Author Topic: Bevel Gauges  (Read 38387 times)

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Offline SRSemenza

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Bevel Gauges
« on: February 15, 2012, 12:09 PM »
Been waiting for this one. bevel gauge, sliding bevel , T bevel, or what ever you want to call it.

Bevel Gauge


Seth
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 12:38 PM by SRSemenza »

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Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #1 on: February 15, 2012, 07:08 PM »
Looks like it might be an improved version of my Japanese tool.  What do you think of it, Seth?

Offline andvari

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #2 on: February 15, 2012, 07:23 PM »
Looks like it might be an improved version of my Japanese tool.  What do you think of it, Seth?

It sure looks like improved Shinwa.

Does anyone know what the angle reference in the order form is?
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Offline campbellcraft

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #3 on: February 15, 2012, 07:31 PM »
Ref is to a thin metal plate with scribed lines to set multiple angles.  Place the bevel on edge of plate and either read or set an angle.  Works very well.

Offline Alex

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #4 on: February 15, 2012, 07:36 PM »
I've got one of these things, works great for measuring and transfering angles. When I was a kid, it also worked great as a sword. Been in the family for over 40 years.

An angle reference is probably something to measure angles. You'll need it with this tool. I use this:


Offline RL

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #5 on: February 15, 2012, 07:44 PM »

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #6 on: February 15, 2012, 07:55 PM »
Looks like it might be an improved version of my Japanese tool.  What do you think of it, Seth?

Don't have it yet. It just went up for preorder today. But it is one that I had suggested, so I am really looking forward to it.

Seth

Offline Ken Nagrod

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #7 on: February 15, 2012, 08:00 PM »
Looks like it might be an improved version of my Japanese tool.  What do you think of it, Seth?

Don't have it yet. It just went up for preorder today. But it is one that I had suggested, so I am really looking forward to it.

Seth

I know you don't have it.   [tongue] I was just curious what you thought of it compared to the one's we use now.  I guess I'm looking for some positive reinforcement to lay out the money for the set.

Offline RonWen

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #8 on: February 15, 2012, 08:06 PM »
The Sutherland Tool Bevel Boss is a great gage for setting the bevel gauge angles.  http://www.sutherlandtool.com/bevelboss.html

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #9 on: February 15, 2012, 08:17 PM »
The Sutherland Tool Bevel Boss is a great gage for setting the bevel gauge angles.  http://www.sutherlandtool.com/bevelboss.html

I love this tool.  I have had one for years, yet I am disappointed that it doesn't have a cord attached.

Ken -  [poke]

Peter

Offline hockey_magnet

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2012, 08:27 PM »
I like the Veritas design with the cam lever as it allows me to lock it with one finger - makes it easier to use if I have to reach into a corner

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #11 on: February 15, 2012, 09:12 PM »
Ken,

Anodized aluminum and stainless steel = no maintenance, I hate having to keep things from rusting / tarnishing.  No wood or plastic  to warp or deform. The bottom end lock means  the mechanism won't be in the way on either side.  [thumbs up]


Seth

Offline PaulMarcel

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #12 on: February 15, 2012, 09:32 PM »
I like the Veritas design with the cam lever as it allows me to lock it with one finger - makes it easier to use if I have to reach into a corner

+5 :)  Fantastic bevel gauge and it doesn't slip.  Closes up nicely, too.
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Offline RL

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #13 on: February 15, 2012, 09:40 PM »
You can also use the lever on both sides of the Veritas gauge.

Offline John Stevens

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #14 on: February 15, 2012, 09:51 PM »
I like the Veritas design with the cam lever as it allows me to lock it with one finger - makes it easier to use if I have to reach into a corner
+1 on that.  I've bought four of the "limited run" tools from Woodpeckers, but can't see buying this one unless it has a cam lock.  Unlike twisting a bolt, which tends to change the angle, the cam lock keeps the angle true.  I also own a Shinwa, but haven't used it in years since buying the Veritas.

