Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 47344 times)

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Offline RKA

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Oliver, the reason it never occurred to us that your SO might be taking the pics is most of us would get a few eye rolls for making such a request, followed by silence as the SO vanished from the shop!

Hmmm, now that I think about it, that might be the recipe I need for shop time!  "Honey, can you take a pic of this for the guys on the FOG?  Oh, just one more, this is a good one!"
-Raj

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Online six-point socket II

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lol, Raj :)  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Most of these pictures actually serve a real purpose: documentary of what was done, how and when. The rest is fun and games... :) It's also just a select few that I end up posting that fit my personal guidelines for online posting ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

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Most of these pictures actually serve a real purpose: documentary of what was done, how and when.

I'm with you Oliver...all of my rehabs have been thoroughly documented, so that in the future when I need to modify a particular area, I know exactly where the sub-structure lies and what it will take to get to where I want to be. I don't just take pictures, rather I will mark on the drywall and the studs the heights and the distances between structural members so that I can then relocate the datum lines that will allow me to continue to modify a structure with minimal disturbance...then I take a picture. It works well. [thumbs up] That's been part of my MO for the last 20+ years...it's a tough habit to break.

For instance, after removing a conventional toilet and installing a wall mounted unit, if I want to mount shelving to the wall later, I'm completely aware of the routing of the PVC venting.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2017, 11:58 AM by Cheese »

Offline neilc

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Thanks for the clarification on the digging, Oliver.  So can I assume that is a 220 v line then?

As for the Installation Pliers, that's a cool tool.  I just went to Amazon with the search 'expandable anchor installation pliers' and low and behold I found this - https://www.amazon.com/ASIBT-Rivet-Wall-Anchor-Setting/dp/B01NCQ9BMY/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491703009&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=expandable+anchor+installation+pliers

I think I'll add one to my cart.  Looks to be so much better than using a drill to tighten the screw and seeing the head spin and tearing up the wall rather than setting the bolt.

I also take really good care of my tools, but for some reason two of the Snap-on drivers have failed.  Both saw occasional use and one was in my trunk, the other in my wife's trunk.  So it might have had something to do with humidity or temperature extremes over time that caused the ratcheting mechanism to no longer catch.  My rep says he sees it a lot on the older style like you have with the yellow cap.  I have that style and the newer one and have had no issues with the newer models.

BTW, I'd have to pay my SO to take photos of me!  You've got it good!

Thanks!

Neil

Online six-point socket II

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Thanks for the clarification on the digging, Oliver.  So can I assume that is a 220 v line then?

As for the Installation Pliers, that's a cool tool.  I just went to Amazon with the search 'expandable anchor installation pliers' and low and behold I found this - https://www.amazon.com/ASIBT-Rivet-Wall-Anchor-Setting/dp/B01NCQ9BMY/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491703009&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=expandable+anchor+installation+pliers

I think I'll add one to my cart.  Looks to be so much better than using a drill to tighten the screw and seeing the head spin and tearing up the wall rather than setting the bolt.

I also take really good care of my tools, but for some reason two of the Snap-on drivers have failed.  Both saw occasional use and one was in my trunk, the other in my wife's trunk.  So it might have had something to do with humidity or temperature extremes over time that caused the ratcheting mechanism to no longer catch.  My rep says he sees it a lot on the older style like you have with the yellow cap.  I have that style and the newer one and have had no issues with the newer models.

BTW, I'd have to pay my SO to take photos of me!  You've got it good!

Thanks!

Neil

Hi Neil,

yes, it's a 220V line.

The pliers look good!

I will keep an eye on my old-style ratcheting wrenches then, maybe I'm just lucky for now.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Online six-point socket II

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@HarveyWildes

Hi Harvey,

a little later than promised, I apologize for that - but here are the picture of that plane you spotted in my previous pictures.

It was made by: Busch, Jacob; Jacob Busch, Werkzeugfabrik, Remscheid, Hochstrasse 26-30 established in 1823, "Garantiewerkzeuge" "Marke "Spannsäge"" - In 2009 they were bought by Wilh. Schmitt & Comp., Königstr. 59, 42853 Remscheid who produce everything that you know/buy as "Kirschen".

Anyway, here are the pictures:



























Hope you like them ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver




Offline HarveyWildes

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Awesome - thanks!

