Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 49661 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

So today's project was about re-painting the suspended ceiling above the entrance to the backyards patio, which double functions (partly) as housing for a large shutter. The shutter housing's covers/ ceiling boards are removable - they had to come out first





Power for sander and dust extractor - I always use a PRCD-S (Portable Residual Current Device) on the main feed, even though I know my electrical circuits are a-ok.



Let's start sanding.



Even though there's only mininmal dust, I really don't want to inhale this stuff. Actually it's the first time I'm using my hearing protection while sanding - what a difference. The noise never bothered me, that's why I didn't use it before - but it definitely makes a huge difference. - Additionally PPE pics are always great to have a laugh ;)



I've said it earlier, virtually no dust left after using a Festool Sander and Festool dust extractor. Even if you use the smallest one, the CTL-SYS like me for this task.





I really like the DTS. So versatile and an absolute specialist when it comes to delicate sanding tasks. I didn't want to remove the spotlights originally, thats and I had no trouble sanding around them. But for painting I had to get them out - my idea of using some masking tape didn't work out so well. You might ask why: Those are pretty old - so they don't have the springs that are common nowadays but two very, very thin flaps made from steel - scary sharp and they pop out when the spotlight is pushed in. For removal you need to press these flaps against the spotlight's housing and push the whole unit back out. Of course this doesn't got without some force and you can cut yourself bad on them. It worked, didn't cut myself - but I would have loved it if I didn't have to get them out.



Over head sanding. Goes well but is of cause pretty exhausting. It's a small area - that's why I didn't want to go the extra mile getting a small, mobile scaffolding...



As I use it in the backyard, I had the Bosch jobsite radio at hand, I love listening to Gregory Porter while painting - makes it go so smooth. :)



I'll add a pic of the finished project tomorrow. Forget to take some pics while painting, had to do the DWC video in between plus the doorbell rang...

Kind regards,
Oliver

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Offline Peter_C

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Might I recommend a good pair of bluetooth headphones. Noise cancelling and you get to listen to books, music, or podcasts. I tear thru books myself, which makes me full of stupid facts and statistics.

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

@Peter C Thanks for the suggestion!

--

Here's the promised picture showing a part of the finished ceiling.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

Today I got a package containing a "grey vanisher" and "oil wipe on care"



At a german woodworking forum I was one among a couple lucky winners to receive a package containing some neat stuff. Among it: a sample of Complex hard oil and a catalog. I looked through the catalog and the afore mentioned products catched my eye.

I thought the "grey vanisher" would be a great product to clean my old backyard table.

Grabbed some stuff.



Before:





After using Complex "grey vanisher" and cleaning it off - still wet:





Base before:



Base after:



Dried:



I'm downright amazed by the result. This table never had any sort of maintenance done to it, I always wanted to, never got around doing it and it's outside year round. I think given the circumstances the result ist fantastic!

What happened, or what I learned (and what you will see in the video) is that obviously this table was coated by the manufacturer. This coating, being old and porous came off after being thoroughly wet and then scrubbed. Long, plastic like, strings came off...

Hier also noch das dazugehörige Video :)




After the table had dried, I decided to coat it with the Complex hard oil.

Because of my prior experience with the porous coating (and strings) that still covered part of the table I decided to scrub off the now dried residue with a copper wire brush.



Ready to coat.



Wider angle.



While coating/oiling.





I'll provide a picture of the result once the oil has dried.

Up to this point I really like the result and the products by Complex were a joy to work with. The "grey vanisher" emits almost no odor and is a pretty "green" product - as is the hard oil - although that does smell quite a bit. ;) One key point: There is no self ignition with Complex hard oil. Although you see me wearing gloves while using the "grey vanisher" - it's probably not needed - like I said, these products are pretty "green". If you like to take a look: http://www.complex-farben.eu/en/home.html

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
I know the feeling.....
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
And the after picture.  This table is Teak, washed with a brightener, then Sanded, then oiled with Epifanes Teak Sealer and finally varnished with multiple coats of different Epifanes Varnishes.
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline six-point socket II

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WOW! That's an uber-fantastic result.  [eek]  [big grin] Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
WOW! That's an uber-fantastic result.  [eek]  [big grin] Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...

Kind regards,
Oliver
. Thank you Oliver... [embarassed]
I had five of them to do, some smaller, some large like the one shown.  11 chairs as well, they were much fussier than the Table Tops
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Online Cheese

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Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...


If you use the sander Oliver, you'll probably get a more even overall finish on the table.  [smile]

Offline six-point socket II

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Yeah, but that's too late now. I guess I'll see what the oil coat looks like when dry. And take it from there ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

dried.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

I re-discovered one of my first "woodworking" projects some time ago. I built it with my Dad in my parents basement workshop/boxroom. Mom wrote Christmas '90 on the backside, I was 4 back then.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

I finished a rather unintentional project today. After a busy Friday and Saturday I wanted to clean out the shed on Sunday. Albeit I was pretty upset on Saturday as I had a lot of trouble getting a much needed radiant heater out of the shed.

So I get everything out and while putting a shelf aside, the floor sags - a little. <- Not good!

I take a look and find this  [eek] [scared] [blink]





Not the biggest surprise because the outer side of this wall faces a flower bed and there's constantly wet soil building up. I did install some sort of fence/ sacrificial board but that didn't hold up so well - you're going to see that later.

Of course I can't get any materials on a Sunday, but I can have a look.

Cutting a peephole with my MultiMaster.