Regards,

John
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Offline Captainwrinkles

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2012, 11:44 PM »
Lee Valley just came out with this one today

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1&p=69055

might be worth a look  [smile]

Offline jmbfestool

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #16 on: February 16, 2012, 02:55 AM »
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Offline GaryLaroff

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #17 on: February 16, 2012, 01:43 PM »
There is another new bevel gauge that was announced in July 2011 that shipped soon after and that is true to the Robinson patent.  In my opinion after using it, this is an excellent bevel gauge.  I have no financial interest in this business, but I can say that the tool works well and that it has retired my trusty Bridge City and Shinwa bevel gauges.  That it is a rugged tool, has the lock on the end and a switch to lock it at 90 degrees are the main product features.

47898-0

This bevel gauge is Patrick Leach’s exact copy of Isaiah Robinson’s 1872 improved patent sliding bevel with sliding tab for quick setting 90 degrees to make it function as a double square.  It a 100% true copy, faithful to original patent, handmade in Massachusetts.  Exact down to the last detail, the 9” long blade can be set to any angle desired and then quickly locked in place by turning the large thumb screw.  What most copies miss is that the patent covers a bevel gauge that can snap to and be locked at 90 degrees.  It was a quantum leap in bevel design, and an engineering achievement for its time, loads of mass (weighs nearly one pound), it works as well as it looks.  I don’t think any other bevel gauge has a detent to lock at 90 degrees for use as a square.

For information, email Patrick Leach at leach@supertool.com

Gary
« Last Edit: February 16, 2012, 01:50 PM by GaryLaroff »

Offline RonWen

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #18 on: February 17, 2012, 12:10 AM »
There is another new bevel gauge that was announced in July 2011 that shipped soon after and that is true to the Robinson patent.  In my opinion after using it, this is an excellent bevel gauge.  I have no financial interest in this business, but I can say that the tool works well and that it has retired my trusty Bridge City and Shinwa bevel gauges.  That it is a rugged tool, has the lock on the end and a switch to lock it at 90 degrees are the main product features.

(Attachment Link)

This bevel gauge is Patrick Leach’s exact copy of Isaiah Robinson’s 1872 improved patent sliding bevel with sliding tab for quick setting 90 degrees to make it function as a double square.  It a 100% true copy, faithful to original patent, handmade in Massachusetts.  Exact down to the last detail, the 9” long blade can be set to any angle desired and then quickly locked in place by turning the large thumb screw.  What most copies miss is that the patent covers a bevel gauge that can snap to and be locked at 90 degrees.  It was a quantum leap in bevel design, and an engineering achievement for its time, loads of mass (weighs nearly one pound), it works as well as it looks.  I don’t think any other bevel gauge has a detent to lock at 90 degrees for use as a square.

For information, email Patrick Leach at leach@supertool.com

Gary


Patrick is a great guy & I really enjoy dealing with him on old tools.  I am a tool nut (surprise, surprise) so I have several old Stanley's, the Lee Valley sliding bevel and yes, even Patrick's true to the Robinson patent sliding bevel.  He did a marvelous job on the recreation and the "square slide" works perfectly.  An outstanding tool!

Offline zapdafish

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #19 on: February 20, 2012, 11:56 AM »
looks like woodpeckers added a video but still no pic of their angle reference
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Offline GhostFist

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #20 on: February 20, 2012, 12:27 PM »
Love my lee Valley! The switch lock is fast easy and sturdy. The blade is stainless steel and the wooden handle keeps it light. Veritas claims that the finish on the handle is resin impregnated and bloody waterproof. Love this tool!

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #21 on: February 20, 2012, 12:47 PM »
You can also use the lever on both sides of the Veritas gauge.

Does the Veritas gauge have a lever on both sides? I am thinking it is only on one side.  You can of course slide/flip the blade over to the other direction, but that doesn't work if you need the angle on the end  of the blade up/down in a particular situation.

Twist lock at end or lever lock at pivot. Kind of depends on preference and usage.  They both beat the side knob hands down.