Any idea how old this particular plane is?  Any plans to refurbish it?  If so, what do you think it would take to get it operating like new?

Online six-point socket II

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Hi Harvey,

well, I have no exact idea about it's age. My (uneducated) guess is: definitely not pre 1900 and not much younger than WWII. It's hard to find backed up information on this, most of what I found regarding old tools from Solingen/Remscheid is focussed on chisels.

Getting it in working order is somewhere on my list and that list is looong and it's certainly not a priority. Now that I got the blade out I will take it as an opportunity to get the rust off and sharpen it. Then someday take it from there...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Online six-point socket II

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Hi,

Long time no hear, I thought I'd post an update.

So shortly after my last post in this thread I had unwanted, nightly visitors. Long story short: Nothing happened, but they managed to get on my backyard patio without tripping any of the cameras. Then one of them tripped a camera with two of his fingers in motion while obviously showing/pointing out the camera to his partner in crime. I saw the e-mail notification 10 minutes late, gladly I was still awake - but when I went out they were gone. Additional measures were put in place - but I also decided I would add another camera (different angle) and replace the low rising elements of my fence by high rising elements.

Preparations - No work without Jerky and Ginger Ale.



Getting out old slotted screw from the wall where the new post would be installed.





Connecting the high rising elements.



Drilling holes for attaching the post to the wall.



Sorry, no more pictures on this.

Then I needed to fix a small gate which posts are too weak. At some point I will have to replace the 70x70 with 90x90 posts but for now I just gave it some additional hold.

Adjusting and attaching angular mount to the board.



Attaching board(s) to post.



Attaching angular mount to concrete wall.



Next up, I needed to re-adjust 2 panels of my patios roof. So I had to unscrew and re-position them.

I prepared a ratchet and my impact wrench as I didn't know if maybe the impact wrench's power would be to much. As the beams have obviously dried over the years and I needed to put the screws back in the exact same holes they came out. I got lucky, it worked like a charm using the impact wrench.





Then, Casper Kjerumgaard called for "Cut out a wooden heart day" - I followed his call. In case you don't know Casper, this is his Website: http://www.casperkjerumgaard.com And this is his Instagram feed: https://www.instagram.com/casperkjerumgaard/ He is a very cool guy, awesome craftsman and I think following him will be well worth your while if you do social media.

So I cut out a wooden heart.



Next thing up was a rather quick re-design of a small portion of the back yard, building a little wall from shell limestone.





Of course this wasn't enough and there's a second part.

But for that I needed to remove a European Yew.



That went very well, I felled it completely by hand using only my Tajima G-Saw 240.





But of course there was still it's root.

So I had to spent quite a bit of time to get that dug out.



Then I went to buy a new tool to get the soil freed from smaller roots.



This is what it looked like after.



Now I was able to build the second part of the new small shell limestone wall.



And this is what it looks like finished. Still needs some new plants. And I'm still looking for something to make that "ramp" look a little nicer.




Now for some just for fun tool shots:











Kind regards,
Oliver

Online six-point socket II

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Hi,

About every two years I install a new, flexible side cover to the patio's roofing. Today was the day.

Back in the day I wanted to use the same quality-material that was used for the roof, while cutting it to spec. isn't a problem - there are no fixtures/hardware readily available to mount these horizontally. So I decided to go with a milky plastic foil, but that of course only lasts two winters before it needs replacing.









Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline neilc

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Great selection of drills / drivers / impacts, Oliver!

How do you like the Snap-on impact?


Online six-point socket II

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Thanks Neil!

I love the Snap-On CT 761. It has a 3/8" drive and is packed with plenty of power (officially 120 ft-lb/ 162.7 Nm of torque output) reality is: it can loosen bolts that are torqued to 150 ft-lb/ 203 Nm. Which is pretty amazing for such a small package.

I mainly use it as impact driver with impact bitholder and impact bits or as pictured with an impact six-point socket when working around the house. Used it for demolition of my old, foldable attic ladder and other stuff like that (works great breaking lose old, rusted bolts and nuts...) - or as pictured to drive large diameter screws on my patio and the patio's roofing. It's capable of doing far more than what you would normally throw at a 3/8" compact impact wrench and that's what makes it, at least to me, so appealing. I did try it on some lug nuts and was impressed - though I wouldn't do that to it if I was changing tires daily. I figure using it constantly at outer maximum torque will at some point lead to premature wear and tear and finally result in a broken tool.

