Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 82180 times)

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Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 348
Hi Oliver, nice post!
And congratulations on the Klein deal!

I think it is always good to get a better insight on tools from across the pond, there are so many things out there in the world and every bit of information helps finding the right tools.

If you need someone to field test the Klein Hacksaw-Bag, I can offer my services, been looking at that recently.[emoji41][emoji51]

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Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2418
What tool did you for the pipe threading?  And did it havea handle or just the pliers, which I would not think would be up to the task.  Don’t know if I would trust threading a pipe in the wall in place due to fear of it potentially breaking from wear and deterioration,over the years.

Great walkthrough of the process. 

Looks like you also scraped/papered the walls before final install.  So much easier with the radiator removed.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 02:11 PM by neilc »

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you!  [smile] [smile]

@neilc

Hi Neil,

Thank you!  [big grin] [big grin]

While planning I thought about these points. The plumber who installed the other radiator also just used a threading die and pliers.

Since I had to buy the 3/8" threading die, I thought of ordering a ratcheting handle with it. Ultimately I decided against it because I wasn't sure how this would turn out: I have two other rooms that could use a new radiator, and given my recent experience I will replace these myself. But I wasn't so sure about that in the beginning, so now I will buy the ratcheting handle. ;) If this hadn't worked out the way it did, I wouldn't need the threading die anymore and didn't want to be stuck with additional accessories for it.

So yes, I did just use the pliers to turn the threading die and did so directly on the pipe without any other tools/support. This was fairly easy, a little bit of cutting oil - not much force needed, the pipe didn't move at all and it felt safe to do it this way, at least to me. If the pipe had moved or if I had the feeling that something wasn't right, I would have stopped immediately.

Would you please share if you know a safer way or know about useful additional tools/supports to do this? Always eager to learn. :)

And yes, I did hang wallpaper before final install. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4995
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Man Oliver,
you do keep busy and do such nice work.

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2418
I have threaders with the ratchet handle.  Don't use it much, but never thought about threading without one!  I don't trust slipjoint pliers for a good grip on something like that.  But I don't have Klein for a sponsor either!  And I never saw a plumber do it either.

Congrats on that sponsorship, BTW!

I would probably have unscrewed the pipe from the wall and taken it to a vise rather than run the risk of threading it in place and it potentially breaking.  I only say that because the radiator pipes in our home were 80 years old before we replaced them with copper 20 years ago.  When we changed the pipes out I remember some of them being pretty corroded, thus wanting to be careful with any wrenches!  They are all 3/4" copper replacing 3/4" iron pipes.

It doesn't even look like you had a pipe wrench on the pipe for extra support while threading.  You live dangerously!

Good stuff.  Keep the projects coming.

neil
« Last Edit: April 29, 2018, 11:00 PM by neilc »

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3626
Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you!  [smile] [smile]

@neilc

Hi Neil,

Thank you!  [big grin] [big grin]

While planning I thought about these points. The plumber who installed the other radiator also just used a threading die and pliers.

Since I had to buy the 3/8" threading die, I thought of ordering a ratcheting handle with it. Ultimately I decided against it because I wasn't sure how this would turn out: I have two other rooms that could use a new radiator, and given my recent experience I will replace these myself. But I wasn't so sure about that in the beginning, so now I will buy the ratcheting handle. ;) If this hadn't worked out the way it did, I wouldn't need the threading die anymore and didn't want to be stuck with additional accessories for it.

So yes, I did just use the pliers to turn the threading die and did so directly on the pipe without any other tools/support. This was fairly easy, a little bit of cutting oil - not much force needed, the pipe didn't move at all and it felt safe to do it this way, at least to me. If the pipe had moved or if I had the feeling that something wasn't right, I would have stopped immediately.

Would you please share if you know a safer way or know about useful additional tools/supports to do this? Always eager to learn. :)

And yes, I did hang wallpaper before final install. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

@six-point socket II, This has been a great info thread on many levels. Very interesting all the way. A while back, you showed some cranes in Germany. Each time I have visited I have noted, even in my inlaws' small village, how many cranes ae in use, even for individual houses. However, cranes are not the subject for now.

