Everything is better with bacon! 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on June 30, 2018, 03:09 AM
It's peanut-butter jelly... oh, no, it's BACON BOMB time!!!

That looks amazing Seth!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on June 30, 2018, 05:58 AM
From the smoker ----------------------------

       Sweet Italian sausage around a hot Italian sausage core, wrapped all the way around with a bacon weave. Smoked for however long then heat  turned up to finish.  It's about 4" - 5" in diameter. Sliced like a loaf of bread and put on your favorite roll with some BBQ sauce or what ever else you like. 

    (Attachment Link)

Seth

  Nice, Seth.
 
 I have never seen that before. Looks good and I'm sure tastes good. What type of wood did you use?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on June 30, 2018, 02:11 PM
From the smoker ----------------------------

       Sweet Italian sausage around a hot Italian sausage core, wrapped all the way around with a bacon weave. Smoked for however long then heat  turned up to finish.  It's about 4" - 5" in diameter. Sliced like a loaf of bread and put on your favorite roll with some BBQ sauce or what ever else you like. 

    (Attachment Link)

Seth

  Nice, Seth.
 
 I have never seen that before. Looks good and I'm sure tastes good. What type of wood did you use?

   Traeger pellet smoker / grill. Probably used hickory, but could have been oak or maple. I don't notice a big difference between the types on this smoker. With the exception of mesquite or alder, neither of which I liked as much. The mesquite seemed to impart a bitterness. The alder did not burn as hot when I wanted the heat turned to max. So it wasn't as good for cooking.

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on June 30, 2018, 05:53 PM
Well tonight, lemon jalapeño marinated mussels for my wife and spicy shrimp fritters with Bahama style dipping sauce for me.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 30, 2018, 06:03 PM
Did you get the lemon jalapeno marinated mussels recipe from Food Wishes?  I saw notification for that video yesterday, but I didn't watch it as it didn't sound that interesting/appealing to me.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on June 30, 2018, 06:33 PM
Did you get the lemon jalapeno marinated mussels recipe from Food Wishes?  I saw notification for that video yesterday, but I didn't watch it as it didn't sound that interesting/appealing to me.

Bingo!  I love his videos and delivery.  I also applaud him for his internet savvy.

Try his Mexican Shrimp Cocktail recipe.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on June 30, 2018, 09:12 PM
Chef John from Food Wishes is awesome!

I just checked out his Mexican Shrimp Cocktail recipe.  It sure sounds like what I had heard my grandpa ate when he was in Acapulco, Mexico.  I think my grandma said he ate something like 20 of those.  I wish my grandparents were still around so I could ask them if this was the same or similar dish.

Tonight we also made a recipe from Chef John, his Chicken and Rice.  We modified his recipe slightly, but here is what we came up with:

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]


Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 01, 2018, 10:53 AM
Scrapple, eggs, and toast for breakfast.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 01, 2018, 11:41 AM
Well tonight, lemon jalapeño marinated mussels for my wife and spicy shrimp fritters with Bahama style dipping sauce for me.

I'm curious Peter how the mussels turned out?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 01, 2018, 11:50 AM
Hi!

Yesterday, BBQ. Spareribs, Steak and Pork neck.

Selfmade cucumber salad, red sauce, herb butter ...

(https://up.picr.de/33128889ih.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33128890jm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33128891ky.jpg)

Today, at least until we have dinner. Home baked strawberry cake. (Biscuit, vanilla pudding, strawberries and topped with melted currant jam and cream ...)

(https://up.picr.de/33128892iw.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 01, 2018, 12:46 PM
Well tonight, lemon jalapeño marinated mussels for my wife and spicy shrimp fritters with Bahama style dipping sauce for me.

I'm curious Peter how the mussels turned out?

@Cheese , I try to be honest here so:  My wife love them but then she loves all things related to mussels.  Mission accomplished.  Me, well, I spit mine out in the trashcan.  Not for me.  Kinda thought so in advance.  But then I love cooking but hate eating anyway.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Wooden Skye on July 01, 2018, 01:00 PM
Seth you should call that creation the Heart Attack Inducer.  I would still try a slice.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 01, 2018, 05:36 PM
@Cheese , I try to be honest here so:  My wife love them but then she loves all things related to mussels.  Mission accomplished.  Me, well, I spit mine out in the trashcan.  Not for me.  Kinda thought so in advance.  But then I love cooking but hate eating anyway.

That’s funny...I think mussels are the same as fresh raw oysters, people either love 💕 them or hate them. I love 💕 them both.  [smile]  One of my favorites is a fresh oyster martini 🍸... delicious. Two of them are even more delicious.  [tongue]

At any rate, I’d never heard of Chef John before so it was interesting going to his blog and checking out some recipes. The jalapeño mussels recipe jumped out at me so I opened up Paprika, loaded the mussels URL, hit copy & then save and the recipe is now part of my cookbook. Couldn’t be easier.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 01, 2018, 06:41 PM
@Cheese , if you have an hour to kill there is an interview video with him on YouTube that I think is interesting because it explains some things about him (like why you won't see him in a recipe video) and why he doesn't list the recipe in his videos.  Refreshing in my mind because he doesn't have the Food Network "I am a chef" aura.  Check it out.

The best way to search for recipes is on his blog site. 

If you like pizza - search for Wolgang Puck Pizza dough!  His San Fransico bagels are great!  With 1400+ videos on his site there is much to surf thru but all his videos are short.

Happy surfing!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 01, 2018, 06:53 PM
Thanks 🙏 Peter... I will check it out. I rather liked the sense of humor he displayed during the jalapeño mussels video.  [smile]  That took me by surprise.

Like pizza...who doesn’t like pizza? That’s one thing I’m still trying to work the kinks out of. Between the dough, the toppings, the cheeses, the sauce, the chew of the crust...way too many variables for me. I actually like cold pizza BEST at times.  [cool]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Koamolly on July 01, 2018, 08:45 PM
Wines?  Not sure if this is drifting too much.  Two of my favorites, Orin Swift/Dave Phinney's Mannequin (white) and Machete (red).  Cool wine maker.

https://www.palatexposure.com/people/inside-the-mind-of-dave-phinney/

http://www.orinswift.com/Information

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Sashimi/i-ThXvXrg/0/f72c1820/M/02AE156C-779C-4F86-B378-13B52AC945A2-M.jpg)

I had built a gate for free for someone to return a favor he had done for a friend of mine.  Every time I saw him he would give me one or two bottles of Machete until I had to refuse them... sort of.  I ended up with quite a few bottles.

Cheers!







Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 02, 2018, 10:31 AM
Last night my wife made 100 egg rolls.  We fried them all in our deep fryer and as we always do, we froze the bulk of them to eat in the future.  We also made kind of a cross between asian congee and greek avgolemono soup served with chicken hearts that had been fried in butter.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on July 02, 2018, 08:43 PM
I enjoy both cooking and baking. Haven't run into a dish I can't cook well after a try or two.

Someone mentioned Beef Bourguignon, my favorite variation is Ox tail Bourguignon.

A few things created over the years.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Wooden Skye on July 02, 2018, 09:00 PM
Tom that German Chocolate Cake has my craving meter running pretty high.  Thanks a lot!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on July 02, 2018, 09:58 PM
Tom that German Chocolate Cake has my craving meter running pretty high.  Thanks a lot!

I have been told by many it is the best they have ever had, that includes the ones my mother would make. The trick today is to make your own whole buttermilk, the lower fat buttermilk’s just don’t work.

My carrot and pound cakes are second to none, took me years to get the chemistry just right.

Chocolate chip cookies are another of my very special concoctions.

I need to find time to do some baking.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on July 02, 2018, 10:17 PM
  Fantastic food here - "common"  food made well as well as fairly exotic. Makes me want to be a little more adventurous in the kitchen and on the grill. But the other day - after a rain, my LED Control Unit - da brains of my grill/smoker needs to be replaced. Glad I have a good gas Weber on hand.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: deepcreek on July 02, 2018, 10:31 PM
But the other day - after a rain, my LED Control Unit - da brains of my grill/smoker needs to be replaced.

Your new one???  That sucks!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on July 02, 2018, 10:40 PM
But the other day - after a rain, my LED Control Unit - da brains of my grill/smoker needs to be replaced.

Your new one???  That sucks!

Yes and sure does Joe! But things happen and I'm sure they will send out a new Control panel. There Customer Service is very responsive.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: mike_aa on July 03, 2018, 10:38 AM
Tom that German Chocolate Cake has my craving meter running pretty high.  Thanks a lot!

I have been told by many it is the best they have ever had, that includes the ones my mother would make. The trick today is to make your own whole buttermilk, the lower fat buttermilk’s just don’t work.

My carrot and pound cakes are second to none, took me years to get the chemistry just right.

Chocolate chip cookies are another of my very special concoctions.

I need to find time to do some baking.

Tom

@tjbnwi

How do you stay so thin?  I think I added a pound or two just looking at the pictures!  [eek]

Mike A.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on July 03, 2018, 12:34 PM
Tom that German Chocolate Cake has my craving meter running pretty high.  Thanks a lot!

I have been told by many it is the best they have ever had, that includes the ones my mother would make. The trick today is to make your own whole buttermilk, the lower fat buttermilk’s just don’t work.

My carrot and pound cakes are second to none, took me years to get the chemistry just right.

Chocolate chip cookies are another of my very special concoctions.

I need to find time to do some baking.

Tom

@tjbnwi

How do you stay so thin?  I think I added a pound or two just looking at the pictures!  [eek]

Mike A.

Our insurance company lists me as obese.

I do need to lose about 15 pounds. 

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 03, 2018, 12:53 PM
Hi,

Sunday's dinner.

Tomatos filled with meatballs, baked in the oven. Sprinkled with butter and breadcrumbs/panko before it's placed in the oven. Some french fries and left over red-sauce from Saturday.

(https://up.picr.de/33145927mz.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 03, 2018, 12:57 PM
Those fries look amazing!  I was eyeing the fries in your earlier post also.  Are those homemade fries or store bought?  Do you deep fry or bake them?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 03, 2018, 01:07 PM
Hi,

those fries are a store bought, a frozen, convenience product. I deep fry them, as I have a built in deep fryer in my kitchen. ( https://www.neff-home.com/de/produktliste/N34K30N0 )

I/we used to make our own fries from time to time - like my Mom taught me - but it has gotten ridiculously hard to get "the right" potatoes ... And more often than not it turned out "not so well" because of that.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 03, 2018, 01:12 PM
Hi Oliver,

Wow I'm jealous!  A built in deep fryer!!  Is it hard to change/clean the oil?

I have this little countertop model: https://www.t-falusa.com/Cooking-appliances/Fryers/Ultimate-EZ-Clean-Fryer/p/7211001726.  I bought it because it makes cleaning and storing the oil much less of a burden.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 03, 2018, 01:17 PM
Hi,

I use a fat that hardens when cold, so whenever I want to change it I simply let it cool down a bit after use, put a pot with plastic bag inside under the drain (it's inside the corresponding cabinet) and open the valve ... :)

If I used oil it would be even easier as I could drain it cold - but it's more hassle to dispose it. (I let the fat harden in the bag and it goes simply into trash, totally legal/OK here)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 03, 2018, 01:28 PM
Last evenings dinner:
Marinated Flank Steak Sandwiches with Pepper Butter and Lime-Cilantro corn.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 03, 2018, 02:09 PM
*yum* :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: aloysius on July 04, 2018, 07:38 AM
Hi,

I/we used to make our own fries from time to time - like my Mom taught me - but it has gotten ridiculously hard to get "the right" potatoes ... And more often than not it turned out "not so well" because of that.

Kind regards,
Oliver


Idaho Russett, Russett Burbank or just Russett (different names for the same variety) are statistically the world's favourite - & probably North America's only - commercially available chipping potato these days. It's the Big Mac Donald's deep frying standard specification varietal.

I prefer older, more localised varieties myself, such as Tasman, Kennebecs or even on occasion Brownells.  Nobody else will have heard of any of these as they're local Antipodean varietals developed over a century ago, & will have fallen from favour for commercial or some other esoteric economic reason.  Nevertheless, they're still popular with fellow Tasmanian cognoscenti.  We love our heritage spuds & onions down under:  bugger your globalised standard varieties.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on July 04, 2018, 11:02 AM
Hi,

I/we used to make our own fries from time to time - like my Mom taught me - but it has gotten ridiculously hard to get "the right" potatoes ... And more often than not it turned out "not so well" because of that.

Kind regards,
Oliver


Idaho Russett, Russett Burbank or just Russett (different names for the same variety) are statistically the world's favourite - & probably North America's only - commercially available chipping potato these days. It's the Big Mac Donald's deep frying standard specification varietal.

I prefer older, more localised varieties myself, such as Tasman, Kennebecs or even on occasion Brownells.  Nobody else will have heard of any of these as they're local Antipodean varietals developed over a century ago, & will have fallen from favour for commercial or some other esoteric economic reason.  Nevertheless, they're still popular with fellow Tasmanian cognoscenti.  We love our heritage spuds & onions down under:  bugger your globalised standard varieties.

We have Kennebecs in my area of NYS. Brownell sounds familiar too , but not sure.

When making my own fries one of the primary tricks is to fry twice. Blanch fry then drain, then fry again. A couple other things ........................... dry them with a towel after cutting, shake in a bag with a little corn starch, then fry.  See Cook's Illustrated / Country for a detailed method.

I think it is odd ( in the USA at least) that there are restaurants touted for having the most incredible fries ever because they are cut fresh in house , etc. I always avoid the fries in those places because I have rarely had any that were any good. They tend to cut them and put them in the fryer. You get big, thick, soft,  floppy, non-crisp  "fries".  Yuk.

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: aloysius on July 05, 2018, 12:00 AM
There's apparently a secret to great chips:
Traditional dripping as opposed to rapeseed oils or other plant-based alternatives.
Parboiling for 3 minutes, quick draining & drying by rolling in a towel.
Immediate snap-freezing.
Immersion (carefully) of frozen chips in preheated dripping.
A light golden-coloured fry rather than a dark browning.
Little or no (natural, not chemically "flavoured") salt to taste.
Serve hot immediately, uncovered allowing steam to escape.

Health practitioners & dieticians would have paroxysms of angst about using animal fats.  Quite rightly so, I'm sure.  But if they're regarded as an occasional treat as opposed to a staple any subsequent harm is minimised.  To put it another way:  which tastes better?  Butter or Margarine?  I rest my case.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 05, 2018, 08:57 AM
4th of July Dinner was grilled wings, brats, hot dogs, and burgers.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 05, 2018, 12:15 PM
4th of July Dinner was grilled wings, brats, hot dogs, and burgers.


Food looks nummy... [smile] Maybe I'll make some burgers tonight.  [big grin]

For the 4th I made Hoisin Shrimp with Bok Choy, Shiitakes and Peppers in a sheet pan. Easy to prepare and everyone just helps themselves. Goes good with an ice cold beer.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Don T on July 05, 2018, 10:49 PM
Hello all

I don’t want to change the direction of this thread but if I may I’d like to ask a question about
knives.  We have a full set of Cutco knives for every day use, but I would like to acquire a few nice knives for my downstairs kitchen that I’m now using as my kitchen for grilling and making pizza dough.   

Knives are a bit of a mystery to me.  Stainless, carbon steel or whatever ever else they’re using to make knives.  Do you need to spend a lot of money or can it be a reasonable purchase.  Seriously I visited a high end kitchen store the other day and I had no idea of what to buy steel wise.  I knew I wanted a chef’s knife and a boning knife but I didn’t know what to buy.  They had so many knives it was confusing

What brought this to mind was the comment about the knife Cheese used in the photo

Thanks all
What do you think of your Cutco knives?  I was just in Costco and they had a 21 piece set for 1149. I was impressed with the demo.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Koamolly on July 05, 2018, 11:42 PM
Hello all

I don’t want to change the direction of this thread but if I may I’d like to ask a question about
knives.  We have a full set of Cutco knives for every day use, but I would like to acquire a few nice knives for my downstairs kitchen that I’m now using as my kitchen for grilling and making pizza dough.   

Knives are a bit of a mystery to me.  Stainless, carbon steel or whatever ever else they’re using to make knives.  Do you need to spend a lot of money or can it be a reasonable purchase.  Seriously I visited a high end kitchen store the other day and I had no idea of what to buy steel wise.  I knew I wanted a chef’s knife and a boning knife but I didn’t know what to buy.  They had so many knives it was confusing

What brought this to mind was the comment about the knife Cheese used in the photo

Thanks all
What do you think of your Cutco knives?  I was just in Costco and they had a 21 piece set for 1149. I was impressed with the demo.

There are way better knives for far less money.  Stay away.  But if the demo seduced you... Costco has a great return policy.  Seriously, for $1150 you can get some really nice kitchen knives... and probably another Festool sander or something.  I have a few Cutco knives.

https://cheftalk.com/threads/cutco-knives.11067/
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on July 06, 2018, 12:02 AM
Give these a try. I’m really impressed with mine. Mine have tak handles.

https://www.crateandbarrel.com/shop-by-brand/schmidt-brothers/1

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Don T on July 06, 2018, 01:18 AM
Hello all

I don’t want to change the direction of this thread but if I may I’d like to ask a question about
knives.  We have a full set of Cutco knives for every day use, but I would like to acquire a few nice knives for my downstairs kitchen that I’m now using as my kitchen for grilling and making pizza dough.   

Knives are a bit of a mystery to me.  Stainless, carbon steel or whatever ever else they’re using to make knives.  Do you need to spend a lot of money or can it be a reasonable purchase.  Seriously I visited a high end kitchen store the other day and I had no idea of what to buy steel wise.  I knew I wanted a chef’s knife and a boning knife but I didn’t know what to buy.  They had so many knives it was confusing

What brought this to mind was the comment about the knife Cheese used in the photo

Thanks all
What do you think of your Cutco knives?  I was just in Costco and they had a 21 piece set for 1149. I was impressed with the demo.

There are way better knives for far less money.  Stay away.  But if the demo seduced you... Costco has a great return policy.  Seriously, for $1150 you can get some really nice kitchen knives... and probably another Festool sander or something.  I have a few Cutco knives.

https://cheftalk.com/threads/cutco-knives.11067/
Thanks for the reply. I did some research and they get horrible reviews. So I will continue to look for a nice set of kitchen knives.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 06, 2018, 08:33 AM
I "worked" for Cutco for all of a day or two during the summer of 2000.  I was the very last person to be interviewed.  I was nervous because some of the other people sitting with me were declined, while others were hired.  I didn't know how it was going to go for me.  Sure enough I passed the interview and was able to purchase the "salesman" set that would be required to give the in home demos.  At the time I was a big fan of QVC and infomercial style selling so I LOVED the sales pitch that we were taught to give the in home demos.  I still remember some of it to this day.  I never actually gave a paid in home presentation - only showed my grandparents the sales pitch.  I just kept the set and that was my time with Cutco.

The only 2 items from the  salesman set  that I really liked from Cutco were the Spatula/Spreader and the Shears (Model 77).  The Shears were actually used in the demo to cut a penny into a "corkscrew."  They were that strong.  They also separate completely for easy cleaning.  We mostly wash ours in the dishwasher with no ill effects.    I still have the same Shears from 18 years ago and 2 years ago I picked up 2 more pairs Cutco Shears from Amazon.  They are very pricey at $100+ but I consider them worth every penny.  I believe I saw Costco selling a pair of the Shears along with a bread knife as a set for $100 something.  It didn't look like they were just selling the Shears alone.  I gave one of the pairs to my in-laws and kept the other pair for us.  They really are the best in my opinion. 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: aloysius on July 06, 2018, 09:46 PM
Sets of tools (knives, chisels, pots & pans etc.) generally tend to be a mixed blessing.  Cheaper unit pricing from multiple purchases are defrayed by intrinsic redundancy.

If you're lucky, maybe HALF of your set will be useful, rapidly becoming favourites.  The other half will languish relatively or in a worse case scenario entirely unused in their ludicrously commodious designer display.  Worse, the useless items on permanent display serve as a permanent reminder of your profligacy, wastefulness & ill-considered impulsiveness.

Knives tend to be an intensely personal tool. What works for one might just as justifiably be considered rubbish by another.  Just as nobody could ever advise me what type of person to choose as a life-partner, I could never trust another's advise with cutlery.  I can't even trust myself!

Here's a case in point.  Seduced by multiple glowing reviews, provocative marketing & a century or more of heritage, I chose what I considered to be a triumph of design from the supposed creators & makers of what must be the world's most expensive serrated bread knife:

https://www.guede-messerstore24.de/guede-brotmesser-balbach-da7431-32/a-527/

Whilst this is well & truly "out of my league", I should've heeded the red flags that were beginning to appear.  Euro 4600 (about AU $7500) for what is to all intents & purposes a "disposable" & otherwise pretty ordinary general purpose bread & other soft produce slicer.  Any purchaser, sufficiently foolish but with eyes wide open deserves to be ripped off.   Such was my reaction to such blatantly exorbitant, ludicrous extravagance.

Yet here was another fine example of the Solingen cutler's art, resplendent in all its glory:

https://www.guede-messerstore24.de/kochmesser-the-knife-damast-guede/a-7926/

Those curves!  The gorgeous damascene patinated interplay of light, dark & reflectivity.  That subtly curvaceous midriff swelling almost begging for a lustful grasp from fevered, sweaty palms!  A mere snip at less than half the price of the "original" Brotmesser.  Yet another red flag, however.  Any knifemaker sufficiently arrogant to name their product "THE Knife", (die Messer) should immediately arouse suspicion.  But there were glowing reviews, extolling the virtues of it's "radical" redesign of this rather basic tool (a chef's knife).  From no less than a "master-chef"  (whatever the eff that's supposed to be!).  More convincing than a "master builder" or "master plumber" perhaps, but in reality I suspect s/he to be closer akin, if you can forgive the double-entendre, to a "master-baiter".

In a masterful stroke of marketing, there was yet another "poor man's" version.  A snip at a mere fraction of the original's price, yet offering most if not all of that seductive form-
factor, including a "free" leather sheath:

https://www.guede-messerstore24.de/kochmesser-the-knife-guede-olive-lederscheide/a-8447/

The clincher was a retailer's half-price offer (a "gentlemen's outfitter" high-end clothing & "accessories" retailer) no less.  This should've been the third & final red flag that sent me running for the hills screaming noooooo, bank balance intact.  In my ignorance, impulsiveness & stupidity I nevertheless forked out what was for me an insanely extravagant AU $250 including postage for this veritable panacea for all my woes that would not only reinforce, rejuvenate & reinvigorate my domestic culinary skills, but perhaps, as the TV advertorials are frequently wont to claim, actually "change my life".

The reality, as always, is more prosaic.  "The Knife" is pretty useless.  It's way too heavy (all that steel, of course).  Should've forseen that one.  Worse, the weight is carried way too far forward, making for a ludicrously disproportionate front-heavy "balance" that requires a tiring death-grip to counterpoint.  The handle is tiny, made from a poorly selected, knotty piece of rubbish firewood-grade olivewood.

It has one of the "laziest" grinds I've ever experienced!  Way too convex, thick & wedge-sectioned, meaning that cutting all but the softest vegs are a chore, & in the hardest (pumpkin & the like) nigh on impossible to force such a pronounced wedge through resilient hard flesh.  The bearded heel of the blade, just as in a medieval axe, supposedly "lightens" the back end, but it simultaneously places one's fingers in harm's way, effectively rendering the back 1/3 of the blade unusable!  Plus it's also impossible to use a sharpening "steel".

After several hours (I do mean several) attempting a hollow grind on the blade, I at least have a semblance of workable form for the front 2/3 of the cutting edge and bolstering.  But the pronounced weight-forward bias & small handle section are rather insurmountable issues that will permanently & irremediably refrain from lifting this abortion from the realm of uselessness.

What a waste!  What a disappointment.  What an unbelievably poor design emanating from such a renowned toolmaker.  What was I thinking?  What an idiot!  Maybe it's going to be useful for no other reason than as a permanent reminder of just how easily a fool & his or her hard-earned readies can be separated by canny but deceptive marketing.

In some ways it's reminiscent of my reaction to some of the worst product from yet another well renowned but unnamed Teutonic toolmaker.  Caveat emptor, one & all.  All that glisters etc. etc.

I can hear the sly sniggers, chortles, snickers & guffaws of schadenfreude from afar!  OK.  I admit it:  I'm the tool!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 07, 2018, 03:36 AM
While shopping on Thursday I came across a really nice 1.6 kg piece of mock tender - and with all the talk about Bœuf bourguignon ... I simply had to make some ... This is going to be deep-freezed now for some "colder" days ...

(https://up.picr.de/33171371fs.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 09, 2018, 09:54 AM
Last Thursday we made poutine.

[attachimg=1]

Last night we made Jacques Pépin's Chicken Jardinière.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 12, 2018, 06:07 PM
From a couple of days ago.

Beef roulade (filled with bacon, onion, dill pickle, mustard (...) (self made) and farfalle pasta (store bought).

(https://up.picr.de/33220677hz.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 14, 2018, 03:58 PM
Hi!

Yesterday we had a spontaneous BBQ with our Lawyer and his family - I forgot to take pictures.

Today, we had another BBQ on our own - I didn't forget to take pictures.

(https://up.picr.de/33234987dj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33234988lv.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 15, 2018, 05:00 PM
Last night's dinner was steak, asparagus, boiled potatoes, and salad.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 15, 2018, 05:45 PM
Last night's dinner was steak, asparagus, boiled potatoes, and salad.

(Attachment Link)

How did you cook your steak?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 15, 2018, 05:56 PM
We buy the large sub primal cuts of strip steak from Costco and then cut them up into regular steak thicknesses.  We season them with salt and pepper (sometimes garlic powder) and then vacuum seal the steaks before freezing.  Then I cook them straight out of the freezer sous vide at 124 degrees for 1 1/2 to 2 hours.  These particular steaks have been in the freezer since January 21, 2018.  My favorite way to finish a sous vide steak is to sear it in a rip roaring pan with avocado oil.  Normally I use a cast iron pan on a Iwatani butane burner outside (keeps the house from getting smokey).  Yesterday I used our All-Clad skillet as it's big enough to sear both steaks at the same time - about 1 1/2 or 2 minutes per side.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

I also have a Searzall, propane torch, and MAPP gas torch, but skillet searing is my favorite way to finish.  I really don't know what all the hype is about the Searzall.  It's waaaay too slow for me.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 15, 2018, 06:22 PM
Hey Oliver, is that a red pepper or a tomato dipping sauce next to the bread?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 15, 2018, 06:41 PM
@GoingMyWay , I was guessing sous vide.  I too am one of those who does "it".

I too have the torch, the Searzall, and probably the same portable burner as you.  I also prefer cast iron on the burner.  I found that Wegmans carries duck fat and holy cow!

Haven't tried avocado oil but have played with coconut oil which is close I believe.

Hey,  one day we will meet up at a Festool event and then there will be a cook off between all those who have posted here.

THAT would be fun.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 15, 2018, 06:42 PM
Hey @Cheese that‘s a tomato dip, family recipe :)

I should have an english translation of that recipe somewhere, if you want I dig it out and post it. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 15, 2018, 06:53 PM
@GoingMyWay , I was guessing sous vide.  I too am one of those who does "it".

I too have the torch, the Searzall, and probably the same portable burner as you.  I also prefer cast iron on the burner.  I found that Wegmans carries duck fat and holy cow!

Haven't tried avocado oil but have played with coconut oil which is close I believe.

Hey,  one day we will meet up at a Festool event and then there will be a cook off between all those who have posted here.

THAT would be fun.

Peter

Yep, I noticed you mentioned that you have a sous vide circulator in another post.  I have the Anova Precision Cooker and love it.  I know someone who waited a very long time for a Joule that ended up dying and needing to be replaced under warranty.

Frying in duck fast would be delish I think.  I know a lot of higher end places fry their fries in duck fat.  Last time I made sous vide duck breasts we had a lot of fat leftover.  I saved it for a bit, but didn't have an immediate need for it so I tossed it.

I just picked up a new big bottle of avocado oil at Costco since I noticed they were selling it.  I had tried using virgin unrefined coconut oil and it imparted a slightly coconutty flavor to the steak.  I can't remember now if I was actually supposed to use the refined coconut oil or not, nevertheless the flavor was very subtle and hard to immediately notice/detect.

A cook off would be fun - I think that's something I might have a shot at.  If it were a woodworking competition I'd be dead in the water.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 16, 2018, 08:41 AM
Last night my wife made thai green curry chicken (left bowl) and northern thai pork belly curry (right bowl) with stir fried chayote.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 16, 2018, 09:46 AM
Hey @Cheese that‘s a tomato dip, family recipe :)

I should have an english translation of that recipe somewhere, if you want I dig it out and post it. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

That'd be great Oliver,  [not worthy]  It looks delicious. It will become recipe #620 in Paprika.  [cool]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 17, 2018, 09:01 AM
Last night I made Braised Octopus with Spaghetti.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2018, 09:20 AM
Hey @Cheese that‘s a tomato dip, family recipe :)

I should have an english translation of that recipe somewhere, if you want I dig it out and post it. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

That'd be great Oliver,  [not worthy]  It looks delicious. It will become recipe #620 in Paprika.  [cool]

Pretty simple, but it really does taste great:

Ingredients for 4-6 servings

6 tbsp Tomato ketchup
4 tbsp Oil (I recommend not to use a native olive oil)
2 tsp Mustard
1 Garlic clove (pressed)
1 Shallot (diced or minced)
Salt, Pepper, Paprika (sweet and hot)
Parsley

Preparation

Stir ketchup, oil, mustard well. Add the garlic clove (pressed) and shallot (diced/minced). Last add salt, pepper, parika - stir well once again. Then add the parsley and stir gently.

--

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2018, 02:32 PM
Today's lasagna :)

(https://up.picr.de/33262291gf.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 18, 2018, 11:54 AM

Pretty simple, but it really does taste great:


Thanks Oliver...it's now part of Paprika. [big grin]               [cool]   Oliver's Tomato Dip   [cool]

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 18, 2018, 12:11 PM
So cool! :) Thanks!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 20, 2018, 10:59 AM
Last night's dinner was pan seared sockeye salmon with wild rice, sauteed shanghai bok choy, and crab and asparagus soup.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 22, 2018, 12:11 PM
Last night's dinner was Kimchi Jigae (Korean kimchi stew)

[attachimg=1]
Dashi Stock

[attachimg=2]
Seared Pork Belly

[attachimg=3]
Tofu, Kimchi, Green Onions
[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on July 22, 2018, 04:37 PM
Hi!

Two really nice Irish Entrecôtes were ready to be put over the coal ...

While waiting for the coal to get ready, we had homemade Tomato soup.

(https://up.picr.de/33308311er.jpg)

And then the fun started!

(https://up.picr.de/33308315ce.jpg)

Irish Entrecôte with homegrown beans from our raised bed.

(https://up.picr.de/33308316he.jpg)

(Here: http://festoolownersgroup.com/home-improvement-other-projects/'quick-and-dirty'-basement-door-repair/msg552270/#msg552270 are some more pictures, I didn't want to put the Klein Tools content in here ...)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 22, 2018, 04:44 PM
What is cooking?  Nothing.  But made jalapeño jelly and also cantaloupe cayenne sorbet.

Does that count?

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 22, 2018, 04:46 PM
Of course that counts!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 26, 2018, 02:51 PM
Dinner 2 nights ago was bone-in chicken breasts, baked potato, with a spicy green sauce.  All the recipes came from America's Test Kitchen: https://youtu.be/pBe6xEPi42k.  I also made a daikon radish salad that's in the bowl.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 28, 2018, 10:27 PM
Tonight's dinner was cajun seafood boil in the pressure cooker:  corn, potatoes, andouille sausage, snow crab, head-on shrimp.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 28, 2018, 10:41 PM
Tonight's dinner was cajun seafood boil in the pressure cooker:  corn, potatoes, andouille sausage, snow crab, head-on shrimp.
(Attachment Link)

Now that looks delicious...the difficult thing about photographing food is getting the colors correct and that all depends upon the color  temperature of the lighting. If the temperature starts to go warm, then the food tends to look yellow and spoiled or just plain tired.

