Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 53595 times)

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Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

Some snapshots of some small stuff I have been busy with in between... (If you follow me on IG you have seen these already, sorry.)






















Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: October 01, 2017, 02:31 PM by six-point socket II »

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Offline Cheese

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Hey Oliver, 
What's in the Fluke package?

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi Cheese,

that's my trusty T150 VDE voltage and continuity tester -> http://www.fluke.com/fluke/uken/electrical-testers/Electrical-Testers/T90-T110-T130-T150-Voltage-and-Continuity-Testers.htm?PID=73757

I think this specific model is NAINA, so I gave you a link to their UK site for a description in english.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

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Hey that's pretty slick. I like the audible and vibration feedback. I'm not familiar with this Fluke product, is it something new?

Offline six-point socket II

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I'm not sure it qualifies as new? I have mine for more than a year now, and it's on the market even longer. But then again it's really NAINA (I just checked) -> http://en-us.fluke.com/products/electrical-testers/

Also companies like Benning ( http://www.benning.de/duspol-voltage-testers-en.html ) and Testo ( https://www.testo.com/en-US/electrical/voltage/c/parameters_electrical_voltage ) make similar products.

Still, I'm a Fluke kinda guy ;) *lol* But before that I had a very old Benning Duspol...

Kind regards,
Oliver


Offline SRSemenza

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Oliver,


    How do you like the Vario version of the VDE screwdrivers compared to the regular VDE?

    Nice pics as usual  [thumbs up]


Seth

Offline HarveyWildes

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Fluke has been around for 70 years or so.  They've been doing voltmeters for at least 35 of those years, if not more.  The brand is now owned by the same company that owns Tektronix (oscilloscopes) - they are both subsidiaries of Fortive, which was spun off of Danaher (who also owned Stanley Tools for a while).  Danaher went on a T&M buying jag a while back and bought Fluke and Tektronix at about the same time.  Both had been independent companies until that point, and both have kept their respective brands as part of Danaher and Fortive.  Fluke makes high-end voltmeters as well as the hand-helds.


Offline SRSemenza

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Oliver,


    How do you like the Vario version of the VDE screwdrivers compared to the regular VDE?

    Nice pics as usual  [thumbs up]


Seth


Oops. I mean Kompakt not Vario.  Also do you like the reduced blade versions? I went with the regular for philips head because I like the laser tips and the reduced aren't available with laser tips.

Seth

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi Seth,

thanks! :)

It really depends from which side you're looking at them. I'll try to explain:

The Snap-On bag pictured is my "grab and go"-bag. It holds a not so basic set of tools, my toolholder should I need/want it and some speciality items. Last but not least a handful of consumables. This is my #1 tool bag and it more or less goes everywhere I go, metaphorically speaking.

It's the bag I bring in addition to a drill/driver when a friend calls at 9PM on a Sunday and asks for last minute help setting up a piece of furniture and I already know by 10PM it will have turned into: can you install this, oh and this, oh that over there, too. ;)

So what I originally wanted was a set of VDE screwdrivers for this bag.

Going with regular drivers the bag would have been half full: Slotted, PH, PZ, Torx, PH/S and PZ/S.

With this set, and by adding a 2nd handle I was able to have a full set of VDE screwdrivers occupying only one compartment of the bag. Additionally they are sturdy enough for most everything "non-VDE" in case typical bits and bit holders, ratcheting bit holders and the much loved bit ratchets are to bulky, not long enough or to wide to reach into some sort of "pocket hole". They are also a lot less wobbly than other solutions. By adding a 2nd handle you don't have to switch blades that often.

Personally I haven't come across any situation where these would break, but obviously it should be considered that these are not as heavy duty as Wera's other lines. Also when you use the #2 PH/PZ or other larger blade sizes it's a little strange feeling at first having a smaller handle than on the regular screwdrivers. But to me they feel great in the hand nonetheless - I can work with them, no problem. The handle size is a medium, a bit like on the #1 PH/PZ, maybe a tiny little bit thicker...

I think these are an excellent choice if you need a full set of VDE screwdrivers but want the smallest footprint possible. They come in a really nifty case with all blades neatly sorted and accessible. (I ditched it because it would have taken up to much space in the bag, but if you can "afford" losing that additional space, it's definitely a great case!)

Last but not least, when you apply quite a bit of torque you'll notice these are interchangeable, there is a little bit of movement you can feel. But nothing to worry about or bothering.