When I was a HS sophomore, I was taking shop. For the first half year, I was in the metal working class. I had a neighbor who was a plumber.  He found out I was learning about metal working. One afternoon, he asked me if i knew how to sweat.  Of course I knew all about sweating. I had lived and worked on a farm for the last few years. But, I knew that wasn't the kind of sweating he was asking about. I replied, "Well. I know how to solder."  That was the beginning of a long relationship in the plumbing trade.

I learned how to sweat, but also earned about other phases of the trade. My neighbor's specialty was pump installation. I learned how to pull wells and install pumps either at the top of wells or to drop a pump down 300 feet into a well. Either way, we had to fabricate fittings. That was in 1946 and there are not as large selections of parts that are available today. We were working mostly on old houses and changing ancient piping for more modern equipment into house that were not built to any code and building codes were just being thought out and developed.

On one job, a short nipple just would not line up and the boss was stumped to make a short pipe fit at both ends without bending. His torch could not develope enough heat to anneal the pipe soft enough to bend without kinking. He would have to go home and get his tanks and bigger torch.  He had a drinking problem and I knew if I let him go home, I would not see him again that day.  In my ignorance, I suggested we mount the die at each end of the pipe off center and thread the pipe crooked.  My neighbor told me it was impossible to thread a pipe crooked, but I persuaded that we should try it.

to make a long story short, we tried it and it worked. Ken was flabbergasted, but forever after, he would tell the story about "Tinker's wobble threads." He is gone now, but eventually, he quit drinking. He used to tell the story with the addendum that if he wasn't drinking, there would have been no lubrication to make it work.

My aunt had a better answer to the impossible: She always told me "Ignorance is bliss." I like that explanation much better.
Tinker


 
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Man Oliver,
you do keep busy and do such nice work.

TOOL TIME!!! :) :) :) I loved that show, even have the DVD Box ... Oh, and I got T-Shirts ... But obviously Heidi is much better looking than me  [eek] [blink] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]



Thank you very much for the compliment on my work!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
I have threaders with the ratchet handle.  Don't use it much, but never thought about threading without one!  I don't trust slipjoint pliers for a good grip on something like that.  But I don't have Klein for a sponsor either!  And I never saw a plumber do it either.

Congrats on that sponsorship, BTW!

I would probably have unscrewed the pipe from the wall and taken it to a vise rather than run the risk of threading it in place and it potentially breaking.  I only say that because the radiator pipes in our home were 80 years old before we replaced them with copper 20 years ago.  When we changed the pipes out I remember some of them being pretty corroded, thus wanting to be careful with any wrenches!  They are all 3/4" copper replacing 3/4" iron pipes.

It doesn't even look like you had a pipe wrench on the pipe for extra support while threading.  You live dangerously!

Good stuff.  Keep the projects coming.

neil

Hi Neil,

Funny you mention Klein, that was my Knipex  [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] - But only because they sent me so much neat tools, I didn't dare to ask for another additional pair of pliers and I don't think I would have used insulated pump pliers for this anyway. :)

Thank you very much!!

I think there lies our little misunderstanding. Maybe I should have put this in my original post. I can't unscrew the pipe. It's completely incased within the brick & mortar wall. It was put in when the house was build, never to be taken out again. (Basically)

Here's a picture from the bathroom when it was remodeled, the pipes were taken out and replaced as the whole room was "stripped" to the core. This view is after tiling and plaster were removed. (In the other rooms the pipe(s) lies even deeper)



But I totally agree with you, when one can take out the pipe, one should do it!

EDIT, I forgot this in my original reply: You're also absolutely right on the pipe wrench, I could have placed one on the pipe for additional support. I will do that next time, didn't think of that before!

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: May 01, 2018, 12:45 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer


@six-point socket II, This has been a great info thread on many levels. Very interesting all the way. A while back, you showed some cranes in Germany. Each time I have visited I have noted, even in my inlaws' small village, how many cranes ae in use, even for individual houses. However, cranes are not the subject for now.