Nice shot... [thumbs up]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 28, 2018, 11:02 PM
Thanks!  I don't usually spend any time at all composing shots or worrying about the colors.  A lot of the pictures that I take end up being too blurry to use. I have taken a couple of shots with the "food" camera mode on my Samsung S9, but the colors look really off on the computer (the colors look really good on the phone however).
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 29, 2018, 12:06 AM
I have taken a couple of shots with the "food" camera mode on my Samsung S9, but the colors look really off on the computer (the colors look really good on the phone however).

I've found that when taking photos of food, that light in the 3500-4200K range represents a reasonable representation of the food quite well. The colors are more true and the food looks much more palatable. [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 29, 2018, 08:53 AM
Is there a way to measure the light color range?  I somewhat recently replaced the ceiling lights in the kitchen with 2700k LED bulbs.  I thought that was supposed to be better than the "white" lights - I guess which is more what you typically get from florescent lighting?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 29, 2018, 09:39 AM
Is there a way to measure the light color range?  I somewhat recently replaced the ceiling lights in the kitchen with 2700k LED bulbs.  I thought that was supposed to be better than the "white" lights - I guess which is more what you typically get from florescent lighting?

I know years ago Minolta sold a meter that measured color temperature, but it was pretty expensive for the day, as in several thousand $$.   [sad]  I believe there are now some apps available for iPhones and Android.

Here's a great experiment...turn on your 2700K bulbs and take a food photo, then aim a Syslite at the same food source and take another photo. Compare the 2 photos for correct colors and for which one looks more appetizing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_temperature
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 29, 2018, 09:47 AM
I figured there might be an app out there.  Nowadays there is seemingly an app for any and everything.

Unfortunately, I don't have a Syslite to try that experiment with.

Here's the picture I took with the "food" mode.

[attachimg=1]

What do you think of those colors?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on July 29, 2018, 11:01 AM
I would suspect that the "Food Modes" favor spectrums other than blue.  Blue food has been shown to appear unappetizing to eaters.  Of course there are some exceptions such as blueberries (which when ripe are usually a darker blue).

Carry on and happy cooking!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on July 30, 2018, 08:06 AM

What do you think of those colors?

[attachimg=1]

That looks a lot more appetizing than the original photo.  [big grin]  What's interesting is that just the seafood changed hue. The pot and everything else remained the same as the original photo.  [smile]

You can try that experiment with probably just about any LED based trouble/inspection light. The Syslite I was 4500K, while the Syslite II is 5000K. The Milwaukee and Streamlight products I've used are also in the 4500K-5500K range.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 30, 2018, 08:19 AM
Oh I guess I should use the "food" mode all the time when I take pictures of food then.  I thought the colors looked too rich - like unnatural or enhanced or "photoshopped" as they say.

I forgot I have a Streamlight Strion LED Flashlight, though that might be too bright of a light to shine directly on food.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on July 30, 2018, 09:32 AM
Last night in honor of National Chicken Wing Day I grilled some wings and my wife made Banh Cuon.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 01, 2018, 10:17 AM
Last night's dinner was meatloaf, garlic mashed potatoes, and green beans.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Sparktrician on August 01, 2018, 10:24 AM
@GoingMyWay, I'll be over for dinner tonight...   [scared]   [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 01, 2018, 10:42 AM
Hi!

Really some great meals @GoingMyWay !!! [smile]

Saturday it was the BBQ again.

(https://up.picr.de/33426007tl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33426009gt.jpg)

Sunday we had pulled pork - sorry I just got a picture of the meat. I found this prepared at one of our butchers, and we just had to heat it up for another good 30 minutes.

(https://up.picr.de/33426012vv.jpg)

And this is from yesterday, some hot dogs. The weather has been so hot for at least 2 weeks now, I really don't feel like going on a cooking spree or extravaganza ... Just some light & easy stuff ...

(https://up.picr.de/33426015hp.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 01, 2018, 10:51 AM
@GoingMyWay, I'll be over for dinner tonight...   [scared]   [big grin]

Tonight's dinner is *expected * to be miso soup, edamame, salad, cream cheese rangoon, and cucumber and california rolls.  Let's see how the rolls turns out.

Really some great meals @GoingMyWay !!! [smile]

Thanks Oliver!  The hot dogs look good.  I've never seen pickle slices like that on a hot dog.  We chop up sweet pickles to use as relish.  What are the crunchy things sprinkled on your hot dogs - crispy onions?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 01, 2018, 10:56 AM
Hi,

Yeah, those are crispy onions. I love this explosion of taste ... Bread, sausage, then ketchup and mustard, the crispy onions and last the sliced pickles ....

Honestly, I've always used sliced pickles but never relish - I will try that next time! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 01, 2018, 12:23 PM
I've never seen pickle slices like that on a hot dog.  We chop up sweet pickles to use as relish. 

Hahaha...that's funny, hamburger pickles on a hot dog. I've never seen that either.

Hey Oliver, this type of relish is pretty much a staple on hot dogs in the US. [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 01, 2018, 06:38 PM
That relish (the intense green coloration) isn't a staple in the US but it is iconic and a requirement for a Chicago dog.  Other areas use a less green version.

What is a Chicago Dog?:

"The hot dog is topped with yellow mustard, chopped white onions, bright green sweet pickle relish, a dill pickle spear, tomato slices or wedges, pickled sport peppers and a dash of celery salt. The complete assembly of a Chicago hot dog is said to be "dragged through the garden" due to the many toppings."

Also usually served on a poppyseed bun.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 01, 2018, 09:34 PM
Dinner turned out okay afterall!

Miso soup, edamame, salad, cream cheese rangoon, and cucumber and california rolls.  My wife rolled the rolls.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 02, 2018, 09:35 AM
The sushi looks delicious...I haven't made hand rolled sushi with nori in probably 30-35 years. Thanks for the idea, I think my bamboo roller is still hanging out in the kitchen drawer.  [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 02, 2018, 10:20 AM
Cool!  I kinda hoped that seeing each others pictures of food might inspire us to make some of the dishes. I hope to see some pics of your rolls or nigiri soon!!

This was a new bamboo mat. Our old one kept getting hung up on stuff in the drawer so we trashed it since we hadn't used it in years.

I'd love to have used raw fish, but I'm afraid we might get sick from it.  I believe the fish is supposed to be frozen very cold for a certain amount of time to kill any parasites.   I figure that's best to the pros.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 02, 2018, 10:42 AM
Hi,

This is not going to help you in particular, but I made Nigiri, Maki (...) many times with raw fish. I trust my sources, local Fishmongers on the "farmers market". Same with their oysters and so on. We love to get some oysters and a glass of wine or champagne while shopping fish ... ;)

Personally I think you're much more likely to find some shady/iffy things going on with convenience type or grocery store take-out Sushi than when you get a nice raw salmon filet from a trusted source.

Then again, our favorite city has quite the relationship with Japan, many people from Japan living there and so we also have some prime Sushi places/ Japanese restaurants that are really, really good and frequented by them. It's always a good sign, so we go there before ordering from one of the overall many places that offer "Sushi" ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 02, 2018, 11:00 AM
Hi Oliver,

Yup it really depends on where you get your fish from. Our local Asian grocery store was having a tuna event not too long ago. They were slicing a huge tuna up in front of everyone and packaging the meat for sale. It was just like you'd see in Japan. I still didn't trust it though LOL.

There's a really good Japanese place near us that has the best chirashi. Only problem is the restaurant is tiny and you need to get there right when they open or try to make a reservation.

I also like raw oysters, but I've been mostly scared off of those after hearing in the news people getting very sick from vibrio or in extreme cases even dying.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 05, 2018, 09:00 PM
Dinner tonight was braised short ribs with polenta and broccoli rabe:

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on August 12, 2018, 12:19 AM
Tonight's dinner was ...................

    Sweet corn ravioli , with crumbled chicken apple sausage, ricotta , roasted red peppers and balsamic olive oil drizzle.



                  [attachimg=1]





Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 12, 2018, 12:37 AM
Tonight's dinner was ...................

    Sweet corn ravioli , with crumbled chicken apple sausage, ricotta , roasted red peppers and balsamic olive oil drizzle.

The sweet corn ravioli looks to be a homemade pasta. If so, maybe we need to establish a menu section along with the saw blade section on the FOG. [big grin]   I’m all in for the recipe section. I’m also all in for the corn ravioli recipe.  [big grin]   Looks delicious. Haven’t made home made pasta in 4-5 years, but it literally melts in your mouth.

Truly, nothing finer...
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on August 12, 2018, 01:23 AM
Tonight's dinner was ...................

    Sweet corn ravioli , with crumbled chicken apple sausage, ricotta , roasted red peppers and balsamic olive oil drizzle.

The sweet corn ravioli looks to be a homemade pasta. If so, maybe we need to establish a menu section along with the saw blade section on the FOG. [big grin]   I’m all in for the recipe section. I’m also all in for the corn ravioli recipe.  [big grin]   Looks delicious. Haven’t made home made pasta in 4-5 years, but it literally melts in your mouth.

Truly, nothing finer...

    Sorry to disappoint but the ravioli is not homemade. Trader Joe's,  actually sweet corn burrata ravioli. One of TJs seasonals. Though home made pasta is great I have found some very good store ravioli. Biggest problem with most store ravioli is no flavor in the filling. Trader Joe's has quite a few good ones and they actually taste like what they are supposed to taste like. Another source, at least in the NYC / LI area is Pastosa (they do ship). If deciding between Pastosa and making your own you may as well just buy the Pastosa and save the hassle because it is excellent!

    My part of the creation is the combination of foods and flavors.

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 12, 2018, 04:03 PM
I've been behind in posting food/cooking pics.

Last Wednesday I attempted to make cheese curds from scratch.  It was pretty much an all day process that ended up being a fail.  The curds look good I guess, but they were not at all squeaky (which is the whole reason why I wanted to make my own).  I believe something went wrong in the cheddaring process - specifically the curds being too high above the whey.  I was only monitoring the temperature of the whey and not the curds themselves during the cheddaring process.  The finished product was more like a very firm tofu or more like paneer.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

I used the curds to make Poutine:

[attachimg=9]

Last Friday I made a fried scrapple and scrambled egg sandwich for breakfast.

[attachimg=10]

Last night we made Sichuan Cuisine: Sauteed Morning Glory (water spinach), Mapo Tofu, and "Water-Cooked Fish"

[attachimg=11]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 12, 2018, 04:12 PM
Funny you just posted about cheese curds.  I watched a Chef John video in the middle of the night about making them.  And yes, I believe the souve vide water bath was mentioned.  Or was that in the mozzarella video? 

I tried making mozz a couple of years ago and although I was successful, decided to just buy it.  Same for ricotta.

But I will make fresh pasta for my wife!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 12, 2018, 04:21 PM
 Baby back ribs just started:

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 12, 2018, 04:22 PM
I did watch Chef John's video on making cheese curds.  He actually used to other videos (I believe 1 from ChefSteps and 1 from Gavin Webber) for the basis of his recipe.  Chef John did mention that it would be easier to maintain the temperatures with a sous vide water bath, which is what I used. I followed ChefSteps recipe that they actually used a Sous Vide Supreme.  I had to increase the water temperature about 2-3 degrees to get the milk to reach the desired temperature.  I think it was because the stock pot was acting as an insulator.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: lunchman on August 12, 2018, 04:34 PM
Sunday Dinner - Grilled Salmon.

I don't think I've posted images of the Kamado grill I'm using, a Golden's Cast Iron, perhaps only a link to their website. Anyway, here's the beast -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_160731_zpsjfc1mpj6.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_160731_zpsjfc1mpj6.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_160757_zpsxt3gxrrb.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_160757_zpsxt3gxrrb.jpg.html)

Salmon and Roasted Cauliflower (roasted in the oven yesterday, being reheated) out on the grill -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_153621_zpstgzozh9t.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_153621_zpstgzozh9t.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_153728_zpsms5bkteo.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_153728_zpsms5bkteo.jpg.html)

And plated, served with some fresh from our garden Cherry Tomatoes and Basil w/ Balsamic and Basil EVOO. And of course a Sam Adams -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_154645_zpsgxai84jw.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_154645_zpsgxai84jw.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_154653_zpsc0nne17x.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_154653_zpsc0nne17x.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_155142_zpsc5ixacwe.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_155142_zpsc5ixacwe.jpg.html)

Thanks for checking out today's dinner!

Regards,
-Dom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 12, 2018, 07:57 PM
Sunday Dinner - Grilled Salmon.

I don't think I've posted images of the Kamado grill I'm using, a Golden's Cast Iron, perhaps only a link to their website. Anyway, here's the beast -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_160731_zpsjfc1mpj6.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_160731_zpsjfc1mpj6.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_160757_zpsxt3gxrrb.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_160757_zpsxt3gxrrb.jpg.html)

Salmon and Roasted Cauliflower (roasted in the oven yesterday, being reheated) out on the grill -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_153621_zpstgzozh9t.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_153621_zpstgzozh9t.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_153728_zpsms5bkteo.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_153728_zpsms5bkteo.jpg.html)

And plated, served with some fresh from our garden Cherry Tomatoes and Basil w/ Balsamic and Basil EVOO. And of course a Sam Adams -

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_154645_zpsgxai84jw.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_154645_zpsgxai84jw.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_154653_zpsc0nne17x.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_154653_zpsc0nne17x.jpg.html)

(http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l50/lunchman77/Grilling/20180812_155142_zpsc5ixacwe.jpg) (http://s93.photobucket.com/user/lunchman77/media/Grilling/20180812_155142_zpsc5ixacwe.jpg.html)

Thanks for checking out today's dinner!

Regards,
-Dom

That looks good!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 13, 2018, 08:56 PM
Spaghetti with meat sauce and salad for dinner tonight.  For dessert we had what I'm coining "orange Jello delight."

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 14, 2018, 01:01 AM
Spaghetti with meat sauce and salad for dinner tonight.

Just curious, was this photo taken in the “food” mode? It looks pretty color true.

Maybe the lighting is different than in your other photos?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 14, 2018, 08:16 AM
Weird - I just noticed that 3 of the images didn't post.

The pictures were taken with the "food" mode - I've been trying to use that setting for the pictures I post since you said they look better.

The lighting should be the same. Usually we just have the ceiling fan light on.  Occasionally we'll turn the recessed ceiling lights on, but that usually puts too much light down.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 14, 2018, 10:01 AM
Bagel with smoked salmon for breakfast.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 14, 2018, 10:39 AM
Bagel with smoked salmon for breakfast.

Looks delicious. It's so bright red. All the smoked salmon I use has a more brownish cast to it. Like this. What's the difference?

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 14, 2018, 10:45 AM
I looked up the "food" mode on the camera and it looks like the main difference is that you can select the color temperature of the picture.  It also adds a blur effect to blur out background items on the table, but I turn off the blur.

When I discovered that you can change the color temperature I moved the setting toward the blue side, but then couldn't remember exactly where it was before.  I think it was closer to the yellow side of the spectrum.  That's where I moved the slider back to for this picture.

This is smoked sockeye salmon from Costco - I think the fact that it's sockeye salmon is why it's so bright red.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 14, 2018, 11:15 AM
It also adds a blur effect to blur out background items on the table, but I turn off the blur.

When I discovered that you can change the color temperature I moved the setting toward the blue side, but then couldn't remember exactly where it was before.  I think it was closer to the yellow side of the spectrum.  That's where I moved the slider back to for this picture.

This is smoked sockeye salmon from Costco - I think the fact that it's sockeye salmon is why it's so bright red.

The blur effect is known as bokeh in the photography world. It's the reason people spend thousands of $$ on lenses just for the bokeh. When done right, the subject of the photo will pop even with a busy background.

The color of the food will determine the best light temperature to use. Raw steak looks better with cooler (temperature wise/red) light while cooked steak will look better with hotter (temperature wise/blue) light.

I'm going to check into smoked sockeye salmon. Thanks...   I do know that fresh Copper River is the reddest salmon I've seen.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 14, 2018, 11:34 AM
Oh yeah - I remember trying to get the bokeh effect with my 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 lens.  Unfortunately the aperture was way too high (is that the correct way to describe it or would saying way too slow be more accurate?) to actually get the blur going.  I like that lens because it covers such a wide range of focal lengths.  Those Canon L lenses are really expensive!

I think this blur is just achieved with software.  The default circle to blur is too small.  It's rather finicky to try to adjust the blur area.

[attachimg=1]

Thanks for that tip on the color temperature.  I guess I can try playing around with it, but usually I'm so impatient I'll just very quickly snap a picture before eating - I'm in such a hurry that half the time the photo ends up being blurry.

Sometimes our Costco has fresh sockeye salmon.  We usually end up buying it since it's not always there and the really dark red color looks super appetizing.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 14, 2018, 07:48 PM
Taco Tuesday tonight - really more like tostados, but I still call em tacos.  I learned this style from a friend's mom.  Before we'd always buy the taco kits that come with the hard and soft shells, taco seasoning, and taco sauce.  She fried her own corn tortillas flat, used mashed up black beans that were seasoned with cumin, and also used olives and white onions as toppings.  Tonight I just used ground beef because we end up with too much leftovers when I make both ground beef and the black beans.   As shocking as it may sound - I think I prefer the black beans to the ground beef.  This is our first time trying this salsa out.  It's got a little heat to it, but it's really lacking in salt.  Too bad - the last newsalsa we tried was really good, but I wanted to keep trying new brands.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 15, 2018, 09:26 AM
Oh yeah - I remember trying to get the bokeh effect with my 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 lens.  Unfortunately the aperture was way too high (is that the correct way to describe it or would saying way too slow be more accurate?) to actually get the blur going.  I like that lens because it covers such a wide range of focal lengths.  Those Canon L lenses are really expensive!

The best way to phrase it for a universal understanding of the condition is the aperture is too small or the lens is too slow. The bokeh thing starts to come on around 2.8 f or faster glass. Typically something in the 1.4 f to 2.0 f range and it's at those apertures that the glass gets very expensive very fast and very heavy.

The tacos look great...I haven't fixed them in a while. I usually make beef or chicken but I have a shrimp taco recipe that's to die for. Maybe I'll make some tonight, thanks for the idea. [smile]

Like the jalapeños on top...but where's the cilantro? [poke]

Raw white onion could impart a certain freshness.

Spanish rice?  Mexican rice?

Good choice on the Xochitl chips, that's my 2nd favorite brand. When I can't purchase El Burrito Mercado, I purchase Xochitl.  [big grin][attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 15, 2018, 10:59 AM
I had a 50mm f/1.8 prime lens before.  I kinda forgot I had it when I sold my old camera including the bag and its contents.  In hindsight I probably should have actually kept that lens.  I should buy another prime lens, it's only like $125.  I think what I didn't like about it - was well the fact that it's a prime lens so I can't zoom, which is what I like doing the most.

Looking forward to hopefully seeing your taco pictures soon.

The pickled jalapenos give it a nice little kick.  I only buy Mrs. Renfro's brand.  They're the perfect balance of acidity and heat.  Not too spicy.  I've only been able to find them at Safeway.  I think one or two other grocery stores carry Mrs. Renfro's green salsa.  It always deceives me every time since the jars and the contents look very similar from afar.  I actually dislike cilantro (with the exception of the green spicy sauce you get with peruvian chicken).  I always have to request no cilantro when ordering pho.  It's usually sprinkled on top of Indian dishes too, but that's relatively easy to scrape off.

The raw white onion is a nice touch - only problem is it lingered on my breath the rest of the night.

The rice was Near East Rice Pilaf Spanish Rice.

We really like Xochitl chips.  I'm always in search for some what I'll call "artisan chips."  These are the best that I've found so far.  I'm always looking for something like you'd get in a Mexican restaurant, same for the salsa.  That being a very thin chip and the salsa being kinda on the thin and watery side, but with a fresh taste.  Unfortunately I think none of those characteristics are conducive to a commercially sold product.  The chips can't be that thin or they'll end up broken up and you'd have a bag of chip crumbs.  The salsa must also have to be cooked in the canning/jarring process to keep it shelf stable.  Those El Burrito Mercado chips look like they're on the thick side is that the case?  I don't think I've ever seen that brand in the grocery stores around here.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Sparktrician on August 15, 2018, 11:32 AM
Clint's Chipotle Salsa is quite good with the smoky character.   [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 15, 2018, 11:47 AM
Thanks for that suggestion.  I'm not a fan of the smokey flavor.  I bought a bottle of the Chipotle Tabasco sauce and didn't like it.

Speaking of hot sauces - I finally caved in and bought the Truff Hot Sauce after I kept seeing the ads for it on Facebook. 

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

I'm not really sure why I saw so many rave reviews for the hot sauce.  I didn't care for it that much.  The taste of truffles was too overwhelming and the hot sauce was too sweet.  Sriracha is far better and so much cheaper.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on August 15, 2018, 01:18 PM
I like tortilla chips and I’ve tried many brands but my favorite are the cheap ($2 for 11 oz) Wise chips from the grocery store. They’re pretty low sodium so the corn flavor is clear and they don’t compete with the salsa. The only problem with them is the extreme fragility. Typically only about half the chips in the bag are whole so the bags always look half full/empty. The crumbs still tase good...
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 17, 2018, 07:33 PM
Dinner tonight was steak and cheese with baked seasoned crinkle cut fries.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 17, 2018, 08:08 PM
Dinner tonight was steak and cheese with baked seasoned crinkle cut fries.


Seeing your images reminded me of something.  The brine from both the peppers and any pickles can help out with heat related cramps pretty quickly.  As someone who endures the nasty humid hot outdoor work this works for me.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 17, 2018, 09:57 PM
That's a new one by me.  Do you just drink the brine to eliminate the cramps?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 17, 2018, 11:00 PM
Nice photos...are you using different lighting or different camera modes?

Everything looks more realistic with the end result..............of everything looking more scrumptious.

That Coors Light can however just keeps interjecting itself in the photos... is that kept at the ready to extinguish any errant flames?  Or is it kept around to use as a grenade to deter any unwanted property intrusions?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 18, 2018, 10:16 AM
The lighting is pretty much the same.  All of the pictures with the exception of the last one were taken in the kitchen.  All of the pictures were also taken in food mode.  I did move the color temperature of the final picture more toward the blue spectrum.

I guess the food mode does make the food look all the better.

LOL someone finally pointed out the all too common Coors Light can [eek].  You're not a fan of domestic light beers I take it?  That's mostly all that I drink.  Usually Coors Light, but also Miller Lite or Bud Light.  Lately I've been buying the Coors Light from Amazon Prime Now.  The delivered price with a $5 tip is about the same as the grocery store, if not cheaper when it's not on sale.  I also have grown to like Guinness Draft cans and also porters/stouts in general.  When traveling I will try to make it a point to drink local beers if possible.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 18, 2018, 10:28 AM
Actually I used to be a huge fan of Coors. Those were the days when Coors was not sold nationally and we'd arrange 900 mile road trips to Colorado to pick up 25-30 cases at a time.  [big grin]

I cooked the shrimp tacos last night and I'll post photos after I figure out why I can't send photos from my phone to my computer. [mad] [mad] [mad]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 18, 2018, 10:30 AM
Wow!  Talk about tapping the Rockies!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 18, 2018, 11:18 AM
Did I hear Coors?  [scared] [scared] [scared] [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Super happy that there are multiple sources in Germany that import it, usually buy it at a small "American Food" store in the city.

Love Coors, but don't say no to Miller either ... Then there are stores that occasionally import from US micro breweries, so I sometimes snag a bottle there too ... But I don't "follow" that cult, sometimes its a good beer ...

This was prior to a Super Bowl ;)

(https://up.picr.de/33596872ts.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on August 18, 2018, 11:22 AM

LOL someone finally pointed out the all too common Coors Light can [eek].  You're not a fan of domestic light beers I take it?  That's mostly all that I drink.  Usually Coors Light, but also Miller Lite or Bud Light.  Lately I've been buying the Coors Light from Amazon Prime Now.  The delivered price with a $5 tip is about the same as the grocery store, if not cheaper when it's not on sale.  I also have grown to like Guinness Draft cans and also porters/stouts in general.  When traveling I will try to make it a point to drink local beers if possible.

Those Guinness draft cans are quite effective at getting a nice pour and "texture"  to the brew.

Mmmmm, porters and stouts ........... my favorite.

I fear I will be taking the what's cooking thread in a different direction  [big grin]

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on August 18, 2018, 11:25 AM
Actually I used to be a huge fan of Coors. Those were the days when Coors was not sold nationally and we'd arrange 900 mile road trips to Colorado to pick up 25-30 cases at a time.  [big grin]

I cooked the shrimp tacos last night and I'll post photos after I figure out why I can't send photos from my phone to my computer. [mad] [mad] [mad]


About 30 - 35 years ago getting Coors (not light at first) was something special in the eastern USA. Not so much anymore.

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 18, 2018, 11:35 AM
I cooked the shrimp tacos last night and I'll post photos after I figure out why I can't send photos from my phone to my computer. [mad] [mad] [mad]

Oops, I missed the second part of your post.  How do you usually get the photos from your phone to your computer?  In the past I was just attaching the photos to draft emails and then opening the draft email on the computer.  Now I use Google Drive to do the transfer.

Did I hear Coors?  [scared] [scared] [scared] [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Super happy that there are multiple sources in Germany that import it, usually buy it at a small "American Food" store in the city.

Love Coors, but don't say no to Miller either ... Then there are stores that occasionally import from US micro breweries, so I sometimes snag a bottle there too ... But I don't "follow" that cult, sometimes its a good beer ...

This was prior to a Super Bowl ;)

(https://up.picr.de/33596872ts.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Is it expensive?  I try to buy it around $17.99 for a pack of 24 cans.  I've seen it as much as $21.99 for 24 when it's not on sale.

It's kind of funny as an American to think of Coors Light or any domestic American being imported into another country, but I guess it's no different than us importing Corona, Heineken, etc. from another country.

Those Guinness draft cans are quite effective at getting a nice pour and "texture"  to the brew.

Mmmmm, porters and stouts ........... my favorite.

I fear I will be taking the what's cooking thread in a different direction  [big grin]

Seth

I bought the Guinness Draft Bottles before St. Patrick's Day this year.  I prefer the cans.  I even bought the Guinness Pint Glasses from Amazon a couple of years ago so I could get more head at the top.

LOL start your own thread  >:(!!  Maybe "What are We Drinking" - just kidding  [wink], food and drink pairings go well together so why not include them here  [big grin].
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 18, 2018, 11:49 AM

Did I hear Coors?  [scared] [scared] [scared] [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Super happy that there are multiple sources in Germany that import it, usually buy it at a small "American Food" store in the city.

Love Coors, but don't say no to Miller either ... Then there are stores that occasionally import from US micro breweries, so I sometimes snag a bottle there too ... But I don't "follow" that cult, sometimes its a good beer ...

This was prior to a Super Bowl ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Is it expensive?  I try to buy it around $17.99 for a pack of 24 cans.  I've seen it as much as $21.99 for 24 when it's not on sale.

It's kind of funny as an American to think of Coors Light or any domestic American being imported into another country, but I guess it's no different than us importing Corona, Heineken, etc. from another country.



Between the two of us, it's ridiculously expensive compared to what you pay. My source has 24/ 355ml cans currently for 39,95 Euro -> 45,XX USD (stock exchange rate). Same price for Bud Light, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Miller, Moosehead ...

But these imports cost, they need to re-label according to EU law ... And they are not imported in really large quantities, plus it's the real deal. Meaning it's the same product that you buy.

(I personally don't care about the cost, I've done other imports myself people would label me insane for, just to get certain products from the USA, that are Made in the USA.)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 18, 2018, 02:14 PM
Last night's dinner was Angus filets cooked about an hour at 275 then seared over direct heat with asparagus. The down side to this is I'm always let down when I spend money on steak at a restaurant and it isn't even close to as tender.

I am late to this thread, wich surprises me. I have said in the past the you can call me  anything. Just don't call me late for dinner. As I look @DynaGlide post, I can see why his steaks are so tender while his orders at most restaurants are no where near as tender. DynaGlide has a good butcher, or a good meat source. Those steaks in the pic are "Prime beef". Really Prime.  You can see the marbling. I have yet, in the last 30years, or maybe even more, found a steak in  any restaurant that has been labeled as "Prime" and yet when I see it on the platter, does not measure up to what I had been taught way back in "the good old days" to be prime. I have not seen marbling like that in a restaurant, not even a few years before I started to admit to being 39. Today, as my departed butcher told me years ago, they have ways to "tenderize" beef mechanically. They can take a piece of nearly cutter grade and tenderize to make people believe they are eating prime beef. That beef in the pic (way back at the very beginning of this thread) really looks delicious. I am sure, as I get further along, some of my favorite BQ operators will come up with enough that will make my mouth water.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 18, 2018, 03:01 PM
@Tinker the grades of beef for quality are determined at only one spot in the animal - the 13th rib.  What the grader is looking at is a ribeye.  If that area qualifies for grading as Prime, Choice, etc. then the entire carcass grades as such which means that it can happen that steaks from a Prime carcass found in other parts of the carcass can be called Prime although the marbling may not be extensive.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: DynaGlide on August 18, 2018, 03:27 PM
@Peter Halle

Thank you for sharing this largely unknown fact. I've found some great deals on prime grade beef labeled as choice.

@Tinker Thank you for the kind words. If you ever want to sample I'm in DC suburbs. In the meantime I post regularly on Instagram @matts.garage
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 18, 2018, 04:33 PM
@Tinker the grades of beef for quality are determined at only one spot in the animal - the 13th rib.  What the grader is looking at is a ribeye.  If that area qualifies for grading as Prime, Choice, etc. then the entire carcass grades as such which means that it can happen that steaks from a Prime carcass found in other parts of the carcass can be called Prime although the marbling may not be extensive.

Peter

Thanks for that info @Peter Halle. Way back when I was in college, (Rattclif Hicks School of Ag/Uconn), i took an elective in butchering and preparing meat for market. That was in the days before all the additives went into meat and other products for preservatives. Cattle were mostly grass fed. In class, when cutting up a carcase we would trim a cut and just nibble raw. Especially tender were cuts from the prime graded carcases. That was in 1950. That  is the reason I am only 39. ven when we were first married 52 years ago, we could still get prime cuts at our butcher. Of course, he and were drinking buddies and maby he would set aside special cuts for my wife. We had to keep her happy [unsure]
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 18, 2018, 04:37 PM
@Peter Halle

Thank you for sharing this largely unknown fact. I've found some great deals on prime grade beef labeled as choice.

@Tinker Thank you for the kind words. If you ever want to sample I'm in DC suburbs. In the meantime I post regularly on Instagram @matts.garage

@DynaGlide  Next time we visit  our daughter (Falls Church) I will just sniff the  air and I will follow the smoke.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 18, 2018, 05:35 PM
While we are on the topic of beef, and in a post ala @Tinker (said respectfully), 2 years ago I was helping out with a project my wife had going on at work that involved menus, food, and food purveyors.  As part of this "adventure" I had an opportunity to be taken to the test and demo kitchen of Sysco (one of the largest food suppliers to restaurants here in NA if not the world).  I had private time to talk to their corporate chef about menu ideas and in front of my eyes he cooked anything I was interested in.  Now we aren't talking flow blown meals but rather what I thought might work for their menus.  It was a lot of fun although the project died and my wife no longer works there.

Two interesting tidbits told to me during that visit stick out in my mind prominently:

1.  Restaurants are supplied aged beef.  That could be 7 days to...  Supermarkets are supplied fresh beef.
2.  Sysco has requirements for farms supplying them that include restrictions on closeness to highways (air pollution contamination) and also power lines (bird poop).

Now do I believe all that?  Maybe.  It does make sense, but...

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 21, 2018, 02:09 PM
Today's dessert straight from the backyard. :)

(https://up.picr.de/33624113cy.jpg)

And now relaxing with a beer from Belgium.

(https://up.picr.de/33624114lr.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 21, 2018, 03:02 PM
@Peter Halle
quote>>> 2.  Sysco has requirements for farms supplying them that include restrictions on closeness to highways (air pollution contamination) and also power lines (bird poop).<<<quote

I remember from the past reading something about not pasturing animals close to power lines. Something about electric contamination and upsetting the nervous system.

When I was riding motorcycles, I often took weekend trips north to Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine and upper NY. I lived in south western Connecticut, not too far from New York City. I always knew when I was getting close to NYC after a couple of days in the wilds of upper New England. My face would start to burn and my lips started to taste of acidity. I had never noticed that until I started riding motorcycles.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 21, 2018, 03:27 PM
The beer and the Snap-on catalogue look relaxing Oliver.  [cool]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 21, 2018, 08:18 PM
When I was living on my uncle's farm during WWII, we sold milk, butter and sometimes cottage cheese (under the table) to a few neighbors. They came our house, brought their own bottles, we supplied the bottle caps.  We had friends in town who had milk delivered to their door.