There might be more powerful and cheaper options out there by now and Snap-On obviously uses their own battery design. But I wanted and want Snap-On. I'm really, really happy with it.

I put a complete 3/8" impact socket set metric, shallow & deep with the CT 761, extensions, a 1/2" ratchet, adapters, 1/2" impact sockets for lug nuts, impact bits, impact bitholders, charger, spare battery... all into that red Systainer T-LOC 2 :)

If you have specific questions, I'll be glad to answer them. :)

If you like, you can watch it - next to the PDC - driving a SPAX (R) HI.FORCE (R) 6x120 Washer head, T-STAR plus (R) drive, steel, Wirox (R), Partial thread.



And, again if you like, you can watch it - next to PDC and Bosch GSR 12V - driving 4,5x80 Wuerth Assy 3.0 screws (AW 20 head)



Kind regards,
Oliver




Offline neilc

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Nice videos and additional detail, Oliver! 

Love your choice of tools.  Got to watch the wallet when I read your posts!


Online six-point socket II

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Hi Neil,

glad you enjoyed that bit of information and the videos :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline leakyroof

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Thanks Neil!

I love the Snap-On CT 761. It has a 3/8" drive and is packed with plenty of power (officially 120 ft-lb/ 162.7 Nm of torque output) reality is: it can loosen bolts that are torqued to 150 ft-lb/ 203 Nm. Which is pretty amazing for such a small package.

I mainly use it as impact driver with impact bitholder and impact bits or as pictured with an impact six-point socket when working around the house. Used it for demolition of my old, foldable attic ladder and other stuff like that (works great breaking lose old, rusted bolts and nuts...) - or as pictured to drive large diameter screws on my patio and the patio's roofing. It's capable of doing far more than what you would normally throw at a 3/8" compact impact wrench and that's what makes it, at least to me, so appealing. I did try it on some lug nuts and was impressed - though I wouldn't do that to it if I was changing tires daily. I figure using it constantly at outer maximum torque will at some point lead to premature wear and tear and finally result in a broken tool.

There might be more powerful and cheaper options out there by now and Snap-On obviously uses their own battery design. But I wanted and want Snap-On. I'm really, really happy with it.

I put a complete 3/8" impact socket set metric, shallow & deep with the CT 761, extensions, a 1/2" ratchet, adapters, 1/2" impact sockets for lug nuts, impact bits, impact bitholders, charger, spare battery... all into that red Systainer T-LOC 2 :)

If you have specific questions, I'll be glad to answer them. :)

If you like, you can watch it - next to the PDC - driving a SPAX (R) HI.FORCE (R) 6x120 Washer head, T-STAR plus (R) drive, steel, Wirox (R), Partial thread.



And, again if you like, you can watch it - next to PDC and Bosch GSR 12V - driving 4,5x80 Wuerth Assy 3.0 screws (AW 20 head)



Kind regards,
Oliver
  I have that same Impact from them , in Red. Started out with it to compliment my Snap-On Impact Driver with its 1/4" Quick Change Chuck[ CT725QC]  Finally decided after a few months to upgrade to the 18 volt platform with the CT8810A, and take the 14 volt impact home. While the 18 volt impact has far more power, I do miss the smaller 14 volt version from time to time since as you noted, it has more power than its size would leave you to believe possible.
 I may STILL bring that 14 volt unit back to work someday.... [embarassed]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Online six-point socket II

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I bet you love the 18V Snap-On impact @leakyroof - It's a beast for sure. I eyed it a couple of times but decided that it would see no real use anyway and skipped on the purchase - but it is tempting. Especially with the "flat gearbox/head" 18V angle grinder they offer and once one has the batteries...... *lol*

I do own a very old 1/4" Snap-On driver, CTSE561CLSK which has a 7.2V NiCd battery. But it's very useful because you can remove/pull out the 1/4" hex shaft and put a 1/4" square shaft in for direct attaching of 1/4" sockets... all of these shafts can also be placed in a instinct-ratcheting handle that came with the set. And of course a big load of bits... One of my very first Snap-On purchases. Love that kit for very light tasks.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Online six-point socket II

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Here's a pic of back when the madness started... @leakyroof



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline RKA

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I have those slip joint pliers...I ****g love them!   [smile]
-Raj

Offline Peter Halle

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You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter

Offline Knight Woodworks

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I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John

Offline rylim

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I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?

Online six-point socket II

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You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter

Hi Peter,

thanks, I will look out for that material and see if I can install it vertically. Would be great to have a cover that lasts longer.  [smile] [smile]

I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John

Hi John,

that was made by a German knifemaker, I would need to look up his information as that was loooooong ago.



I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?

Hi,

In Germany that is readily available from every Spax dealer.


Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline rylim

  • Posts: 44
You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter

Hi Peter,

thanks, I will look out for that material and see if I can install it vertically. Would be great to have a cover that lasts longer.  [smile] [smile]

I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John

Hi John,

that was made by a German knifemaker, I would need to look up his information as that was loooooong ago.



I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?

Hi,

In Germany that is readily available from every Spax dealer.


Kind regards,
Oliver

Oliver,

At first I thought you got it from USA dealer. Sigh...

I wish I have a chance to visit Germany, and bring some tools back

Ryan

Online six-point socket II

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Hi Ryan,

I'm sorry. But as always, to you and anyone else, my offer stands: If you need anything such as a Spax Mini-L-Boxx from here, write me a PM and we work something out and find an economical shipping rate.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

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Oliver, I used a white poly film made for greenhouses...exactly what Peter was talking about. I purchased a 18' x 24' piece for $65. It's a 6 mil poly film with a 55% opacity rating. It's been up for 6 years now and still looks fine. White film is also a lot cooler temp wise. 

Google greenhouse poly film. I know there's at least one available that now has a 10 year warranty. [cool]

Offline Knight Woodworks

  • Posts: 193
Oliver,

Thanks for responding. No need to research the maker of your knife. My knowledge of German knife makers is non existent.

Keep up the good work.

John

Online six-point socket II

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Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)










Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline HarveyWildes

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Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)
...

Lignum Vitae sole?

Online six-point socket II

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Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)
...

Lignum Vitae sole?

Yes, Sir. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Online six-point socket II

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Hi,

So I thought I'd share a story where everyone can have a little laugh, or maybe just a little chuckle at my expense as I did something incredibly stupid a little while ago. Additionally be as amazed as I was by the generosity of one of my buddies.

The story starts with me looking for a used, (approximate 2005 model year) Hilti T2 - M because this is a discontinued model - and later models of this type don't offer the same functions. Namely the "precision hammer mode" combined with 2 different speed gear settings for drilling and another gear for "full hammer mode". Current models only offer three of them combined.

I wanted this rotary hammer for my video (series, more to follow) about different types of drilling and what happens to certain materials when either not enough or too much power is involved.

So I found the TE 2-M I wanted on ebay and bought it. Well used, working condition.

I get the rotary hammer, unpack and check it. All good, works like a charm - but it is really dirty. So being pedantic about clean tools as I am, I decided to sit down and clean it. I have never taken a rotary hammer apart, but I thought if I wasn't supposed to - some sort of barrier would prevent me from opening something I shouldn't open. With that in mind I unscrewed the 4 screws that hold the two parts of the housing together. A little pull and there it is, a rattling noise and three parts - all for gear selection/gear switch lay on my table.

After hours of searching I find a exploded-view drawing and I now know where the parts have to go. Additional hours later - I can't piece it together. By now I also dismantled the complete gear switch for the sake of accessibility. All to no avail.

I was already on the phone with Hilti to get this repaired, when I thought of a buddy of mine who has an unbelievable knowledge of power tools (albeit from a different brand). So I thought I would ask him if he could help me out because I was sure he had opened, maintained and repaired power tools before.

This is what it looked like at that moment - I placed most of the parts back inside.









His response came fast: I can try.

I packed her up and shipped her to him.

Same day he got her, I get a reply in the evening: She runs, all back A-OK. But she needs some new grease.

I was delighted and unbelievable thankful.

Now getting Hilti grease isn't easy, it took awhile before we found an offer that suited the overall situation - but we found it and fast forward my TE 2-M was back on her way to me.

So this is what she looked like when I took her out of the package.











Can you imagine how baffled and even more grateful then ever I was? Not only had my buddy fixed the initial problem, but he cleaned her completely and re-greased her for me. Still in awe when thinking about it, and this was quite a little while ago.

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: July 22, 2017, 06:59 PM by six-point socket II »