When I was a HS sophomore, I was taking shop. For the first half year, I was in the metal working class. I had a neighbor who was a plumber.  He found out I was learning about metal working. One afternoon, he asked me if i knew how to sweat.  Of course I knew all about sweating. I had lived and worked on a farm for the last few years. But, I knew that wasn't the kind of sweating he was asking about. I replied, "Well. I know how to solder."  That was the beginning of a long relationship in the plumbing trade.

I learned how to sweat, but also earned about other phases of the trade. My neighbor's specialty was pump installation. I learned how to pull wells and install pumps either at the top of wells or to drop a pump down 300 feet into a well. Either way, we had to fabricate fittings. That was in 1946 and there are not as large selections of parts that are available today. We were working mostly on old houses and changing ancient piping for more modern equipment into house that were not built to any code and building codes were just being thought out and developed.

On one job, a short nipple just would not line up and the boss was stumped to make a short pipe fit at both ends without bending. His torch could not develope enough heat to anneal the pipe soft enough to bend without kinking. He would have to go home and get his tanks and bigger torch.  He had a drinking problem and I knew if I let him go home, I would not see him again that day.  In my ignorance, I suggested we mount the die at each end of the pipe off center and thread the pipe crooked.  My neighbor told me it was impossible to thread a pipe crooked, but I persuaded that we should try it.

to make a long story short, we tried it and it worked. Ken was flabbergasted, but forever after, he would tell the story about "Tinker's wobble threads." He is gone now, but eventually, he quit drinking. He used to tell the story with the addendum that if he wasn't drinking, there would have been no lubrication to make it work.

My aunt had a better answer to the impossible: She always told me "Ignorance is bliss." I like that explanation much better.
Tinker

Hi!

Thank you very much Tinker!

I have to say "Tinker's wobble threads." was an amazing read, thank you so much for sharing, love it!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4995
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
@six-point socket II

TOOL TIME!!! I loved that show, even have the DVD Box ... Oh, and I got T-Shirts ... But obviously Heidi is much better looking than me....


Nahhhhhhhh  [eek] [big grin]

Offline rst

  • Posts: 1866
Im the Tool Man...still have a hat   [big grin]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Yesterday I was caught saying: “Let me just change that tire real quick.” Even though I know so well, I should never use "just" and "real quick" in the same sentence.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

So, we have this garden/hand cart - it's really great when it works as intended, but it's also kinda "high maintenance" ...

We ordered this a couple of years ago from a backyard/gardening stuff related dealer located in one of the next bigger cities. It wasn't cheap but on the same hand also not really expensive. What we didn't know back then, this dealer gets almost everything that is not seeds/plants from China and sells it here by "pretending" and advertising to be a local, high quality/expert gardening market ... After ordering a couple of times (mainly seeds and plants) we went there once, and instead of a gardening market it was just a big warehouse and many greenhouses. You could only access a part of the warehouse where they either hand out products from stock, or look through returns/factory seconds ... We were pretty disappointed, as his advertising clearly sounded a lot different.

Anyway, back to the cart. I think it was in a picture or two before, but just in case, here it is:



Comes in handy for anything from intended use as garden cart to getting groceries from the car to the house or transporting other materials ...

After the first year I had to change all 4 tires for the first time, because all of them had cracked, some tubes were punctured, some had defective valves. This then turned out to be another lesson: I tried sourcing these tires/wheels locally. From our equivalent of home depot to specialized tool/hardware stores - no one could (or wanted to?) really help me. Then I typed the numbers embossed in the tire into amazon's search... LOL! Of course, there were plenty of sellers and offerings .........

Speaking of high maintenance, the coatings of paint are really thin so it started to rust after the first week, so I we have to keep this pretty clean and dry ... (I'm thinking of investing in a small paint spray setup ...)

So fast forward, gardening season is upon us and of course, another flat. So I bought another tire, in fact I bought two, to have a spare at hand. While unpacking I think they look kinda odd but I couldn't put my finger on it ...