When I went to Germany to visit my inlaws, I was surprised to find they had beer delivered to the door every two days. They had to go to the store to get milk.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 21, 2018, 08:31 PM
Saturday my wife made deep fried quail on watercress with Vietnamese chicken curry.

[attachimg=1]

Tonight's dinner was pork chops, stuffing, mashed potatoes, and sauerkraut all smothered in pork gravy.

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: PeterJJames13 on August 22, 2018, 08:35 AM

When I went to Germany to visit my inlaws, I was surprised to find they had beer delivered to the door every two days. They had to go to the store to get milk.
Tinker

Priorities, lol.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 22, 2018, 12:15 PM
I had absolutely no complaints
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 24, 2018, 09:53 AM
These are a bit of a cop out since it's not really made from scratch.  Wednesday night we had Kung Pao Chicken from Trader Joe's and yesterday for lunch I tried B&M Baked Beans and B&M Bread.  The Kung Pao Chicken is surprisingly good considering it's mass produced and comes frozen in a bag.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

Anyone else a fan of the B&M Beans and/or Canned Bread?  This is my first time trying either.  I thought it wasn't bad - the beans weren't too sweet.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 24, 2018, 09:03 PM
>>>Anyone else a fan of the B&M Beans and/or Canned Bread?  This is my first time trying either.  I thought it wasn't bad - the beans weren't too sweet. [wink] [wink]<<<

The B&M beans over mashed potatoes and lots of butter on the hot B&M bread
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 24, 2018, 11:05 PM
I rather like B&M beans. They have a nice, subtle molasses taste.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 25, 2018, 08:37 AM
>>>Anyone else a fan of the B&M Beans and/or Canned Bread?  This is my first time trying either.  I thought it wasn't bad - the beans weren't too sweet. [wink] [wink]<<<

The B&M beans over mashed potatoes and lots of butter on the hot B&M bread
Tinker

Over mashed potatoes?  That's interesting, I'd never had thought to use beans like a gravy for mashed potatoes.  How do you heat the bread?  I just cut the slice and dropped it in the toaster.

I rather like B&M beans. They have a nice, subtle molasses taste.

I guess it was very subtle.  I also got a can of B&M Boston Baked Beans that I need to try.  I wasn't really sure what the difference was between the different flavors of B&M beans.  They all sounded very similar.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 25, 2018, 08:13 PM
>>>Anyone else a fan of the B&M Beans and/or Canned Bread?  This is my first time trying either.  I thought it wasn't bad - the beans weren't too sweet. [wink] [wink]<<<

The B&M beans over mashed potatoes and lots of butter on the hot B&M bread
Tinker

Over mashed potatoes?  That's interesting, I'd never had thought to use beans like a gravy for mashed potatoes.  How do you heat the bread?  I just cut the slice and dropped it in the toaster.

I rather like B&M beans. They have a nice, subtle molasses taste.

I guess it was very subtle.  I also got a can of B&M Boston Baked Beans that I need to try.  I wasn't really sure what the difference was between the different flavors of B&M beans.  They all sounded very similar.

Before I turned 39, i used to cover my plate with potatoes and pile everything else on top. The B&M beans were good on any kind of potatoes. Mashed, Baked, Boiled, Fried, even scolloped. Sometimes I mix in a few slices of onion or tomato.

We  would heat the bread in a toaster sometimes. Another way was to put a dab of butter in a frying pan, butter one side of the B&M bread, put it in the pan, butter side up heat the dry side in the pan, flip it over. There is nothing any better than the smell of melting butter. (Actually, I was only using enough butter to keep the bread from sticking to the pan) My wife would yell at  me when I finished heating the slice or two, all saturated with the butter and then I would slap more butter on the (each) slice and devour before the butter could melt.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 26, 2018, 10:08 AM
You weren't kidding about LOTS of butter [scared]!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 26, 2018, 10:45 AM
Boston Butt (Pork Shoulder) ....[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on August 26, 2018, 11:51 AM
You weren't kidding about LOTS of butter [scared]!

I need to support the industry
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 26, 2018, 12:43 PM
The last 3 dinners...

Shrimp tacos with Napa cabbage, black olives & cilantro. [attachimg=1]

Asparagus & mushrooms done in the oven for 12 minutes and an Akaushi Porter House done on the grill.
[attachimg=2]

Chicken breasts with a tequila-lime marinade & glaze.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 26, 2018, 02:37 PM
Boston Butt (Pork Shoulder) .... (Attachment Link)

Nice!  What temperature and how long are you cooking it for?

The last 3 dinners...

Shrimp tacos with Napa cabbage, black olives & cilantro. (Attachment Link)

Asparagus & mushrooms done in the oven for 12 minutes and an Akaushi Porter House done on the grill.
(Attachment Link)

Chicken breasts with a tequila-lime marinade & glaze.

Ah so there are your shrimp tacos!  Looks good.  I had never heard of Akaushi and had to look it up.  That's basically American Wagyu Beef?  Where do you buy it?  It sounds expensive.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 26, 2018, 02:51 PM
Boston Butt (Pork Shoulder) .... (Attachment Link)

Nice!  What temperature and how long are you cooking it for?

The last 3 dinners...

Shrimp tacos with Napa cabbage, black olives & cilantro. (Attachment Link)

Asparagus & mushrooms done in the oven for 12 minutes and an Akaushi Porter House done on the grill.
(Attachment Link)

Chicken breasts with a tequila-lime marinade & glaze.

Ah so there are your shrimp tacos!  Looks good.  I had never heard of Akaushi and had to look it up.  That's basically American Wagyu Beef?  Where do you buy it?  It sounds expensive.

Currently cooking at 250F.  Has been on about 5 hours and within the next hour will wrap it and increase the temp 25 - 40 degrees to get over the hump.  Better be done for dinner or I might need to call @Cheese for some recipe ideas to get out of the doghouse.
[attachurl=1][attachimg=1]
Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 26, 2018, 02:56 PM
That's low and slow.  It takes some forethought and planning since you have to put it on so far in advance even for dinner.

I cooked ribs low and slow with my Slow 'N Sear a couple of months ago.  That was my first time ever trying to go low and slow.  I cooked the St. Louis Ribs for like 4 hours at around 250-270 (it was supposed to be 225, but I have a "leaky" lid), but that wasn't quite long enough.   Maybe 5-6+ hours would have been better.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on August 26, 2018, 03:00 PM
Currently cooking at 250F.  Has been on about 5 hours and within the next hour will wrap it and increase the temp 25 - 40 degrees to get over the hump.  Better be done for dinner or I might need to call @Cheese for some recipe ideas to get out of the doghouse.
(Attachment Link) (Attachment Link)
Peter

LOL Peter...That pork looks delicious.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 26, 2018, 03:00 PM
Lot's of awesome dishes, thanks for sharing!

Here's mine from today.

>>Koteletten op grootmoeders wijze<< Veal chops like Grandma used to make them ... This was excellent, as we're having some autumn like weather and temperature, still warm enough to enjoy the meal on the patio, sun quite low ...

(https://up.picr.de/33667709nh.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33667710yz.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33667711zs.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33667712tx.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 26, 2018, 03:09 PM
There have been many times when smoking pork I have eaten plan “B”for dinner.  It has been a long time since I was able to sit, relax, and tend to the smoker.  But while I am waiting:  [attachimg=1]

Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

Edit:  I wasn,t trying to get fancy with photo effects.  My cheap iPad case partially obscures the camera lens and I haven,t taken a drill bit to it.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 26, 2018, 03:20 PM
Are those "green" or raw peanuts or were they already roasted and you're just roasting them a little more?

My wife has made boiled peanuts a couple of times.  She said she prefers boiled peanuts to the salted roast peanuts from Five Guys that we had on Friday.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 26, 2018, 03:34 PM
Are those "green" or raw peanuts or were they already roasted and you're just roasting them a little more?

My wife has made boiled peanuts a couple of times.  She said she prefers boiled peanuts to the salted roast peanuts from Five Guys that we had on Friday.

Raw peanuts.  My first cooking memories involve peanuts.  My parents were immigrants from Germany and South Africa thru Canada after WWII.  There was a couple across the street from ours in Tucson that had a Grandson that I could play with.  That couple became the only "Grandparents" that I knew and they helped my Mom and Dad acclimate into living in the US.  Grandad and I would make peanut brittle twice a year with raw Spanish peanuts.

Funny thing is the Grandma never needed help making grilled cheese sandwiches on Roman Meal bread.  But she was an incredible lady.  She volunteered at a hospital until she was 96.  She travelled on both a covered wagon and the 747.  But as Tinker would say, she was always 39 at heart.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on August 26, 2018, 11:57 PM
There have been many times when smoking pork I have eaten plan “B”for dinner.  It has been a long time since I was able to sit, relax, and tend to the smoker.  But while I am waiting:  (Attachment Link)

Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

Edit:  I wasn,t trying to get fancy with photo effects.  My cheap iPad case partially obscures the camera lens and I haven,t taken a drill bit to it.

I wonder how peanuts would be on a smoker ? I wonder if the smoke would penetrate enough?

Ever tried re-roasting peanuts that were already roasted?

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Sparktrician on August 27, 2018, 07:25 AM
Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

I'm wondering if the smoking process might be improved by the use of a perforated pizza pan/sheet which might allow more smoke to get to the peanuts compared to just using a cookie sheet? Just a thought...   [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on August 27, 2018, 07:56 AM
Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

I'm wondering if the smoking process might be improved by the use of a perforated pizza pan/sheet which might allow more smoke to get to the peanuts compared to just using a cookie sheet? Just a thought...   [smile]

I may try smoking some in the future.  I have a perforated pizza pan!  Good suggestion.  I imagine that the "hickory smoked" peanuts in the shell that I saw at the grocery store were probably soaked in a salt brine that had liquid smoke in it.  Never tried those and probably won't.

It was interesting that as some of the shells got darker the smell in the kitchen reminded me of the smell of oak burning - so perhaps oak would be an appropriate fuel.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 27, 2018, 08:23 AM
Last night's dinner was chicken marsala with romaine lettuce tossed with homemade caesar dressing.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on August 27, 2018, 11:51 AM
Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

I'm wondering if the smoking process might be improved by the use of a perforated pizza pan/sheet which might allow more smoke to get to the peanuts compared to just using a cookie sheet? Just a thought...   [smile]

I may try smoking some in the future.  I have a perforated pizza pan!  Good suggestion.  I imagine that the "hickory smoked" peanuts in the shell that I saw at the grocery store were probably soaked in a salt brine that had liquid smoke in it.  Never tried those and probably won't.

It was interesting that as some of the shells got darker the smell in the kitchen reminded me of the smell of oak burning - so perhaps oak would be an appropriate fuel.

To get smoke into the shells wouldn’t you just crank up the heat and get the shells a-smokin?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Sparktrician on August 27, 2018, 12:57 PM
Getting ready to roast my own peanuts.  I like them darker roasted and without salt so I need to do it myself.  350F for 25-30 minutes.

Peter

I'm wondering if the smoking process might be improved by the use of a perforated pizza pan/sheet which might allow more smoke to get to the peanuts compared to just using a cookie sheet? Just a thought...   [smile]

I may try smoking some in the future.  I have a perforated pizza pan!  Good suggestion.  I imagine that the "hickory smoked" peanuts in the shell that I saw at the grocery store were probably soaked in a salt brine that had liquid smoke in it.  Never tried those and probably won't.

It was interesting that as some of the shells got darker the smell in the kitchen reminded me of the smell of oak burning - so perhaps oak would be an appropriate fuel.

To get smoke into the shells wouldn’t you just crank up the heat and get the shells a-smokin?

WHAT???  You want peanuts to smell like - PEANUTS and not OAK???  Blasphemy!!!   [scared] [poke] [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on August 27, 2018, 01:41 PM
Hey, he said the shells smelled like oak already  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: PeterJJames13 on August 28, 2018, 09:25 AM
Boston Butt (Pork Shoulder) .... (Attachment Link)

Nice!  What temperature and how long are you cooking it for?

The last 3 dinners...

Shrimp tacos with Napa cabbage, black olives & cilantro. (Attachment Link)

Asparagus & mushrooms done in the oven for 12 minutes and an Akaushi Porter House done on the grill.
(Attachment Link)

Chicken breasts with a tequila-lime marinade & glaze.

Ah so there are your shrimp tacos!  Looks good.  I had never heard of Akaushi and had to look it up.  That's basically American Wagyu Beef?  Where do you buy it?  It sounds expensive.

Currently cooking at 250F.  Has been on about 5 hours and within the next hour will wrap it and increase the temp 25 - 40 degrees to get over the hump.  Better be done for dinner or I might need to call @Cheese for some recipe ideas to get out of the doghouse.
[attachurl=1][attachimg=1]
Peter

Funny, I have the exact same color Therma-Pen. Aren't they one of the greatest things when cooking?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on August 28, 2018, 04:53 PM
Tonight's home made burger(s)

(https://up.picr.de/33685419yq.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 29, 2018, 09:18 AM
My wife made chicken noodle soup last night.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: IndyMike on August 29, 2018, 11:02 AM
My wife made chicken noodle soup last night.

(Attachment Link)
Looks good!  Now I'm hungry!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on August 29, 2018, 11:04 AM
Thanks
Looks good!  Now I'm hungry!

Thanks!  I'm having a bowl for lunch today.  What are you having for lunch?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: IndyMike on August 29, 2018, 11:07 AM
Thanks
Looks good!  Now I'm hungry!

Thanks!  I'm having a bowl for lunch today.  What are you having for lunch?
Right now, a cup of coffee.  It's been a long couple of days.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 02, 2018, 01:01 PM
Hi!

We had the neighbors over yesterday, just a little get-together. We offered a really small but delicious buffet. Ordered a salmon and two roast beefs from one of our favorite restaurants, prepared two salads ourselves, and got a nice wheel of (dark) buns from the bakery. For dessert there was tiramisu, and 2 bowls of chocolate mousse one from white chocolate one from dark chocolate - also from one of our favorite restaurants. Sorry there are no pictures of the desserts, because we kept them refrigerated (obviously) until they were needed and then I was to slow ...

Enough talking, pictures:

(https://up.picr.de/33722399zk.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722397bo.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722395md.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722403ja.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722401uw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722402vj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33722405og.jpg)

"How wonderful that all of you showed up" (Napkins)
(https://up.picr.de/33722406rn.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 02, 2018, 02:16 PM
Maybe this is way off base and most people are not at all interested. But I thought I'd give it a go.

Well, with 207 posts and over 13,000 reads in  just 2 months... I think you nailed it. [thumbs up]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 02, 2018, 04:57 PM
Hey Oliver...salmon & prawns 🍤...sounds nummy.

The beef looks delicious. Is that a blue cheese sauce that’s in the bowl?

I’ve never seen rolls like that. Sesame seed, caraway seed but what’s the blue?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 02, 2018, 05:50 PM
Thanks @Cheese :)

It's a dijon mustard (seed style) sauce.

Those are poppy seeds.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 02, 2018, 06:02 PM
Well, with 207 posts and over 13,000 reads in  just 2 months... I think you nailed it. [thumbs up]

I must say I have been pleasantly surprised by the interest and response to this thread  [big grin].

I’ve never seen rolls like that. Sesame seed, caraway seed but what’s the blue?

I was also gonna comment that those were some interesting looking rolls.  I like that there are a variety of different rolls.  The real question is - which roll was the best??
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 02, 2018, 06:09 PM
Personally I like the "mixed bag of seeds" best. (Front row, between the sesame and poppy seeds)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 02, 2018, 06:16 PM
Oh yeah those do look good.  I actually hadn't even noticed that roll - it looks very similar to the caraway and sesame rolls.

Seeing the poppy seed roll remdined me of the Russian Poppy Seed Roll/Cake.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 02, 2018, 06:50 PM
This isn't really cooking per se, but today we went to check out a new Balducci's that recently opened by us.  In case you don't know, Balducci's is a gourmet market.

They had a nice big selection of Xochitl chips on display.

[attachimg=1]

They even had some Halloween colored chips [cool]!

[attachimg=2]

I'm a big sucker for buying seasonally colored food products like Halloween or Christsmas Oreos or Rice Krispies or other items like that.  I know it's just food coloring, but something about the seasonality of it entices me to buy it when I normally would just pass.

I haven't been in a Balducci's in several years.  Back in the late 80s/90s I used to go with my dad every Saturday to Sutton Place Gourmet (before it merged with Balducci's).

This new store is really next level in terms of gourmet:

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

I don't recall seeing any local grocery store selling A5 Wagyu beef.  I was really tempted to buy the steak slice that had already been cut.  It weighed about 3/4lb so it was about $100.  I had looked at getting a whole loin of A5 Wagyu from Costco, but that's over $1k+.  I had also looked at buying a similarly sized steak (actually a couple of ounces lighter) from Grand Western Reserve, but that would be 60% more ~$250.  The other concern I had about buying online is that the picture's marbling may look nothing like the steak they actually send.  At least I knew for sure what I'd be getting at Balducci's.  We had real Kobe beef in Kobe Japan 3 years ago and I feel like the one I saw at Balducci's might actually be better (or at least better looking) than what we had in Japan.  Here's a picture of the Kobe steak from Japan for reference.

[attachimg=7]

We ended up buying the Dry Aged Tomahawk for $60.  I've always bought my Tomahawk steaks from Whole Foods when they have them, but I don't believe they are dry aged so this should be a treat.

Maybe the most remarkable discovery that I made at Balducci's today was the Table 87 Margarita Pizza.

[attachimg=6]

I have literally been looking for this pizza for the last 3 years since I saw it on Shark Tank.  Every time I go to a Whole Foods I'd check to see if they had it.  I almost ordered it from Goldbely a few months ago, but it was too expensive for how little we'd get.  Seeing it and buying a frozen slice was like a dream come true.  I haven't tried it yet so the verdict is still out on how good it actually is.  I suspect I'm not gonna like it, but at least I can say I've tried it  [tongue].

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on September 02, 2018, 07:04 PM
As a moderator (hiss - boo) I am surprised by this thread.  But then honestly happy as heck.  Working with wood and cooking have many common strategies.  Rather than ask questions instead of going out to eat try to cook on your own.

Rock on Festoolichefs!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on September 03, 2018, 03:08 PM
This isn't really cooking per se, but today we went to check out a new Balducci's that recently opened by us.  In case you don't know, Balducci's is a gourmet market.

They had a nice big selection of Xochitl chips on display.

(Attachment Link)

They even had some Halloween colored chips [cool]!

(Attachment Link)

I'm a big sucker for buying seasonally colored food products like Halloween or Christsmas Oreos or Rice Krispies or other items like that.  I know it's just food coloring, but something about the seasonality of it entices me to buy it when I normally would just pass.

I haven't been in a Balducci's in several years.  Back in the late 80s/90s I used to go with my dad every Saturday to Sutton Place Gourmet (before it merged with Balducci's).

This new store is really next level in terms of gourmet:

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

I don't recall seeing any local grocery store selling A5 Wagyu beef.  I was really tempted to buy the steak slice that had already been cut.  It weighed about 3/4lb so it was about $100.  I had looked at getting a whole loin of A5 Wagyu from Costco, but that's over $1k+.  I had also looked at buying a similarly sized steak (actually a couple of ounces lighter) from Grand Western Reserve, but that would be 60% more ~$250.  The other concern I had about buying online is that the picture's marbling may look nothing like the steak they actually send.  At least I knew for sure what I'd be getting at Balducci's.  We had real Kobe beef in Kobe Japan 3 years ago and I feel like the one I saw at Balducci's might actually be better (or at least better looking) than what we had in Japan.  Here's a picture of the Kobe steak from Japan for reference.

(Attachment Link)

We ended up buying the Dry Aged Tomahawk for $60.  I've always bought my Tomahawk steaks from Whole Foods when they have them, but I don't believe they are dry aged so this should be a treat.

Maybe the most remarkable discovery that I made at Balducci's today was the Table 87 Margarita Pizza.

(Attachment Link)

I have literally been looking for this pizza for the last 3 years since I saw it on Shark Tank.  Every time I go to a Whole Foods I'd check to see if they had it.  I almost ordered it from Goldbely a few months ago, but it was too expensive for how little we'd get.  Seeing it and buying a frozen slice was like a dream come true.  I haven't tried it yet so the verdict is still out on how good it actually is.  I suspect I'm not gonna like it, but at least I can say I've tried it  [tongue].

 I remember well the Balducci's store on 6th Ave (10th st?) as I used to work around there in the late 80's and 90's and bought there often. Incredible store - at that time about the best in the city.
 Those steaks look amazing. I have never tasted real Wagyu beef, but let us know how those Tomahawks taste.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: deepcreek on September 03, 2018, 03:20 PM
Since one of the moderators (love you guys) commented on the nature of this thread, I thought I'd tie it back into woodworking.

I routinely save my Mesquite and Pecan cutoffs for the smoker but I'm currently working with rift-sawn Cherry.

Has anyone tried smoking meat with Cherry?

Any suggestions?

Thanks!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on September 03, 2018, 03:51 PM
Cherry is a great smoking wood.  More delicate than say mesquite and can be used for any meat really.  When I am using my large smoker I am generally using up dead wood from my trees and cherry is in the mix.  Smells great as it is doing its job.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 03, 2018, 09:59 PM
Tonight's dinner was the previously mentioned dry aged tomahawk steak along with a frozen strip steak with baked potato and frozen veggies from Trader Joe's.

I believe this is the first time cooking a dry aged steak sous vide. In the past we have cooked both frozen and fresh choice vs prime strip steaks from Costco, but I honestly didn't notice much difference.

Both steaks were cooked at 124 degrees for 90 minutes and then seared in 500 degree avocado oil for about 90 seconds a side.

The dry aged steak was noticeably more tender, granted it was ribeye vs strip. Nevertheless, the dry aged tomahawk was much more tender than the regular tomahawk that we have bought from Whole Foods in the past. The dry aged steak also had a lot more flavor, sort of a fermented taste, but not at all in a bad way.

I think the dry aged steak from Balducci's was definitely worth the extra money.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 03, 2018, 10:53 PM
First off, a tomahawk steak just looks like a good marbilized prime...Kobe...Waygu...Akaushi steak. Am I missing something?

It’s my understanding that Kobe beef is a particular group of cattle from Kobe Japan. Much the same way Champagne is a beverage from a particular region in France and the same style bubbly from Italy is called Proseco.

So, in the USA, we imported the same Japanese cattle but because they were not pastured in Kobe, from an FDA point of view, we had to call them Waygu or Akaushi.
 
The principal price point of Waygu or Akaushi is in the $30-40 range per pound which isn’t much off of the typical Prime range of $30-35 per pound.

Our local store carries both Akaushi and prime and I’ll choose Akaushi every time. If you’re purchasing a flank steak the prime version costs $10.99 per pound, the Akaushi version costs $12.99 per pound.

If you’re only buying a pound of meat, the $2 is insignificant.

The difference in flavor is huge.
 

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 04, 2018, 06:04 PM
The tomahawk steak we got didn't have any where near the level of marbling as a Kobe or Wagyu.  I think the pictures might have made the level of marbling appear deceiving.

That's a great explanation of the difference between Kobe and Wagyu.

I really want that Wagyu steak now [drooling]!!!!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on September 04, 2018, 06:46 PM
Here is an article on kobe beef from wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef)

And another one from Bon Appetit that is very interesting:

https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/trends-news/article/kobe-wagyu-steak-myths (https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/trends-news/article/kobe-wagyu-steak-myths)

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 05, 2018, 04:23 PM
That Tomahawk steak looks marvelous!

--

Hi!

So it's my Birthday today and since I was doing quite well for the last couple of days, we decided to spent today in the nearby city of Aachen, Germany. I pre-ordered some takeout from our favorite restaurant yesterday, that we could pick up on our way back home today. We had a lovely Crémant de Limoux „Grande Cuvée 1531“ Brut to go with it. Nothing fancy, just good quality. (Aimery-Sieur d´Arques, Languedoc, France)

(https://up.picr.de/33750618hc.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33750624bf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33750638sw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33750629it.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33750633uz.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33750643qt.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 05, 2018, 04:36 PM
We're eating the leftovers of the tomahawk and strip steak tonight.  We usually eat leftovers of something cooked 2 days before since it cuts down on the amount of cooking and simplifies the process of trying to figure out what to eat.

Happy Birthday!  You got all that food as takeout?  Wow, normally I think of takeout as something pretty basic like Chinese or Thai or maybe a pizza, not bone in fish.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 05, 2018, 04:43 PM
Thanks! Yes, all of it -> takeout.

It's from our favorite/ go-to whenever we feel like it - Restaurant. We almost always eat this, except when there is something more intriguing among the daily specials ...

And when we call, about, lets say minimum 2hrs upfront, the chef prepares this for us - ready to eat - to take home. Since we knew what would happen today, we called yesterday. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 05, 2018, 05:07 PM
That's nice that you have a go to restaurant like that.

The staff and chef must know exactly who you are when you either come in or call.  I wish we had that type of relationship with a restaurant that we frequent.  I guess part of the problem is that we don't go to any one restaurant all that often (like say once a week or even once a month).
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 05, 2018, 05:42 PM
It's one of those hidden gems, no big name, no flashy VIP line, no "oh yeah, you can have a table in X weeks/months ..." Just plain great food and a chef (an staff) that will go above and beyond to make sure you're enjoying your meal. The restaurant had a little remodel/renovation some time ago, now we can also bring friends/newcomers *lol*. It really was that kind of hidden gem, you had to "know" to step inside. Still thankful for that recommendation.

--

Not to brag, but we have a couple of those places where we're known by name, favorite dishes/drinks, place to sit ... One is a hotel, that even gives us a suite occasionally when we stay for a 2nd bottle of wine after dinner and it gets late - even though it's just a couple of miles from home. But that is a rather flashy location and we've celebrated major holidays there as well as personal achievements. Additionally for some years they were pretty much the only available cigar bar that could still serve drinks, among another hotel or two ... (Long and boring story, but local government has revoked it by now, and other great cigar places start serving again)

But ever since I have my ups and downs health wise, I'm more home than anywhere else - it's the only place I'm comfortable, especially on "bad days". And being able to swing by that first mentioned restaurant in sweatpants and a sweater without being judged to pick something up is really priceless in my situation.

But then there are also great days, like today. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on September 05, 2018, 06:12 PM
Happy belated birthday my Friend!

Glad to see your food score!  Looks marvelous!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 08, 2018, 01:10 AM
Here is an article on kobe beef from wikipedia:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kobe_beef)

And another one from Bon Appetit that is very interesting:

https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/trends-news/article/kobe-wagyu-steak-myths (https://www.bonappetit.com/entertaining-style/trends-news/article/kobe-wagyu-steak-myths)

Peter

A very interesting read Peter...my thoughts at this point are biforcated, trying to separate fact from fiction. I need to chat with my local butcher and get his perspective. From a marketing standpoint this scenario certainly has credibility. From a legal standpoint this is frought with risk. In this day and age, corporations can be sued for coffee that’s too hot let alone beef that does not have the proper pedigree. This may be an interesting reveal.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 08, 2018, 01:22 AM
Nice stuff Oliver...have you noticed that with this thread the food continues to be more appetizing with everyones post? As it should be, if it doesn’t look good... why would you eat it?

Happy birthday  [big grin]

Question, what is the red sauce with the sorbet and mint? Looks nummy.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 10, 2018, 12:32 PM
I tried the Table 87 pizza slice on Saturday.  The very first bite was just blah, but the more I ate the better it got.  The cheese was really tasty.  It wasn't worth $6 though.

[attachimg=1]

Last night we made minestrone soup for dinner.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 11, 2018, 07:51 AM
Last night's dinner was skillet baked ziti with spicy italian sausage and caesar salad.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 11, 2018, 08:21 AM
Last night's dinner was skillet baked ziti with spicy italian sausage and caesar salad.

I've tried a couple of skillet baked pasta dishes and was pleasantly surprised with the results.  [big grin]

I really wasn't expecting good results but they both worked out well. If I remember correctly, they were finished off in the oven for maybe 20-25 minutes?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 11, 2018, 08:29 AM
This was actually cooked 15-18 minutes on the stove top covered and then just finished off in the oven after sprinkling with cheese.  The recipe said to finish in the oven at 475 degrees for 10 minutes.  We were closer to 5 minutes since the cheese had already melted and started to brown at that time.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 12, 2018, 03:22 PM
Hi!

Home alone today. So I had lunch in the city after I was shopping groceries/food stuff and other necessities ;) on the farmers market.

Lobster cream soup.

(https://up.picr.de/33807901qj.jpg)

And then for dinner, from the farmers market: Great olive & oregano bread, an amazing ham from French Basque Country, and a venison salami ... The mustard is from our region and tastes great with the ham ...

(https://up.picr.de/33807903pk.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33807904bo.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 15, 2018, 01:13 PM
From Thursday, onion-quiche.

(https://up.picr.de/33828532wn.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 16, 2018, 12:08 PM
Here's an interesting article, who'd have thunk?

"Instagram Is Ruining Sushi in NYC"
 
https://ny.eater.com/2018/8/10/17672814/sushi-instagram-ruining-nyc
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 16, 2018, 12:50 PM
Hi!

Yeah, it's a shame that people are willing to substitute taste for their IG "needs" on time sensitive food/courses. They are only ruining their personal experience, though.

But then again, the "real" "problem" is that "Instant" was taken out of Instagram looong ago.

Adapt and overcome - the world changes continuously ;)

I decide pretty carefully when and when not to take pictures. A straight out ban for something this trivial - I'm very opposed to bans anyway - would put any place last on my list.

It's a good read! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on September 16, 2018, 02:45 PM
I tried the Table 87 pizza slice on Saturday.  The very first bite was just blah, but the more I ate the better it got.  The cheese was really tasty.  It wasn't worth $6 though.

(Attachment Link)

Last night we made minestrone soup for dinner.

(Attachment Link)

@GoingMyWay The pizza slice you paid $6 for was not interesting to me. But your minestrone soup that you could almost eat with a fork.... UMMMM!!! that looked DEEEE luscious
Tinker

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 16, 2018, 03:05 PM
Thanks we used Lidia Bastianich's recipe for the Minestrone soup. We like her recipes because they're pretty straight forward and simple. The best part is that it just called for water instead of chicken stock like a lot of recipes call for.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on September 16, 2018, 08:30 PM
We ate for 12 years once a week at a pizza resterant. the pizza was good, but the soups were excellent. I used to tell the chef that i liked his soups because i could eat them with a fork. His minestrone was out of this world. Unfortunately, the owner of the building kept raising the rent until he was not expensive any more. The building has been up for rent for two years now. We  have found other  places with, actually, better menus, but no soup can compare to our old place. My wife is a good cook and makes especially good soups.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 17, 2018, 09:57 AM
Thanks we used Lidia Bastianich's recipe for the Minestrone soup. We like her recipes because they're pretty straight forward and simple.

Well thanks for that info. 🙏  I've never heard of her before but she has 6 restaurants and 5 market places. I think I'll try one of her recipes for tonight.  [big grin]

https://lidiasitaly.com/recipes/

Also of interest, is she has a market in Chicago that may be interesting to visit.

https://www.eataly.com/us_en/stores/chicago/

My favorite non-celebrity Italian chef is Giuliano Bugialli and one of my favorite cook books is "Bugialli on Pasta". Two of his recipes that are a staple are "Sweet & Sour Carrots" and "Chicken with Black Olives".

http://www.tantemarie.com/blog/chef-giuliano-bugialli/
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 17, 2018, 10:24 AM
Lidia has also had several tv shows on PBS. That's how we came to know about her and also where we specifically got her recipe for the minestrone and the octopus and spaghetti that I posted a while back. I noticed that the recipe for minestrone soup online was a little different than how she made it on the tv show. The beauty of her recipes is that they're really easy and don't require very specific measurements. Handful of this, spoonful of that.

Is Lidia also involved with Eataly?  I thought that was a partnership between her son, Joe Bastianich and Mario Batali.

We might check out Eataly as we're currently in Chicago. We're heading to Chinatown today.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on September 17, 2018, 10:52 AM
We might check out Eataly as we're currently in Chicago. We're heading to Chinatown today.