Seth

Offline PaulMarcel

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #22 on: February 20, 2012, 01:56 PM »
Lever is on just one side of the Veritas; as you mention, you can flip the blade sides to put the lever where convenient.  I can't picture the situation you are referring to.  Advantage of a lever, minor I know, is one-handed operation.  Coincidentally last night I needed to transfer some angles and had to hold parts in place.  Very easy to tip the blade with a finger while locking into place.

What bugs me is that they are difficult to transfer to a drawing since the body can lie flat, but the blade is in the air.  Usually use a jointed board to abut the blade and mark the line, but a hassle.  Luckily found a BS-5 and BS-10 last week.  They have the knob on the face, but at least you can more easily transfer to drawings.  If Veritas made a lever version of this (since the lever is their patent, I believe), I'd be there in a heartbeat.
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Offline hockey_magnet

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #23 on: February 20, 2012, 03:44 PM »
Lee Valley just came out with this one today

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?cat=1&p=69055

might be worth a look  [smile]

More expensive in the UK   [crying]

http://www.langtoninfo.co.uk/showitem.aspx?isbn=0038728082800&loc=GBP



Just picked one up from the display in Lee Valley Saturday - for $20, can't go wrong. Anyway, the digital is very acurate - some pretty handy features - digital readout flips to read from  both directions and you can get the complimentary angle with a button push (if you have trouble with subtraction  [embarassed] ). I like it because I can get in tighter spots than with my digital angle finder. I doubt I'd pay the UK price - 4X the Lee Valley price!

Offline RonWen

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #24 on: February 20, 2012, 04:15 PM »
Lever is on just one side of the Veritas; as you mention, you can flip the blade sides to put the lever where convenient.  I can't picture the situation you are referring to.  Advantage of a lever, minor I know, is one-handed operation.  Coincidentally last night I needed to transfer some angles and had to hold parts in place.  Very easy to tip the blade with a finger while locking into place.

What bugs me is that they are difficult to transfer to a drawing since the body can lie flat, but the blade is in the air.  Usually use a jointed board to abut the blade and mark the line, but a hassle.  Luckily found a BS-5 and BS-10 last week.  They have the knob on the face, but at least you can more easily transfer to drawings.  If Veritas made a lever version of this (since the lever is their patent, I believe), I'd be there in a heartbeat.

Back in the day (before we got CAD) I used tools like this to create the drawings.  It sometimes comes in handy to transfer an angle to the sliding bevel.
48003-0

48005-1

I apologize for the "non-Marcel" quality of the pictures...  [big grin]
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 04:18 PM by RonWen »

Offline RL

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Re: Woodpecker's Bevel Gauge
« Reply #25 on: February 20, 2012, 09:10 PM »
You can also use the lever on both sides of the Veritas gauge.

Does the Veritas gauge have a lever on both sides? I am thinking it is only on one side.  You can of course slide/flip the blade over to the other direction, but that doesn't work if you need the angle on the end  of the blade up/down in a particular situation.

Twist lock at end or lever lock at pivot. Kind of depends on preference and usage.  They both beat the side knob hands down.

Seth

Partway through this thread, the quote that put my comment in context was left out. I was referring to this measuring tool which was a reply to a previous comment about what an angle reference is.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=52403&cat=1,42936,50298,52403

Offline GhostFist

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #26 on: February 20, 2012, 10:10 PM »
I guess I'm buying that now, thanks Richard.

Offline RL

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #27 on: February 20, 2012, 10:18 PM »
Sorry!

Offline RonWen

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #28 on: February 21, 2012, 07:57 AM »
48032-0

Woodpecker just edited their YouTube video to show the setting gage -- very similar to the Sutherland tool except they have it graduated in 1/4 degree increments -- very nice.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2012, 11:12 AM by RonWen »

Offline SRSemenza

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Re: Bevel Gauges
« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2012, 11:09 AM »
Yes, the Angle Reference Plate is simple but looks very functional.  I  like that it is thick so it can be placed flat and have the bevel blade right on it.

Seth