Author Topic: Planing rabbets  (Read 5008 times)

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Offline mrFinpgh

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Planing rabbets
« on: June 09, 2016, 10:38 PM »
I'm making some trim by hand, and I'm planing a 3/4" rabbet into it.

What I find is that once I start to really hog out the material, the throat gets clogged on my rabbet plane (3/4" wood rabbet, straight blade, no knicker).   So what I tried tonight is to mark out the line with a mortise gauge - 1 line around 3/8" and one around 3/4".   I planed to depth on the first line, and then moved over and planed to depth on the 2nd line, creating the full rabbet.

This seemed to take a little less time than planing the whole thing at once.  I would guess it's because I'm removing less material per stroke, which allows more room for the throat to clear without my stopping.   Also, it's easier to do a 3/8" wide shaving vs a 3/4" wide shaving.  Especially when taking a thick shaving.

So I'm trying to identify what would make the most sense here. Taking a thinner shaving?  It still clogs the throat.  Getting a wider rabbet plane?   That kind of makes sense to me, except many rabbet planes have a fence, so presumably they are intended to be used at full width.

Any seasoned folks want to offer some wisdom on this one?

Thanks,
Adam

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Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2016, 11:02 AM »
Hi Adam,

Got a photo of the plane you're using?  I suspect that what you're using is actually a shoulder plane, which is designed for trimming.

A rabbet plane often has a skewed blade and conical escapement, which automatically ejects shavings out the side, so you don't need to stop to clear the plane.
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com

The thoughts and ideas expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of http://UltimateTools.ca.  But Dan does say "hello".

Offline danbox

  • Posts: 70
Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2016, 03:15 PM »
Rebate Plane


Shoulder Plane


It would be pritty hard to clogg the rebate plane, the shaving should just curl up and be ejected off to the side of the plane and then when at the end of the work piece just fall to the floor.

Offline RL

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2016, 11:25 PM »
It sounds like you are using a shoulder plane if it has no nicker and is getting clogged. Is the blade skewed? That's another difference.

Anyway, shoulder planes are designed to take thin end-grain shavings (primarily). If you have a lot of material to remove I'd go with a chisel and then plane to the gauge lines.

Offline bdiemer

  • Posts: 195
Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2016, 08:12 AM »
sounds to me also you're using a tenon plane.  But if your using a rabbet plane it sounds like you're not starting off with a good strong backwards motion to engage the nicker. Even though the nicker is placed in front of the blade a pre cut is very helpful. If you don't have a rebate plane, they are very common on the used, non collectable  market. If you're not yet schooled in the art of setting up tools, veritas makes a very nice new on.

Offline JJ Wavra

  • Posts: 247
Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2016, 10:19 AM »
You said you have wood body plane.  So, try taking a thinner shaving and push the plane quicker.  With wooden planes like you are using pushing a little faster can help keep the shavings from clogging.
Hope this helps and good luck.

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 265
Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2016, 03:28 PM »
Here are a couple photos of the plane:

245657-0

245659-1

245661-2

245663-3


Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2016, 03:40 PM »
Adam,

You should be able to take full-width shavings and not have it clog.  Is the escapement (hole in the side of the body) angled towards one side?
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com

The thoughts and ideas expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of http://UltimateTools.ca.  But Dan does say "hello".

Offline mrFinpgh

  • Posts: 265
Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2016, 11:35 PM »
Hi Chris,

I can take full width shavings, if they are thin enough, and it won't clog. However, any time i start to 'dig in' and take thicker shavings, it clogs up pretty quickly.

Mine you, I'm planing 4 foot long rabbets, so that might be part of it.

The escapement seems to be centered right in the middle of the plane.

Thanks,
Adam

Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #9 on: June 14, 2016, 10:56 AM »
Adam,

If the plane has a symmetrical escapement, the shavings should eject to whichever side is heavier.  The plane has to be wider than the rabbet being cut however, since in that case, as you have found, the shaving will not automatically eject.
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com

The thoughts and ideas expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of http://UltimateTools.ca.  But Dan does say "hello".

Offline Chris Wong

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #10 on: June 14, 2016, 10:56 AM »
PS:  Who made your plane?
Chris Wong, http://FlairWoodworks.com

The thoughts and ideas expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of http://UltimateTools.ca.  But Dan does say "hello".

Offline bdiemer

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #11 on: June 14, 2016, 01:07 PM »
Hi Adam, That's not a rabbet plane. It's a very nice ECE plane. Its a shoulder plane designed to clean up tenens, rabbets and others. It's not designed to hog out a lot of wood. Its designed for joint tune ups and cleanups. I'm amazed you were able to cut that nice rabbit in oak. Rabbet planes are abundant on the used market and veritas makes one that's ready to use.

Offline derekcohen

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Re: Planing rabbets
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2016, 11:52 AM »
Quote
What I find is that once I start to really hog out the material, the throat gets clogged on my rabbet plane

Adam, I suspect that the problem is that the lever cap/wedge (the part that extends onto the end of the blade) is not directing the shavings out of the escapement (the hole at the side of the plane). This section of the wedge should be shaped to turn the shavings sideways. If it is set too far back (perhaps because it has been reshaped, or because it is not original, or because it is damaged), it cannot do this, and instead the shavings roll up behind the mouth.

Regards from Perth

Derek