If you do check out Eataly, let us know what you think. [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 18, 2018, 03:12 PM
Afternoon, plum pie.

(https://up.picr.de/33855390fn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33855391dl.jpg)

Evening, BBQ.

(https://up.picr.de/33858320el.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33858319xo.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33858322aj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33858327ur.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33858330bc.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on September 18, 2018, 04:05 PM
@six-point socket II and @GoingMyWay I have just been torturing--- Er! showing --- my wife some of your dishes. She is from Germany and she was going crazy over some of your offerings. I have been with her to visit her family south of Stuttgart several times. We have never gotten a bad meal anywhere in Germany. I think I gain 10 pounds everytime I have visited. Thanks for showing so many enjoyable meals.
Tinker
PS She just visited our German Deli today and we are having Weiswurst for dinner. Definitely not in the same class as some of the meals you  have shown, but my wife gets excited anytime she brings home any of those sausages that remind her of her previous home
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Jesse Cloud on September 19, 2018, 12:28 AM
.....
My favorite non-celebrity Italian chef is Giuliano Bugialli and one of my favorite cook books is "Bugialli on Pasta". Two of his recipes that are a staple are "Sweet & Sour Carrots" and "Chicken with Black Olives".

http://www.tantemarie.com/blog/chef-giuliano-bugialli/

I have a Giuliano Bugialli story.  I took a class back in the 90's from a guy who was close friends with Bugialli.  He would meet Bugialli whenever the chef came to D.C. and get him whatever materials he needed for classes, etc.  He also took him to restaurants in the area.  I asked which Italian restaurant Bugialli liked best.  His answer "He hates all American Italian restaurants.  All his favorite U.S. restaurants serve Chinese food."

I really enjoy Bugialli, too.  Have cooked many of his recipes.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on September 19, 2018, 08:20 PM
@six-point socket II and @GoingMyWay I have just been torturing--- Er! showing --- my wife some of your dishes. She is from Germany and she was going crazy over some of your offerings. I have been with her to visit her family south of Stuttgart several times. We have never gotten a bad meal anywhere in Germany. I think I gain 10 pounds everytime I have visited. Thanks for showing so many enjoyable meals.
Tinker
PS She just visited our German Deli today and we are having Weiswurst for dinner. Definitely not in the same class as some of the meals you  have shown, but my wife gets excited anytime she brings home any of those sausages that remind her of her previous home

Hey Tinker,

that's great! :) Oh, and while I'm not from southern Germany, I still love me a good Weisswurst. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on September 26, 2018, 11:57 AM
If you do check out Eataly, let us know what you think. [smile]

Eataly was quite good.  We got a dozen oysters (even though I had mentioned earlier about being a little scared about getting sick from raw oysters.  Usually I seem to care less when I'm on vacation - you know, when in Rome do as the Romans do.)  The oysters weren't that great - I found a lot of larger than normal pieces of shell inside.  We also got the Octopus, which was exceptionally tender.  We shared the Squid Ink Tagliatelle.  The pasta was perfectly cooked and tasted great.  The overall meal was over $100 with a glass of white wine, but that seemed to be pretty much par for the course for our dinners in Chicago.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Eataly also had the largest selection of Italian items that I have ever seen.  Literally everything in the 2 level store.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 03, 2018, 10:17 AM
I'm a bit behind in posting dinner pictures.

Last Sunday we made kind of our own teppenyaki at home with some american style wagyu that I bought at the local asian supermarket.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

Last Monday we made pork chops with sauerkraut and instant mashed potatoes.

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

Last Thursday we made wonton noodle soup.  We were actually using frozen broth and frozen wontons from when he had made it fresh back in May.

[attachimg=9]

We still had leftover wonton noodles so my wife made stir fried noodles with chicken on Friday.

[attachimg=10]

On Monday we made Okoyonomiyaki.

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

[attachimg=17]

[attachimg=18]

[attachimg=19]

Last night we made Chicken Kabsa using Martha Stewart's recipe.  I had never heard of the dish before I saw it Martha Stewart's cooking school, but evidently it's the national dish of Saudi Arabia.

[attachimg=20]

[attachimg=21]

[attachimg=22]

[attachimg=23]

[attachimg=24]

[attachimg=25]

[attachimg=26]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 03, 2018, 10:20 AM
I may have tried to attach a few too many images in the last post - it looks like the last 6 images didn't make it.

I added the missing images to this post:

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 04, 2018, 08:28 AM
Last night we made lo mein with baby octopus.  I would have preferred beef, but we had leftover baby octopus from the okonomiyaki so we used it up.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 06, 2018, 09:13 PM
Chicken and dumplings for dinner tonight.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 06, 2018, 10:47 PM
That’s interesting, after having some shavings from the now infamous mystery block fall into last nights lamb chops, I feel both dazed and confused, albeit not in the same way that it affected Led Zep.

What first caught my eye was the Trinity, yet it was not the traditional Trinity that we think about. It appeared to be onion, carrots and celery as opposed to onion, peppers and celery. Is that a local twist?

The dumplings look great, my grandmother made some of the best. Her mashed potatoes (RIP Nora) were like eating cement but her dumplings were delicious.

That’s some great looking thigh meat. It makes me want to take a break from the chicken breast syndrome.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 06, 2018, 11:01 PM
I read the other post about that mystery block. It sure looked like graphite and appeared to be used as a lubricant to me, but I don't know much about these type of things.

I believe the "trinity" is regional. In cajun country it's usually onions, celery, and green pepper. Traditionally (at least in classic French cuisine) I believe the mirepoix is carrots, onions, and celery. There's also a similar Italian soffrito.

The dumplings are more like drop biscuits. I have seen other variations of chicken and dumplings where the dumplings are more like extra wide/thick noodles.

The thighs were pretty good. I was just commenting to my wife today that I really don't like chicken legs or thighs that much. I most prefer wings, but eaten as wings on the bone of course. I also like breast meat.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 06, 2018, 11:23 PM
You’re right...I forgot about the soffrito.  [tongue]

The thighs do look good and I need to expand a bit as chicken breasts in our household are like gold bullion (according to my wife), while chicken thighs are considered more like Bitcoin.

A thought...Maybe some pizza with lots of cheeses and some chicken thigh meat may confuse the princess.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 07, 2018, 08:57 PM
We made chili for dinner.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 08, 2018, 07:57 PM
I used some of the leftover chili to make chili mac for lunch.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 10, 2018, 10:09 AM
Last night we made a corned beef and cabbage casserole with some cheddar cheese biscuits.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on October 10, 2018, 11:26 AM
That's a cool way to get the cheese into the biscuits!

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 10, 2018, 11:29 AM
Yup I saw it in a YouTube video - same video where I got the recipe for the casserole.  It is such a simple way to get the cheese in there - just cut a cross and insert a couple of pieces of cheese.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 16, 2018, 10:36 AM
On Saturday my wife made Banh Canh with homemade Banh Canh noodles.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

On Sunday we made Ragu alla Bolognese with Papardelle.

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 17, 2018, 09:14 AM
Last night I went a little crazy with the grilling.  I made rotisserie turkey breast along with hamburgers, brats, potatoes, and broccoli rabe.  I had always wanted to try these prepackaged burgers because they look so good.  Unfortunately they weren't that good - especially not for nearly $10 for 4 patties.  At least the brats were on sale for $3.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on October 17, 2018, 09:34 AM
Well last night was frozen pot pies. 

BUT
@GoingMyWay has reminded me that I haven’t done a turkey breast rotisserie style in a while and he speared his a different way!  So maybe this weekend the Weber with it’s rotisserie attachments will come into play.  Yum.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 17, 2018, 09:46 AM
This was actually my first time ever roasting a turkey breast before (in the oven or on the grill or on a rotisserie).  I'm quite happy with how it turned out.  I had planned to spear it the traditional way initially and then I realized I wasn't going to be able to push through the breast bone.  I had seen a YouTube video where they speared it basically through where the wing was so I used that method instead.  It worked out fine.

The turkey breast came pre-brined so I just seasoned with a little bit of kosher salt and black pepper.  I've used Weber Beer Can Chicken Rub before on both beer can chickens as well as rotisserie chickens and the skin always seems to get too dark.  The skin came out just how I like it yesterday.

I hope to see your rotisserie turkey breast pics this weekend!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 18, 2018, 10:31 AM
That turkey looks delicious.

I've never seen that grate setup on a Weber before with a round briquet holder in the middle along with the central door. I'm familiar with the grate that has 2 end doors and the 2 briquet holders are half-moon shaped so they can be pushed together or pulled apart for indirect cooking.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 18, 2018, 10:41 AM
It came out really nicely.  I surprised myself actually!  I'm thinking about making the Thanksgiving Turkey on the rotisserie this year instead of using the indoor electric turkey fryer that we've used the last 3 years.  Thought my understanding is that it may be harder to maintain the cooking temperature when it's cold outside.

That grate is part of Weber's Gourment BBQ System: https://www.weber.com/US/en/accessories/cooking/gourmet-bbq-system/.  It came with the new charcoal grill that my wife got me for my birthday last month: https://www.weber.com/US/en/grills/charcoal-grills/performer-series/15301001.html.  I had been wanting another grill for a while.  Now I can cook something on the rotisserie, ribs, or use my Vortex to make wings on one grill while I cook something else on the other  [thumbs up].

This is also the first grill I've had with a built in thermometer in the lid.  That is a game changer!  Before I was totally flying blind not having a clue how hot it was inside.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 18, 2018, 12:10 PM
Though my understanding is that it may be harder to maintain the cooking temperature when it's cold outside.

Ya, be careful...several Christmas eves ago we had people over for dinner and the plan was to grill the steaks outside. Unfortunately it was Zeroº out and windy. The Weber just wouldn't get hot, gas probably would have worked better. At any rate, when dinner was 1 hour late "the boys" decided to move the Weber into the garage and leave the door open to help the process along. When dinner was now 2 hours late "the boys" then decided to close the garage door to further help the process along. Consequently, the garage filled up with smoke so completely that we couldn't see each other let alone the food we were cooking. We stunk from all that smoke, it permeated everything, our clothing and our hair. The garage still smelled 5 months later.  [tongue]  Live & learn.

I have an older Performer model, it has a stainless side cover under which is a bin for the charcoal. It can be seen in the very top part of the photo. It's 15-18 years old and still just hums along. I do try to enjoy it year round.

Thanks for the info on the Gourmet System. That sear grate and griddle look pretty interesting.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 18, 2018, 02:15 PM
Methinks a Big Green Egg might be ok in the cold since it's so heavy and thick.  I've never used one, but I know they can really hold the heat.

Yikes!  Couldn't you all have died from smoke inhalation or carbon monoxide poisoning?

I kinda wanted the super deluxe Performer grill with the ignition system and the charcoal holder, but space is at a premium and we already have the other Weber so we decided to get the smallest Performer.  The foldable table is good as we can also always use more table space.

I'd be interested in the Sear Grate, but I have the Grill Grates that work really well over my Slow N' Sear.  The pizza stone might be cool.  I have a baking stone for our oven.  It mostly just sits in the bottom, under the rack to act as a heatsink. I need to check and see how well my wok fits into the opening.  Weber offers a cast iron wok, but from my understanding that seems to be the opposite of what you want.  The wok should be able to quickly absorb and dissipate the heat - the cast would really hold the heat even if it was removed from over the coals.

I seem to recall Alton Brown showed how you can use a Charcoal Chimney Starter as a "burner" for a wok.  Speaking of Alton Brown, has anyone else seen that his show Good Eats is back?  It's called Good Eats Reloaded.  I watched the first episode and I was quite disappointed.  I was expecting a complete reboot of the series.  It ended up being him just revisiting clips from the original episode adding his commentary as to how what he originally said might have changed.

I just realized that the Weber website doesn't show all of the Gourmet BBQ System accessories that are shown in the brochure that came with the grill:

[attach=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Gregor on October 20, 2018, 02:25 PM
A little quiche, always tasty.
[attach=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: PeterJJames13 on October 20, 2018, 04:32 PM
Big Green Egg is definitely great in the cold. Years ago, when I was new to egging, I was smoking a pork shoulder in late January. Mercury was -3 F. I figured I'd use more charcoal than I normally use on a smoke like this. I couldn't keep the temps low enough - I most definitely underestimated the insulating properties of the ceramics. Rookie mistake on my part. Now I'm well aware and trust what it can do - I also sell them.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 21, 2018, 01:04 PM
Yesterday was my wife's birthday. We made a roast beef, sauteed mushrooms, haricots verts, oven fried potatoes, popovers, and homemade gravy. 

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on October 21, 2018, 01:55 PM
Yesterday was my wife's birthday. We made a roast beef, sauteed mushrooms, haricots verts, oven fried potatoes, popovers, and homemade gravy. 

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

YUM!  Except for the mushrooms.  Surprised you didn't sous vide the beef.  But it looks delicious!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 21, 2018, 02:08 PM
I guess mushrooms are one of those love em or hate em kind of things.  I hated them when I was a child, but I like em now.

I think I have made a sous vide roast before.  It's a little less than ideal since the big piece of meat sits in its own juices for so long it really makes it had to develop that nice caramelized crust you get from the dry heat of the oven.  I did miss having that perfect edge to edge pink however.  It was in fact a little overcooked to our normal liking.

We were in a little bit of of a hurry yesterday so I first seared it on the stove and then put it into a 375 degree oven.  It was supposed to be about 15 minutes per pound for medium rare.  I used a probe thermometer set to 125 degrees.  I think it was closer to 1:30 to reach 125.  From the doneness of the meat, I think I should have actually set the target temp to 120 degrees.  I've also used the reverse sear technique for roasts, but that takes longer since the oven is much cooler.

I've heard the "best" way to make prime rib is to crank the oven as hot as it will go, throw the roast in for a short while and then turn the oven off completely and let it very slowly cook like overnight.  I've never tried this, in fact I had also read that the technique doesn't even really work on modern ovens since they don't hold the heat in like they used to.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on October 22, 2018, 02:41 AM
@GoingMyWay   If you are into roasting rib roasts, here is an interesting read:  https://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html (https://www.seriouseats.com/2009/12/the-food-lab-how-to-cook-roast-a-perfect-prime-rib.html)

His cookbook “The Food Lab” is a great cookbook and gift for those who get into food science and enjoy reading in addition to cooking.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 22, 2018, 08:21 AM
Thanks for that link.  I think I used his Perfect Prime Rib with Red Wine Jus recipe for Christmas one year.  I don't recall if I had seen the article that you sent or not.  His technique is very good, albeit a longer cook time at only 200 degrees. 

One of the things that I was trying to do by making the turkey and roast beef this week is get more practice / experimentation in before a major holiday meal.  I was just telling my wife that the problem is we normally only cook a turkey and prime rib 1 time a year.  Usually for Thanksgiving and Christmas.  I'm always afraid to try something new or test something out for fear of ruining a meal for multiple people.  This past week was a good opportunity to "live free" and not be too worried about a complete failure since it was just the 2 of us eating.

Yesterday we finished up the turkey breast by making turkey club sandwiches. We also made home fries by cooking the 2 leftover grilled potatoes in the bacon fat.

[attachimg=1]

We made a little turkey stock that we froze from the turkey breast carcass.

[attachimg=2]

For dinner we had a simple split pea soup that was made with just ham hocks, split peas, and water.  The last couple times we have made pea soup it ended up being very thick.  This time I added extra water to thin things out.  Unfortunately, I ended up adding way too much water so the soup was very very thin. 

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 22, 2018, 01:02 PM
Talking about the Weber Performer grills and particularly the stainless tray/table off to the side, I always assumed the tray was manufactured from 304 stainless. First because after 15-18 years of outside exposure there isn't a trace of rust and secondly, because 304 is a lot cheaper than the equivalent amount of 316. Both of these stainless products are very non-magnetic.

Well this last weekend I was going to grill some marinated flank steaks and I wanted to use the SysLite with the magnetic adapter and try to find a place on the bevel cedar siding where I could mount the SysLite. After fumbling around for a while I decided to place the light on the grill table and then mark the area on the siding where I would mount the light...the SysLite stuck to the stainless table.  [eek]

Here are some shots, so @GoingMyWay , this may be an alternative for you if you need some localized lighting when grilling at night.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 22, 2018, 01:10 PM
That's a nice setup.  There have been several instances when I needed more light while grilling after sunset.  I usually had to struggle to use the flashlight on my phone.

Any idea now what kind of stainless steel or other metal the table is made out of?

Are you telling me I need to buy a SysLite now???  I had seen some kind of Festool lights come up on the recon site, but never really paid attention since I didn't think I had a need for it.  I may need it now...
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 22, 2018, 01:33 PM
Any idea now what kind of stainless steel or other metal the table is made out of?

I still think it's 304 stainless because there's absolutely no rust after all these years. The only thing I can figure is that during the stamping/forming process, the molecular structure is changed as far as magnetism is concerned, (maybe a kind of work hardening process) , yet the corrosion resistance is not affected. If that's the case, that could be a big processing bonus for many items and manufacturers. I'm thinking specifically the boating industry.

The Festool mount holds good and tight as I rotated the SysLite 90º on the mount (parallel to the stainless surface) and it never moved or tipped. I think your situation may be the same. Take a very small refrigerator magnet to the surface and if it sticks, you'll have no problem with the Festool magnetic mount.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 22, 2018, 01:43 PM
I don't know anything about metallurgy, but a molecular structure change from hardening sounds interesting.

I just checked.  The magnet stuck fine to my table also.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 22, 2018, 01:55 PM
I had seen some kind of Festool lights come up on the recon site, but never really paid attention since I didn't think I had a need for it.  I may need it now...

If you decide to purchase from the recon site, just be aware that I've seen both the original KAL (600 lumen) and the newer KAL II  (770 lumen) for sale and the price differential was literally $10. The older KAL has 6 LEDs with a run time of 90/240 minutes, while the newer KAL II has 12 LEDs with a run time of 130/290 minutes.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 22, 2018, 01:58 PM
Thanks for the heads up.  It's just the CXS 1.5 vs 2.6 being offered up.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on October 23, 2018, 04:46 AM
@GoingMyWay   >>>For dinner we had a simple split pea soup that was made with just ham hocks, split peas, and water.  The last couple times we have made pea soup it ended up being very thick.  This time I added extra water to thin things out.  Unfortunately, I ended up adding way too much water so the soup was very very thin. <<<

My aunt, as also my mom, used to make pea soup very thick. I loved it that way. Later, it was great to sit down to a steaming hot bowl of pea soup when coming home from plowing snow. My wife does not make it quite so thick, but pea soup is great any time the weather is cold and stormy. It does not  last long in our house.
Tinker 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Gregor on October 23, 2018, 06:46 AM
One of the things that I was trying to do by making the turkey and roast beef this week is get more practice / experimentation in before a major holiday meal.
Regarding roast beef I can recommend to reverse roast it: Put with a core thermometer into 60-80°C (depending on how many hours you want to start before dinner, lower temperature and more time usually gives better results) oven and drop the temperature to 55°C the moment the beef core reaches that target level. You can keep it like this for several hours without any degredation and when your guests finally arrive (on time or late) you take it out to give it a brief high-heat treatment (on the grill or in a pan) that quickly brings the outside/crust to your level of liking - let it sit for 2-3 minutes after the charring stage and you'll end up with perfect roastbeef.

What's nice with this approach is that it works regardless the size of your cut (thinner ones will just be quicker to reach the stage where you can put them into hibernation by dropping the oven to the core temperature) and massively eases requirements on your (or your guests) timing.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 23, 2018, 09:40 AM
@GoingMyWay   >>>For dinner we had a simple split pea soup that was made with just ham hocks, split peas, and water.  The last couple times we have made pea soup it ended up being very thick.  This time I added extra water to thin things out.  Unfortunately, I ended up adding way too much water so the soup was very very thin. <<<

My aunt, as also my mom, used to make pea soup very thick. I loved it that way. Later, it was great to sit down to a steaming hot bowl of pea soup when coming home from plowing snow. My wife does not make it quite so thick, but pea soup is great any time the weather is cold and stormy. It does not  last long in our house.
Tinker

Do you use stock or water to make the soup?  We rarely make pea soup - mostly after Easter dinner when we would have a ham bone and some leftover ham to make the soup.

I went to the famous Pea Soup Andersen's in Gustine, CA 5 years ago.  I bought some of their canned pea soup and also their bags of split peas to make at home.  My favorite place to get pea soup is from a fast casual place called Vie de France.  There used to be a lot more in the DC area, but now I think there's pretty much only one near my mom's in Maryland and another in DC itself and maybe one in California.  There are little cubes of ham in the soup and little specks of what carrot that appears to been grated.  I wish I knew exactly how they make it. 

Regarding roast beef I can recommend to reverse roast it: Put with a core thermometer into 60-80°C (depending on how many hours you want to start before dinner, lower temperature and more time usually gives better results) oven and drop the temperature to 55°C the moment the beef core reaches that target level. You can keep it like this for several hours without any degredation and when your guests finally arrive (on time or late) you take it out to give it a brief high-heat treatment (on the grill or in a pan) that quickly brings the outside/crust to your level of liking - let it sit for 2-3 minutes after the charring stage and you'll end up with perfect roastbeef.

What's nice with this approach is that it works regardless the size of your cut (thinner ones will just be quicker to reach the stage where you can put them into hibernation by dropping the oven to the core temperature) and massively eases requirements on your (or your guests) timing.

It is a very good method of cooking.  I've never tried it, but I hear it also works great on a steak on the grill.  The only thing for me is unless it's a very thick steak, I don't like to push a probe thermometer in (one of the main reasons I like sous vide steak so much).  I find it's a little tricky to hit the center of the meat, it's obviously not that hard on a big 4+ lb roast.

Do you know if there's a general rule of thumb for how long it takes for the meat to rise in temperature in say a 200F oven?  It feels like it takes a very long time for the temperature to even go up 1 degree when the oven is so low.  So like maybe we'll put the roast in at 12pm and the internal temperature will be like 56 degrees.  Then by 2pm it'll be like 80 something, but I'm trying to hit 120 or 125.  I know there are a lot of factors that come into play - how cold is the meat to start with, how long has the meat been warming up outside, how big/thick is the meat, but my biggest problem is basically knowing how early I need to put the roast in to eat at say 4pm.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Gregor on October 23, 2018, 05:01 PM
It is a very good method of cooking.  I've never tried it, but I hear it also works great on a steak on the grill.  The only thing for me is unless it's a very thick steak, I don't like to push a probe thermometer in (one of the main reasons I like sous vide steak so much).  I find it's a little tricky to hit the center of the meat, it's obviously not that hard on a big 4+ lb roast.
Yes, it's the same idea as sous-vide, just in air instead of vacuuming it and putting it in warm water.
I don't do sous-vide as I prefer to not heat plastics that is in contact with my food.

Regarding your question about timing: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/oct/18/ultra-slow-roast-rump-beef-recipe is somewhat the way I do it (at least that was the first one I found when searching for an english language recipe). In case you're unsure put it in 1-2 hours earlier and when reaching desired core temperature just drop the oven temperature to that - as no additional heating of your dinner can happen the meat will stay in perfect state for some hours, without any problems (it'll only get better).
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 24, 2018, 09:33 AM
The other advantage of using air to cook the food is that the exterior stays dry.  The food becomes quite water logged when cooked in its own juices in the bag which can make getting a good sear a little bit harder.

Thanks for that recipe.  That says 4-5 hours for a rump roast.  I guess if we want to eat around 4pm it would probably be safest to start around 10am.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 25, 2018, 02:44 PM
Last night we made Corvina en Papillote.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 25, 2018, 03:42 PM
Last night we made Corvina en Papillote.

Thanks for the great idea...🙏...I have a "Salmon Fillet en Papillote with Julienne Vegetable" recipe that's delicious and that I haven't made in years. I think that baby makes it to the table tonight. [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 25, 2018, 03:45 PM
Awesome!  I hope to see pics.

We normally use salmon, but we had 2 pieces of frozen corvina so we used that instead.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 25, 2018, 04:03 PM
Ya, it’s an Alton Brown recipe circa 2003. Haven’t made it in 5-7 years.

What’s corvina? Not familiar with that one.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 25, 2018, 04:07 PM
I guess it's also known as drum.  This was the first time that we had it.  We were looking for a thicker cut of white fish and saw it at Costco so we bought it.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 25, 2018, 04:16 PM
That's funny because I've also never heard of drum.

I thought the last time I made this recipe I used cod so that it wouldn't overpower the fennel, leeks, snow peas, carrots & bell pepper. However I couldn't find it under the cod section so I went to the salmon section and it popped up. We'll see what fish looks the best at the monger tonight.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 25, 2018, 04:20 PM
I had never heard of drum either LOL.  I thought like it sounded like a more familiar name though.

Yup sometimes it is best to use whatever looks best or is available at the market.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 27, 2018, 10:29 AM
Awesome!  I hope to see pics.

We normally use salmon, but we had 2 pieces of frozen corvina so we used that instead.

Well I went to the market to purchase some fish, but I fell in love with these lamb chops. Just look at the size of the tenderloin. [eek]

So, keeping it simple, just Malden sea salt, fresh ground pepper and minced fresh rosemary. Cooked till they were 135º in the center and then a 5 minute foil covered rest. Nummy...

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on October 27, 2018, 10:59 AM
Awesome!  I hope to see pics.

We normally use salmon, but we had 2 pieces of frozen corvina so we used that instead.

Well I went to the market to purchase some fish, but I fell in love with these lamb chops. Just look at the size of the tenderloin. [eek]

So, keeping it simple, just Malden sea salt, fresh ground pepper and minced fresh rosemary. Cooked till they were 135º in the center and then a 5 minute foil covered rest. Nummy...

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

 Looks delicious (as do so much food does here) cooked perfectly with a juicy top. What grill did you use?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 27, 2018, 12:53 PM
Looks delicious (as do so much food does here) cooked perfectly with a juicy top. What grill did you use?

Hey Bob, I use a Weber charcoal grill, however I went outside Thursday evening and I was out of charcoal.  [sad]  So I just used the gas range with a LeCreuset grill pan.

https://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/le-creuset-signature-square-grill-pan/?pkey=ccookware-le-creuset%7Cle-creuset-cast-iron&isx=0.0.4046
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 27, 2018, 11:53 PM
Awesome!  I hope to see pics.

GoingMyWay, here are your photos...
This recipe is called "Salmon Fillet en Papillote with Julienne Vegetable" from Alton Brown circa 2003. I looked up En Papiliote today and found it was French for "in parchment". That makes sense.  [big grin]

Photo 1: Ingredients left to right:
Sea salt, fresh ground pepper, ground coriander
Blanched snow peas
Fennel bulb
Carrots
Leaks
Navel orange slices...I wanted Blood oranges but they're not yet in season
Fennel fronds
Orange bell pepper
Alaskan Sockeye Salmon

Photo 2: Ingredients arranged on the parchment paper before wrapping it up.

Photo 3: Everything cooked in parchment paper and done at the same time.  Delicious and healthy [big grin] [big grin]  That's a complete meal...however if you're an over achiever, just grab another parchment pouch, I guarantee your tummy will be filled.

And then if you're really an ultra over achiever, try adding some white/brown rice bed to the mixture and some more liquid. I haven't tried that but it would be interesting.  [smile]

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 28, 2018, 07:09 PM
Thanks for sharing your pictures Cheese!

When I first read "lamb chops," the image of the scrawny rack of lamb chops immediately came to mind.  I've never had this type of lamb chop before.  They look great (well except for the rosemary - I don't like rosemary or thyme) and perfectly cooked!  The resting of the lamb is absolutely critical.  If it's not allowed to rest the meat will look way under cooked  Did you serve them with mint jelly?

Your sockeye salmon en papillote looks great also.  I'd never have thought to include a sweet citrus like regular oranges or blood orange.  My wife put some thin slices of lemon on her fish.  We also put little thin slices of potato as the base of our corvina en papillote.  I cut them with a vegetable peeler to make sure they were thin enough to cook in about 20 minutes.  Speaking of corvina - it was funny how neither of us had heard of that fish before.  My wife's cousin was over the other day and she said she had grilled corvina from a Korean restaurant.  I asked her twice if she was sure it was corvina because it doesn't seem to be a very common fish (she had never heard of corvina before either).

Last night we made thai rice soup.  It's a pork stock with cooked rice mixed in and served with pork meatballs and a soft boiled egg.  The meatball flavor reminded me a lot of wonton filling.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on October 29, 2018, 01:30 PM
Did you serve them with mint jelly?

I'd never have thought to include a sweet citrus like regular oranges or blood orange. 

I asked her twice if she was sure it was corvina because it doesn't seem to be a very common fish (she had never heard of corvina before either).


Nope...no mint jelly, just the seasonings. It is delicious, especially that big tenderloin.   [big grin]

I failed to add, that once assembled, I added 1 Tbl of fresh squeezed OJ and 1 Tbl of some nice white wine to the oranges on top. Then I sealed the pouches up and put them in the oven. You could also add a dollop of butter to the oranges if you prefer.

I prefer blood oranges because they're a bit sweeter and I love their color.  [eek]

I looked up Corvina and found this. Look at the six cooking methods, this is a pretty versatile fish. [smile] I'm going to look around for some, I'll check at Coastal this week.

http://www.fortunefishco.net/Assets/ffg-corvina-sm.pdf
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on October 29, 2018, 02:44 PM
Hi!

Today it was "Housewife's pie".

(https://up.picr.de/34202862mp.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202864nj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202865oa.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202866vn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202868dd.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202869wf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202872pl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202873im.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202875xw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202876mq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202877rf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202879bc.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: justaguy on October 31, 2018, 11:35 AM
We have a Halloween block party every year. The residents all bring a dish and some sides. We eat and have a drink while passing out candy to the kids. The past few years I've made pulled pork. This year a couple of neighbors asked me to add a shoulder/"butt" just for them.

The Primo is full to capacity.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on October 31, 2018, 11:36 AM
Wow, that looks amazing!

Have a great Halloween party!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on October 31, 2018, 01:24 PM
Hi!

Today it was "Housewife's pie".

(https://up.picr.de/34202862mp.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202864nj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202865oa.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202866vn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202868dd.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202869wf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202872pl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202873im.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202875xw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202876mq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202877rf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34202879bc.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver

That looks interesting.  I've never heard of a Housewife's pie before though.  I kinda reminds me of a stromboli, but not that similar.

We have a Halloween block party every year. The residents all bring a dish and some sides. We eat and have a drink while passing out candy to the kids. The past few years I've made pulled pork. This year a couple of neighbors asked me to add a shoulder/"butt" just for them.

The Primo is full to capacity.


That looks yummy.  I wish we had a Halloween block party like that where I live.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 13, 2018, 03:50 PM
A while back we made crispy pork belly with oil blanched snow pea tips.  Sadly the crispy pork belly was a fail because it wasn't crispy.  This was the second time we made it.  The first time it came out nice and crunchy.  I used the same recipe so I'm not sure where I went wrong.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

Sunday we made sous vide ribeye and sauteed chanterelle mushrooms.  NY strip is my favorite cut of steak, but my wife says that the ribeye steak is better and also more tender.

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

Last night I grilled up some Mediterranean marinated chicken breasts for my wife's lunch.

[attachimg=13]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on November 24, 2018, 04:02 PM
Advertisement because of visible Klein Tools in picture.

Hi!

Started on my Christmas baking today by making a pyramid cake (Baumkuchen) Take a look at my first post (last 6 pictures) in this thread, if you would like to see the whole process: http://festoolownersgroup.com/general-friendly-chat/what's-cooking/msg549979/#msg549979

Spent the day in the kitchen, preparing and then baking layer by layer ...

Just two new pics, just for fun. :)

(https://up.picr.de/34416896uq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34416897zl.jpg)


Cake will get wrapped tonight and then sit in the cold basement until Christmas.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: RJNeal on November 24, 2018, 05:43 PM
Today I’m having some friends over for a “last supper”.
Cooking a 31 lb turkey stuffed on a Weber summit. 5 hours and the turkey is done and the guest won’t be here for a few more hours.
Cranberries 3 ways.
One regular, one with grey poupon and thyme,last one with pomegranate seeds.
Rick
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on November 24, 2018, 06:09 PM
Today I’m having some friends over for a “last supper”.
Cooking a 31 lb turkey stuffed on a Weber summit. 5 hours and the turkey is done and the guest won’t be here for a few more hours.
Cranberries 3 ways.
One regular, one with grey poupon and thyme,last one with pomegranate seeds.
Rick

Holy pterodactyl!  31 LBS.  Hope your friends respect both your strength and also your cooking skills.