Ok, there's enough space to make a clean cut with my TSC.





The old beam has to come out, another job for the Fein MultiMaster.





Then I just took measure and thought of what I would do. This morning I went to buy materials and started again.

The first beam went right in without much effort.





The second one had to be cut.





Fits.

Now a new floorboard, another job for TSC.





Fits again.

Then comes the wallboard.





Also fits. - Now the inner wall is finished.

Old sacrificial boards on the outside.



Removing all soil and cleaning the foundation/ concrete framing for holding the gravel



And now the new sacrificial board/ protective cover.



To build this I used self-tapping screws with sealing washer to attach the pool liner to the board. Then I had the pool liner travel behind the board and used the same screws to attach this construction to a healthy board - closing the gap. Hopefully the pool liner makes a good enough seal, but at least it will definitely keep all wet soil away. Additionally I will build another fence to keep the soil of the flower bed from running down. That should do the trick.

Kind regards and thanks for reading,
Oliver

Offline Peter Halle

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When you do something you don't waste any time do you?  [thumbs up]

Ultimately I think you will have to do more on the exterior than what have done because water will always wick from wet to dry and even defy gravity.  But if you had airspace involved then it won't.  Translation would be that ultimately I think that you will have to dig deeper outside and install coarse stone inside of a fabric (to prevent soil from eliminating the air spaces) and then do something like you did to move the initial water away.

Love this thread!

Peter

Disclaimer:  I have been involved with the development of some TSO Products.  I have offered thoughts and ideas freely.  I am not paid but I may receive products during the development process or afterwards.

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

Thanks Peter!

I will dig a little deeper, there should be a bit of the foundation sticking out to the side and then build a drain.

Thanks for the advice! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline SoonerFan

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Oliver,
This is a great thread.  You do some really cool stuff and do it all really well.  If it weren't for this thread reminding me about all of stuff I should do around my house I would say this is the perfect thread  [blink].  Seriously, keep up the good work, thanks so much for taking the time to share and thanks for all your great contributions to FOG.   You make this a better place for sure.

PS - I enjoyed seeing your first woodworking project.  Reminded me of the catapult I made many years ago to fire pennies in the driveway.  My kids found it recently.

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

@SoonerFan , Thank you!  [smile]

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline VW MICK

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@six-point socket II

I really enjoy these posts too. I think most of my favourite threads are ones based on a progression of a project

I wish I was organised enough to post like this

Thanks you are a great contributor to the FOG

Mick

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

@VW MICK

Thank you very much for the compliments Mick! Glad you enjoy my posts! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline neilc

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Oliver

Your productivity and tool selection make us all look bad!  But keep it up, because it does inspire us to try to keep up with your work ethic and tool collection!

Great stuff!

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

@neilc

Thank you very much! But you're giving me way too much credit here  [eek]  ;)  [smile] , I'm just having fun and share a bit of it  [big grin] [big grin] and I love this place!

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline grobkuschelig

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Thank you very much! But you're giving me way too much credit here  [eek]  ;)  [smile] , I'm just having fun and share a bit of it  [big grin] [big grin] and I love this place!

Kind regards,
Oliver

@six-point socket II
Your modesty honors you.
You really bring a lot to this place with all your postings and especially the extra mile you are going on almost everything you get involved with!

This is highly appreciated and the outcome of this and the vibe it creates (also from the same behavior of others) is what makes the FOG such a tremendous place to hang out!

Grüße aus Hessen. ;)

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you very much!

Viele Grüße aus NRW ;)
Oliver


Offline six-point socket II

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I love how easy the SYS-SB transforms back from Toolbox to it's intended purpose of being a storage box, thanks to the Sortainer inset boxes. Especially on days where good amounts of installation material are needed.



Kind regards,
Oliver


Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 1958
I love how easy the SYS-SB transforms back from Toolbox to it's intended purpose of being a storage box, thanks to the Sortainer inset boxes. Especially on days where good amounts of installation material are needed.



Kind regards,
Oliver
. Oliver, what are those pieces on the right side of the photo, the yellow and red ones?
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline antss

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They look like push in wire connectors to me  [unsure]



Offline Bob D.

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Some style Wego connectors are UL approved for use in the US. I say some because I don't if they all have been approved or not. They can be handy for special situations. Not sure what the bulk pricing is but buying them a hundred at a time they cost much more than traditional twist-on wire nuts.

Great for mixed wire types, you when you are wanting to connect 16G stranded wire in a fixture with your 12 or 14G solid wire and the wire nut doesn't want to grab them both.

I've seen some informal testing on YT loading them to the point of melt-down at current loads that far exceed their rating.

They are small and take up less space than a Red wire nut, so they can be helpful in that regard too.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Online Cheese

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I use the Wago connectors exclusively for low voltage outdoor lighting. They will work with 18-12 gauge wires. Real nice when trying to connect 6 different wires. With wire nuts, sometimes the connection isn't that solid and there can be some flickering on a light standard. Wago's eliminate that issue. 

In the picture below you can see the bare wire after it is inserted into the connector. If you can see the wire, you'll have a functional circuit.

Offline antss

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They are available in the U.S. under the Wago, GB and Ideal brands.

In some instances, they are actually cheaper than trad. wirenuts.   :o   Orange BORG  ::)

They run anywhere from 6 to 18 cents ea. depending on what size, how many a pack and where you buy them.   Trad. wirenuts are rarely over 10 cents a piece.