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Author Topic: Is it easy to learn to use cabinet scrapers?  (Read 2571 times)
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Flashman

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Location: UK
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« on: March 12, 2013, 06:12 PM »

....bearing in mind I'm a painter, not a woodworker so not used to working with bare wood.
I'd use them to get a nice surface on table tops etc per-varnish.
Are they as easy to use vertically?
Also, do you get what you pay for? Should I buy the best I can get?
I'm thinking of getting an assortment from Axminster with a Clifton burnisher.
Paul
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Flashman

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« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2013, 06:15 PM »

Another thought...
Do I need a file as well to prep the scraper?
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Jesse Cloud

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Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico


« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2013, 07:08 PM »

You will need a file and a vice to hold the scraper steady.  I suspect others may disagree, but I don't see a lot of difference in the different brands.  If you will be scraping curved surfaces, get a curved scrapper as well as a rectangular one.

There are lots of videos on the net on how to sharpen, pick one that looks good to you and keep trying until it clicks.  Also, try hold the scraper at different angles until you find the "sweet spot." 

If you plan to use the scraper on site, buy a few and sharpen them before you go, hard to predict how long they will stay sharp.
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Frank Pellow

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Toronto, Ontario and Lake Pivabiska, Ontario


« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2013, 07:42 PM »

I spent many years of woodworking (about 50) before I learned about cabinet scapers and only started using them about ten years ago.  I found that it was very easy go lear how to use and to sharpen them.

I recommend this inexpensive scraper/burnisher set from Lee Valley as a starting point: http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=32644&cat=1,310,41070
« Last Edit: March 17, 2013, 10:34 PM by Frank Pellow » Logged

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               Frank (Festool connoisseur)
Christopher Robinson

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« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2013, 07:56 PM »

Scraper plane with the largest base you can find is useful---especially when working with figured woods (sometimes the ONLY way to work on highly figured woods).

Some people mod their older cabinet scrapers/planes by screwing them into a larger custom base.

Have to have extremely sharp blade, also have to have some practice with setting the anlge in the plane.

Card scrapers are OK but hard to get a really flat surface if you don't have a scraper plane...I only use card scraper for touch ups...
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RL

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« Reply #5 on: March 12, 2013, 10:04 PM »

You don't tend to use them vertically because they are designed to be bent and it's easier to bend them on the long side of the scraper. It's useful to have a couple of different thicknesses of scrapers. The burnisher is very important, and yes, I think you you need a file, and of course waterstones or whatever medium you use to sharpen your tools.

There are several youtube videos available on using a card scraper. I think Chris Tribe did a good one.
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TinyTiger

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Location: Northern Illinois, USA
Member Since: Mar 2013
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« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2013, 11:40 PM »

Another thought...
Do I need a file as well to prep the scraper?

Call me crazy if you will, but I struggled with scrapers until I found the Woodsmith Shop Scraper Kit.  It includes a scraper, sharpening file, burnishing pin, and extruded aluminum jig that will allow you to sharpen 90 AND 45-degree bevels easily and with repeatability.  You can use them on hand-held card scrapers and the Stanley #80 scrapers.  It makes sharpening so dead easy, even I ( with 10 thumbs and 0 patience) can do it quickly and get right back to work.  Tongue Out  Now it's easy to learn and use them.

I've seen them available at both the Woodsmith Shop Store and Woodcraft.  I hope this helps!
« Last Edit: March 12, 2013, 11:43 PM by TinyTiger » Logged

Russ
rdesigns

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Location: usa
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2013, 09:59 AM »

Two of the best tips on sharpening I've seen (and since used) are to not angle the burnisher very much when turning the burr--just about 2 degrees is enough, and the other thing is not to put much pressure on the burnisher--about 8 or 10 ounces is enough. I was way overdoing both of these steps.

Since you intend to use scrapers in connection with your finishing work, another really effectivet use of the scraper is to level and smooth the finish between coats of laquer, varnish, poly, etc. You just very lightly drag the scraper over the surface, and it will shave off any roughness. Much more pleasant than sanding, and it creates almost no dust.
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Flashman

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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2013, 02:28 PM »

Thanks everyone, really useful stuff here.
Paul
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Alan m

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Location: Ireland
Member Since: Aug 2010
Posts: 3112



« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2013, 03:54 PM »

i struggled with scraper for a long time. they were always left on the shelf

that was until i watched  a video posted by the wood wisperer. now i can sharpen them and do use them

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/scraper-sharpening-w-william-ng/

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ts 55+2 1400 rails+ 1 lr32 1400 rail, domino+assortment systainer+ domiplate, ct 22 with boom arm+home made thien baffel, lr32 set, rotex 150, home made MFT,home made work center, 6 t locs for other tools, of2000 , ro 90, mft 800, trion , ls 130
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