I hope you enjoy your time with friends!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 25, 2018, 12:36 AM
Cranberries 3 ways.
One regular, one with grey poupon and thyme,last one with pomegranate seeds.
Rick

The Grey Poupon and thyme variation sounds interesting.  [smile]  I can also see the pomegranate seed version working well.  [smile]

There must be some other fixes inside to balance the mustard?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: RJNeal on November 25, 2018, 12:44 AM
Thanks Peter,
This was a normal to small this year. One year I got a 40 pounder.
Local grow at the Hub Cap Ranch in Pope Valley. Ca.
[attach=1][attach=2]
Here is a picture of the 38 lb one.
Rick.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: RJNeal on November 25, 2018, 12:56 AM
Cheese, what I do is use Poms pomegranate juice instead of water. 2/3 of the sugar they call for. Then I split it in to threes.
Maybe a tablespoon or 1-1/2 of mustard and a tablespoon or 1-1/2of thyme to a cup and a half or two cups of sauce
It’s not much mustard.
Rick.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 25, 2018, 01:08 AM
Well after 4 days of meal planning, house cleaning, grocery buying and turkey cooking...it's time for a break.

Tonight it was Akaushi tenderloin, with beans, butter & shallots, (a left over from Thanksgiving and an Ina Garten recipe) along with crab & cream cheese stuffed mushrooms.
The adult beverage is a dirty BET vodka martini in a Grey Goose glass. The BET vodka is a local Minnesota product, produced from locally grown sugar beets and distilled in Wisconsin ...truly the smoothest I've ever tasted.  Seriously the smoothest vodka ever and I'll stand by that. [big grin]

https://vodka-guy.com/bet-vodka-review/

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 25, 2018, 01:17 AM
Cheese, what I do is use Poms pomegranate juice instead of water. 2/3 of the sugar they call for. Then I split it in to threes.
Maybe a tablespoon or 1-1/2 of mustard and a tablespoon or 1-1/2of thyme to a cup and a half or two cups of sauce
It’s not much mustard.

That's interesting Rick, the mustard just for a little subtle flavor...using that much thyme it's probably fresh?  I'm trying this version next year.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: RJNeal on November 25, 2018, 08:15 AM
Cheese, what I do is use Poms pomegranate juice instead of water. 2/3 of the sugar they call for. Then I split it in to threes.
Maybe a tablespoon or 1-1/2 of mustard and a tablespoon or 1-1/2of thyme to a cup and a half or two cups of sauce
It’s not much mustard.

That's interesting Rick, the mustard just for a little subtle flavor...using that much thyme it's probably fresh?  I'm trying this version next year.  [big grin]


Yes fresh is better.
Enjoy.

My wife and I took a short vacation up to Humboldt County to see if the redwoods were still there and the ocean still making waves.
We found Humboldt distillery and their vodka. Now that one is really smooth also.
Rick
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 25, 2018, 09:54 AM
We ended up cooking 2 turkeys for Thanksgiving this year.  One was deep fried and I cooked the other on the rotisserie on the grill.  I had been concerned about being able to maintain the cooking temperature considering it was unusually cold here (in the 30s).  It ended up not being a problem at all - in fact I ended up cooking the turkey hotter than I wanted to - at 400 degrees.  I would have preferred that it have cooked around 325-350 degrees.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

I bought the Meater Wireless Thermometer so I could monitor both the internal and ambient temperature of the grill in real time.  I already have a Maverick Wireless Dual Probe Thermometer, but I didn't want to have to fuss with securing the probe wire and worrying about it possibly tangling around the rotating rotisserie spit.  I was initially apprehensive about buying the Meater because I had read a lot of negative comments about its limited range and connectivity issues and what not.  I used an old phone to connect to the Meater via Bluetooth and then that phone acted as a wireless bridge to connect to my WiFi network.  Then I could monitor the temperatures from my cell phone.  It worked perfectly for me and I was truly impressed!

Here are some screenshots from the Meater app on my phone.

[attachimg=6] [attachimg=7]  [attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9] [attachimg=10] [attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 26, 2018, 09:38 AM
We ended up cooking 2 turkeys for Thanksgiving this year.

I bought the Meater Wireless Thermometer so I could monitor both the internal and ambient temperature of the grill in real time.  I already have a Maverick Wireless Dual Probe Thermometer, but I didn't want to have to fuss with securing the probe wire and worrying about it possibly tangling around the rotating rotisserie spit.  I was initially apprehensive about buying the Meater because I had read a lot of negative comments about its limited range and connectivity issues and what not.  I used an old phone to connect to the Meater via Bluetooth and then that phone acted as a wireless bridge to connect to my WiFi network.  Then I could monitor the temperatures from my cell phone.  It worked perfectly for me and I was truly impressed!


We usually cook a single 12-14# breast. This year it was 2 breasts, a 6# and a 7#. It worked out a lot better. The 2 breasts needed less room to store in the fridge, a smaller cooler to brine them in, took less brining solution, took less time to cook and will be easier to make turkey soup with. Really liked the 2 turkey approach.

That Meater thermometer is pretty interesting. I especially like the Ambient temp output for charcoal grilling. I'm thinking for cooking brisket at 250º, this would be perfect. Is there a low/high alarm you can set on the Ambient output?

The good thing about grilling the turkey at 400º, is that you can render the fat from the turkey skin easier and it crisps up. The skin looks as crisp as the skin on the deep fried version.  [big grin]

I'll typically crank the oven up to 425º and place the turkey in there for 30 minutes, then I reduce the temp to 325º and finish the bird off. A little basting every 20 minutes and the skin is nice and crisp.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 26, 2018, 10:12 AM
We really like turkey wings so we usually buy a package of turkey wings to cook in addition to 1 turkey.  We didn't need to do that this year since we had 4 wings and 4 legs between the 2 birds.

Yup you can set all kinds of custom alarms in the app: https://meater.com/blog/how-to-set-up-custom-internal-and-ambient-temperature-alerts/.  My Maverick Dual Probe Wired Thermometer (https://www.amazon.com/Maverick-Range-Wireless-Smoker-Thermometer/dp/B00FOCR4UI) can also set custom high/low temperatures.  If you create a Meater Cloud account for free, you can even monitor the temps when you're not connected to the same WiFi network (though if the temp is too high or too low there's not much you can do about it if you're not home).

I guess it kinda rendered more fat, but the 10lb bird cooked in seemingly record time.  I think it was done in about 1.5 hours.  I fiddled with the vents to try to bring the temp down.  At one point I had the top vent completely closed and the temperature dropped down to around 315, then I opened the vents a little more and we rose up to around 375.

I probably should have rubbed the skin with some butter or oil to help it crisp up.  I didn't do it because other times I've run into problems with the skin getting a little too dark so I didn't want that to happen this time.

For Christmas I plan on doing a prime rib in this rotisserie basket (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N0MCTEW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00)  that I ordered from Amazon.  I plan on sandwiching the roast between the spit rod and the basket, rather than running the spit all the way through the middle of the roast.  I got the idea from this YouTube video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sx1j62NLO90
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 28, 2018, 08:58 AM
We took our leftover turkey meat and carcass and made Turkey Rice Soup.  I think this is the first time we've ever made the soup with rice (aside from congee, but that's different).  We always use noodles.  I kinda liked the rice for a change.  Since we pre-cooked the rice separately it also didn't soak up all of the broth like the noodles always do.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 28, 2018, 10:08 AM
My 3 tasks for the day:
1. Cleaning the gutters.   [sad]
2. Installing a Honeywell dehumidifier in the HVAC system.   [smile]
3. Turkey wild rice soup.    [big grin]


 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 28, 2018, 01:05 PM
Sounds like a busy day.  I hope you post a picture of the soup.  I was just at the grocery store and saw this:

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on November 28, 2018, 03:38 PM
Hi!

Take a nice pork neck.

(https://up.picr.de/34451376ox.jpg)

Make a deep cut.

(https://up.picr.de/34451377dm.jpg)

Season with salt & pepper. Stuff with dried apples, apricots & plums.

(https://up.picr.de/34451378hz.jpg)

Enjoy.

(https://up.picr.de/34451379nr.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: rvieceli on November 28, 2018, 07:38 PM
looks good Oliver.

I think that might be what we call pork collar over here. Maybe?

Ron
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on November 29, 2018, 10:16 AM
Sounds like a busy day. 
I hope you post a picture of the soup. 
I was just at the grocery store and saw this:

Funny, of those 3 items,  [crying]  the only item that got any real attention was the dehumidifier. I decided to build a small frame of 80/20 to support it as it weighs 70# before any ducting is attached.

So that puts the gutters on today's list and pushes the turkey soup out to Friday or Saturday.

That package of wild rice that you've shown is cultivated. The clue being "paddy grown", which means farmed. 90% of the wild rice sold in the US is cultivated product. Cultivated wild rice and naturally grown wild rice are actually 2 completely different items. Their appearance is different and their taste is different. In Minnesota, the natural wild rice is usually hand harvested by native Ojibwe using canoes and poles. Some people prefer the taste of cultivated over the taste of natural. The flavor of the naturally grown variant will change depending upon its growing conditions. I like them both.

The whole Great Lakes region, including the US side & the Canadian side are producers of natural wild rice.



 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on November 29, 2018, 10:22 AM
Too bad that the turkey soup got pushed back all the way til Friday or Saturday.  Why not make the stock and "set it and forget it" while you clean the gutters?

I reckon I've only eaten cultivated wild rice - particularly with most of my wild rice consumption being from an Uncle Ben's box.  That's good information to know about the difference.  I'll have to seek out some naturally grown wild rice from the Great Lakes Region, though I suspect I won't like it since I'm so accustomed to the cultivated stuff.

Last night I made deep fried pork chops, gator bites, sauteed green beans, chinese broccoli, and jambalaya.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on November 29, 2018, 07:24 PM
Concerning "Wild Rice", it used to be common here to be able to buy the Wild Rice in small boxes (Normally on the top shelf of grocery stores by the way.)  Those days are now gone in my area.

Wild rice is actually a grass seed by the way.

I hate rice but love wild rice and ironically I started looking on the internet a few weeks ago to find what I could once find locally.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on November 29, 2018, 07:29 PM
And to follow up, one of the many great internet vendors I learned about thru FOG members is nuts.com.  I have never had an issue and they are fun and quirky.

They sell cultivated wild rice!  Here is a link:  https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/rice/northern.html (https://nuts.com/cookingbaking/rice/northern.html)

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking Wild Rice
Post by: Cheese on November 30, 2018, 11:59 AM
Dwelling on the naturally grown wild rice vs paddy grown wild rice saga, here are a couple of photos to help identify the two rices (grasses).

In the first 2 photos, the naturally stream/river/lake grown rice is lighter in color and tan or gold hued as opposed to the dark brown or even almost black paddy grown (cultivated) wild rice.

Photo 3 is cultivated.

Photo 4 is naturally grown.

Also a sure sign is to look at the cooking times on the package. Paddy grown will be 50 minutes or longer, while naturally grown will be 30 minutes or shorter.

Also of note for those brown rice aficionados out there, here's a comparison between cultivated wild rice and brown rice. The naturally grown wild rice has even fewer carbs, calories & fat plus more protein than paddy grown wild rice.

1C - Cultivated Wild Rice:
Carbohydrate - 35g
Calories - 166
Total Fat - .6g
Protein - 6.5g

1C - Long Grain Brown Rice:
Carbohydrate - 44.8g
Calories - 216
Total Fat - 1.8g
Protein - 5g

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 02, 2018, 02:03 PM
Made a vichyssoise today, after that: duck breast, potato croquettes and warm apricots.

(https://up.picr.de/34481474fe.jpg)

Yeah, I love cordless ... even or especially in the kitchen ...
(https://up.picr.de/34481475yi.jpg)


(https://up.picr.de/34481476bq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34481477vt.jpg)



Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 03, 2018, 10:00 AM
Last night we made a ginger pork salad with ginger miso soup and some seasoned rice.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 07, 2018, 12:34 AM
Harkening back to the wild rice theme, took a photo of the current local prices for cultivated wild rice and naturally grown wild rice.

Hand harvested...$12
Cultivated...$7
Cultivated shards...$6

I know...this hurts if you're outside the local area.  [crying]

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on December 07, 2018, 12:42 AM
Oxtail bourguignon.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 07, 2018, 12:49 AM
And harkening back even further, here's the local selection of Akaushi beef. The rib eyes are to die for but the flank steak is the most tender and flavorful I've ever had. Also check out the marbling in the New York strips.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 07, 2018, 12:53 AM
Oxtail bourguignon.

Not a fan of ox tails but they do look good, the sauce looks very rich and concentrated.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 10, 2018, 12:03 PM
Hoisin Shrimp with Bok Choy, Shiitakes & Peppers:      Simple to make and delicious...healthy too. [cool]

Bok choy first.

[attachimg=1]

Add peppers.

[attachimg=2]

Add shiitakes.

[attachimg=3]

Drizzle on sauce and sesame oil.

[attachimg=4]

Roast @ 450º for 15 minutes.

[attachimg=5]

Add shrimp for additional 5 minutes.

[attachimg=6]

Plate over wide cellophane noodles, add sauce & some fresh basil.

[attachimg=7]


Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 10, 2018, 12:10 PM
That's an interesting cooking technique.  I'd normally think to always stir fry a dish like that.  Baking in the oven seems really easy and convenient.  I'd never have thought to bake it.

Saturday night we made Gamjatang (Korean Pork Neck Bone Soup).  Sunday morning my wife used the leftover rice to make a fried rice with XO sauce.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Gregor on December 10, 2018, 03:16 PM
Hoisin Shrimp ...healthy too.
Only when you skip the shrimp.
In case you want to stay blissful as you want to continue to eat them: don't research how they are farmed.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 11, 2018, 12:08 AM
Hoisin Shrimp ...healthy too.
Only when you skip the shrimp.
In case you want to stay blissful as you want to continue to eat them: don't research how they are farmed.

Yea, ain’t that the truth... [scared]

This reminds me of my first year in college when I needed to get a “good paying part time job” to help pay for the expenses. I hired on as a butcher and a smoker for a local sausage maker. One of the perks of the job was that every day I worked, I could go into the coolers and pick any meat product to cook for my dinner/lunch.

Unfortunately, after seeing how these ground meat products in casings were produced, I lost any interest in eating any of them.

It took 4-5 years after I quit before I mustered up the courage to actually, once again, eat a brat or a wiener.  Sometimes it’s just “too much information”.

50+ years later the single mention of “head cheese” still gives me the willy’s.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 15, 2018, 09:18 PM
Last Sunday we had a bit of a fail with what was supposed to be Hungarian Goulash with Spatzle and Braised Red Cabbage.  The braised red cabbage didn't make it as the cabbage got scourged somehow, the goulash was salty, and the spatzle didn't come out that nicely using a ricer (last time I squeezed it out of a ziploc and cut it with a knife).  It's a shame since the same meal was a real success back in April.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

Tuesday I may Fettucine Alfredo with chicken.

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

[attachimg=17]

[attachimg=18]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 15, 2018, 09:57 PM
This meal is totally out of my expertise, but I’d think @six-point socket II will weigh in and make some sense out of the mayhem.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 15, 2018, 10:15 PM
Here are the pictures from when we made it back in April.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

We used the same recipe for the goulash, but I don't remember what technique or recipe we used for the braised cabbage.  Neither of the 2 recipes for red cabbage that I had in my browser history look like what we used, at least from a recipe/technique perspective.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on December 16, 2018, 03:36 AM
Last Sunday we had a bit of a fail with what was supposed to be Hungarian Goulash with Spatzle and Braised Red Cabbage.  The braised red cabbage didn't make it as the cabbage got scourged somehow, the goulash was salty, and the spatzle didn't come out that nicely using a ricer (last time I squeezed it out of a ziploc and cut it with a knife).  It's a shame since the same meal was a real success back in April.

When we first married, my wife had not previously done a lot of cooking. But shows game to learn. The first few dishes she tried were German meals. She first tried making Goulash with Spatzle. I liked her result. We have  had variations of the meal over the years.

Next, she included kartuffleclaisse (sp?) with a meal. Those came out teriffic as far as I was concerned. She was not satisfied. "They didn't hold together" was her complaint. She has since learned how to get them to "hang together" as she wanted.  However, whatever she uses to get them to stay solid, as she expects, has  not anything towards improving flavor. They are still good, but not as great to my taste as her very first attempt.

She is still a good cook, but with just the two of us rattling around, she does not have the energy to prepare as she used to do. When we have company, that is her time to shine.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 16, 2018, 09:51 AM
I rather like the little bundled parcels of green onions floating around.  [smile]

I see the sriracha bottle, do you just add that to the soup like Tabasco?

Because of the browser issues you mention  and my poor memory  [eek] , that's the main reason I decided to go with the Paprika app. I can change quantities, ingredients, add notes, add photos, change serving size, pin different recipes to toggle between them while cooking  and everything is shared and updated between my laptop, iPhone & iPad.

When I go to the store a shopping list comes up on my iPhone. No more paper shopping lists or recipe adjustments scribbled on the back of an envelope.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 16, 2018, 01:56 PM
The little bundles make for easy removal.

Yup, you can squirt the sriracha directly into the broth.  Some people also like to squirt in Hoisin Sauce.  Others will have a small bowl and squirt in a mix of sriracha and hoisin to dip the meat into it.  I used to put sriracha into the pho broth, that is until I discovered the joy of sate (the chili and oil in the tall jar).  I still squirt sriracha into canned vegetable soup to kick it up a notch.

It's possible that I used a different computer to get the recipe.  We usually print of a hard copy of the recipe for easy reference when cooking.  I'll hand write notes and cross out anything that we omitted or changed.  Sometimes that paper gets wet or splattered and ends up getting trashed without permanently recording the edits that we made to the original recipe.

I do often think about the Paprika app, but the price kinda kills me especially since I think I need to pay for my phone, iPad, and computer separately?  I have started to put some stuff into Evernote, but I don't think it works that well for recipes (better for me for just general lists of things).

This morning we had more pho with some frozen spring rolls, vietnamese iced coffee and my wife had Banh Mi Op La (Vietnamese bread with a fried egg).

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 17, 2018, 09:48 AM
Last night we had sous vide ribeye steak, oven roasted asparagus, and Hasselbeck potatoes.  It was rainy outside so I used the Searzall to sear the steak inside without setting off the smoke detector.  I was cursing the Searzall (like I always do) the whole time.  It takes so long to get a mediocre sear at best even with MAP gas.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 17, 2018, 10:31 AM
Hi!

@Cheese not sure I can help, but I'll try. Thanks for "paging" me. :)

@GoingMyWay

Can you tell me what you mean by scourged in regard to the red cabbage? Maybe using another word? I haven't heard that word before, I looked it up in a dictionary and I can't get "whipping" / "plague" and red cabbage together  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Or was that just an auto-correct/typo and you meant scorched? That would make sense. :)

I can translate and post the recipe for red cabbage (with onions and apples) we use, if you like.

Spatzle, well - the dough is basically key, but I think a typical ricer's holes may be to small. We always scrape/shave them when we make them from scratch.

Here's a video (not ours) on how it is done: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azaxChFUAUc

(You could do that with Festool's putty knife ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] )

As usual, very great looking meals & dishes! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver



Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: zapdafish on December 17, 2018, 10:37 AM
Lol, are those balls of gluten? 


Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).


(http://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=56420.0;attach=288927;image)
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 17, 2018, 11:17 AM
Hi!

@Cheese not sure I can help, but I'll try. Thanks for "paging" me. :)

@GoingMyWay

Can you tell me what you mean by scourged in regard to the red cabbage? Maybe using another word? I haven't heard that word before, I looked it up in a dictionary and I can't get "whipping" / "plague" and red cabbage together  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Or was that just an auto-correct/typo and you meant scorched? That would make sense. :)

I can translate and post the recipe for red cabbage (with onions and apples) we use, if you like.

Spatzle, well - the dough is basically key, but I think a typical ricer's holes may be to small. We always scrape/shave them when we make them from scratch.

Here's a video (not ours) on how it is done: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azaxChFUAUc

(You could do that with Festool's putty knife ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] )

As usual, very great looking meals & dishes! Thanks for sharing!

Kind regards,
Oliver

Hi Oliver!

Yes you are correct - I meant to say scorched.  I try to proofread my posts before posting, but I guess I missed that one  :-[.  I think it might have been caused by the combination of factors.   I think I originally cooked in our le crueset dutch oven, whereas this time I used our chicken fryer skillet.  I think last time I also washed the cabbage so there was much more liquid in the pan.  This time I only added sugar and vinegar (along with butter) - I think the sugar is what really caused everything to burn.  Does braised cabbage traditionally have onion and apple in it?  I feel like whenever I've gotten it from a European restaurant it's just cabbage.  I suppose I might not have been able to taste an apple that had cooked down to basically nothing, but I'm pretty sure I would have been able to detect onion.

I think the holes in the ricer are about 1/4".  I think those were the largest holes that I could find in a ricer.  I bought it specifically for trying to press out noodles like this and also to make a Vietnamese rice flour noodle that's similar to udon.  I think the viscosity of the dough/batter really matters if you're going to try to squeeze it out.  Too thin and it just oozes, runs, drips through the holes on its own.  Too thick and it may not be possible to squeeze it through the holes.  The style of the spatzle in your video is interesting.  It's like a thin noodle.  I always thought spatzle was more like orecchiette shaped.  I guess there are different varieties of spatzle - kind like chicken and dumplings, some use a drop biscuit while other versions have more like a rolled and cut noodle.

Lol, are those balls of gluten? 


Tonight my wife made Vietnamese Beef Noodle Soup (pho).


(http://festoolownersgroup.com/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=56420.0;attach=288927;image)

Nope those are the pieces of cut up meatball with pieces of tendon in there for added texture.  This particular brand wasn't very good as the overall meatball was rather soft and mushy.  The colors also seems a little lighter than normal.  It's usually a little more firmer and chewy.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on December 17, 2018, 11:35 AM
quote >>>I guess there are different varieties of spatzle - kind like chicken and dumplings, some use a drop biscuit while other versions have more like a rolled and cut noodle. <<<

My wife's spatzle is more like the "rolled and cut noodle."
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 17, 2018, 11:54 AM
I do often think about the Paprika app, but the price kinda kills me especially since I think I need to pay for my phone, iPad, and computer separately?  I have started to put some stuff into Evernote, but I don't think it works that well for recipes (better for me for just general lists of things).

This morning we had more pho with some frozen spring rolls, vietnamese iced coffee and my wife had Banh Mi Op La (Vietnamese bread with a fried egg).

I believe the Paprika app is $5 and the same app can be used on both the iPhone & iPad. That's how I started out. The iPad for cooking meals because it's easier to read and the iPhone for the shopping list. Try it on your iPhone and see how you like it. It's only a $5 hit if it doesn't work for you. [smile]

Then after about a year I decided to add the MacBook to the list. That's a $25 hit. The lap top is nice to easily add original home brewed recipes because of the keyboard.

The Vietnamese iced coffee looks delicious...
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 17, 2018, 12:04 PM
Oh.  The problem is I have an Android Phone and iPad plus a Macbook and Windows desktop and Window laptop.

I bought the frozen version of the iced coffee from Lees.  I think they're fairly popular on the West Coast.

[attachimg=1]

It's pretty expensive (I wanna say like $40 for 6 bottles), but it really is the best in my opinion.  The iced coffee can be hit or miss at a lot of Vietnamese restaurants - too strong, too bitter, too sweet.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 17, 2018, 03:22 PM
It didn't seem like a lot of people drink Coors Light, but I thought I'd throw out this PSA anyway.  Evidently there is a known issue with Coors Light cans not opening properly.

This last 24 pack had several cans that failed to pop open.  Sadly I lost these 2 cans as I didn't have anything to open it with.

[attachimg=1]

I think I've lost 3-4 cans in total that I wasn't able to open.  There have been many many more that required using the end of a butter knife to pop open.  Pretty annoying!

I finally noticed there was a pattern of the cans not opening so I called MolsonCoors this morning to report/complain.  They acknowledged there is a problem with some of their distributors and they are collecting the information off of the cans to help identify batches/distributors that have problems.  I gave them the information (I never realized there were so many different numeric codes on the can before!) off of one of my defective cans and they're going to send me a check for the trouble.

I just thought I'd share this with in case anyone else runs into a similar experience.  You should report it and hopefully get a little money back for the inconvenience.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 25, 2018, 09:08 PM
For Christmas dinner I made rotisserie reverse seared prime rib with baked potatoes, corn, asparagus, popovers, and spinach salad from Costco.

We had frozen cherry pie ala mode for dessert.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

Merry Christmas everyone!

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 27, 2018, 02:14 PM
Hi!

Christmas eve. Traditionally we had oxtail soup and smoked fish with bread. (Eel, salmon (different types), trout)

(https://up.picr.de/34687540va.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687539no.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687541bi.jpg)

Christmas.

Traditionally we would have made venison filet, lukewarm pears with cranberries and potato croquettes. The truth: We couldn't stand it anymore. Year after year, and our source for really good venison filet vanished a couple of years ago ... So what else?

We thought of a dish my grandmother loved and made for special occasions: Sole - Norman style. The recipe was found in her old cook book and off we went.

Preparing the duchess potatoes: (We did this in advance and kept them in the freezer until needed)

(https://up.picr.de/34687536pa.jpg)

Sole, Norman style.

(https://up.picr.de/34687542gp.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687545og.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687547ds.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687548wn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687550lu.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687551av.jpg)

Starter: Carpaccio.

(https://up.picr.de/34687549gt.jpg)

Sole, Norman style.

(https://up.picr.de/34687553no.jpg)

2nd Christmas Day - Main course: Duck filled with apples and oranges, red cabbage (with apples and onions) and bread dumplings. Starter: Scampi with puff pastry and mushroom/shallots cream sauce.

(https://up.picr.de/34687554rg.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687556vo.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687558zs.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687560qp.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687563mi.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687565sy.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687567sm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687571ut.jpg)

Starter.

(https://up.picr.de/34687569ah.jpg)

Main course.

(https://up.picr.de/34687574el.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34687576ta.jpg)

We drank mostly white wines: German pinot blanc (Palatinate) Weißburgunder No.1 2017 Dr. Deinhard (steel tank fermentation division of Von Winning Winery)  on Christmas eve, Ravenswood (California) Chardonnay 2016 Vintners Blend on Christmas Day and Georg Mosbacher Riesling (Palatinate) on 2nd Christmas Day.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 29, 2018, 03:47 PM
Everyday I'm pestling ... ;) ;) ;)

Preparation of the goose legs - for confit goose legs. These will marinade over night, go into the oven tomorrow (Sunday) for 8 hrs at 80° C (completely covered in sunflower oil) - after cooling down enough they go into the fridge until Monday, New Years Eve. Then they will be carefully heated, and then grilled.

(https://up.picr.de/34704769kk.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34704782sy.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34704793ja.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 30, 2018, 08:18 AM
Hi Oliver,

You had quite a feast for Christmas, looked amazing!

Do you usually eat Goose for New Year's Eve?

Do other people have any New Year's Eve/Day food traditions?  We don't, but we usually try to eat something "fancy" on New Year's Eve.  I reckon you're actually supposed to be eating the "special food" on New Year's Day itself if you expect to have good luck or prosperity for the rest of the year.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 30, 2018, 09:24 AM
Thanks! :)

Usually we would do Fondue or Swiss Raclette (Big block of Swiss cheese in a special holder with heat source and then scrape the molten cheese ...) Personally I'm not exactly a big fan of Raclette, and always the same setup for Fondue gets old too ...

So we decided to make the goose legs, it's been some time since the last time.

Honestly, the freezer is stocked with "good stuff" - so we will find something for New Years Day as well - don't ask me right now what it will be. lol. ;) The more I think of it, maybe venison ragout ...

New Years Eve will be relaxing. We will read, plan a renovation project further, listen to music ... at some point we eat ... listen to some more music and at midnight we'll clink glasses with some Champagne - go outside, greet some neighbors maybe, (maybe because it's highly likely that our direct neighbors are visiting their friends/families as they did the last couple of years) so we'll go a couple of houses down the road, watch a couple of people going crazy with fireworks painting beautiful effects in the sky ;).

We return, I will stay up a little longer and watch a James Bond movie while smoking a cigar and emptying that bottle of Champagne. ... When I finished the movie, I grab my Surefire from my pocket and go all the way around the house(s) into the backyard and back - to make sure theres no fire caused by some fireworks on sheds, waste bins i.e. By then it will be around 2:30/3:00 AM and I fall into bed.

We have breakfast at +- 10:00 AM on New Years Day and it will be just as relaxing + some cooking. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on December 30, 2018, 10:40 AM
Man oh man...you guy's have been busy cooking. [smile]

The sole Norman style and the duchess potatoes look great. So does the scampi with the shallot, mushroom cream sauce. I'm familiar with the Ravenswood chard as my wife loves chards of all styles.

And then there's the prime rib with the cherry pie...yum, yum. The last time I cooked prime rib for Christmas, the 13 year old grandson refused to eat it and wanted a peanut butter sandwich instead.  [eek]

Better yet, when I directed him to the loaf of French bread and the fresh peanut butter kept in the fridge, he informed me he liked "regular" white bread with Skippy peanut butter.

Hmmmmm, a 13 year old gourmet chef in the offing.  [big grin]

A New Years eve tradition for us is surf and turf. Something you wouldn't normally eat. Originally it was lobster and tenderloin, then it segued to large U10 sea scallops and tenderloin. Currently we've been at the crab legs and tenderloin stage for the last several years. As far as a vegetable and salad go, it's whatever sounds good at the time.

Thinking ahead, this year maybe just a caesar salad and green beans with lemon & thyme.   [smile]
 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on December 30, 2018, 04:15 PM
Advertisement (Due to visible Klein Tools ...)

Roughly one hour in ...

(https://up.picr.de/34717443zg.jpg)

After 8 hrs. :) Now cooling down, then fridge - and tomorrow: tempering + grill.

(https://up.picr.de/34717444ll.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34717445gj.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Akaushi Tenderloin with your choice of a vegetable.
Post by: Cheese on December 30, 2018, 11:08 PM
So the latest is “Hers” with green beans at the medium level.

And “His” with baked potatoes at the medium rare level.

The interesting thing is that all of these carmelizeing marks are produced with a Le Creuset cast iron grill pan on a gas range.

Looks good...tastes good.

Not the same as being grilled, but better than being boiled.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on December 31, 2018, 11:56 AM
Not the same as being grilled, but better than being boiled.  [big grin]

That looked good!

How about "boil in bag" as my friend refers to sous vide cooking  8)?

Last night I tried making Neapolitan style pizza. I made 1 pizza in a 550 degree oven on a pizza stone and I tried 1 pizza on a pizza stone on the grill. I'd say the grill was a complete fail. The one made inside the oven turned out very well.

I heated the grill pizza stone directly over the vortex. That got the pizza stone surface above 716 degrees (max temperature on my infrared thermometer).  What I completely neglected to think about was the ambient temperature in the rest of the grill.   It wasn't nearly hot enough and that resulted in the bottom being completely scorched on the bottom and the top being very pale so we put it back into the oven to brown the top a little more.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]


Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on December 31, 2018, 07:35 PM
I have never had success with pizza on the grill using a stone.  Even when using my Bubba Keg (poor man's version of an egg).  For grilled pizza I use basically this recipe and technique:  https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/ (https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/)

For pizza in the oven I use Chef John's Wolfgang Puck recipe that I think was referenced here before.  We don't get as perfect a crust but we prefer more sauce and MORE CHEESE.  And other stuff.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on January 01, 2019, 09:42 AM
Happy New Year everyone! :)

Your pizza looks fantastic @GoingMyWay !!

--

Starter: Escargot, main course: confit Goose legs with potato croquettes and baked apples/oranges  + cranberries

(https://up.picr.de/34731231zf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34731232bt.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34731233gv.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 01, 2019, 09:58 AM
I have never had success with pizza on the grill using a stone.  Even when using my Bubba Keg (poor man's version of an egg).  For grilled pizza I use basically this recipe and technique:  https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/ (https://barbecuebible.com/recipe/grilled-pizza/)

For pizza in the oven I use Chef John's Wolfgang Puck recipe that I think was referenced here before.  We don't get as perfect a crust but we prefer more sauce and MORE CHEESE.  And other stuff.

Peter

DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off).  Good thing I didn't also buy another pizza stone I saw on Amazon.

I hear that the Kettle Pizza (https://www.kettlepizza.com/) is supposed to get you pretty close to a wood fired brick pizza oven, but the cost is a little high and it's also kind of a big contraption that won't get very much use.

We had used America's Test Kitchens's pizza recipe before for cooking in the oven.  We found that it was just best as cheese pizza because the toppings tended to just ooze out water and then the top wouldn't really cook properly.

Your pizza looks fantastic @GoingMyWay !!

Thanks Oliver!  The crust came out nice and chewy!

Your escargot look great.  You even have the shell holder and the little fork!

Last night my wife made nabeyaki udon and buffalo and fish sauce wings.  We made peach cobbler for dessert and rang in the New Year with some Champagne from Costco.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

Happy New Year!!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on January 01, 2019, 11:13 AM
DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off). 

I have an All Clad pizza stone that I use in the oven year round. After a year or so of usage it collects bits of cheese, olive oil, pepperoni grease, tomato sauce, corn meal...you name it. It all gets baked into a nasty hard mass on the soapstone. I just pull out a Festool sander and place 60/80/100 grit Granat on it and sand the stuff off. It usually takes 2 pieces of Granat to remove all the gunk. It works well. [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on January 01, 2019, 02:22 PM
And todays dinner on New Years Day. :smile:

French/ Parisian onion soup

(https://up.picr.de/34734229sg.jpg)

Venison ragout on Spätzle

(https://up.picr.de/34734233cd.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/34734237qv.jpg)

Jelly roll.

(https://up.picr.de/34734242xe.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 02, 2019, 10:04 AM
Last night, for New Year's Day we made black eyed peas with collard greens and corn bread.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 03, 2019, 06:35 PM
DOH!  I wish I had thought things through a little longer before I bought the Weber pizza stone.  Oh well, I guess I can also use it in the oven (assuming I can scrape all the burnt stuff off). 

I have an All Clad pizza stone that I use in the oven year round. After a year or so of usage it collects bits of cheese, olive oil, pepperoni grease, tomato sauce, corn meal...you name it. It all gets baked into a nasty hard mass on the soapstone. I just pull out a Festool sander and place 60/80/100 grit Granat on it and sand the stuff off. It usually takes 2 pieces of Granat to remove all the gunk. It works well. [big grin]

I believe the Weber pizza stone is made out of cordierite stone.  I wonder if that can also be sanded with Granat.  When you say it usually takes 2 pieces of Granat, do you mean 2 different grits or you actually have to change the paper because it's clogged?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on January 03, 2019, 09:51 PM
When you say it usually takes 2 pieces of Granat, do you mean 2 different grits or you actually have to change the paper because it's clogged?

The grunge on the pizza stone plugs up the sandpaper pretty quickly. That’s the reason I went from a 2-3 year maintenance schedule to a yearly schedule.  Try using 80 grit and then go from there.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 05, 2019, 10:12 PM
Oooh.  I'm still kinda scared to take a power sander to a pizza stone.  For now, I just scraped the one we keep in the oven with a cooking bench scraper.  Even just the bench scraper seemed to take some of the top finish off. especially at the edge.  Maybe I can try the Weber pizza stone since that's practically brand new, I have no "attachment" to it.

Tonight we made spaghetti and meatballs with "house salad."

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

P.S. I downloaded and bought the Desktop and Android version of the Paprika App.  It is pretty slick, especially the recipe scaling.  Now, hopefully I'll input all the printed out recipes we have laying around (including handwritten modifications)!!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on January 06, 2019, 09:14 AM
Oooh.  I'm still kinda scared to take a power sander to a pizza stone.  For now, I just scraped the one we keep in the oven with a cooking bench scraper.  Even just the bench scraper seemed to take some of the top finish off. especially at the edge. 

P.S. I downloaded and bought the Desktop and Android version of the Paprika App.  It is pretty slick, especially the recipe scaling.  Now, hopefully I'll input all the printed out recipes we have laying around (including handwritten modifications)!!

I'm curious what type of finish is on the stone, is it an anti-stick? The stones I'm familiar with are just plain.

Paprika:
The recipe scaling is really slick. I also like the pin feature. I've pinned 3 recipes at once and can just flip flop between the 3 as I'm cooking different courses.

Remember you can also add multiple photos to a single recipe. So if I'm cooking something in layers, think a layered pasta dish, I can take a photo of each layer and add them to the recipe while still keeping the finished food item as the main photo.

Keep up your enthusiastic attitude towards adding printed recipes to Paprika...It's been 3-4 years for me and I'm still finding scraps of paper around the house with recipes/directions/corrections scribbled on them.  [big grin]

Beef, pork & veal for the meatballs?

Can you believe that I've only made home made meatballs 3 or 4 times...EVER!!  They're so delicious but they just take so long. I have 2 Italian neighbors, one from Rome & one from Brooklyn. In the summer I can always tell when they're making meatballs. That wonderful aroma starts around 10:00 AM and doesn't quit until 6:00 or 7:00.

The salad makes me hungry even at 7:30 AM.  [tongue]  The colors really pop. [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 06, 2019, 02:39 PM
Maybe it's actually not a finish at all.  The top surface of the pizza stone was kind yellowish before.  Right after I ran the bench scraper over the surface I saw some chips of the yellow surface had come off revealing "white" stone underneath.  I just checked again today and now it doesn't look so bad.  Maybe the coloring I'm seeing is more or less from the stone oxidizing in the air?  It might be a little hard to see in this picture, but today everything looks to be the same color again.

[attach=1]

Adding photos would be super helpful and useful.  It would almost become like a personal cookbook.  Only thing is that I'm too lazy to go back in to upload/attach the photos to the recipe after the fact.  This is despite the fact that I take pictures of all the food we cook and eat.

I know the feeling of finding recipes that were jotted down.  The worst part is is that I can't read my own handwriting half the time.

Yup, 1.5 lbs of ground beef, .5 lbs of ground pork, and .5 lbs of ground veal.  In the past I've just bought the prepackaged meatball/meatloaf mix since it's super convenient, but I think those are usually equal parts of each meat (that's what the store had yesterday anyway).  This time I wanted to get the "correct" ratio so I bought 3 separate packages and weighed and mixed it myself.

I haven't made meatballs that often either.  Last attempt I sous vide them and they turned out terribly!!  They were way too soft (which is supposed to be one of the "desirable" reasons to cook them sous vide.  I have to say that these meatballs turned out really well.  Frying them basically one by one in oil was a little tedious, but worth it I think.  I think the 1/2 cup of grated pecorino romano cheese inside really made it.  I bought a $10 jar of italian marinara sauce to cook the meatballs in since I didn't have time to make a marinara sauce at the same time as the meatballs.  I liked the sauce but was kinda floored at the cost - $10 for a regular jar.  Last night I used 2 28 ounce cans of whole san marzano tomatoes to make a homemade marinara.  It cooked for 4 hours and yielded probably the same amount of sauce as the $10 jar.  I think each can of tomatoes was about $5 so it basically ended up costing more than the store bought sauce when I figure the time and the gas used to cook it!  Here are some pictures of the homemade marinara sauce.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

The salad was pretty good too - only problem was it was a little too salty.  I think it might have been that the canned olives were very salty and/or also that the lemon pepper had salt in it too.  I'm not sure if lemon pepper normally also has salt.  The lemon pepper we had might have also had salt as it was sold as "lemon pepper seasoning" and not just lemon pepper.  I'll know for next time though.  My wife really wanted to add cucumbers to the salad, but that wasn't in the original recipe that I was using so I wanted to try to stay true to the recipe at least for the first go around.  Next time cucumbers would be good in there.  I'd also really like to add in some strips of yellow and red bell pepper.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 06, 2019, 08:27 PM
Back by popular demand is pizza for dinner tonight.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

I try not to re-post a meal that we've already had, but we had some lessons learned from last week's pizza making exercise:

Make double the amount of dough and freeze the extra.
Don't try to stretch the middle of the dough too much at first.
Put the pizza stone on the top rack of the lower oven instead of the top rack of the upper oven.
Don't put too much sauce.
Sauce closer to the edge.
Don't make the pizza too far ahead of putting into the oven.
Parmigiano Reggiano cheese tastes better than pre-grated pecorino romano cheese.

Title: Re: What's Cooking: Duxelles Pizza with Arugula & Balsamic Reduction
Post by: Cheese on January 07, 2019, 11:05 AM
I bought a $10 jar of italian marinara sauce to cook the meatballs in since I didn't have time to make a marinara sauce at the same time as the meatballs.  I liked the sauce but was kinda floored at the cost - $10 for a regular jar.  Last night I used 2 28 ounce cans of whole san marzano tomatoes to make a homemade marinara.  It cooked for 4 hours and yielded probably the same amount of sauce as the $10 jar.

That's funny...I've done/thought the same thing.  [smile]

How did the home made sauce compare flavor-wise to the $10 jarred sauce? 

I also made pizza last night.  [big grin]

I made a "Duxelles Pizza with Arugula and Peach Balsamic Reduction"  It was absolutely delicious!!! It's now on the list of keepers.  [cool]

As I mentioned yesterday, this is one of those dishes that I like to take pictures of each stage, so when I make this again in a few months, I'll more easily remember how it was done. Easier and faster to just look at the photos than read the text.

I'll enter all these photos into Paprika but use the final photo as the recipe photo.

Home made crust with the duxelles slathered across the surface.

[attachimg=1]

Fresh mozzarella sprinkled on the duxelles

[attachimg=2]

A blend of mushrooms placed over the mozzarella

[attachimg=3]

The cooked pizza is pulled from the oven and...

[attachimg=4]

the arugula and balsamic reduction is added.

[attachimg=5]


Then it's sliced & served. Like I said, it was delicious. Next time I'll give it a minute or two longer so that the crust crisps up a bit more.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 09, 2019, 09:38 AM
How did the home made sauce compare flavor-wise to the $10 jarred sauce? 

I also made pizza last night.  [big grin]

I made a "Duxelles Pizza with Arugula and Peach Balsamic Reduction"  It was absolutely delicious!!! It's now on the list of keepers.  [cool]

As I mentioned yesterday, this is one of those dishes that I like to take pictures of each stage, so when I make this again in a few months, I'll more easily remember how it was done. Easier and faster to just look at the photos than read the text.

I'll enter all these photos into Paprika but use the final photo as the recipe photo.

I actually think the store bought sauce was slightly better than the homemade, though I think that's mainly because I didn't add enough salt to our sauce and maybe reduced it down a little too much.

Wow we both made pizza on the same night!  That looks really good.  I never really would have thought of using a duxelle of mushrooms in lieu of tomato sauce.  A balsamic vinegar reduction would go great with the arugula.  I wish I had thought to do that on our pizza.

Adding the step by step pictures along the way is great.  As I was saying, I'm probably too lazy to upload them after the fact.  I also sometimes forget to take a picture of a step when I get in a hurry and/or my hands are messy and don't want to touch my phone.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 14, 2019, 10:18 AM
I forgot to upload the mozzarella and Tawainese spinach omelet that I made last week using the leftover spinach from the udon and the cheese from the pizza.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

Saturday night we made a take on Olive Garden's Zuppa Tuscano.

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

Sunday we had a snow day.  We had dried scallop congee for brunch.

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

Dinner was an indoor picnic of sorts. Hot dogs with homemade coleslaw,  2 kinds of potato salad - trying to recreate my grandpa's recipe and a korean version, and Boston baked beans. This is my first time ever trying to make coleslaw and mayo based potato salad.

[attachimg=14]

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

[attachimg=17]

[attachimg=18]

[attachimg=19]

[attachimg=20]

[attachimg=21]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 20, 2019, 10:21 AM
I made chicken ala king last night. It was my first time ever making it and it turned out pretty good. Tasted like Stouffers, but better. 
The seared chicken ended up being a little rubbery so I think I might cook it differently next time.  I'd also use chopped pimentos instead of sliced pimentos.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

Yesterday was National Popcorn Day so we had popcorn and a root beer float for dessert.

[attachimg=12]

We also made the oven roux for tonight's seafood gumbo.

[attachimg=13]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 22, 2019, 11:15 AM
Sunday night we made seafood gumbo.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on January 22, 2019, 12:55 PM
Looks good...I need to do this. [big grin] Haven't cooked this in a while.  [sad]   I'll usually cook a crawfish jambalaya instead because it's quicker.

I see the Trinity with some garlic.

I don't see the Andouille.

Frozen okra, how's the flavor?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 22, 2019, 01:15 PM
Do you use frozen crawfish tails?  Yes, it is a rather time consuming endeavor to make the gumbo.  At least we have 2 more batches of the roux frozen for next time.

Our version of gumbo is likely to be considered not real gumbo by aficionados.  We're breaking all kinds of laws, including putting in tomatoes [oops].

Yup, Trinity with a little bit of garlic.

We don't put Andouille sausage in this recipe.  I can't remember if the original recipe called for Andouille or not, but we have trouble finding an authentic Andouille around here, so I think that might be why I removed it from the recipe.  I ordered some frozen crawfish tails, frozen gator tail meat, and Andouille sausage last February, just before Fat Tuesday from www.lawcrawfish.com.  I think we still have 1 package of the Andouille sausage left.  I'm saving that to make chicken and Andouille jambalaya again.  I'm gonna need to reorder from them again soon! 

The original recipe also called for oysters and I think some other kind of seafood, which I also omitted because it may be difficult to acquire and it would also increase the total cost of the dish.

The frozen okra is ok I guess.  It still imparts its sliminess.  We have used fresh okra in the past and I guess it is slightly more slimier, but not a world of difference to me.  It's cooked for 1 hour so it basically cooked down to nothing.  Fresh okra is sometimes hard to find locally also and sometimes it can be pricey.  The frozen okra is easy and it's already sliced so I can just dump 2 bags in.  Plus it's a standard measurement.  Often the store sells the okra prepackaged so it can make it difficult to get just the right amount that we need.  One of my pet peeves with recipes is when they call for like "2.5 cups of chopped bell peppers or 1/2 cup of chopped onion."  I don't know how many peppers chopped up will yield 2.5 cups so I change the recipe to call for "4 bell peppers" or "6 stalks of celery" or "1 20oz can of whole peaches" units of measure that make sense to me.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: ctfeet on January 22, 2019, 01:29 PM
Maybe this is way off base and most people are not at all interested. But I thought I'd give it a go.

Being a foodie and someone who likes to cook (I like to think that I'm a better cook than a woodworker), I thought it might be a nice to start a thread of people showing what they've been cooking.

Last night we made sous vide duck breast with broad bean tips, leftover scalloped potatoes, and jasmine rice:


I've done some sous vide cooking myself and I love it, but my searing NEVER comes out that good! How do you sear your food? Do you a torch, pan or grill?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on January 22, 2019, 01:54 PM
One of my pet peeves with recipes is when they call for like "2.5 cups of chopped bell peppers or 1/2 cup of chopped onion."  I don't know how many peppers chopped up will yield 2.5 cups so I change the recipe to call for "4 bell peppers" or "6 stalks of celery" or "1 20oz can of whole peaches" units of measure that make sense to me.

Yes I purchase frozen crawfish from Coastal Seafood. There's one right up the street so I can walk the 2 dogs and purchase the mud-bugs at the same time.  Multi-tasking at its best.  [smile]

I also have a difficult time finding good Andouille.  [sad]  Some of it just tastes like pork sausage run amok.

Fresh oysters around here are $2 each, so adding fresh oysters bumps up the grocery tab significantly. Especially for a dish that was basically meant to be a "use what you have on hand" dish.

I've used fresh okra but it's never available locally until the fall. I'll check out the frozen variant. It's really just used as a thickener?

I share your pain with the measurement conundrum. I'm cooking Ore House Stew today and they want me to add 5 cups of cubed stew meat...what the HEY?  Why not just say 2 1/2 #?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 22, 2019, 03:30 PM
I've done some sous vide cooking myself and I love it, but my searing NEVER comes out that good! How do you sear your food? Do you a torch, pan or grill?

@ctfeet  I've tried all 3 methods: torch, pan, and grill.  I never really had any luck with the torch.  I've tried using propane and MAPP gas, with and without the Searzall attachement and it was just soooo slow.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

I was using the TS4000 burner tip so that might account for part of the problem.  I just recently bought the TS8000 burner, which is supposed to have a much better output than the TS4000.  I'm going to try that on International Sous Vide day, which is coming up on January 26.  I would like to have a good method for searing without needing to normally go outside because otherwise the house fills with smoke.

Using a cast iron pan is my favorite way of searing something that has been cooked sous vide.  For steaks, I go outside and place my cast iron skillet (filled with some avocado oil because of its high smoke point) either directly over my Vortex grill accessory, or more conveniently I'll use my Iwatani butane stove and crank the heat until the pan reaches about 500 degrees.  Then I'll sear the steak on each side for about 1.5-2 minutes.  That really develops a nice crust.

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

I've also tried place the cast iron over the chimney and over the charcoal baskets .

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

I actually cooked the duck breasts inside in a stainless steel skillet.

[attachimg=14]

I didn't crank the heat that high because I don't want the whole house to get all smokey, but also because I want to try to render some of the fat from the duck breast.  I don't remember the exact cooking time, but I think I preheated some canola oil in the pan and then seared over medium high heat for 3-5 minutes.  The duck breast had been cooked at 135 degrees.  I cook my steaks at 124 degrees, which I think helps the meat tolerate the longer and higher heat searing outside without being overcooked.  I  have ended up overcooking a steak slightly (gray branding below the crust) when using a torch because of the intense concentrated heat from the flame.

Grilling looks nice from an appearance perspective, but the grill marks are really just parts of the meat that burnt from contact with the grill grate.  I only have a charcoal grill so the standard thin grill grates don't make the best grill marks.  If I want really awesome looking grill marks I'll use my GrillGrates over my Slow N Sear.  That only takes about 1 or 1.5 minutes per side, including turning the steak 45 degrees to get that diamond pattern.  As nice as the diamond grills marks look, I'd still rather have a nice all over sear in oil.

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

[attachimg=17]

[attachimg=18]

[attachimg=19]

I've also tried grilling over the coals in the charcoal basket and directly over the chimney.  In both cases I found the steak just burned too much.

[attachimg=20]

[attachimg=21]

[attachimg=22]

[attachimg=23]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 22, 2019, 03:55 PM
Yes I purchase frozen crawfish from Coastal Seafood. There's one right up the street so I can walk the 2 dogs and purchase the mud-bugs at the same time.  Multi-tasking at its best.  [smile]

I also have a difficult time finding good Andouille.  [sad]  Some of it just tastes like pork sausage run amok.

Fresh oysters around here are $2 each, so adding fresh oysters bumps up the grocery tab significantly. Especially for a dish that was basically meant to be a "use what you have on hand" dish.

I've used fresh okra but it's never available locally until the fall. I'll check out the frozen variant. It's really just used as a thickener?

I share your pain with the measurement conundrum. I'm cooking Ore House Stew today and they want me to add 5 cups of cubed stew meat...what the HEY?  Why not just say 2 1/2 #?

Do they let your dogs inside or do they have to wait outside?

Yup, worse yet I've seen some Andouille with chicken, that's definitely not right!

I saw a pint of "extra small oysters" at Costco yesterday for $7.99.  That sounds like a pretty reasonable price.  I'm not sure how much it is at the asian supermarket where we usually shop.  It is annoying to have to go to Costco to get one or 2 ingredients to make a recipe though.  Another reason we omitted the oysters is that I often find they are gritty, and I'm always the first one to cry when I find grit in my shrimp, clam, oyster, etc.  We did remind ourselves that this is "seafood gumbo."  A chicken and Andouille gumbo would probably be considerably cheaper to make.  Out of curiosity I added up the approximate cost of the seafood gumbo.  It was about $38.58 before tax.  That's enough for 3 meals for 2 people each meal so the final cost per person is less than $7 per person per meal.  That's really not bad - I often feel like there are times when it's really cheaper to eat out than cooking at home.

Maybe it's not quite as good of a thickener as fresh okra, but pretty close.  It's a little hard to say as our gumbo is rather thin to begin with.  I was considering reducing the amount of shrimp stock by 2 cups to make it a little thicker, but my wife said she likes it the consistency that we have.

I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one with the measurement conundrum.  Sometimes unless you go to an actual butcher it's hard to get "2lbs of ground beef" or whatever.  In those cases, I'll modify the recipe to just say the "large or family size pack of ground beef" since I'm usually at the mercy of whatever is prepackaged.  I think the original recipe for the zuppa tuscano we made the other day called for "an 8 ounce can of chicken broth."  Someone in the comments felt our pain and asked who even sells chicken broth in an 8 ounce can.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on January 29, 2019, 05:51 PM
Saturday was the 2nd annual International Sous Vide day (when I first mentioned it the other day I didn't realize it was a relatively new anniversary date).

I made the so called "perfect" 63 degree egg for breakfast.  The egg is cooked at 63.2 degree C for 45 minutes.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

For dinner we had sous vide steak with sous vide potatoes. I put in too much kosher salt so they ended up too salty. The potato flavor was also rather intense, in this case that wasn't really a good thing for me (tasted very "earthy").

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]


I finished the steak using the Searzall with my newly acquired TS8000 tip. I think the Searzall was more efficient and faster with the TS8000 tip. I still think cast iron is the best way to finish a sous vide steak.

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

For dessert I made sous vide creme brulee. I first tried to torch the sugar with the Searzall, but I think it didn't work very well because I couldn't get the flame close enough to the sugar. I switched to a cheaper propane tip with the flame turned way down.

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on February 04, 2019, 03:14 PM
On Saturday night, we made california rolls, which I've already shown pictures of.  We found some hamachi kama (yellowtail collar) at the asian market.  I roasted them in the oven and served them with some ponzu soy sauce.

[attachimg=1]

Last night I made a salt and pepper roast chicken from a NY Times recipe.  I bought an expensive organic air chilled chicken from Whole Foods thinking it was going to taste like the best chicken ever - it tasted like any other regular chicken that I've bought.  I'm pretty disappointed with the recipe.  I seasoned the outside and inside of the chicken with 2 1/2 tsp of sea salt and 2 tsp of pepper about 6 hours before cooking,  but the bird still came out under seasoned.  I wonder if dry brining over night would have make a difference. The chicken baked at 450 degrees, which resulted in a very smokey oven.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on February 06, 2019, 09:07 PM
 
 OK,  an admittedly dumb question. But here goes. What is the real deal difference between cooking  something in a slow cooker and cooking sous-vide?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on February 06, 2019, 09:16 PM
The French term sous vide translates to under vacuum.  By using a sous vide cooker with a bagged item that has minimal air in the bag you allow heat transfer to all outside areas of the item being cooked at the same rate (slow) without creating areas that cook slower or faster.  Just like someone could be cooked in a hot tub.  It will be enjoyable for a while, but over time  [eek]

Sous vide cookers are precise.  Slow cookers are not.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: SRSemenza on February 06, 2019, 09:42 PM
In addition ^^^^

      It has a different cooking effect than a slow cooker. You will get less of a caramelized blending of flavors with sous vide than a slow cooker.

     Slow cooker is great for stew.

     Sous vide is great for proteins that you want cooked but to have an almost uncooked result. Sous vide tends to preserve the natural food state better than a slow cooker.

    Hard to describe but that is probably sort of close.

Seth
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 07, 2019, 01:05 AM
A slow cooker is great for...think about it...it’s coming up... corned beef for March 17th.

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

Some people have bragged about baking a cake in a slow cooker...but that’s certainly not my thing.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on February 07, 2019, 02:57 AM

(...)

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

(...)

Someone called my name?

From a couple of days ago.

(https://up.picr.de/35016209ez.jpg)


And a visit to our favorite "every day" casual restaurant.

(https://up.picr.de/35016210mj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/35016211rk.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/35016212hx.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/35016213om.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/35016214be.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 07, 2019, 12:55 PM

Someone called my name?


 [smile]

Hey Oliver, the 3rd photo is salmon and what kind of sauce?

And the fish dish in the 5th photo, what different fish have been plated up?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on February 07, 2019, 02:11 PM
Hi Cheese,

The Sauce is a Honey-Dill-Mustard Sauce.

Fish was: Angler-Fish, Sole, Gilthead, Catfish and a Scampi.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on February 07, 2019, 05:38 PM
A slow cooker is great for...think about it...it’s coming up... corned beef for March 17th.

They’re also good for stews, chili’s and my fav...beef bourguignon. Anything that needs to “stew in it’s own juices” is a good candidate.

Some people have bragged about baking a cake in a slow cooker...but that’s certainly not my thing.

Just as as side note to this, Corned Beef can be made sous vide.  Here is a great link for those who like the science of it all (it does take longer than in a crock pot slow cooker BUT you can select the doneness you desire):  https://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/how-to-make-corned-beef-st-patricks-day-simmering-brisket-meat-the-food-lab.html (https://www.seriouseats.com/2011/03/how-to-make-corned-beef-st-patricks-day-simmering-brisket-meat-the-food-lab.html)

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 07, 2019, 10:59 PM

The Sauce is a Honey-Dill-Mustard Sauce.

Fish was: Angler-Fish, Sole, Gilthead, Catfish and a Scampi.


Thanks Oliver, it's always interesting to experience different cuisines from different worlds.  [big grin] The green sauce contrasts nicely with the salmon.  [smile] Looks delicious. I wonder what gives it the green color? Parsley possibly?

That looked like raw salmon or is it a ceviche? Producing a ceviche has been on my priority list for the last 4-5 years now.  [tongue]

Angler-fish & gilt head...I'm unfamiliar with both.  [tongue]
Title: Re: What's Cooking: St. Patty's Day
Post by: Cheese on February 08, 2019, 12:10 AM
Just as an aside to this, Corned Beef can be made sous vide.  Here is a great link for those who like the science of it all (it does take longer than in a crock pot slow cooker BUT you can select the doneness you desire): 

Great article Peter...I haven't finished reading it yet because of all the side ways elements contained within, but I will.  [smile]

My ears really perked up with the reference to Jewish and Irish families living side by side because that's also been my experience.  [big grin]

I'll also throw the Italians into that mix because that was the way it was locally 80-90 years ago...a true melting pot. [thumbs up]

That's the Essence (thank you Emeril) that's made us such a great country.

Different thoughts...different methods...but the same final product/goal.

Rather like this conversation as a matter of fact.  [smile]

So, speaking about corned beef and March 17th...can you tell that I'm Irish?

My biggest St. Patties no-no is to take the cabbage, carrots & potatoes and throw them into the corned beef. I did that for years, and I hated the results for years until I decided to just think through the situation.

Corned beef in a slow cooker (or any cooker for that matter) renders the fat from the meat very slowly over hours of time. Where does that fat gravitate to?...the vegetables. So if you want your cabbage to be greasy & taste like corned beef, if you want your carrots to be greasy and taste like corned beef and if you want your potatoes to be greasy and taste like corned beef, then by all means, just throw them in with the corned beef.

So over the years, I've learned to cook my vegetables separately from the corned beef and the taste is amazing. Vegetables with subtle flavors need to taste like vegetables while corned beef with it's in-your-face flavor needs to be the star of the show.

A second suggestion is to purchase a flat cut corned beef or a Waygu eye of round corned beef. Both shrink less than a typical corned beef brisket.

I'll also add a couple of bottles of Shiner's Bock or Guiness to the slow cooker to add a little pizazz. Then I obviously need to consume what's left of the beer to make sure it's not spoiled.  [smile]

Here's a shot of last years celebration before I added a few potatoes and carrots. This happens to be a Waygu eye of round.Notice how lean it is yet it's not dry at all, just very moist.

[attachimg=1]


Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on February 08, 2019, 04:32 AM
quote>>>Great article Peter...I haven't finished reading it yet because of all the side ways elements contained within, but I will.  [smile]

My ears really perked up with the reference to Jewish and Irish families living side by side because that's also been my experience.  [big grin]

I'll also throw the Italians into that mix because that was the way it was locally 80-90 years ago...a true melting pot. [thumbs up]

That's the Essence (thank you Emeril) that's made us such a great country.

Different thoughts...different methods...but the same final product/goal.

Rather like this conversation as a matter of fact. <<<quote

When I was 8 years old, my brother and I were shipped off to stay with my father's uncle and cousin for two weeks while Mom and Dad sorted out their differences. We ended up staying with the cousins for six years of the best life that ever happened to me. The uncle and aunt were very active in the church (Congregational) and the cousin was the type who just about any kids were welcome into her family. At one time, her son and I (who grew up as best friends)counted up the number who had been "dropped off" and had become part of her family. We got to between 50 and 60 and stopped counting. During the periods of our stay and others with the same good fortune, Mary, my dad's cousin, took each kid to his or her church. We grew up going to Protestent churches all denominations, Catholic, Jewish services and even Seventh Day Adventists and Jehovahs Witnesses. A couple from India stayed with us for a couple of weeks. I think they were Budists. They conducted their own services and some of us kids attended. Eventually, I decided that since I almost always fell asleep during any service, i would not go to church anymore. I did go to my cousin's grandfather and help him with his Sunday chores. (he was a small dairy farmer) I learned a lot about other folks ways during those years.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 08, 2019, 10:19 AM
Eventually, I decided that since I almost always fell asleep during any service, i would not go to church anymore. I did go to my cousin's grandfather and help him with his Sunday chores. (he was a small dairy farmer) I learned a lot about other folks ways during those years.

That's funny... [big grin]

My grandparents on both sides of the family are 1st Gen born Americans. When their parents made the great voyage to America they all settled in an area known as the levee. The space was tight but the housing was affordable. They'd borrow and use each other's clothes lines to hang their laundry out to dry. Automobiles didn't yet exist. Electricity didn't exist. One of my great, great uncles was a lamp lighter while another sold rags in the downtown area out of the back of a horse drawn wagon.

Jews, Germans, Italians, Austrians, Irish and then add in the odd Swede, Bohemian or Czech. They all grew together as friends, started businesses, raised families and eventually purchased their own homes. It was the beginning of the America we know today.

As you said Tinker, you can learn a lot from other people.  [big grin]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on February 10, 2019, 08:42 AM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

[attachimg=1]
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

[attachimg=2]
Start time

[attachimg=3]
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 10, 2019, 09:40 AM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.


So this will be interesting. [popcorn] [popcorn] [popcorn]

You're right Peter, whether an apple pie or corned beef, the smell does make a difference.  [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on February 10, 2019, 12:12 PM
All this talk about the smells, as I look (drool) over all the wonderful pics in this discussion, all the great roasts and desserts, I can just smell all the goodness. I love the smell of my wife's cooking. As I am watching TV in the other room, or doing bookkeeping right in the same room where a meal is cooking, I just love the smells coming from the stove.  Suddenly, the smell of burning wax starts to invade. I no longer need to investigate. After nearly 53 years of wedded bliss, I now know the source. My wife thinks the smell of cooking is an assault to the senses and she lights candles all around the kitchen and living room to hide those smells. Those candles remind me of the days when my mom's house had the kerosene stove for cooking. I even prefer the smell of burning good food to the odor of that old kerosene stove. The first thing we did once we got electricity into Mom's house was to get rid of the kerosene cookstove and get an electric stove. That was even before we got the refrigerator to replace the Ice Box. My problem now is I just don't want to replace my wife. I will just have to put up with those (expletive) candles.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on February 10, 2019, 12:20 PM
@Tinker , I admit that I am old enough to remember the colder days of the 1970's and 1980's and was a witness to efforts taken to stay warm by those who used fuel oil to heat their homes.  Kerosene space heaters became common in the US.  The stench of a kerosene heater running out of fuel or being turned off is one not to be forgotten.

Glad those days are behind me.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on February 10, 2019, 12:26 PM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.


So this will be interesting. [popcorn] [popcorn] [popcorn]

You're right Peter, whether an apple pie or corned beef, the smell does make a difference.  [smile]

Speaking of smells, if there are people out there who like the taste of cabbage but can't stand the smell of cooking cabbage, there are numerous suggestions out on the internet.  Vinegar, lemon juice, vinegar in a bowl, walnuts, baking, etc.

Also you can try savoy cabbage instead of the cheapest green cabbage.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on February 11, 2019, 11:11 AM
Saturday my wife made Vietnamese beef stew (bo kho). It didn't turn out too good.  It was too salty and there was a bit of an aftertaste.  She thinks the aftertaste is because she burnt the beef stew seasoning when she was trying to toast it.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]


Sunday we made wonton noodle soup.

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on February 15, 2019, 09:48 AM
For Valentine's Day I made a small ~8oz Wagyu ribeye steak, a regular ribeye, and a lobster tail with sauteeed bok choy and a baked potato.  I used the America's Test Kitchen Technique of poking some holes in the potato and then dipping into salt water and cooking in a 450 degree oven until the internal temperature reached 205 degrees.

[attachimg=1]

The steaks were cooked sous vide at 135 degrees (normally I always cook steaks at 124 degrees ) and and the lobster tail was cooked at 140 degrees.  The lobster tail was very disappointing.  The texture was odd and really needed seasoning.  I didn't preseason since I didn't think much would penetrate through the shell.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 15, 2019, 11:35 PM
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on February 16, 2019, 09:06 AM
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.

That sounds very good! But (exposing my ignorance again) what is EVOO?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: rvieceli on February 16, 2019, 09:14 AM
EVOO = Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Ron
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on February 16, 2019, 09:18 AM
That sounds very good! But (exposing my ignorance again) what is EVOO?

Sorry Michael  [tongue]  That's Rachael Ray speak for Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

Ya for me the potato skins are the best part of the potato, they contain all the nutritional goodness. Break open the potato, place some butter inside and let it melt. Then cut pieces of the potato so that you get some of the soft inside while also some of the crisp skin. The additional fresh black pepper and kosher salt baked onto the skin of the potato adds just a little pop.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on February 16, 2019, 09:35 AM
A decade ago or so I built a set for a tv show on a stage right next to Rachel Ray’s stage so I got to watch her work occasionally. She’s good and her crew was happy.

Crispy seasoned potato skin is delicious, I know that much, but we’re pretty specialized at my house. I dont work in the kitchen (except at the sink and dishwasher) and my wife stays out of the shop.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on February 16, 2019, 10:33 AM
So 1 question and 1 statement...

What were your thoughts on the Waygu?

My go-to recipe for baked potatoes is:
Wash & scrub the potato clean of all dirt and let dry
Oil the outside lightly with EVOO
Dust with kosher salt and fresh cracked pepper
Bake in an oven at 350º for 45-60 minutes

If you like crispy/blackened potato skins (I do) bake for 30 minutes in the oven and then finish on the grill over hot coals.

It was good.  Very rich!  I think the Kobe Beef I had in Kobe, Japan was better, but the chef was doing the cooking right in front of us.  The Wagyu might have been better if I just quickly seared it in a pan instead of cooking sous vide, but I was a little afraid of overcooking it since it's so thin.  I'd definitely buy it again if it's available.  I have been thinking about this Wagyu since I first saw back in September.

I used to always just microwave the potato but the exact timing was hit or miss.  For some reason I always find that a baked potato at a restaurant always tastes better than what I make at home.  I found a recipe for "steakhouse style" baked potatoes.  That said to rub the outside with oil and sprinkle with salt and bake at 425 degrees.    It still wasn't as good as the baked potato at Outback!

I also HATE potato skins.  I know it's the most nutritious part and people love it, but I really dislike potato skins.  I always have to ask at restaurants if the potatoes in the mashed potatoes are peeled, or in like a potato soup.  I'll often cut the skins off of home fried potatoes is they're not peeled.  I am able to tolerate the little bit of skins on french fries, like Boardwalk Fries.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on February 16, 2019, 01:32 PM
A decade ago or so I built a set for a tv show on a stage right next to Rachel Ray’s stage so I got to watch her work occasionally. She’s good and her crew was happy.

Crispy seasoned potato skin is delicious, I know that much, but we’re pretty specialized at my house. I dont work in the kitchen (except at the sink and dishwasher) and my wife stays out of the shop.

Ditto and ditto
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on March 03, 2019, 08:13 AM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

  Sooooo Pete, how did the corned beef taste using the sous vide method?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Bob Marino on March 03, 2019, 08:39 AM
For Valentine's Day I made a small ~8oz Wagyu ribeye steak, a regular ribeye, and a lobster tail with sauteeed bok choy and a baked potato.  I used the America's Test Kitchen Technique of poking some holes in the potato and then dipping into salt water and cooking in a 450 degree oven until the internal temperature reached 205 degrees.

(Attachment Link)

The steaks were cooked sous vide at 135 degrees (normally I always cook steaks at 124 degrees ) and and the lobster tail was cooked at 140 degrees.  The lobster tail was very disappointing.  The texture was odd and really needed seasoning.  I didn't preseason since I didn't think much would penetrate through the shell.

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

  So many fascinating foods and recipes in this thread!Hate to ask, but how much is that Wagyu beef cost per lb?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on March 03, 2019, 08:47 AM
The Wagyu was $124.99/lb, so my little steak was $56.87.

I didn't think that was too outrageous, at least compared to some of the prices of Wagyu I had seen online that were delivered to your house (I think in most cases you had to pay for overnight delivery).
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Chicken Divan
Post by: Cheese on March 03, 2019, 11:23 AM
I've meant to post this for the last couple of days but keep forgetting.

This is a Paula Dean recipe...Chicken Divan.

A delicious dinner for the winter.  [big grin]

Chicken and broccoli in a sherry cream sauce with some provolone and Reggiano over the top and sprinkled with Marcona almonds.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on March 03, 2019, 12:01 PM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

  Sooooo Pete, how did the corned beef taste using the sous vide method?

The corned beef was good.  Flavors were more concentrated - maybe that would be off-putting to some - because it is not being diluted in a water or beer bath.  Next time I will follow the receipt and do it according to the recipe and refrigerate it after cooking so that the juices can be re-absorbed.  In other words it was a little drier than I would have expected, but in the end it worked out great for my rustic sandwiches.

Peter 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on March 06, 2019, 04:19 PM
On Saturday we made spring rolls (I believe most restaurants call them summer rolls for some reason) and some eggrolls.  We also made some fried silver fish patties.  I forgot to take a picture of the fish by themselves, but they're tiny!  They actually tasted really good and I normally don't like fish because I always manage to find a bone.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

For Mardi Gras yesterday,  I ordered 5 lbs of live crawfish and we made our version of a crawfish boil.

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Tuna Steak Burgers with a Beet Salad
Post by: Cheese on March 07, 2019, 10:55 AM
On Saturday we made spring rolls (I believe most restaurants call them summer rolls for some reason) and some eggrolls.

For Mardi Gras yesterday,  I ordered 5 lbs of live crawfish and we made our version of a crawfish boil.

The spring rolls look delicious. I'm hungry for some.  [cool]

I've never seen 5# of mud bugs, let alone 5# of live mud bugs. Is there a large difference in flavor between fresh & frozen?


Last night I fixed fresh tuna steak burgers on toasted buns and a fresh beet salad. I like to spread a little Sir Kensington's Special Sauce (flavored mayo) on the bun with a little arugula.

The salad has beets, romaine hearts, red grapes, goat cheese with honey and is sprinkled with EVOO and a peach balsamic vinegar while Marcona almonds are scattered over the top.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on March 07, 2019, 12:11 PM
They were good.  I'm not a very good roller though.  A lot of times my rolls either come out too fat or not tight enough.  It doesn't really matter to me though since it's fast to eat and just roll another.

Funny you should ask.  I feel like the fresh ones have juicier heads.  Now having said that, our favorite place to get crawfish is Hot and Juicy (they have a couple locations around the country).  I believe most of the time their crawfish are frozen and not fresh.  I can't really tell a difference because the juice/broth that they cook everything in tastes so good.

That's a very healthy looking meal you have!  Was the tuna steak cooked all the way through or was it medium rare in the middle?  I only like my tuna raw, or broken up in tuna salad.
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Citrus Herbed baked Chicken
Post by: Cheese on March 08, 2019, 09:45 AM
Was the tuna steak cooked all the way through or was it medium rare in the middle?  I only like my tuna raw, or broken up in tuna salad.

In a hot cast iron grill pan, cook tuna 2 minutes, rotate 60º to 90º, cook 1 minute, flip tuna and cook 2 minutes, rotate and cook 1 minute.

The 2+1 method always yields med rare to medium tuna depending upon the thickness.

FWIW...I just came across a recipe for citrus herb baked salmon that I'm going to try. I've done citrus herb baked chicken many times and it is delicious. It's especially good cold the next day sliced thick for sandwiches. Here's a photo of how it starts out.

[attachimg=1]

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Mike Goetzke on March 08, 2019, 10:53 AM
So, after reading the corned beef link posted above...

(Attachment Link)
4 lb. store bought corned brisket

(Attachment Link)
Start time

(Attachment Link)
180 degrees f for 10 hours.  Green bubble wrap added to insulate and also reduce evaporation.  Very effective.  Also a tribute to Bob Marino!

Now I can go do what I want for the rest of the day.  One advantage / disadvantage of sous vide cooking is that there is virtually no smell.

Peter

Nice! I'm going to try this.

FYI - I recently bought a Coleman 24 can Party Stacker Cooler and punched a hole in the top for sous.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on March 08, 2019, 02:39 PM
@Mike Goetzke ,

If you brine your own or use one of the supermarket packages of stuff floating in liquid than looks grossly like what you would see surrounding your strawberries on a shortcake, make sure to take that meat out and soak in in plain water for a few hours to seep some salt out.  You will be cooking it without surrounding water to leach it out and this will achieve this for you.  Brining recipes are not designed commercially or otherwise for the absence of water to dilute the salty taste.

Sous vide will probably leave any fat veins, well lets just say gross, so go healthier and avoid those.

After cooking remember to place back in the fridge in the bag and let the meat reabsorb the juices pressed out.

I am waiting for the sales on pre-brined next week.  I cleaned out the freezer and tossed anything looking like the abominable snowman inside a plastic bag into the trash can to see if they would come alive so as to make room. [eek]

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on March 08, 2019, 08:42 PM
@Mike Goetzke ,

If you brine your own or use one of the supermarket packages of stuff floating in liquid than looks grossly like what you would see surrounding your strawberries on a shortcake, make sure to take that meat out and soak in in plain water for a few hours to seep some salt out.  You will be cooking it without surrounding water to leach it out and this will achieve this for you.  Brining recipes are not designed commercially or otherwise for the absence of water to dilute the salty taste.

Sous vide will probably leave any fat veins, well lets just say gross, so go healthier and avoid those.

After cooking remember to place back in the fridge in the bag and let the meat reabsorb the juices pressed out.

I am waiting for the sales on pre-brined next week.  I cleaned out the freezer and tossed anything looking like the abominable snowman inside a plastic bag into the trash can to see if they would come alive so as to make room. [eek]

Peter

My mom had a very large chest freezes for years.  I think she bought it around 1947 and had for over 50 years. I think she still had food from the first day and the darned thing, once it got full, the food never seemed to disappear more than 6 inches below the top.  Finally, I decided she had to get rid of the contents.  By that time, it could no longer be classified as food.

I got my son to come with his backhoe and together with one of my crew, we started pulling stuff out and into a wheelbarrow. While my son was digging a hole, Scott and I were wheeling chunks out for buriel. Almost all of the packages were ‘honey combed” they had been in the freezer so long. My mom was hovering close by as the two of us were prying out those honeycombs and throwing into the wheelbarrow. Mom would, every now and then, grab a package that she could still see the label on and “save” it.  Finally, as we got within a couple of feet from the bottom, we could no longer pry packages apart. They had been thru too many thaws from power loss. They had thawed and frozen together.  So, we just hooked a chain to the freezer, dragged it to the garage door and my son hooked on with his loader and we buried the entire freezer. I went to Sears and bought Mom a new freezer.  Definitely not the size chest we had buried, but a very small freezer, the size for a camper vehicle. By that time, Mom did not have too much time left. By the time we finally put her in a “home” she only had a few packages on the shelves.

Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 03, 2019, 11:09 PM
I missed a few cooking posts from the last couple of weeks.  I caught the flu and that really wiped me out for a while.

I attempted to make hush puppies with honey butter, that ended up being an epic fail (though the honey butter was good).  The hush puppies were under cooked in the middle and super greasy.  We also made pork katsu cutlets and some deep fried dwarf bananas that also ended up being greasy.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

We made corned beef and cabbage for St. Patrick's Day.  Normally the pre-brined corned beef are salty.  We bought these from Costco and they were not overly salty, as a result the broth ended up being a little on the bland side.

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

Finally I made some sous vide lamb chops with couscous.

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]



Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 06, 2019, 10:59 PM
Great thread.

I'm away from my kitchen for almost a year now. I cook every night, just simple things

@GoingMyWay, fantastic meals, great preparation and presentation. I brine my own corned beef, you should try it some time.

I mentioned chocolate chip cookies in my first post in this thread. Cocoa, white chocolate chips cookies. The sheet on the left is baked to be chewy, the way my wife likes them, the sheet on the right is baked crispier, the way I like them.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Tenderloin & Asparagus
Post by: Cheese on April 07, 2019, 10:08 PM
Well tonight's meal was sushi but last evening's meal was more note worthy.

Akaushi tenderloin and fresh asparagus with a tarragon sherry vinaigrette. The asparagus were small and tender and it was the perfect overture for starting a healthy spring cooking regimen.

In the upcoming weeks there will be among other spring/early summer options, fresh morels, fiddlehead ferns, young tender asparagus, vidalia onions, spring garlic and ramps.  Now's the time to anticipate your spring cooking adventure.

If I had thought a bit more about last evening's meal, I should have sliced the tenderloin a lot thinner and then wraped it around a small bunch of asparagus like a bow on a package. The presentation would have been a lot more fun and then drizzle some tarragon sherry vinaigrette on the package. Nice...oh well there's always next time.  [big grin]  That's how you learn...that's how you grow.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 08, 2019, 11:07 AM
Great thread.

I'm away from my kitchen for almost a year now. I cook every night, just simple things

@GoingMyWay, fantastic meals, great preparation and presentation. I brine my own corned beef, you should try it some time.

I mentioned chocolate chip cookies in my first post in this thread. Cocoa, white chocolate chips cookies. The sheet on the left is baked to be chewy, the way my wife likes them, the sheet on the right is baked crispier, the way I like them.

Tom

Thanks Tom.

Do you buy a plain brisket and then brine it yourself?  I've found that buying brisket is very expensive, especially compared to the price of ready made corned beef when it goes on sale around St. Patrick's Day.

Those cookies look great!  Do you have a recipe for them?  I was just thinking that macadamia nuts might be good in there (though I think they're pretty expensive).  Do you just take the chewy cookies out early so they remain chewy or do you cook them at a different temperature?  I prefer chewy cookies myself.  I really like the chewy white chocolate macadamia nut cookies from Subway.  Those cookies are what made me say macadamia nut cookies might be good in your chocolate cookies.

Well tonight's meal was sushi but last evening's meal was more note worthy.

Akaushi tenderloin and fresh asparagus with a tarragon sherry vinaigrette. The asparagus were small and tender and it was the perfect overture for starting a healthy spring cooking regimen.

In the upcoming weeks there will be among other spring/early summer options, fresh morels, fiddlehead ferns, young tender asparagus, vidalia onions, spring garlic and ramps.  Now's the time to anticipate your spring cooking adventure.

If I had thought a bit more about last evening's meal, I should have sliced the tenderloin a lot thinner and then wraped it around a small bunch of asparagus like a bow on a package. The presentation would have been a lot more fun and then drizzle some tarragon sherry vinaigrette on the package. Nice...oh well there's always next time.  [big grin]  That's how you learn...that's how you grow.

(Attachment Link)

Was the sushi homemade or from a restaurant?

This is the season for the thin/tender asparagus.

Thanks for the reminder about all the goodies we can find at the farmer's market!  The farmer's market that we always go to opens the last Saturday of April.  We're looking forward to its return.  Last year we bought ramps and morels.  Fiddleheads are harder to find around here.  Giant used to carry them, but the last couple of times I bought them at Wegmans.

Your tenderloin is perfectly cooked!  Is that just chopped up hard boiled egg on the asparagus?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 08, 2019, 09:01 PM

1. Was the sushi homemade or from a restaurant?

2. This is the season for the thin/tender asparagus.

3. Your tenderloin is perfectly cooked!  Is that just chopped up hard boiled egg on the asparagus?

1. I used to make my own sushi 30-40 years ago but that was more for the challenge and less for the flavor. After all, raw fish is just raw fish and whatever small thing I may do differently really doesn’t change the flavor in a major way. And then you still have sticky rice to cook and nori to prepare...then the vegetables need to be minced in 1/2 mm widths...no I learned my lesson.

2. Indeed it is...kind of caught me by surprise because I thought it was another couple of weeks away.

3. Thanks. Again, all that is done in a Le Creuset cast iron pan on a gas range. A nice crust on both sides and a check with the ThermoPop thermometer. At 135 degrees remove to a plate and cover with foil for 5 minutes. As it’s resting it will gain another 5 degrees and will suck up all the juices it previously lost.

I know it may sound goofy but that hard boiled egg has been pressed through a strainer and it really does improve the flavor of the asparagus. I’ve tried it 3 times with and 3 times without and the “with” gets my vote every time.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 09, 2019, 10:22 AM
I was going to ask if the egg had been grated.  I should have realized it had been run through a strainer.  I forgot that's how my wife did the egg on her Korean potato salad.

Last night I grilled brats, wings, and pork chops.  I try to avoid reposting a meal that I've already posted, but I think this is the first time I've grilled pork chops.  This is also the first time cooking the wings whole.  I normally break them down, but I was feeling lazy and also wanted to see how the whole wing turned out.  It took longer to cook - about 30/35 minutes versus 15/20 minutes when cut up.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 09, 2019, 09:05 PM
@GoingMyWay ,

Plain brisket, brine it myself most often. I could not find a single corned beef to cook where I'm at.

Yes, I'll hunt down the recipe.

The cookies have walnuts or pecans in them. Forgot which I used in this batch.

To soften them, I bake about half the time (4 minutes), remove, let cool about 3 minutes, finish bake.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 10, 2019, 11:51 AM
Oh interesting.  All the grocery stores around here have big displays of the corned beef in both point and flat for St. Patrick's Day.  How much do you pay for your brisket?

Walnuts sound good.

I've never heard of taking the tray out and letting them cool for a bit and then finish baking.  That sounds like a good idea.  Is that a common technique when making cookies?  I like to make chocolate chip cookies using the Pillsbury cookie dough log you buy in the refrigerator section of the grocery store.  For chewier cookies, I just take them out when they still look a little under cooked.  I really like to bake them until they're golden brown and fully cooked and then eat them right out of the oven still warm.
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Shrimp, Prosciutto & Lemon Pasta
Post by: Cheese on April 11, 2019, 10:32 PM
Thursday's meal...Shrimp, Prosciutto and Lemon Pasta.

Delicious...sauteed prosciutto, garlic, cherry tomatoes, and shrimp served on angel hair pasta with a grating of Reggiano, some fresh basil and just a squeeze of lemon...nummy.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 12, 2019, 01:03 PM
That looks good.  I should try making it with regular spaghetti sometime.  I don't care much for thin pasta.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 14, 2019, 04:32 PM
Last night my wife made Dolly Parton's Chicken and Dumplings.  My grandmother used to make a similar style of "noodle" chicken and dumplings.  I believe this style is the more traditional southern style of chicken and dumplings, but I prefer the biscuit style like I had previously posted (America's Test Kitchen recipe).

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 14, 2019, 08:51 PM
Tonight's dinner was liver and onions with fried potatoes.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 15, 2019, 10:18 PM
@GoingMyWay,

One of my favorites, especially with bacon.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 15, 2019, 10:23 PM
Awesome! A lot of people really turn up their noses at the sound of liver. I've liked it from when I was a child surprisingly enough.

Lately we had been trying bacon and then cooking the liver in the bacon fat and garnishing with the crispy bacon. This time we were trying to be "healthier"and not cook in bacon fat and also eat the bacon.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 15, 2019, 10:35 PM
With Easter and possibly lamb around the corner here is the recipe for a lamb sauce that is beyond fantastic. It comes from moms cookbook.

The hand written note may be hard to read so here it is typed out;

Blend; 1/2 cup sugar, 1 table spoon corn starch, 1/2 tea spoon salt & sweet basil, 1 table spoon prepared mustard (plan old every day yellow mustard)

Add & stir well, 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice, 1 cup water

Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until thickened. Brush over over lamb every 10 minutes during the last 30 minutes of roasting time.

My edit;

I cook my lamb on a Weber Kettle using indirect heat. I do not brush/baste during cooking. I use the sauce as a dipping sauce.

For the record---I hate mint sauce.....

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 15, 2019, 10:58 PM
@GoingMyWay,

The cookie recipe you asked for. The optional leavening will give you a little more rise. Had to type it out, moms cookbook is fading fast.

1 cup butter-softened (leave out about an hour)

2/3rds cup white sugar

2/3rds cup brown sugar

2 eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract (high quality)

2-1/4 cups all purpose flour

3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon baking powder (optional)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 2/3 cups white chocolate chips

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time, then stir in the vanilla. Combine the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt; stir into the creamed mixture. Fold in the white chocolate chips. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheets.

Preheat oven to 375, bake for 10 minutes.

Allow to cool on sheet for 5 minutes, move to cooling racks

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 16, 2019, 07:55 AM
When I was living on my uncle's farm, when we butchered a calf, the liver was the first meal. I think it was still warm as it hit the pan. when a deer was brought home from a hunt, the liver was always cooked, almost, before it cooled off. My cousin always prepared it very tasty. I loved liver in those days. When I moved back with my mom, i lost my taste for liver. she always over cooked it to be very dry and tasteless ....... and greasy. And then, I got married. I regained my taste for liver. Even tho it was always "store bought," my wife does an excellent job. This is one guy who has never bugged his wife that "Mom always did it a better way." I still like liver.  And meat loaf. My wife cooks the best meat loaf I have ever eaten. Those are two meals that when i tell people my wife does the best job of cooking, I often get some negative looks and replies.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 16, 2019, 09:13 AM
@GoingMyWay,

The cookie recipe you asked for. The optional leavening will give you a little more rise. Had to type it out, moms cookbook is fading fast.

1 cup butter-softened (leave out about an hour)

2/3rds cup white sugar

2/3rds cup brown sugar

2 eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract (high quality)

2-1/4 cups all purpose flour

3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon baking powder (optional)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 2/3 cups white chocolate chips

In a large bowl, cream together the butter and sugar until smooth. Beat in the eggs one at a time, then stir in the vanilla. Combine the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt; stir into the creamed mixture. Fold in the white chocolate chips. Drop by rounded teaspoonfuls onto ungreased cookie sheets.

Preheat oven to 375, bake for 10 minutes.

Allow to cool on sheet for 5 minutes, move to cooling racks

Tom

Thanks Tom!  Thanks for finding the recipe, typing it up, and sharing!  I've typed up some of my grandparents old recipes to make sure they are saved electronically so the recipe isn't lost forever.  Thanks to @Cheese, I use the Paprika App to store and manage most of my recipes (I'm still have a bunch of recipes to type up and input).

When I was living on my uncle's farm, when we butchered a calf, the liver was the first meal. I think it was still warm as it hit the pan. when a deer was brought home from a hunt, the liver was always cooked, almost, before it cooled off. My cousin always prepared it very tasty. I loved liver in those days. When I moved back with my mom, i lost my taste for liver. she always over cooked it to be very dry and tasteless ....... and greasy. And then, I got married. I regained my taste for liver. Even tho it was always "store bought," my wife does an excellent job. This is one guy who has never bugged his wife that "Mom always did it a better way." I still like liver.  And meat loaf. My wife cooks the best meat loaf I have ever eaten. Those are two meals that when i tell people my wife does the best job of cooking, I often get some negative looks and replies.
Tinker

I forgot to mention that we always use calves liver when making liver and onions.  It's much more tender than beef liver.

Does your wife have a secret recipe for the meatloaf?  I always liked my grandmother's meatloaf because of its simplicity.  It was basically ground beef, bread crumbs, chopped onion, Worcestershire sauce, ketchup, salt and pepper, and 1 egg.  Ironically I believe the recipe came from a microwave oven cookbook they had.  The meatloaf was cooked in a glass pyrex loaf pan in the microwave.  I've tried to replicate the recipe/cooking, but it hasn't quite come out the same.  I don't remember the microwave power setting or cook time.  Though I wanna say it was like 30 minutes at 50% power.  The ends always came out rather overcooked, which was my grandmother's favorite part.  The leftovers made great meatloaf sandwiches the next day!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 16, 2019, 10:24 AM
Thanks to @Cheese, I use the Paprika App to store and manage most of my recipes (I'm still have a bunch of recipes to type up and input).

When I moved back with my mom, i lost my taste for liver. she always over cooked it to be very dry and tasteless ....... and greasy.

Does your wife have a secret recipe for the meatloaf?  The leftovers made great meatloaf sandwiches the next day!

Glad to hear you picked up Paprika... [smile] ...I just noticed I now have 674 recipes on mine. The latest addition was Shrimp, Prosciutto and Lemon Pasta that I mentioned a couple of days ago.

That's the way I always remember eating liver. Dry and chewy with pieces of grizzle that you'd have to spit out. We had to eat it 2-3 times a month because "it's good for you."  The only way I could choke it down was to bathe the stuff in yellow mustard so I couldn't taste the acrid flavor. Moved out and I've never eaten it again.

When it's cooked properly does it still have that weird flavor?

Love meatloaf, I always use 1/3 beef, 1/3 pork & 1/3 veal. I love ❤️ cold meatloaf sandwiches.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 16, 2019, 10:42 AM
Wow that's a lot of recipes!  I only have 53 so far.

While I like my steaks cooked medium rare, I prefer my liver fully cooked through.  I don't find the calves liver to be very tough and chewy.  I guess liver does have a kind of distinct, possibly organy or metallic taste to it.  I think soaking it in milk might help (I think I've heard/read that it works, but I've never tried since the taste doesn't bother me)?

I made a beef heart "steak" a few years ago.  I think I soaked that in vinegar to help take out some of the taste.  I actually liked it.  I also served it with cooked up onions.  The beef heart is very inexpensive.  The only downside is it's kind of a chore to cut out all of the veins/arteries/ventricles/connective tissue.

I tried making kidneys (can't remember if they were beef or pork) about 7-8 years ago.  I was so excited when I bought them because I was thinking this is so cheap for a "big piece of protein."  Now kidneys have a very distinct and terrible taste!  I followed the instructions for cleaning them, but they still did not taste good at all! 

A mixture of beef, pork, and veal!  That's a little too fancy for me [wink].  Do you buy each meat individually or do you buy a pre-packaged "meatloaf/meatball" mix?  I think most of the pre-made mixes I've seen don't use equal portions - I wanna say it's more beef than pork and veal?

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 16, 2019, 08:30 PM
My wife kicked me out of the kitchen 53 years ago today. Well, maybe she waited a couple of days. I really don't have a clue to how she cooks liver or meatloaf. Both always come out tender, juicy and tasty.  I never have to use any spices, ketchup, mustard or any thing else to fortify or hide the flavors. Her meatloaf is made from beef, pork and veal and it is never over cooked. It falls apart when cut with a fork. I love the leftovers, not for sandwiches, but just slice off a big chunk for lunch and eat it plain. She adds onions and a few other vegetables to the mix. Not much, if any, bread. That is why it falls apart, but it is juicy and tasty.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 16, 2019, 08:56 PM
My wife kicked me out of the kitchen 53 years ago today. Well, maybe she waited a couple of days. I really don't have a clue to how she cooks liver or meatloaf. Both always come out tender, juicy and tasty.  I never have to use any spices, ketchup, mustard or any thing else to fortify or hide the flavors. Her meatloaf is made from beef, pork and veal and it is never over cooked. It falls apart when cut with a fork. I love the leftovers, not for sandwiches, but just slice off a big chunk for lunch and eat it plain. She adds onions and a few other vegetables to the mix. Not much, if any, bread. That is why it falls apart, but it is juicy and tasty.
Tinker

When I'm home, my wife is banished from the kitchen. I grew up with a mom who cooked for the nuns at the orphanage she was raised in from the age of 10 until she left at 18. My wife has become a much better cook over the last 42 years.

By the way I can set a full formal table, and know what each piece of flatware and its placement means. When I'm home,  home all are dinners are served with a 5 pieces flatware setting.

I have a killer meatloaf recipe.....

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas
Post by: Cheese on April 20, 2019, 12:41 AM
You know what's incredible about this thread..............there may be only a dozen or so continual contributors to this thread yet this has been read over 42,000 times. This is a woodworking forum and the eats section has more hits than the saw blade section.

I wonder if this is a case of a lot of closet cooks out there, or if there are a lot of people that hope there are some good alternatives to fast food. If it's the later...tell us what you don't like about fast food and let the contributors help. This service is free.  [big grin]

To help you on your way to eating better tasting foods may I suggest Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas with Red Sauce. The interesting thing is that the chicken is poached in chicken broth with half of a white onion and some fresh oregano for 20+ minutes. This imparts moisture and flavor to the chicken so that it doesn't dry out when it's baked later on.

2 cups of this poaching liquid is then also used when making the red sauce.

Simple & Delicious

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: travisj on April 20, 2019, 03:10 AM
I am one of those readers.  I enjoy this thread, although I don’t fancy myself a good cook.  I have a very limited range.  Meatloaf and sloppy joes are solid.  Lefse tastes perfect, but I haven’t been successful in rolling it out perfectly round.  My Swedish potato sausage and fresh walleye tacos are excellent (in my opinion).  However it pales in comparison to what I see posted here.

My one daughter (she’s 10) has taken an interest in cooking and I am trying learn and be supportive for her.  She can handle the lefse fairly well and enjoys making the spicy mayo and cabbage slaw for the fish tacos.  She doesn’t do too well with meat yet, too gross in her eyes, especially when I pull out the grinder to make sausage.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 20, 2019, 08:56 AM
I am one of those readers.  I enjoy this thread, although I don’t fancy myself a good cook.  I have a very limited range.  Meatloaf and sloppy joes are solid.  Lefse tastes perfect, but I haven’t been successful in rolling it out perfectly round.  My Swedish potato sausage and fresh walleye tacos are excellent (in my opinion).  However it pales in comparison to what I see posted here.

My one daughter (she’s 10) has taken an interest in cooking and I am trying learn and be supportive for her.  She can handle the lefse fairly well and enjoys making the spicy mayo and cabbage slaw for the fish tacos.  She doesn’t do too well with meat yet, too gross in her eyes, especially when I pull out the grinder to make sausage.


The walleye tacos with the spicy slaw sounds terrific.  [smile]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on April 20, 2019, 09:14 AM
Cheese said, “This is a woodworking forum and the eats section has more hits than the saw blade section.”

I’m no gourmet but I can say that compared to the delicious looking dishes you guys have posted, saw blades taste flat.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on April 20, 2019, 05:07 PM
You know what's incredible about this thread..............there may be only a dozen or so continual contributors to this thread yet this has been read over 42,000 times. This is a woodworking forum and the eats section has more hits than the saw blade section.

I wonder if this is a case of a lot of closet cooks out there, or if there are a lot of people that hope there are some good alternatives to fast food. If it's the later...tell us what you don't like about fast food and let the contributors help. This service is free.  [big grin]

To help you on your way to eating better tasting foods may I suggest Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas with Red Sauce. The interesting thing is that the chicken is poached in chicken broth with half of a white onion and some fresh oregano for 20+ minutes. This imparts moisture and flavor to the chicken so that it doesn't dry out when it's baked later on.

2 cups of this poaching liquid is then also used when making the red sauce.

Simple & Delicious

(Attachment Link)

When this thread started I was "talking" with someone and I chuckled and predicted that this thread would end up being the most popular on the forum in time.

I think its GREAT!

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 20, 2019, 08:40 PM
Cheese said, “This is a woodworking forum and the eats section has more hits than the saw blade section.”

I’m no gourmet but I can say that compared to the delicious looking dishes you guys have posted, saw blades taste flat.

Yes, but even with no extra seasoning, they are sharp.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 20, 2019, 09:07 PM
I am one of those readers.  I enjoy this thread, although I don’t fancy myself a good cook.  I have a very limited range.  Meatloaf and sloppy joes are solid.  Lefse tastes perfect, but I haven’t been successful in rolling it out perfectly round.  My Swedish potato sausage and fresh walleye tacos are excellent (in my opinion).  However it pales in comparison to what I see posted here.