Just brought my wrenches.


Old tire comes off easy


New tire goes on, that looks good. - Almost finished.


But wait, what's this? Where's the bolt?


Put the old tire back on - looks good.


Well ...


First thought: I gotta pack these both back up, and send them back. Pay return shipping as they don't qualify for free return shipping.

Second thought: I could simply change the hub, as tire and tube are supposed to be the same.

To make this as quick as possible I got my impact ...

Dismantling of old tire.


Deflating new tire.


Both tires dismantled.


Putting my "new" tire together. Old hub, new tire and tube.


Works.


Fastening.


Let's see when I will need the spare...  [eek] [blink] [eek] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: May 25, 2018, 05:48 AM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 348
I hope you just learned your lesson real quick. [emoji6]

It seems to be the week for this. I wanted to quickly repair my old Nintendo NES this week, spent two nights and still have things to finish. Postponed for now, due to other projects ranking up in priority.

At least now you know how quickly you can dismantle and reassemble the tire. [emoji6]

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2186
I feel your pain Oliver... Last night I drained the gas and the oil out of our SnowBlower to put it to rest for the Summer and Fall until we awaken it again for Winter.  The Oil Drain tube backed out of the engine block when I was trying to just remove the cap at the end of the pipe to drain the oil like usual.  There wasn't enough room next  to the engine to get pliers or a Visegrip to hold the drain pipe so I could loosen and remove that stuck cap..... Ended up with a mess of oil that I couldn't stop.... [embarassed]  Now it's all fixed, drain pipe/tube is secure in the engine again.... but what a time waster..... [mad]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

@grobkuschelig Good luck with the NES!

@leakyroof

Thank you, but your situation sounds a lot less fun and more serious then my little odyssey - I hope you have flooring that was easily cleaned up at least. What a mess  [eek] [scared] Glad it is back OK now!!



I visited our hardware rental this morning and reserved some mobile scaffolding for next week, the beams of my patios roof need to be sanded and painted. FUN FUN FUN  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]
 
5l. of paint and 123.3m FrogTape will be delivered on Monday.

Kind regards,
Oliver


Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4582
Hey Oliver, I have the same style wagon and was constantly re-inflating the tires on a bi-weekly basis and replacing tires. I finally got fed up and purchased solid urethane tires for it. Fantastic conversion, right now the wagon has probably 500# of porcelain tile sitting on it, been like that for about a year.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
That sounds great @Cheese do you have a link to the source for me by any chance? Would be highly appreciated. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4582
Sorry Oliver,  [sad]  I looked but the receipt is not in the proper folder. They came as a set of 4 tires with hubs & bearings just like the picture. You simply pulled a cotter key and then removed a nut, pulled the old one off and slipped the new one on.

I purchased the wagon at Northern Tool so it's likely that I also purchased the tires from them. The name Marathon also sounds familiar.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_lawn-garden+wagons-yard-carts+hand-pull-towable-wagons

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_tires-wheels

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks @Cheese those links help a lot! Great! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4582
Hey Oliver, just checked the wagon and they’re Marathon Flat-Free.

No wonder Marathon sounded familiar.  [doh]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Thanks Cheese!

I'm going to get me some of these for sure!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi,

"There's always something ..."

I finished a little something in my basement which required me to move a gel joint installed in 2015 by professionals from Germany's largest telephone company.

After touching it, I had some kind of liquid all over my hand ... Checked the second gel joint, that was never moved/touched, even more of this liquid substance on the underside ...

Right now I'm trying to find out if it is normal for the gel/silicone to liquify over time/ "sweat". But I guess no matter what, I will have to call the telephone company on Monday. ...









Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2418
The gel joints I have seen were used by the phone company here.  Far smaller than yours!


They never harden.  Gel is for moisture displacement. 

https://goo.gl/images/MPcwdE

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Neil,

Thank you! You made me look for the file I have on this, and I found this picture, taken by the pros when they installed it.



As you can see, the joints inside that box are probably the same. :) Thank you again!

