Author Topic: Which sharpening system should I have?  (Read 3435 times)

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Offline jools

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Which sharpening system should I have?
« on: October 17, 2016, 01:53 PM »
Ok. So Im now at the stage in my life when I own quality chisels (not sharp screwdrivers)  [big grin]and planes that my current wet stones can't do justice to in my hands. I've always just touched them up free hand with a rolling jig. So do I go the Tormec route which is very expensive, a cheaper copy of the tormec (triton,schepp etc), better quality stones etc
It started with one little sander

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Online jimbouk

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2016, 02:15 PM »
Worksharp!

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Offline Peter Parfitt

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2016, 02:21 PM »
You might want to Google "Scary Sharpening" and see what either The Woodworkers' Workshop or Axminster have to offer. The Veritas honing guide is an essential part of this in my opinion.

It is a quick and easy approach with no hollow grind and less fuss than Tormek.

Peter

Offline grbmds

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2016, 03:00 PM »
The Veritas MKII is great! I have it and it is an essential part of my current hand sharpening method and tools. However, I might consider going with Lie-Nielsen's side clamping model if I were to buy a honing guide right now. Side clamping really is the best and holds the chisels/blades the best and keeps them square to the stone once clamped.

I now sharpen with diamond plates to create the primary bevel (unless the chisel is trashed completely), then 4000 and 8000 Shapton glass stones. This combo works the best for me of anything I've spent my money on over the years and I've spent quite a bit thinking that their was a sharpening tool and method which made sharpening a snap. There isn't. Practice is the best and practice with the same method.

The best piece of advice I ever got was pick a method and stick with it unless it really just doesn't work for you.

I have the Worksharp 3000 also. Great as far as it goes. However, when you flatten the back of a chisel and polish it to 8000 on a water stone, the Worksharp only serves to scratch the back and take it back down a notch or two. It is easy and will get you most of the way to where you want to go. I have just found that it's not the best answer for me.
Randy

Offline HarveyWildes

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2016, 03:23 PM »
I'm also a big fan of the Veritas Mk II.  For chisels, get the narrow blade head, which is a side clamping mechanism.  For plane blades get the standard head.  Veritas sells a package with both.  For skew chisels, get the skew registration jig a well.  The setup is very accurate and repeatable.

I use a combination of stones and sandpaper on plate glass.  For initial setup of a set of chisels, I use sandpaper as I have a hard time keeping the stones flat enough over a setup session.  For honing, I use stones.  For grinding new bevel angles, I use a Tormek, which is good for a lot of other stuff as well.

Offline DrD

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2016, 04:49 PM »
Rob Cosman at robcosman.com has a fantastic approach to sharpening hand planes, chisels and the like; simple approach, extremely quick and easy to get beyond "shave sharpness."  All done by hand.
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Offline grbmds

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2016, 06:45 PM »
I'm also a big fan of the Veritas Mk II.  For chisels, get the narrow blade head, which is a side clamping mechanism.  For plane blades get the standard head.  Veritas sells a package with both.  For skew chisels, get the skew registration jig a well.  The setup is very accurate and repeatable.

I use a combination of stones and sandpaper on plate glass.  For initial setup of a set of chisels, I use sandpaper as I have a hard time keeping the stones flat enough over a setup session.  For honing, I use stones.  For grinding new bevel angles, I use a Tormek, which is good for a lot of other stuff as well.

The Shapton GlassStones require very little flattening maintenance. They don't wear nearly as quick. And, to flatten them, a diamond flattening stone does it quickly. I wouldn't use them for the primary bevel though. I have coarser diamond plates that I use for the primary bevel finishing that at 1200.
Randy

Offline Xoncention

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2016, 07:00 PM »
So do I go the Tormec route which is very expensive, a cheaper copy of the tormec (triton,schepp etc), better quality stones etc
For me the Tormek is the primary tool to get the tools in prime shape.  For upkeep, I use the Veritas MkII honing guide.  I also keep my hand in and manually touch up the edges on a 8000 wet stone.  I take my hat off to those who only use a manual system.  I just don't have the time to work this way.

Online waho6o9

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Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2016, 11:03 PM »


Paul Sellers ^^

After the diamond plates I like using 8000 water stone and then strop.

YMMV

Have fun, sharpening's a blast

Offline derekcohen

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    • In The Woodshop
Re: Which sharpening system should I have?
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2016, 10:49 AM »
Ok. So Im now at the stage in my life when I own quality chisels (not sharp screwdrivers)  [big grin]and planes that my current wet stones can't do justice to in my hands. I've always just touched them up free hand with a rolling jig. So do I go the Tormec route which is very expensive, a cheaper copy of the tormec (triton,schepp etc), better quality stones etc

A sharpening system for me begins with a hollow grind as I freehand sharpen. I have a Tormek, but I would recommend instead a half-speed 8" grinder with a 180 grit CBN wheel. Follow this with good ceramic waterstones, such as 1000 Pro Shapton, and 6000 and 13000 Sigma. You'll be happy for life.

My system is here: http://www.inthewoodshop.com/WoodworkTechniques/UltimateGrindingSharpeningSetUp.html

Regards from Perth

Derek