Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 112365 times)

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Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 534
That said, I rather feel a little chilly than sweating my a** off. ;)
I totally know what you mean. ;)

But (pun intended) my shop is a free standing garage, so no heat donations.
I’m using a small heater to circulate some air and have two “baby grills” ;) Radiant heaters installed. They switch off automatically and need to be restarted, but I like the safety convenience.

Makes it bearable. I need to close off some additional gaps in the garage door, but I need to build some more projects to get the stacked plywood out of the way first. [emoji23]

I have not had cigars for a long time. I stopped when smoking in bars was banned.
Though I sometimes fondly remember the taste of a John Aylesbury Candela with a nice Mojito.

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
That said, I rather feel a little chilly than sweating my a** off. ;)
I totally know what you mean. ;)

But (pun intended) my shop is a free standing garage, so no heat donations.
I’m using a small heater to circulate some air and have two “baby grills” ;) Radiant heaters installed. They switch off automatically and need to be restarted, but I like the safety convenience.

Makes it bearable. I need to close off some additional gaps in the garage door, but I need to build some more projects to get the stacked plywood out of the way first. [emoji23]

I have not had cigars for a long time. I stopped when smoking in bars was banned.
Though I sometimes fondly remember the taste of a John Aylesbury Candela with a nice Mojito.

Ok, that's a different story then. Safety is a good point in regard to those heaters, they can be quite an hazard. But then again, when used with common sense like we do, no problem. :)

Don't get me started on that beyond-stupid ban ... And now it seems even to be overturned here, as my old place started pouring drinks again, just not sure if they serve it, or if you have to pick it up at the "counter" ... I don't get it.

But it also doesn't matter to me anymore, during the ban we mainly used a hotel for meetings and get togethers that would serve drinks "at the door" of the smoking lounge. Meaning you could order inside the smoking lounge, and then there was a table at the entrance, bartender would stick his/her head in and let us know drinks were served ... We just had to carry them into the smoking lounge on our own for it to be legal ... Kinda like the brown bag ...

Anyway, I drastically lowered my consumption of cigars because of my health, and now it's just one, from time to time. Not a frequent visitor anymore to smoking lounges/bars & shops.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3709
When I was ten, I, along with all the rest of the kids in our small village, took up smoking.  It was early 1941 and already, patriotism was exposed and the come on for kids was the cigarette advertisers thought of a way to get to young kids. They sold Wings Cigarettes, every pack had a picture card showing a war plane. Those cards were the size of baseball player cards. We bought the cigarette to get those cards. Most of my pals grew to like the tobacco, but i hated the smoke. I lasted about two weeks and just quit--- cold turkey. Along the way, there was an elderly lady in the village who discovered we were all smoking. She was very religious and would often preach to us about our sins.  One day, she got a bunch of us together to preach about the sin of smoking. As she went on and on, she finally old us that, "Why just a couple of weeks ago, i was walking thru town and i saw a man sitting on a barrel in front of a store and smoking" she went on.  "I told him, young man, if you don't quit smoking, the devil will get you."

"Well, Lady, I have been smoking for just over 90 years. I will take my chances with the devil."

The lady, by now, figured she had our full attention and went on. "And don't ya know, exactly one week later, that man died." 

I quit smoking a few days later. Not because of what the old lady preached. I just hated tobacco. I hated the smoke. I never smoked again. I sometimes think about that old lady and the old man who had been 39 even longer than I have been 39. I laugh to think how long he had been smoking and it was time for him to pass into another world. Not because of his smoking. It was just his time.
Tinker
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2177
I smoked for about a month when I was 15, long, long, long time ago.  Camel unfiltered, wasn't too hard to give them up.  The only smoking, Swisher Sweet cigars, after that was on camping trips in the sixties and seventies for mosquito protection.

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 821
My uncle Al (who was the family rebel) talked me into smoking a 12" tourist cigar in Florida when I was around 10.  I turned green, threw up, and have never been tempted to smoke anything since.


Many thanks to uncle Al, though I didn't think so at the time.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3709
I smoked for about a month when I was 15, long, long, long time ago.  Camel unfiltered, wasn't too hard to give them up.  The only smoking, Swisher Sweet cigars, after that was on camping trips in the sixties and seventies for mosquito protection.

Yeah, I tried that a few times when fishing and camping. I decided I could stand the bugs better than I could stand the weeds. My grandfather, who I never saw more than 5 or 6 times in my/his life, used to smoke cigars. I could not stand anywbere near him when he was smoking. He was a bookkeeper and accountant for a tobacco company(tent grown) up around North Hampton. I remember the devestation of his tobacco fields being washed down the river during the hurricane of 1938.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hey Oliver, I have the same style wagon and was constantly re-inflating the tires on a bi-weekly basis and replacing tires. I finally got fed up and purchased solid urethane tires for it. Fantastic conversion, right now the wagon has probably 500# of porcelain tile sitting on it, been like that for about a year.
(Attachment Link)

So today was the day. Another flat. But I was prepared. I had 4 solid urethane tires waiting to be put on the cart. :) Thanks again @Cheese !!



Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 5995
So today was the day. Another flat. But I was prepared. I had 4 solid urethane tires waiting to be put on the cart. :) Thanks again @Cheese !!

Enjoy Oliver...they're on my wagon...they're on my wheelbarrow...best investment ever!! [big grin]

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3942
I might get a pair. A few weeks ago a hand truck tire was so deflated the tubeless seal was lost and had to take it to a tire shop to blast air in and set the seal.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3709
My mower tires were constantly getting flats on the front caster tires. Mostly from wild rose thorns. I chop into those bushes with the front of my mower without getting far enough in to get thorns in the back tires. My equipment guru suggested solid tires for the front. End of problem. I have not had a flat on the front tires for 5 years now.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 8823
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
My mower tires were constantly getting flats on the front caster tires. Mostly from wild rose thorns. I chop into those bushes with the front of my mower without getting far enough in to get thorns in the back tires. My equipment guru suggested solid tires for the front. End of problem. I have not had a flat on the front tires for 5 years now.
Tinker

If you have a flat with solid deck tires, then you have hit something other than a rose thorn  [big grin]

Seth

Offline Peter Halle

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  • Posts: 11904
I might get a pair. A few weeks ago a hand truck tire was so deflated the tubeless seal was lost and had to take it to a tire shop to blast air in and set the seal.

I trick I learned somewhere and have actually used too many times with my riding lawnmower is to take a ratchet strap and wind it around the tire parallel to the rim.  Try to center and then start to crank it down until the center is slightly depressed.  Then add air.  might have to depress more.

You can also do it with a loop of rope and a stick to twist and tighten.

Maybe this will help someone in the future.

Peter

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1587
That’s what I do (rope and stick), but it’s a royal pain in the rear.  You have to get the tire reasonably close to seated which takes a bit of fiddling, trial and error and dumb luck.  After having done that a few times, I now try to top off those air filled tires more routinely.  Which reminds me, it’s that time again!
-Raj

Offline Vondawg

  • Posts: 276
Saw a guy spray starter fluid inside a Jeep tire that had separated from the rim, light it, and it blew up and seated back on the rim.....I think you’d really have to know what you’re doing .......not me.
There are no mistakes....just new designs.

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 11904
That’s what I do (rope and stick), but it’s a royal pain in the rear.  You have to get the tire reasonably close to seated which takes a bit of fiddling, trial and error and dumb luck.  After having done that a few times, I now try to top off those air filled tires more routinely.  Which reminds me, it’s that time again!

It is easier with a wider strap.  But still one of life's annoyances.

Perhaps ou should ask Santa for a wider strap.  Or better yet, a gift card to be redeemed at your favorite Festoo Dealer!

Peter

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1587
That’s what I do (rope and stick), but it’s a royal pain in the rear.  You have to get the tire reasonably close to seated which takes a bit of fiddling, trial and error and dumb luck.  After having done that a few times, I now try to top off those air filled tires more routinely.  Which reminds me, it’s that time again!

It is easier with a wider strap.  But still one of life's annoyances.

Perhaps ou should ask Santa for a wider strap.  Or better yet, a gift card to be redeemed at your favorite Festoo Dealer!

Peter

No need, I'll save my Santa credits for something useful.  I've discovered that an old nylon dog leash works perfectly for this so I keep one around just in case a tire goes flat.  Now if you don't have a dog...well you should ask Santa for one!   [wink]
-Raj

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3709
I always keep amounted apart in the barn. If I get a flat, I either  load the  machine on the trailer and go home and dismount theft and mount the spare and drop he flat off  at equipment repair shopped I'm back on the jb in less than an hour. My equipment guru fixes the flat  and the next time i stop at his shop, uptick up therpaired tire and when I get home, the tire goes on the rack in the barn. When i used to do the repair by myself, I took more time and it was always an aggravation. When I had a crew, a flat ire would bring a whole crew to a stop. Tat might mean couple of hours lost o do an hoursrunning around for oe  man. I was paying the wages for the time  lost. That is when I bought spare rims and tires and kept  one of each size  on the rack. Now, working alone, I still find it more convenient to keep spares and it is cheaper to let those who are equiped to do the repairs.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3709
That’s what I do (rope and stick), but it’s a royal pain in the rear.  You have to get the tire reasonably close to seated which takes a bit of fiddling, trial and error and dumb luck.  After having done that a few times, I now try to top off those air filled tires more routinely.  Which reminds me, it’s that time again!

It is easier with a wider strap.  But still one of life's annoyances.

Perhaps ou should ask Santa for a wider strap.  Or better yet, a gift card to be redeemed at your favorite Festoo Dealer!

Peter

No need, I'll save my Santa credits for something useful.  I've discovered that an old nylon dog leash works perfectly for this so I keep one around just in case a tire goes flat.  Now if you don't have a dog...well you should ask Santa for one!   [wink]

I understand Peter always has a spare dog  or two lying around just waiting to do something useful.
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 11904
Thanks for the reminder.  Time to change the ‘ol avatar when I get home.