So it might be just the outer gel/silicone seal of that box that is "leaking"/"sweating" ...

I guess I won't get around interacting with the phone company on Monday.

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: May 27, 2018, 02:06 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Wooohooo this happened today:



Goodbye copper DSL, welcome fiber optic ...

Wooohooo!!!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Advertisement.

Hi!

Today I prepared my patio's roof "substructure" for tomorrow's sanding extravaganza.

Minimalistic tool kit.



I started by removing cramps (Don't ask ...)





And cable clamps. These snap easily and then you need some quality pliers to get a good grip and pull them out. I have to say that I really like the Klein Tools J2000-9NECR Journeyman 2000 series pliers. I've used these before on the other project to get some really long and stubborn nails out of masonry so I knew they were the right tool for this. They just  grip everything, even if there’s not much left to grip. Optimal transmission of force right into the tip of the jaws and a sure grip you can rely on. Very happy with them and by now they have become my go to pliers for everything that needs a sure grip and lots of force.







Then it was time to remove the brackets from my "party lighting". Although I did install these, I had no idea the (at least partly) slotted screws were this small. I must have forgotten - and I have no Idea how/ with what tool I installed these originally.

So I got my SIR Tools Mini-Hexdriver Bit-Kit to find a 3mm slotted bit, and put it in my PDC's quick (ex)change chuck.





Of course, and this is totally not like me, there were also very small PH screws on some of them ...



Back to the PDC.



Well I'll spare you the pictures of moving stuff off the patio and so on...

Very early tomorrow morning I will be at the local hardware rental to get my mobile scaffolding - and hopefully I can post about it in the evening when the sanding is completed. Saturday is reserved for painting. Monday the mobile scaffolding needs to be back, and I honestly don't plan on working on Sunday. So let's see and hope for the best.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 348
Hi Oliver,

Best of luck that you get it finished in the time planned. :)

How many meters of beams are there to cover?

Offline neilc

  • Posts: 2418
Don't you have a bigger drill for that small screw bit?!

I have a 40 year old set of very similar Klein pliers.  Here, they are called lineman's pliers as any electrician was guaranteed to have a pair in their toolbelt.  Here's a brief history of how they got started - making a pair that sound similar to what you are using today!  In 1857, so 161 years ago!  Amazing.  http://www.kleintools.com/content/history

Klein Tools is headquartered here in Chicago and has had several factories in the Chicago area.  Fantastic tools.


Good luck with the project!
« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 07:39 PM by neilc »

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4582
Hey Oliver, don't want to rain on your parade,  [unsure]   but I couldn't help but notice the divot in the linesman's pliers' edge.

An object was obviously cut and the jaws of the pliers were either too soft, and they deformed, or the edges were too hard and they chipped...just curious...there's a story there....[big grin]

« Last Edit: May 31, 2018, 10:03 PM by Cheese »

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 639
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Good morning everyone! :)

08:07 AM - It's raining, and a tiny storm with lightning and thunder is rolling through, so I let that pass before picking up my small scaffolding.

@grobkuschelig

Thanks! Well:

10 m x2 sides
10 m x3 sides
3.7 m x3 sides x10 beams

And some smaller parts.

So it's roughly 161 m + ...

@neilc

Thank you so much! Have you been to the factory?

@Cheese

Advertisement.

It's not the rain, that ruined the parade...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

But I'm afraid there's no real story. I did some extensive cutting tests with these Lineman's pliers - after all, that's what the series 2000 side cutting pliers are meant to do.

It went smooth through everything I threw at it, and then I found this "little" rusty nail, probably from my grandfathers hardware assortment. I pondered for some seconds, I knew it was a 50/50 chance, I cut it. There was a louder than normal "crack", that's when I knew that was a hardened steel nail. Actually I was surprised there wasn't more damage to the cutting edge.

I cut bolts, nails, spring hardened wire - no problem. And even after my "mishap" it would still pass my paper test. I took a small file to smoothen the dent a little. I originally wanted to cover this in my overall review of the pliers. :)







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver