Author Topic: Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.  (Read 1337 times)

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Offline Coliban

  • Posts: 100
Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.
« on: February 18, 2017, 03:12 AM »
Last sunday i took a stroll on the fields near our home. As every time when i take a walk, i went a little aside the ways and searched the ground and found some tools, they used presumably about 5000 or 10000 years ago in this area.

As a student i worked for the archeologist museum to earn some money and there they taught me how to recognize stones which where treated by humans in order to work on wood, bones, furs, and so on.
(This area was transit for hunters in and between the last ice ages, they came after reindeers, deers, and so on and crossed the river elbe (which is near our place) and had their summer or transit camps etc., around here).

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Offline PreferrablyWood

  • Posts: 847
Re: Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 03:51 AM »
Nice story, early ancestor of the festool OF 2200 perhaps?
850 HL E Planer rustic head standard head angle fence, MFS 400x2, MFS extensions MFS VB 700 x 1 MFS VB 1000 x 2 . CMS GE, sliding fence, VB and 2x VL extension tables, OF 2200, Accessory Set ZS OF 2200 M,36mm 5m antistatik hose, CMS OF+ CMS TS 75 insert modules. SYS-MFT Fixing-Set,  3.5m sleeved hose, Syslite duo, Sys 4 sort 3 x3, Sys Roll, Sys 1 Box x2 , classic Sys 3-Sort 4, classic Sys 3 Sort 6 x2, Sys Cart x3 Systainer 4 x2  as toolbox with selfmade inserts Systainer 5 as toolbox with insert.
Festool 18V HKC 55 Li 5.2 EB Plus FSK 420,FSK 250, Extra blade for the HKC 55 W32.TI 15, CXS 2.6 Ah version, RO 90 DX, PDC 18/4 plus DC UNI FF depth stop chuck,AD 3/8 square socket holder FF chuck, Centrotec Bits; -->Bit holder and bit selection BHS 65 CE TL 24x, ,Bradpoint DB WOOD CE SET ,Zobo (Forstner) D 15-35 CE-Zobo SET ,Masonary/stone bits DB STONE CE Set,Extender BV 150 CE, Countersink QLS D2-8 CE Hook turner HD D18, end centrotec<--.  TS 75 EBQ, PSC 420, OF 1010, RS 300 EQ, CTL Midi, MFT 3, Parf dogs x2pair +Bench dogs x2pair, FS 1080, FS 1900 .  will get Domino DF 700 XL,  CMS insert BS 120 Belt sander.

Offline Coliban

  • Posts: 100
Re: Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.
« Reply #2 on: February 18, 2017, 05:28 AM »
Maybe...

But these sort of stones are nothing special since the whole land is gathered with this sort of stones, tools, weapons, etc. the museums have tons of stones in their cellars. You can tell if it is formed by man when you look at the edges: they are hammered with other stones or dear head and you can see small scratches where the stone cut off. These scratches are on a regular basis and not by accident because there are several in the same direction which would not happened if that would be by accident from moving over the ground by ice, the plough or something else. Often stones burst when water is freezing, but these marks are cut or hammered always from the edges at defined points.

At point 1 there are several scratches "hammered" in, that was the blade.
The other marks where made to dull the sharp edges so they could hold it in the hand (fresh impacted flintstone is very sharp and you can't use it without dulling it).

I took it and it is astonishing how well it fits in the hand and they made additional kerfs (3) for the thumb and for the other fingers, you would not guess how comfortable the stone fits into the hand! I tried to make some photos to illustrate this.

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Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 408
Re: Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.
« Reply #3 on: February 18, 2017, 10:42 AM »
Here I thought finding an Indian arrow head from a couple hundred years ago was so cool. Apparently not... :)


Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3542
Re: Woodworking tools about 5-10000 years b.c.
« Reply #4 on: February 18, 2017, 07:42 PM »
nice job Oliver.
That gives us some perspective on things.
And cool how the tools were ergonomic.