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2177
My cart and hose reel tires do the same thing.  I tie a loop of rope around insert hammer handle between tire and rope, twist until tire pushes out and pump up tire.  I really need to get the run flats but too cheap, maybe once the tires rot.

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3942
The previous time I had a flat hand truck tire I tightened a belt around it and managed enough to get the seal close enough that it would hold air.

This time I didn’t have the patience. At the tire shop I expected he would use the air blaster but he didn’t after trying the same thing I had he removed the valve from the stem. That allowed enough air in fast enough to seat the tire. Have to try to remember that...

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2260
Saw a guy spray starter fluid inside a Jeep tire that had separated from the rim, light it, and it blew up and seated back on the rim.....I think you’d really have to know what you’re doing .......not me.
. I’ve done this myself while off-roaming and in a shop setting where even an special air filled tube/expander around the tire couldn’t get the bead to hold.  Out came the Starting Fluid as a last ditch attempt...Risky but effective... [embarassed]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!


Conclusion on the "water damage" that happened in June 2018. The insurance paid although it took a rather long time.

Now the details.  [big grin]  [eek] [scared]  [big grin] [big grin]  [wink]

Overview. Floor, and pedestal.


This is where the water emerged, on the pedestal. L is for orientation in next picture.


This was one of pictures taken with my inspection camera of the hole where the water emerged. And please remember I had no idea what I saw inside the cavity, it looked odd, a mixture of "rotten away" and crystalline build up ...


Fast forward we (Pro and I) did the video inspection of the whole sewer system, pipes ... Result = all pipes A-OK.


But why the hole, and why the water?!

Careful chiseling around the drain/pipe.





Wait, what was that?



...

So what I saw inside the cavity was newspaper mixed with concrete. But why?







...





Actually, when the pedestal was poured the drain needed to be liftet/ extended. Whoever did this, thought it was a good idea to fit the new drain/pipe into the old one by "sealing" it with newspaper (probably to keep the concrete out). But of course this didn't really "merge" when the pedestal was simply poured over the joint.

Over the years, paper not fully encased with concrete rotted away, the paper wicked the water into the concrete and it "rotted" too.

With the heavy rain and a lot of pressure on the pipes, one little piece of concrete finally couldn't take the pressure anymore and bursted out.

I'm happy it wasn't the pipes or anything else, but I would have never thought of something like this.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1587
That's horrible!  [mad]  I guess they never expected that pipe to be under any pressure and everything would just drain out by gravity, but still, it was such an easy thing to seal up that extension.
-Raj

Offline SRSemenza

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 8823
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Unbelievable !!!!!!!!!!

Well, no, actually it is ...................  the stuff you find in buildings  [blink]

Seth

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5665
  • Festool Baby.....
Oliver and All ,

Doncha just tales of fine homebuilding like this?

It amazes me what ya find when ya get into stuff.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Yeah, I expected a lot, but not something like this. Well, it's taken care of/repaired and lets hope the pipes hold up in the meantime, as the weather-crazies will probably increase in the coming years.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Advertisement because of visible Klein Tools.

Hi!

Here are a couple of pictures of what I have been keeping busy with in the meantime ...

Demolition of old flood light.


Sorting through the wires ...




New wires need to go somewhere ...




Using the Klein Tools Electrician's MultiTool I got as Christmas gift.






"Glueing"/sealing a PVC pipe leading outside.




Getting familiar with a LSA connector terminal


Light & Music. Calling this my job-site disco. ;)


Installing the LSA connector.







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 911
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Maybe some of you remember this:




It is with great sadness that I announce the premature passing of :hager contactor ESC 440S which paid the ultimate price today after literally lifelong bravery even though it was facing excessive misuse.

Nevertheless it ensured that no one showering in this house would be met with a stream of cold water should someone have turned on another flow heater and I deeply thank you for that.

The truth is, it never stood a chance. Made with great care by the fine people of :hager your estimated lifetime was 60.000 switching cycles and if it had been installed correctly it would have lived happily for decades.

Being installed incorrectly it cycled for as long as someone kept a hot water tap open and did so for almost 6 years which is remarkable under the given circumstances.

Thank you my dear :hager ESC 440S - you will never be forgotten and one of your brothers/sisters now, correctly installed, performs in your spot and for rememberance of your heroic acts.

The person responsible for wrong installation will be dealt with accordingly. :P ;) ;) ;)

---

(I better write a disclaimer in todays world: This post is meant funny/ as a joke. …)

---

Kind regards,
Oliver

Since a couple of weeks, every time I enter the basement, I hear this buzzing noise ... When I tap the contactor, it gets significantly less noisy. I know this happens/ is supposed to happen when the magnet is "stuck". But after one year? And as far as I can tell, the prior issue (endless cycling) did not occur again.



Ladies and gentlemen, any ideas? (Besides that I'm obviously calling the electrician again who erected this ...)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3942
Good luck Oliver!

Regarding you previous post, the filter you used processing the B&W pics makes my eyes itch  [scared]