Author Topic: Using Waterstones  (Read 9556 times)

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Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1404
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2015, 09:34 AM »

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Offline FOGNewbie

  • Posts: 134
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2015, 10:01 AM »
Thanks! will have to look into this.

Offline waho6o9

  • Posts: 1404
    • Garage Door Handyman.com
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2015, 10:07 AM »
You're welcome.

I purchased one on ebay for around 79.99 so their price @ 49.00 is
pretty darn good.


Offline RL

  • Posts: 3039
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #33 on: April 15, 2015, 10:39 AM »
...or you can just use cool grinding wheels with a regular bench grinder.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=32981&cat=1,43072,43080&ap=1

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1818
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2015, 10:54 AM »
While I recently have acquired stones for hand sharpening, I have had great success with the Worksharp 3000 and various attachments to accommodate wide blades (a horizontal slow spinning plate rather than upright wheel). The Worksharp works especially well with chisels and, because it is so fast and the results good, it is not truly necessary to create a micro-bevel. Just sharpen at the desired angle. When it's not sharp anymore, resharpen. It is fast, but a little pricey (although not nearly as pricey as some wheels are). Each to his own, though. Many get satisfaction from the hand sharpening process. It is cathartic and satisfying when you get great results.
Randy

Offline FOGNewbie

  • Posts: 134
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #35 on: April 15, 2015, 02:17 PM »
While I recently have acquired stones for hand sharpening, I have had great success with the Worksharp 3000 and various attachments to accommodate wide blades (a horizontal slow spinning plate rather than upright wheel). The Worksharp works especially well with chisels and, because it is so fast and the results good, it is not truly necessary to create a micro-bevel. Just sharpen at the desired angle. When it's not sharp anymore, resharpen. It is fast, but a little pricey (although not nearly as pricey as some wheels are). Each to his own, though. Many get satisfaction from the hand sharpening process. It is cathartic and satisfying when you get great results.

I had someone sharpen a wooden plane blade for me once on a Veritas MK II power sharpening system. It did the job very well. I thought about going that route at one point, but right now I'm trying to get down sharpening by hand. Maybe
http://www.leevalley.com/en/Wood/page.aspx?p=48435&cat=1,43072

Offline Ellingferd

  • Posts: 19
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #36 on: April 15, 2015, 03:26 PM »
Hand sharpening isnt as difficult as you think. Here is a video from Paul Sellers sharpening a $10 set of chisels to perfection using sandpaper and a strop. He uses diamond stones day in and day out, but to get started you really dont need much. I use his technique and I can tell you it is very fast, and very effective with little to no learning curve. He demonstrates his technique in another video for plane irons as well. I use the diamond plates but I dont even use a leather strop. Just a piece of wood that I rub chromium oxide on. Very, very sharp result in about 2 minutes and, if you strop every little bit while you are working, you dont need to do a big sharpening for some time, even when putting the tools through a lot of work.

At any rate, a much cheaper method (~100 dollars for diamond plates, a scrap piece of glass for initial flattening, and glass cleaner as lapping fluid), which leaves you with much more $ to spend on Festool. I am a novice, and I learned this method in about 20 minutes, and my tools are incredibly sharp.



Edit: forgot to include link.

Offline grbmds

  • Posts: 1818
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #37 on: April 15, 2015, 03:30 PM »
Hand sharpening isnt as difficult as you think. Here is a video from Paul Sellers sharpening a $10 set of chisels to perfection using sandpaper and a strop. He uses diamond stones day in and day out, but to get started you really dont need much. I use his technique and I can tell you it is very fast, and very effective with little to no learning curve. He demonstrates his technique in another video for plane irons as well. I use the diamond plates but I dont even use a leather strop. Just a piece of wood that I rub chromium oxide on. Very, very sharp result in about 2 minutes and, if you strop every little bit while you are working, you dont need to do a big sharpening for some time, even when putting the tools through a lot of work.

At any rate, a much cheaper method (~100 dollars for diamond plates, a scrap piece of glass for initial flattening, and glass cleaner as lapping fluid), which leaves you with much more $ to spend on Festool. I am a novice, and I learned this method in about 20 minutes, and my tools are incredibly sharp.



Edit: forgot to include link.

Actually I don't believe it's that hard anymore. The longest, most tedious part is generally flattening the back of the blade unless you buy planes from Lie-Nielsen or Lee Valley. I have diamond stones and a Norton Waterstone for finishing. The Worksharp is more foolproof for beginners I think. At least it was for me some time ago when I first realized that the reason I wasn't getting good results with my chisels and planes was because I wasn't paying enough attention to sharpening.
Randy

Offline FOGNewbie

  • Posts: 134
Re: Using Waterstones
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2015, 12:26 AM »
Hand sharpening isnt as difficult as you think. Here is a video from Paul Sellers sharpening a $10 set of chisels to perfection using sandpaper and a strop. He uses diamond stones day in and day out, but to get started you really dont need much. I use his technique and I can tell you it is very fast, and very effective with little to no learning curve. He demonstrates his technique in another video for plane irons as well. I use the diamond plates but I dont even use a leather strop. Just a piece of wood that I rub chromium oxide on. Very, very sharp result in about 2 minutes and, if you strop every little bit while you are working, you dont need to do a big sharpening for some time, even when putting the tools through a lot of work.

At any rate, a much cheaper method (~100 dollars for diamond plates, a scrap piece of glass for initial flattening, and glass cleaner as lapping fluid), which leaves you with much more $ to spend on Festool. I am a novice, and I learned this method in about 20 minutes, and my tools are incredibly sharp.



Edit: forgot to include link.

Actually I don't believe it's that hard anymore. The longest, most tedious part is generally flattening the back of the blade unless you buy planes from Lie-Nielsen or Lee Valley. I have diamond stones and a Norton Waterstone for finishing. The Worksharp is more foolproof for beginners I think. At least it was for me some time ago when I first realized that the reason I wasn't getting good results with my chisels and planes was because I wasn't paying enough attention to sharpening.

What both of you said, I am an aspiring novice and i have obtained very sharp edges with sandpaper mounted to a glass plate(mulitple grits of course). I also agree that most of the time spent is the initial flattening. I have now prefer water/ whetstones and finishing with a Nagura slurry and strop. This technique seems to work a little better for me. The edge seems to hold up a little better especially when I frequently stop to strop (sounds like a jingle/ slogan).

Just got a Shapton 15000 Grit whetstone and Dia-flat lapping plate delivered today. Looking forward to testing it this weekend. I got an edge on an old Stanley spokeshave with a Ron Hock replacement blade to shave end grain a test piece of white oak well enough to think I might not even need to sand if I can repeat these results on an actual project. I am excited to see if the higher grit stone, and new 1000 and 8000 stones will give even better results.

I think my left forearm might be bald this weekend. [scared] Maybe I should switch to paper to check sharpness. [unsure]