Author Topic: Hand tools, where have you been all my life?  (Read 11990 times)

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Offline John Broomall

  • Posts: 47
Re: Hand tools, where have you been all my life?
« Reply #30 on: August 22, 2015, 11:39 PM »
A Lie-Nielson number 5 jack plane for general use and a No. 7 jointer for joining long boards. Veritas is making excellent planes as well there are some nice lower priced ones around now. The old Buck Brothers or Butcher Brothers cast steel chisels are always useful. 

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Offline Birdhunter

  • Posts: 2305
  • Woodworker, Sportsman, Retired
Re: Hand tools, where have you been all my life?
« Reply #31 on: August 23, 2015, 06:30 AM »
I've collected and use nearly all the L-N planes and a lot of chisels. They became a lot more fun to use after I bought the Work Sharp 3000 sharpener.

I had tried water stones (messy, fussy, slow), Tormec (messy, fussy, slow), diamond stones .(need guides and Still inaccurate ), and grinder (inaccurate and can burn tools).

The Work Sharp produces a mirror finish incredibly sharp blade every time I've used it. You absolutely need to know the bevel angle of the blade you are sharpening.

It uses sandpaper adhered to a thick glass plate spinning at a moderate RPM. The blade rests on a guide the user sets to the correct bevel angle. The blade is pushed gently against the sandpaper and then withdrawn repetitively. 

The first time the blade is sharpened, you have to work through all the grits. Touch ups require only one or two grit passes and can be done in less than 5 minutes.

My L-N planes now produce shavings thinner than paper and I hardly have to push the plane. I get the neatest "swish" noise as I make a pass.

Birdhunter

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7651
Re: Hand tools, where have you been all my life?
« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2015, 06:58 AM »
I've collected and use nearly all the L-N planes and a lot of chisels. They became a lot more fun to use after I bought the Work Sharp 3000 sharpener.

I had tried water stones (messy, fussy, slow), Tormec (messy, fussy, slow), diamond stones .(need guides and Still inaccurate ), and grinder (inaccurate and can burn tools).

The Work Sharp produces a mirror finish incredibly sharp blade every time I've used it. You absolutely need to know the bevel angle of the blade you are sharpening.

It uses sandpaper adhered to a thick glass plate spinning at a moderate RPM. The blade rests on a guide the user sets to the correct bevel angle. The blade is pushed gently against the sandpaper and then withdrawn repetitively. 

The first time the blade is sharpened, you have to work through all the grits. Touch ups require only one or two grit passes and can be done in less than 5 minutes.

My L-N planes now produce shavings thinner than paper and I hardly have to push the plane. I get the neatest "swish" noise as I make a pass.

You're not helpning [sad] [embarassed]

I've got a Tormek T7 with all of the bells, but I've been considering a WorkSharp. I was initially against them as I thought it would be too easy to cook the metal, but it's really a technique and practice thing.

I also got the monster drill sharpening jig for the Tormek, but I'm just tool lazy to use it.


Offline Bohdan

  • Posts: 877
Re: Hand tools, where have you been all my life?
« Reply #33 on: August 23, 2015, 09:13 AM »

I was initially against them as I thought it would be too easy to cook the metal, but it's really a technique and practice thing.

You can leave the Worksharp setup and it only takes a minute to restore a dull edge. If you need to repair the edge I find that I hit the tool hard on a coarse grit and then let it cool off, both tool and motor, coming back to grind it as I walk past while doing something else. I find that if you push it too hard the thermal cutout on the motor limits your efforts.