My one daughter (she’s 10) has taken an interest in cooking and I am trying learn and be supportive for her.  She can handle the lefse fairly well and enjoys making the spicy mayo and cabbage slaw for the fish tacos.  She doesn’t do too well with meat yet, too gross in her eyes, especially when I pull out the grinder to make sausage.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Altho I am no high quality chef, I do enjoy good food.

I was a very finicky eater until i was left at my uncle's farm. there were always plenty of children at the table, especially at holiday diners. All of us children would pitch in for the preparations. I, especially enjoyed preparing the raw cranberry relish. The attraction for me, and most of the children, was not that we were chopping and mixing, but there was a lot of sneaked tasting involved. One thanksgiving dinner, the preparations were assigned by my cousin (like a mom to me). She happened to put me onto chopping the cabbage for coleslaw. I thought i should be chopping the cranberry relish and was only half heartedly weighing into the cabbage. As i was muttering under my breath and chopping slower and slower, my cousin came over and sort of mentioned that I should put a little energy into my chopping. now, whenever Mary sort of mentioned an increased effort, one just sort of changed gears and that's when i got to chopping with just a bit more effort.  Soon, Mary came over to check on my progress.

She looked at the copped cabbage and said, "Did you already add pepper?"

"No."

She looked a little closer and started to chuckle. "You are chopping up the bowl!"

I agreed, sure enough, those little peppers were indeed particles of the wooden bowl.

"Don't you breath a word. Just take it a little easier with the chopping." The slaw turned out great and nobody suffered from eating the saw (chop) dust flavoring.

Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Jesse Cloud on April 21, 2019, 12:16 PM
Thursday's meal...Shrimp, Prosciutto and Lemon Pasta.

Delicious...sauteed prosciutto, garlic, cherry tomatoes, and shrimp served on angel hair pasta with a grating of Reggiano, some fresh basil and just a squeeze of lemon...nummy.

(Attachment Link)

I tried this the other day and loved it.  Simple, easy, quick.  Light but very flavorful!  I think it will become a regular here!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on April 21, 2019, 01:04 PM
Easter Sunday dinner classics.

Scampi.

(https://up.picr.de/35571200ug.jpg)

Vol-au-vent.

(https://up.picr.de/35571204sl.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 22, 2019, 09:55 AM
Scampi looks great Oliver.

What filling is in the Vol-au-vent?
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on April 22, 2019, 01:41 PM
Hi,

@Cheese

Chicken and mushrooms.

Chicken goes into pressure cooker for 20 mins. Keep broth/stock.

Clean mushrooms (200g) and dice. Braise for a couple of minutes, add salt, pepper and a little bit of lemon juice.

Remove bones and skin from chicken and kinda "pluck"/pull the meat into pieces.

Make white roux (40g fat, 60g flour) and add 500ml from the chicken broth/stock. Maybe add some chicken broth/stock concentrate to intensify taste.

Add chicken. Some more salt, pepper.

I like a drop of Worcester(shire)sauce added. And I enjoy a Maraschino-Cherry or two - it's a really great and interesting taste ... :)

--

Today Roastbeef and Asparagus (from the oven). Since I'm on a pretty strict diet, none of the self made sauce hollandaise for me.

(https://up.picr.de/35581498bs.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 22, 2019, 03:33 PM
Nice to see you posting food pictures again Oliver!

The roast beef and potatoes look great.  I love me potatoes so long as they're peeled.  The white asparagus reminded me of one of my grandpa's favorite dishes, Veal Oscar.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: neilc on April 22, 2019, 08:51 PM
Here's one for you - It's an easy recipe and perfect for several meals.
Low in calories too!

Chicken with Rice Soup

Ingredients:
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced carrots
1 cup diced celery
1 tablespoon of olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste.

1/2 can of drained petite diced tomatoes.
1/2 cup fresh parsley
2 boxes of Swanson’s Chicken Broth
1 cup white rice uncooked
1 cooked double chicken breast

Combine and sweat the vegetables in a warm skillet with olive oil and light salt and pepper. 
Don’t cook them too long - maybe 5 minutes at low heat. 

Next, cut up and debone a fully cooked chicken breast - store bought or one you have roasted. 
Dice the chicken breast and add to the mix.

Add in:
1/2 can of drained petite diced tomatoes
1/2 cup fresh parsley
2 boxes of Swanson’s Chicken Broth or similar

Cook on low heat for 45 minutes in a soup pan. 


Let this sit in the refrigerator overnight or until ready to serve.



When reheating, add in:

1 cup white rice uncooked.

Cook for 20 minutes till the rice is ready.

Easy to reheat leftovers on the stove or in the microwave.

Goes great with toasted french bread on the side!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 24, 2019, 05:34 PM
That soup seems quick and easy!  I'll have to try it sometime.

Last night we had chicken cordon bleu, wild rice, and asparagus.  It's a bit of cheating since the chicken cordon bleu was premade/frozen and just needed to be baked in the oven and the wild rice was Uncle Ben's.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on April 24, 2019, 06:08 PM
@GoingMyWay , if it works - it works.

When I finally caved and got cable tv I got hooked by the Food Network.  I then spent one year making all our meals totally from scratch.  Nothing pre-processed or frozen.

That was an interesting and expensive experiment.

My wife is a mashed potato snob.  One of the few things she makes.  Always had to make from scratch and perfectly beaten.  No lumps for her.  When I was going thru chemo food was my diversion.  I would walk around grocery stores leaning on my cart for exercise, an excuse to get out of the house, fighting depression, and looking for interesting food to try that I hadn't tried before.  I figured that if I hadn't had it before, my messed up tastebuds couldn't tell my brain it didn't taste like it should.  Weird, but it worked.  Anyway, I discovered the new versions of ready to make mashed potatoes that are around a buck a bag.  They hit the spot.

Guess what; my wife liked them enough that they are now in the pantry!

Rock on and keep cooking'

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on April 25, 2019, 08:38 AM
Here's one for you - It's an easy recipe and perfect for several meals.
Low in calories too!

Chicken with Rice Soup

Ingredients:
1 cup diced onions
1 cup diced carrots
1 cup diced celery
1 tablespoon of olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste.

1/2 can of drained petite diced tomatoes.
1/2 cup fresh parsley
2 boxes of Swanson’s Chicken Broth
1 cup white rice uncooked
1 cooked double chicken breast

Combine and sweat the vegetables in a warm skillet with olive oil and light salt and pepper. 
Don’t cook them too long - maybe 5 minutes at low heat. 

Next, cut up and debone a fully cooked chicken breast - store bought or one you have roasted. 
Dice the chicken breast and add to the mix.

Add in:
1/2 can of drained petite diced tomatoes
1/2 cup fresh parsley
2 boxes of Swanson’s Chicken Broth or similar

Cook on low heat for 45 minutes in a soup pan. 


Let this sit in the refrigerator overnight or until ready to serve.



When reheating, add in:

1 cup white rice uncooked.

Cook for 20 minutes till the rice is ready.

Easy to reheat leftovers on the stove or in the microwave.

Goes great with toasted french bread on the side!


Hi Neil,

thank you so much, that sounds delicious! I will try one of these days and post pictures! :)

Thank you!!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 25, 2019, 10:06 AM
@GoingMyWay , if it works - it works.

When I finally caved and got cable tv I got hooked by the Food Network.  I then spent one year making all our meals totally from scratch.  Nothing pre-processed or frozen.

That was an interesting and expensive experiment.

My wife is a mashed potato snob.  One of the few things she makes.  Always had to make from scratch and perfectly beaten.  No lumps for her.  When I was going thru chemo food was my diversion.  I would walk around grocery stores leaning on my cart for exercise, an excuse to get out of the house, fighting depression, and looking for interesting food to try that I hadn't tried before.  I figured that if I hadn't had it before, my messed up tastebuds couldn't tell my brain it didn't taste like it should.  Weird, but it worked.  Anyway, I discovered the new versions of ready to make mashed potatoes that are around a buck a bag.  They hit the spot.

Guess what; my wife liked them enough that they are now in the pantry!

Rock on and keep cooking'

Peter

Yup it is a tasty meal.  I used to make it for my parents long time back.  It was quick and simple to make.  I couldn't even imagine trying to make chicken cordon bleu from scratch.

What brand of mashed potatoes do you buy?  I also love mashed potatoes (so long as there are no potato skins in there).  I think I may like the gravy that goes on top even more though.  Does anyone have a good recipe for homemade gravy?  I've never really had any luck attempting to make it myself.

Last night I made sous vide steaks with baked potatoes and some grilled corn.  Sort of a repeat, but this is the first time I showed grilled corn.  My wife made her corn mexican style with mayo, chili powder, and parmesan cheese.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 25, 2019, 12:49 PM
I love mashed potatoes but the only way I know how to get them creamy without any lumps is by using a ricer. I've tried all types of mashers and even tried using a fork...lumps. 

Consequently, I seldom make them now except for the holidays...too much work with that ricer. And that's too bad because I've got a great recipe for Leek Mashed Potatoes.

Then about 3 years ago I stumbled on these, I was amazed...still am amazed.  For the last several years I've served this with the holiday meal and everyone raves when I tell them the taters are packaged. They're in the refrigerator section with the milk and eggs.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 25, 2019, 12:53 PM
Have you ever tried using a food mill?  I believe that would eliminate the lumps, with maybe a little less effort than using a ricer (cleanup might be a different story?).  I wanted to buy a food mill, but my wife said we don't need another kitchen gadget!

I'll have to see if that brand is carried by a local grocery store.  I suspect it is, I just never noticed them.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on April 25, 2019, 12:57 PM
Yes, passe-vite it is. :) Tell your wife, @six-point socket II said it's a must have in the kitchen. lol.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Try to get one of the originals, like the moulin-legumes.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 25, 2019, 01:05 PM
I like my mashed spuds all lumpy. My wife even leaves the skins on when mashing. she dices before cooking so the skins are in tiny pieces scattered thru. We both love our baked potatoes with the skins on. She likes them done in the micro, but I like them old fashioned way baked to crisp. I slice them open, scoop the center out, pack in the butter >>> Yummy.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Michael Kellough on April 25, 2019, 01:12 PM
I like my mashed spuds all lumpy. My wife even leaves the skins on when mashing. she dices before cooking so the skins are in tiny pieces scattered thru. We both love our baked potatoes with the skins on. She likes them done in the micro, but I like them old fashioned way baked to crisp. I slice them open, scoop the center out, pack in the butter >>> Yummy.
Tinker

I’m with you!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: rvieceli on April 25, 2019, 02:52 PM
Me too on the lumps and the skins. I just use an old fashioned wire masher. I add butter, sour cream and heavy cream and then have at them with the masher,

Ron
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 25, 2019, 08:24 PM
I do them the same way with the old wire masher. I just smashed them if we are alone or if I know the company likes them lumpy. If they prefer them with no lumps, I just do the final mash by extra whirling with the masher. Lots of butter, and milk or as @ rvieceli, sour milk and sometimes, cottage cheese mixed in. I figure with butter, I don't need to add cream. Of course, by adding cream, if I whipped them hard enough and long enough, maybe the cream would turn to butter ;-)
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 25, 2019, 10:30 PM
My mashed potatoes;

Smooth, no lumps. Hand mashed with a waffle head masher.

https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/oxo-good-grips-reg-smooth-potato-masher/1011586082

5 pounds potatoes, washed and peeled, quartered if size dictates

1 medium size onion, peeled

Place in large pot, cover 2" with water add 1 tea spoon coarse salt

Boil until soft, drain, add potatoes back to pot

Add,

Warm to 130° 3/4 cup milk

1 stick butter

Mash away

Add some Parmesan cheese to taste if desired

Remove from pot to bowl (oven safe, see below)

another option;

Flatten top of potatoes

Cover with 1/8" of milk

Place under broiler until browned

Enjoy......

Tom










Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Dick Mahany on April 27, 2019, 06:45 PM
Well nothing is cooking today except me.  It's 102 degrees on my covered patio and I'm enjoying my favorite Labatts Blue Canadian beer which is a rare find in the SoCal desert. Kept cool courtesy of Festool. Hmm, maybe time for one more  [big grin]

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 28, 2019, 10:12 AM
Yes, passe-vite it is. :) Tell your wife, @six-point socket II said it's a must have in the kitchen. lol.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Try to get one of the originals, like the moulin-legumes.

Kind regards,
Oliver

I had to look up what passe-vite translates to.  LOL - it's food mill!  I was surprised to see the original, moulin-legumes is only about $10 more than the Oxo that I had planned to buy.

I find it interesting to hear about the different ways people like their mashed potatoes.  Some like it "rustic" with the lumps and others prefer it to be perfectly smooth.  I guess it may largely depend on what you grew up with and is familiar or comforting to you.  Or maybe some people just like some texture in what they're eating.

Well nothing is cooking today except me.  It's 102 degrees on my covered patio and I'm enjoying my favorite Labatts Blue Canadian beer which is a rare find in the SoCal desert. Kept cool courtesy of Festool. Hmm, maybe time for one more  [big grin]

(Attachment Link)

102 degrees already?  It's not even May.  With that heat you gotta stay "hydrated" [wink]!  I don't know that I've ever had a Labatt's before.

All the talk about meatloaf on here inspired me to take another stab at it.  My wife had also been asking for meatloaf for a while.  I already had the "base" recipe, I just needed a better cooking technique.  I've always used dry italian breadcrumbs, but to my horror we didn't have any in the cupboard so I had to make some fresh breadcrumbs with Wonder Bread in the food processor.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

I microwaved on high for 5 minutes, drained out about 1/2 cup of fat.  Put on 3 tbsp of ketchup and microwaved for another 20 minutes at 50% power.  Sadly the ketchup didn't really caramelize like it did when my grandmother made it.  Probably 30-35++minutes at 50% power would have been better.  I thought about adding some brown sugar to the ketchup for the glaze, but I thought that might be too much sugar and it might burn.  I don't recall my grandmother adding brown sugar.  I'm pretty sure we just dumped some ketchup out of the big glass bottle and spread it around.

We used 93% lean ground beef.  I was a little surprised by how much fat and grease was in the pan, even after draining out about 1/2 cup.  I remember it being greasy, but not that greasy.  I actually bought my grandparents a special plastic microwave meatloaf pan.  It was like a tray within another pan so the grease could easily drain away.  My grandpa thought it was a really good idea.

The mashed potatoes were the Simply Potatoes.  They were very tasty!

I have the meatloaf sandwich to look forward to today.

Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 28, 2019, 10:20 AM
passe-vite---I've known it as a Foley Mill, turned that crank many a times as a youngin' helping mom (I use the word "helping" loosely).

http://fantes.net/manuals/foley-food-mill-75-ways-to-use.pdf

Never used it for mashed potatoes.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 28, 2019, 10:28 AM
I primarily wanted it to make tomato sauce from whole San Marzano tomatoes.  It's obviously much more versatile than that.

That old instruction book is neat.  Skimming through it made me think of an infomercial - but wait... there's more!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 28, 2019, 10:36 AM
I primarily wanted it to make tomato sauce from whole San Marzano tomatoes.  It's obviously much more versatile than that.

That old instruction book is neat.  Skimming through it made me think of an infomercial - but wait... there's more!

I recall moms primary directions was to make tomato sauce also. I should have keep it along with her cookbook.

Worst kitchen disaster was------ my brother recycled all her Nordic Ware bundt cake pans, she had at least 50 of different designs and sizes. Now I'm out buying them....

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 28, 2019, 10:49 AM
I learned that you shouldn't be in too much of a hurry to get rid of person's belongings after they have passed away.  I learned that the hard way.  I took someone's advice too much to heart.  He said something to the effect of "one person's stuff just becomes another person's junk."   At the time it sounded like very sage advice.  We already had too much of our own crap, no need to kind of hoard all of my grandparents belongings - most of which had no use or significance.  On the other hand, there were a few items that I wished I had thought a little bit more about before being tossing.

It does hurt having to go out and buy something again that you used to have.  It's even worse considering that most things aren't made the same way they used to be.  I bought a set of metal measuring cups around 2008.  I really liked em so I wanted to get another set (because one set is just never enough when cooking).  I bought a new set just a couple of years later.  It looks identical, but the weight and feel is much lighter than the original set. 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 28, 2019, 03:36 PM
>>>I find it interesting to hear about the different ways people like their mashed potatoes.  Some like it "rustic" with the lumps and others prefer it to be perfectly smooth.  I guess it may largely depend on what you grew up with and is familiar or comforting to you.  Or maybe some people just like some texture in what they're eating.<<< Quote

I like to eat my soup with a fork. Does that explain anything?
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: six-point socket II on April 28, 2019, 03:53 PM
Yes, passe-vite it is. :) Tell your wife, @six-point socket II said it's a must have in the kitchen. lol.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Try to get one of the originals, like the moulin-legumes.

Kind regards,
Oliver

I had to look up what passe-vite translates to.  LOL - it's food mill!  I was surprised to see the original, moulin-legumes is only about $10 more than the Oxo that I had planned to buy.

I find it interesting to hear about the different ways people like their mashed potatoes.  Some like it "rustic" with the lumps and others prefer it to be perfectly smooth.  I guess it may largely depend on what you grew up with and is familiar or comforting to you.  Or maybe some people just like some texture in what they're eating.

(...)

Hi!

I don't exactly dislike any kind of mashed potatoes. If I get to choose, and if it's a dish with a great sauce, I prefer the totally smooth kind as it mixes better. ;) But then again.

What I also like to do with bigger portions of mashes potatoes: put them under the oven's grill with some butter and panko/breadcrumbs (really, really fine)

A bit like duchess potatoes.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: What's Cooking - There are failures
Post by: Peter Halle on April 28, 2019, 05:33 PM
So last night was part of a boneless rib roast that was frozen at Christmas.  The other half was great!  This half (3 lbs. or so) was cold smoked for about an hour and a half over oak - my favorite, and then cooked sous vide for 4 hours at 132 F.  Then seared on a cast iron pan coated with coconut oil.

Let's just say that my dogs will enjoy this for a few days as fortification on top of their dogwood.  It was cooked perfectly.  The smoke flavoring would have been something that maybe everyone else would love - but not me.

I love smoking food - fish, meat, cheese for others but then I can't eat it.

The twice baked potato initially cooked on the grill was wonderful.  Yes, finished in the oven with panko bread crumbs sprayed with oil and it was great.

On to hamburgers with Hellman's potato salad - potatoes grilled instead of boiled and with Montreal Steak seasoning.- tonight.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: tjbnwi on April 28, 2019, 07:13 PM
I get my mashed potato texture buy smothering them with cream style corn [thumbs up].

I really like cottage cheese, that had a little texture....

I did score another All-Clad pan, wife wanted to go to Marshals for shoes, I wonder by the cooking stuff. Caught the pan out of the corner of my eye, $120.00 pan for $30.00. They had a few Lodge cast iron, going back in a week to see if they’re still there and price drops.

Tom
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 29, 2019, 12:48 AM
I like to eat my soup with a fork. Does that explain anything?
Tinker

Well it explains to me that you probably also eat peas with a knife.   [popcorn] [popcorn]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 29, 2019, 12:57 AM
I like smooth mashed taters...lumps are for the chumps...until of course, potato skins are offered as a bonus round, then all bets are off. So... smooth taters without the skin and smooth taters with the skin. The best of both worlds.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: pixelated on April 29, 2019, 09:55 AM
I like to eat my soup with a fork. Does that explain anything?
Tinker

Well it explains to me that you probably also eat peas with a knife.   [popcorn] [popcorn]

I eat my peas with honey
I've done it all my life
It makes the peas taste funny
But it keeps them on my knife

 [wink]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: rvieceli on April 29, 2019, 03:18 PM
Just in case folks don't know about this resource, I'll add it. Great Chefs television series.

It started as a 1/2 hour program on PBS and then went to Discovery I believe.There were usually three dishes prepared. No flash like today's shows, just real technique. The female narrators accent is wonderful. I think the whole episodes are available for a fee somewhere, but this website has a lot of the recipes and videos for free.

https://greatchefs.com/

Try it. you'll like it

Ron
Title: Re: What's Cooking - There are failures
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 29, 2019, 06:31 PM
So last night was part of a boneless rib roast that was frozen at Christmas.  The other half was great!  This half (3 lbs. or so) was cold smoked for about an hour and a half over oak - my favorite, and then cooked sous vide for 4 hours at 132 F.  Then seared on a cast iron pan coated with coconut oil.

Let's just say that my dogs will enjoy this for a few days as fortification on top of their dogwood.  It was cooked perfectly.  The smoke flavoring would have been something that maybe everyone else would love - but not me.

I love smoking food - fish, meat, cheese for others but then I can't eat it.

The twice baked potato initially cooked on the grill was wonderful.  Yes, finished in the oven with panko bread crumbs sprayed with oil and it was great.

On to hamburgers with Hellman's potato salad - potatoes grilled instead of boiled and with Montreal Steak seasoning.- tonight.

Peter

That sounds really good!

I get my mashed potato texture buy smothering them with cream style corn [thumbs up].

I really like cottage cheese, that had a little texture....

I did score another All-Clad pan, wife wanted to go to Marshals for shoes, I wonder by the cooking stuff. Caught the pan out of the corner of my eye, $120.00 pan for $30.00. They had a few Lodge cast iron, going back in a week to see if they’re still there and price drops.

Tom

I like cottage cheese too with lots of ground black pepper on top.  This may sound weird, but I like the cottage cheese you find on a salad bar the best.  I don't know what it is or why, but the little tubs from the grocery store just never taste the same.  Be it small curd, large curd, lowfat or regular, name brand or store brand.  I even bought a big tub from Restaurant Depot once hoping that it might be what some salad bars use.  It was not the same, I reckon theirs must come in a huge bag from somewhere like Sysco or some other commercial food distributor.

Sounds like you got a good deal on the All-Clad pan.  Does Marshals usually drop the prices on items if they sit on the shelf too long.  We maybe only shop there once or twice a year.  We've gotten some scented candles there several times.

Just in case folks don't know about this resource, I'll add it. Great Chefs television series.

It started as a 1/2 hour program on PBS and then went to Discovery I believe.There were usually three dishes prepared. No flash like today's shows, just real technique. The female narrators accent is wonderful. I think the whole episodes are available for a fee somewhere, but this website has a lot of the recipes and videos for free.

https://greatchefs.com/

Try it. you'll like it

Ron

That was a great show!  Predating the Food Network.  I used to watch it with my grandparents.  It had a catchy theme song too.  I believe the full episodes are available on Twitch.  I've heard of Twitch, I don't really know what it is or how it works.  Their YouTube channel looks to have videos of individual dishes: http://www.youtube.com/user/GreatChefs/videos.  It's funny to see now famous chefs appear back in the day on the show.  People like Emeril Lagasse, Lidia Bastianich, Jacques Torres, all sorts of well known cooking names.  Reminds me of another good show, Julia Child: Cooking with Master Chefs (http://www.pbs.org/food/shows/julia-child-cooking-with-master-chefs/).

Last night I made oxtail stew the pressure cooker.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

I made Tom's (or his mom's) Chocolate Cookie recipe for dessert.  We didn't have any nuts so we put some hazelnut spread M&Ms on a few of the cookies.

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Peter Halle on April 29, 2019, 06:39 PM
Oh cottage cheese - one of my vices.  I am a full fat cottage cheese kind of guy and can't stand the ones where the curds almost squeak in your teeth.  I won't buy the name brands and locally only will buy the Food Lion brand.  Small curd is virtually impossible to find.  I suspect that cottage cheese might taste better at a salad bar due to longer exposure to the air - like many cheeses do.

Growing up as a kid cottage cheese was sprinkled with Lawry's Season Salt.  I prefer Chef Paul's Meat Magic on top now.  My wife and her whole family mixes cottage cheese with baked beans at Thanksgiving  [scared] [scared] [scared].

To each their own I suppose.

Peter
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 29, 2019, 09:06 PM
It's funny that you can't stand the ones that almost squeak.  Last year I posted my failed attempt at making squeaky curds.

That's a very interesting observation you made about the air exposure.  I had never thought of that.

Hmm maybe I should try dumping the tub of cottage cheese out on a black takeout plastic container so it can air out.  Or maybe just take the lid off the tub in the fridge. 
Title: Re: What's Cooking: 5 winners
Post by: Cheese on April 29, 2019, 09:22 PM
I eat my peas with honey
I've done it all my life
It makes the peas taste funny
But it keeps them on my knife

LOL... [popcorn]

Well I've had a great run on trying new recipes over the last 2 weeks. We all know sometimes things work and sometimes they don't no matter how much we try.  [crying]

So the new 4 or 5 star (my rating) recipes that I've cooked for the last 2 weeks include:
Individual Smoked Salmon Pizza

[attachimg=1]

Creamy Lemon Orzo with Peas & Shrimp

[attachimg=2]

Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas with Red Sauce

[attachimg=3]

Shrimp, Prosciutto & Lemon Pasta

[attachimg=4]

Duxelles Pizza with Arugula and Balsamic Reduction

[attachimg=5]

Tomorrow I'm going to try a new turkey tetrazzini recipe with a nice fresh béchamel sauce rather than using canned soup that has a high concentration of salt.




Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on April 29, 2019, 09:42 PM
Great pictures Cheese!  Have you had belly lox before?  I made the mistake of buying it at Wegman's because it was the only salmon package that explicitly said "lox" on it (I was looking specifically for lox for bagels).  Boy what a mistake.  It was the saltiest thing I've ever eaten.  I actually contacted the company to complain and they asked me if I've ever had belly lox before.  I said no and they responded that it's supposed to be salty.  This was inedibly salty!  I definitely think there was something wrong with it.  Like I expect caviar and prosciutto to be salty, but not like this was - pure salt.

I usually think of turkey tetrazzini as a way to use up the turkey leftovers from Thanksgiving.  Turkey really should be eaten more just once a year!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on April 29, 2019, 10:53 PM
Great pictures Cheese!  Have you had belly lox before? 

I usually think of turkey tetrazzini as a way to use up the turkey leftovers from Thanksgiving.  Turkey really should be eaten more just once a year!

I have not had belly lox before...as a matter of fact, I've never heard of it before. You've introduced me to another food product that I need to sample.  [big grin]   I'm feeling a little bit like Anthony Bordain...not really as he was a world away from my tasting sensibilities.

Interestingly enough, we cooked a turkey for Easter...darn the torpedo's...full speed ahead. We cooked an 8# brined turkey breast. Simply delicious. 
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Tinker on April 30, 2019, 09:41 AM
It's funny that you can't stand the ones that almost squeak.  Last year I posted my failed attempt at making squeaky curds.

That's a very interesting observation you made about the air exposure.  I had never thought of that.

Hmm maybe I should try dumping the tub of cottage cheese out on a black takeout plastic container so it can air out.  Or maybe just take the lid off the tub in the fridge.

When I was living with cousins on my uncle's farm, we made our own cottage cheese and our own butter, among other goodies from the small herd. Never got to like the home made butter, whether made from sweet, or sour cream, whether or not we kids got to crank the butter churn. The churning was the exciting part of the process. Occasionally, we bought butter from the village store just down the road. That was the treat.

We sometimes made our own cottage cheese. Large curd as I remember. When my cousin made that, she would hang a couple of bags (cheese cloth bags) from the ceiling over the kitchen sink. I ever got involved with the cheese making, but it was DDee luscious. I have never appreciated store bought cottage cheese.
Tinker
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Vondawg on April 30, 2019, 11:21 AM
@Cheese I’m starting to see where the moniker “Cheese” comes...ha-ha !
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on May 01, 2019, 03:49 PM
Last night we had sous vide leg of lamb, with couscous and a Mediterranean salad.  I bought a semi-boneless leg of lamb on sale and cut it in two.  I seasoned both pieces and vacuum sealed them.  I froze the seasoned piece with a bone.  I'll cook it sous vide straight from the freezer at a later date.

This piece cooked at 134 degrees for 4 hours.  I'm already trying to calculate in my head how long I should cook the frozen bone-in piece.


[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

I made pound cake for dessert.

[attachimg=10]

[attachimg=11]
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Cinco de Mayo
Post by: Cheese on May 09, 2019, 12:15 PM
Last Sunday, on Cinco de Mayo, I served up Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas with Red Sauce. I know I've already posted this recipe but this time I was able to find some fresh yellow heirloom tomatoes so I added them to the mix.  [big grin]

Delicious...

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]
Title: Re: What's Cooking: Wilted Arugula
Post by: Cheese on May 16, 2019, 09:59 AM
Well what started as a salad side dish, Wilted Arugula with Balsamic Vinegar turned into a nice main dish by simply adding some sea scallops.

Arugula wilts/cooks just like spinach so while a 5 oz package might seem like a lot, by the time the water is removed there's not a lot left. 8 oz would be a nice proportion for 2 people.

So, wilted arugula with garlic, add some pan fried sea scallops, sprinkle on some toasted pignoli & some shaved Reggiano and a splash of your favorite balsamic vinegar. I used peach balsamic because it's soft flavor doesn't mask the scallops or parmesan.

Fully drying the scallops so that they will get a crust is the most difficult task. This is basically a 10 minute meal. [big grin]

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on May 16, 2019, 02:18 PM
That's a nice looking dish.  Also seems to be relatively low carb.  I don't eat scallops that often.  Sometimes they're a little gritty, which I hate (I also hate gritty clams).

I got lazy and haven't posted the last couple of meals.

Last week we had chicken parm with salad.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

We also made ham with scalloped potatoes, brussel sprouts, and corn.

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

[attachimg=6]

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

[attachimg=9]

[attachimg=10]

I used the leftover ham bone to make split pea soup with homemade croutons.

[attachimg=11]

[attachimg=12]

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]

[attachimg=15]

[attachimg=16]

[attachimg=17]

[attachimg=18]

[attachimg=19]
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Gregor on May 18, 2019, 07:48 AM
I love mashed potatoes but the only way I know how to get them creamy without any lumps is by using a ricer. I've tried all types of mashers and even tried using a fork...lumps.
You're using the wrong kind of potatoes, the waxy ones are better used for fried potatoes as they don't fall apart. Try starchy / floury potatos as these work way better for mush, a local farmers market should be a good source for this kind.

Boil the potatoes, remove them from the pot to give it a quick clean (hot water + brush/sponge, so it stays hot), then skin the potatoes and re-add to the still hot pot where you mush them with something like this
(https://www.lurch.de/media/image/09/fb/22/00010990_15b76b3c5c85d2_600x600.png)
(image lifted from https://www.lurch.de/kochen/kuechenwerkzeuge/62/kartoffelstampfer-edelstahl)
while adding bits of butter and/or milk till you get to the desired consistency, finally add salt and freshly grated nutmed to your taste.

In case you want it really creamy: use a bit more butter/milk and finish with a handheld electric mixer.

Quote
Then about 3 years ago I stumbled on these, I was amazed...still am amazed.  For the last several years I've served this with the holiday meal and everyone raves when I tell them the taters are packaged. They're in the refrigerator section with the milk and eggs.
*shudder*

Do yourself a favour and make it from scratch, it really isn't rocket science when using the right potatoes for the job.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on May 18, 2019, 10:50 PM
Last week we had chicken parm with salad.

The brussels sprouts with bacon/prosciutto/pancetta looks terrific.  [smile]

I'll cook the same faire but then give them a quick super hot saute just to give them a crust...gotta love the fond. That's where the flavor is.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: GoingMyWay on May 18, 2019, 10:52 PM
It was bacon. Everything is always better with bacon [big grin]!
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on May 18, 2019, 11:06 PM
It was bacon. Everything is always better with bacon [big grin]!

Ya you're right...bacon just makes it better. It can be a subtle taste or a more astringent taste, just depends upon what part of the pig you serve.  [big grin]

My wife shouts from the highest hills that she hates pork...cannot stand the stuff..I will never eat ribs in my life...and then bacon comes along...and then prosciutto....and then pancetta...life is suddenly good for her.
Title: Re: What's Cooking
Post by: Cheese on May 18, 2019, 11:27 PM
So seeing as we're talking about food at this hour, the dinner for tonight was Shrimp Tacos with Cilantro Lime Slaw. It was very good...I'd like to tweek the lime avocado crema a bit, but for the first roll-out it was a dinner winner.


[attachimg=1]