Author Topic: Router planes  (Read 4064 times)

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Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3594
Router planes
« on: September 07, 2016, 04:36 PM »
Basic question about router planes, since I'm still learning the ropes on hand tools.

When I was up at LN last month, I got to play around a little with their large router plane.  Talked with the sales guy about open vs. closed, and he said that closed was his preferred option by far, with open being only appropriate/useful for inlay work.  Is this true?  I feel like I've read discussions where the open throat was said to have additional virtues.

Also, I have the usual LN vs. LN question.  LV seems to have more accessory options (as well as a choice of metric blades), though these appear relevant only if I'm doing inlay work.  In terms of basic functionality, does anyone have a preference over the other?   
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Offline Discap

  • Posts: 82
Re: Router planes
« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2016, 05:11 PM »
Pretty quiet on the topic so far, so I will go first.  I have no experience with router planes and don't own one.

I own a bunch of LN and LV planes.  Both are high quality and will last a lifetime.  The LN follow the more traditional aesthetic while the LV may be a little more innovative.  From a usage point of view (plane vs. plane) I don't see any measurable difference.  I tend to prefer to look of the LN.  I have several bench planes and use the LN 62 1/2 the most.  LV makes a really nice chamfering plane that doubles as a block plane.  I find it too ugly to use as a block plane.  Just my opinion.

You can't go wrong with either.  Consider your actual usage and don't get too tied up the multi-function aspects of the LV.

bill

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 785
Re: Router planes
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2016, 06:53 PM »
I can't make a comparison for you as I only have the LV.  I chose it less because of the open vs. closed issue and more because I wanted the inlay cutterhead (which I have yet to use in any meaningful capacity lol) and I generally lean LV over LN. 

I'm perfectly happy with it, and I doubt you'll have regrets no matter which way you go. 
Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline 2ooladdict

  • Posts: 85
Re: Router planes
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2016, 09:03 PM »
The closed throat is better as it makes the plane more stable. Depends on what you plan on doing but I use the small router plane much more than the normal router plane.

Offline RL

  • Posts: 3039
Re: Router planes
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2016, 12:13 AM »
I've used both open and closed, and LV and LN. I prefer the closed throat planes, and LV over LN. Closed gives you more stability which is important if you are pivoting the plane over a tenon for example. The LV plane also has an optional inlay cutter set, which is perfect for that specific task.

You can also get far more blade sizes- imperial and metric- with the LV, up to a maximum 3/4". LN tops out at 3/8". If you want to use smaller blades with the LN, you have to buy the blade adaptor ($40). IIRC the LN blades are also one piece, whereas the LV blades detach from the shaft allowing you to sharpen them more easily (at least the way I sharpen them).

You can't go wrong with either plane, but in this comparison I can't think of anything the LN offers over the LV.


Offline Jesse Cloud

  • Posts: 1722
  • Festooling at the end of a dirt road in New Mexico
Re: Router planes
« Reply #5 on: September 08, 2016, 12:45 PM »
My stock of planes is about 1/3 LN, 1/3 LV, and 1/3 old Stanleys, so I don't have a bias toward either LV or LN.

My router plane is LV.  It has always done whatever I needed it to do.  I generally use a powered router for inlay, though.

Offline Rusty Miller

  • Posts: 238
Re: Router planes
« Reply #6 on: September 08, 2016, 01:01 PM »
You might also take a look at walkemooretools.com  They have a router plane modeled after an old Preston.  Seems like all the people that have them like it very much.  Just another option.

Rusty
Rusty Miller
I'd rather be woodworking!

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3658
Re: Router planes
« Reply #7 on: September 08, 2016, 01:26 PM »
I have an old Stanley (don't recall the #) that I inherited from my dad.  I have drooled over both the LN and LV versions, but don't really see an advantage with either one over the antique.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline derekcohen

  • Posts: 226
    • In The Woodshop
Re: Router planes
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2016, 11:16 AM »
I've used the LV and LN alongside each other. They are both exceptionally well made and either would make anyone very happy to own. It is only when you use them together that differences begin to emerge.

The bottom line, however, is that the LV scores over the LN in most, if not all, departments ....

1. The LV has the better blade choice and the better blade design. I think that the LN only comes with only a single 1/2” blade for the #71 and then uses the 1/4” and 3/8” blades for the small version, which required a fiddly adapter. The LV has a wide range of blades from 1/16" through to 3/4", plus a pointed, V cutter.

The LN is square in plan while the LV is a hexagon. Both seat well.

The blade section of the LV is a little longer than the LN, and I find that this enables it to be honed a little more easily. I developed a method of creating a hollow grind, which makes honing so much easier.

2. A closed mouth affords better registration and control when on narrow work.

3. The LV's fence is easier to adjust, has better registration, and has a wider range of adjustment. This fence is used to convert the router plane for plough plane use. Keep in mind that LN follow the traditional lines of Stanley, and the original Stanley fence design was never a strong point.

4. The LV has better thought out blade holding (such as the spring-loaded holders) to avoid blades dropping out when you adjust or change them.

5. The other difference between the LV and the LN is the positioning of the handles. This is not a statement of better-or-worse. Some will prefer the inboard feel of the LN, while others will prefer the wider stance of the LV.

In summary, both are excellent tools, but my preference goes to the LV.

Regards from Perth

Derek

Offline bdiemer

  • Posts: 194
Re: Router planes
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2016, 01:37 PM »
I prefer the LN for myself but my reasoning is one dimentional. I cut most of my solid wood rebates by hand with a record 078 and 99% of my hand cutting router use is leveling and straightening rebates. I learned to come into the rebate in a circular motion using the handle as an axel. For that I prefer the straight handle. That being said the LV is a beautiful tool with more features. I use the solid bottom model.

Offline JJ Wavra

  • Posts: 247
Re: Router planes
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2016, 03:26 PM »
I like the LV because in addition to the full size router you can use all the blades in their medium router as well.  Their medium router is a little larger than LN's small but being able to change blades back and forth is quite nice. I really like the size on the LV medium for smaller projects.


Offline ear3

  • Posts: 3594
Re: Router planes
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2016, 08:44 PM »
Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I'm leaning toward LV then.
Kapex KS 120 w/UG Cart and Extensions • CXS Set • T18+3 w/Centrotec Installer's Set • PDC 18/4 • TS 75 • TSC 55 • HKC 55 w/250, 420 and 670 FSK rails • Carvex 420 w/Accessory Kit • Domino 500 Set • Domino 700 XL • OF 2200 w/Base Accessory Kit • OF 1400 • OF 1010 • MFK 700 EQ Set • LR 32 • MFS 400 w/2000, 1000, and 700 extensions • Rotex 90 • Rotex 150 • LS 130 • ETS-EC 150/5 • ETS-EC 150/3 • ETS 150/3 • Pro 5 LTD • RTS 400 • RAS 115.04 • RS 2 • HL 850 • Vecturo OS 400 • CT 26 w/BT module • CT Sys w/Long-Life Bag • MFT/3

Offline Cochese

  • Posts: 294
    • The 144 Workshop
Re: Router planes
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2016, 08:54 PM »
The router plane is the only LV plane I have, and I have no LN. I simply prefer the look of the Veritas planes, with the dark finish handles. As for use, it's lovely. I have the basic version with the flat and peaked chisel.