Sometimes I don't want to carry that bag around my place, because I really just need a select few tools, thats when I grab a few of the regular VDE from my workshop. Makes no real difference to me speaking of application.

What's cool with the Kompakt(s) is that you can also get blades for opening maintenance doors, control cabinets and so on.

However, if I was working in a industrial/commercial setting knowing exactly what three, four maybe five sizes and types of screwdrivers I need and use them everyday 9-to-5. I would spear the Kompakt(s) the wear and tear and go for the regular VDE(s)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Oops. I mean Kompakt not Vario.  Also do you like the reduced blade versions? I went with the regular for philips head because I like the laser tips and the reduced aren't available with laser tips.

Seth

Yes, I like (use) the reduced blades. It's very practical for some tasks, especially inside control cabinets and corresponding components. But that's Germany. I have to admit I have no idea how a typical control cabinet and it's components look like in the US and if the reduced blades would be of any help.

One other application that they are perfect for is installing these: https://www.kitchenking.de/thebo-3-fach-energie-ecksaeule-st-3007-320-3-ecksteckdosen-edelstahl-steckdosenleiste-steckdosen.html (Link just for reference) You need to reach far, and at a slight angle through the two holes on top and bottom to screw them into place. Only few screwdriver blades fit.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Even the smallest possible chores need to be done...














Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline VW MICK

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Hi Oliver

You have a knack of making very normal jobs look very interesting

cool

Mick

Offline six-point socket II

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Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.





Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Here are two pictures that don't fit anywhere else for the moment, but I really like how they turned out. I took them while taking pictures and filming for a larger, coming review of accessories/consumables. But that will still take a little while.





Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline HarveyWildes

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Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

Replacing all of the handles or all of the windows? - I assume handles, but I've always found that the prospect of replacing windows leads to thoughts of buying a new house.  Now we have aluminium clad wood windows, so I probably will need to replace the handles before the windows.

Also, why did you have to replace this handle?

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi Harvey.

Thankfully, it's just the handles. Windows are plastic frame windows, double glazing. They are all still good. The only reason for changing them would be another major step: getting a sliding door to the backyard, thus replacing the old door and window combination in the living room. And if that was done, it would be the perfect time to replace the living room's radiators... Meaning: If it's done - everything in conjunction will be done. I don't see that happening before 2020... And if it came to that in 2020, it would mean that our original plans were shattered yet another time... Let's leave it at that, don't want to think about it right now. But just for the record, I couldn't get a new place like this for the cost of new windows. ;)

For the old handle: See that white plastic ring that bursted in the first picture? It's an retention ring that holds the square shaft in place that connects the handle to the window's lock. It bursted and offered no retention anymore so the square shaft simply traveled further down the lock and the handle simply fell off. Old stuff... ;) I already replaced two of them, but those were intentional replacements, I wanted the locking feature. This one was simply necessary. And now I'm already sitting here with 3 of the new... Time to go all in. lol. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver


« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 03:32 PM by six-point socket II »

Offline HarveyWildes

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Hi Harvey.

Thankfully, it's just the handles. Windows are plastic frame windows, double glazing. They are all still good. The only reason for changing them would be another major step: getting a sliding door to the backyard, thus replacing the old door and window combination in the living room. And if that was done, it would be the perfect time to replace the living room's radiators... Meaning: If it's done - everything in conjunction will be done. I don't see that happening before 2020... And if it came to that in 2020, it would mean that our original plans were shattered yet another time... Let's leave it at that, don't want to think about it right now. But just for the record, I couldn't get a new place like this for the cost of new windows. ;)

For the old handle: See that white plastic ring that bursted in the first picture? It's an retention ring that holds the square shaft in place that connects the handle to the window's lock. It bursted and offered no retention anymore so the square shaft simply traveled further down the lock and the handle simply fell off. Old stuff... ;) I already replaced two of them, but those were intentional replacements, I wanted the locking feature. This one was simply necessary. And now I'm already sitting here with 3 of the new... Time to go all in. lol. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Thanks for the info, and good luck on your handle replacements and your longer term plans.

Offline Cheese

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Here are two pictures that don't fit anywhere else for the moment, but I really like how they turned out.

Posting pictures just for the sake of posting interesting pictures...I like 💕 that Oliver.  [big grin]

Offline Tinker

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This is probably way off topic, but I laughed when it happened. 

As I was reading thru this discussion and had gotten to the discussion about window handle replacement, I came to Harvey's point about window replacement meaning house replacement.  As soon as I read to the end
Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

Replacing all of the handles or all of the windows? - I assume handles, but I've always found that the prospect of replacing windows leads to thoughts of buying a new house.  Now we have aluminium clad wood windows, so I probably will need to replace the handles before the windows.

Also, why did you have to replace this handle?

I heard a beep and looked to the upper corner of my computer, knowing that a new Email was being sent to me.  I looked up, and what should I be looking at but a notice that I was receiving and add for Anderson windows.  I have often wondered how closely these add companies monitor our communications. I laughed as i thought, "there's  my answer."

Now, back to the very interesting subject at hand.
Tinker

Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

Little documentation on how to change the filling valve on a Geberit in-wall flushing cistern. Couldn't wait any longer, had to replace it before the old one broke down completely. (Took over 5 minutes to fill up the cistern...)

I had never done this before so I asked on a German forum for advice - and it worked out great.

Starting point.



Removal of cover - on this model by shifting the whole plate to the right.



Unscrewing of baseplate.



Removal of yet another cover.



I have no idea how this can get that dirty...





Look around the corner. Per the advice I got I marked the position of the rods.



I also marked the rods which the baseplate is mounted to.



taking out the bearing block.



Shutting off water and emptying the cistern.



Unscrewing the connection between hose and filling valve. (I'm amazed how well this works, even though my hands are pretty big...)



This is what it looks like now.





Bringing the female part of the connection back to the end of the hose.



Put new filling valve in place, tighten the connection between hose and valve lightly.



When in place, tighten the connection and click the hose in place.





Put bearing block and rods back in place. (So easy because of the great advice to mark them...)



Works.



Finished. :)




Here are 3 additional random pics I took while customizing a drill bit to fit a hole saw adaptor.








Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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"Come to the dark side, we got Snap-On and Festool tools"  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin]





Then we finally got some snow... I'm so delighted... Sadly it's already almost gone...







And some minor DIY. I finally got around to finish the trimming of the attic ladder. I used an acryl from Soudal that has some sort of granules inside. Pretty awesome stuff if you ask me, didn't expect it to be this good - both in how to work with it and the result. It's applied like silicone.







Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Peter_C

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WAIT! You don't have an electric caulking gun? I would recommend the Milwaukee M12 gun, or in whatever battery platform you have. It lays a really consistent bead... I use the heck out of mine and it is one of those tools I had kinda questioned it usability, until I started using it and now I don't want to go back to a manual gun. Especially for glues like PL400 which are hard to pump all day long. It does take different attachments for the smaller and larger tubes though.

Fancier welding helmet than I have. Mine is over a decade old, and I have gone thru more than a few of the forward glass covers.

If you haven't seen them already Sperian makes a really nice face shield that can house plasma, grinding, and flame cutting shields too. I have a couple and swear by them for face/eye protection.

Yeah I like spending other peoples money :)

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi Peter,

Not yet. ;) Can't decide on a manufacturer/battery platform. It's not an imminent need, I only use my hand press once or twice a year and mostly for acrylic and silicones - and that presses fairly easy...

DeWalt, Milwaukee, Metabo, Makita and Hilti all make one (or more)

Personally I'd like the Hilti best given it's ergonomics but it's a different battery platform than I already have from them.

So I was thinking to get the Milwaukee (since I have to get a new battery platform anyway) and use it as a gateway into their 12V line. Which I see me buying more tools from than from Hilti's 22V line at the moment.

Would you recommend the 12V Milwaukee caulking gun?

Metabo and Makita both don't do it for me.

Then there is DeWalt.

But like I said, since it's really not imminent for me, I just buy other stuff all the time. lol. ;)

I will take a look at Sperian, but right now the Snap-On is more than enough since I don't weld on my own currently. I have different shields/"glasses" for it. But I will definitely look at Sperian, love learning about manufacturers. :)


Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

 [scared] [blink] [eek] 8) [big grin] [big grin] [tongue] [big grin] [big grin]









Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline RKA

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Lol!  Very nice, happy holidays Oliver.  My wife would throw me out of the kitchen/house if Knipex “utensils” found a way into the kitchen!

Oh, the M12 caulk gun is great!  I haven’t used it with construction adhesive, but with regular acrylic caulk I can lay out consistent smooth beads that I just can’t do when I’m always squeezing the trigger.  And the rest of the 12v lineup ain’t bad either.
-Raj

Offline SRSemenza

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Those look yummy  [tongue]


     Some seriously tough packaging though, if you needed the Cobolts!

Seth