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GENERAL DISCUSSIONS => Home Improvement & Other Projects => Topic started by: six-point socket on September 11, 2015, 09:57 PM

Title: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on September 11, 2015, 09:57 PM
Hi all,

I thought I start a thread to collect all of my smaller projects, small day to day tasks and so on.


So I posted some tool reviews and now I think it's time to show some of the stuff I have done over time. Please keep in mind that I'm not a professional by any means, I do not offer services or sell stuff of any kind to 3rd parties - everything I do is solely for my personal projects.

Preface to this is as follows: I was remodeling my basement and put tiling on all floors, to gain space I moved the doors out - they had to be cut anyway. You will notice that this is a pretty old and cheapish door, the problem in my basement is that not 2 doors come at the same size - they are all different. Since these doors serve no real purposes for me I decided against having new ones build. Then, after moving the doors a few times around I left one standing upright by accident - of course a little wind came up and blew that door right to the ground. Of course it didn't fell flat to the ground but into something pointy that destroyed a nice section of the door leaf.

Taking into consideration what I wrote above - I couldn't simply buy a new one - and if I had someone custom build it for me, I would have wanted all doors to look alike. So I decided to repair it myself - after all, it's just a basement room door.

Stupid me didn't take a picture of the damaged door leaf, so we start with a picture where I had already cut out the damaged portion and put in a piece of MDF. The cut was made with a Multicutter and I glued in a support structure made from wood dowels for the little piece of MDF.

[attachimg=1]

Next I applied wood filler

[attachimg=2]

Then started the process of sanding. (Of course I used a dust extractor during sanding)

[attachimg=3]

more sanding

[attachimg=4]

And then the final layer of paint.

[attachimg=5]

Personally I think this turned out pretty well, not so "Quick and dirty" after all and might be an Idea if you face a problem similar to mine.

During normal lighting you won't see no see the formerly affected portion - if you search for it under direct lighting you can find a fine line on the right side.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on September 19, 2015, 04:33 PM
Don't know where to post 'em, so I'll add them here. Some pictures from today. (Installing some Kupa pipe, new outlet...)

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on October 31, 2015, 10:34 AM
Still don't know where, or even if I should little pictures like this, but anyway.

Installed a new outlet for a stand mixer, used the CXS to drill through the tiles, then the Bosch to drill into the wall, and then again the CXS to fasten the outlet's screws. The other stuff was used for the electrical work that had to be done.

[attachimg=1]

Kind regards,
Oli-bakingsnickerdoodles-ver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on October 31, 2015, 04:25 PM
So here are a few pictures from my basement renovation earlier this year.

The room serves as dry-food storage and additionally houses a freezer and a 2nd fridge.

First I wanted to make the very ugly insulation of some remaining heating pipes disappear, secondly I wanted more light in the room.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Love working outdoors, even well before spring.

[attachimg=3]

Not so easy when you have to work around a running fridge and freezer

[attachimg=4]

Almost done.

[attachimg=5]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 01, 2015, 10:20 AM
Looks good Oliver, huge improvement.  [thumbs up]

Are those recessed lights LED's and if so who makes them? They seem nice and thin and seem to produce a lot of light.

Liebherr...that brand just became available locally about 2-3 years ago.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 01:14 PM
Hi Cheese,

thanks! :)

Honestly, I have no idea who the manufacturer of those recessed lights, or better, the "housing" is. I had them lying around from another project. I originally put them in a self made wooden holder to light up a wall in my home theater from behind a couch. When I remodeled that room, I went for a professional solution but never threw the lights away, thought I could use them. Turns out to be true, so I used them for my basement renovation/remodeling.

The lamp/illuminant itself is indeed LED. It's manufactured by Osram -> LED STAR MR16 35 36° 5 W/827 GU5.3 http://www.osram.com/osram_com/products/led-technology/lamps/professional-led-reflector-lamps/parathom-mr16/index.jsp (http://www.osram.com/osram_com/products/led-technology/lamps/professional-led-reflector-lamps/parathom-mr16/index.jsp)

Fit's all standard housings, but need's quite a bit of height.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 03:17 PM
During basement remodeling I had just finished the installation of a new light in one of the basement's hallways and basically all I was left to do with was cleaning two old outlets.

[attachimg=1]

Of course, that would have been to easy. Basically out of nowhere, the announcement of a new hallway cupboard came from my significant other.

So the light had to travel to the ceiling above. Since I didn't know if there were any additional wires in that wall (it has outlets on the other side, too...) I started to search for live wires and safe places for my pipe clamps. You can also see a small, although purely "optical", mistake I made. I should have drilled a hole in the backside of that small junction box, instead of getting the existing wires (power supply) in from above. Would have been a cleaner look.

[attachimg=2]

Then moved the light to the ceiling.

[attachimg=3]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on November 01, 2015, 03:27 PM
Next time you have to do a surface mount raceway look at using Wiremold.

Tom
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 03:38 PM
Did a quick search on Wiremold - definitely an interesting product, legrand seems to have quite a few nice products! I will consider it if I ever have to install a visible raceway outside my basement. (I'm not a big fan of visible raceways...) Do you now if Wiremold/legrand stuff is rated for use with 240V?

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 03:54 PM
Found another picture taken while setting up that cupboard.

[attachimg=1]

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on November 01, 2015, 04:05 PM
Did a quick search on Wiremold - definitely an interesting product, legrand seems to have quite a few nice products! I will consider it if I ever have to install a visible raceway outside my basement. (I'm not a big fan of visible raceways...) Do you now if Wiremold/legrand stuff is rated for use with 240V?

Kind regards,
Oliver

All are rated for line voltage except the low voltage line of Wiremold.

Tom
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 04:06 PM
Thanks! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 01, 2015, 04:13 PM
Hiring a pro.

So after installing sheetrock myself in the storage-room, I decided I would hire a pro to do the basement's hallways. What I can say is that I will be much more careful who I'm hiring in future.

Here's one of the episodes that left rather amused, than actually angry.

So, I told the pro that I would install 2 switches, 2 single switches. I drilled corresponding holes into the wall to make additional space for my installation needs. (I would have marked the center of the holes I need on the sheetrock, but my pro insisted that wasn't necessary, he knows how to meet the holes...)

Well, the result:

[attachimg=1]

Of course, he didn't meet the holes and also didn't leave enough space between the holes for two single switches.

I rectified this myself after all was done and the guy out the house.

[attachimg=2]

Kind regards,
Oliver


Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 02, 2015, 09:44 AM
Hi Oliver,
I have a question for you. Is it common in Germany/Europe to use the screw barrier terminals to connect wires together? As per your picture in a previous post.

[attachthumb=1]

In the states, we've used wire nuts for years and increasingly I am now using the Wago push-in connectors or Wago lever connectors.

[attachthumb=2]

[attachthumb=3]

[attachthumb=4]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 02, 2015, 10:36 AM
Hi Cheese,

There are a couple different answers to that. :)

If you, like me, life in an old house built in 60'ties you will encounter a lot of those screw barrier terminals. It is what was used.

Today, and I'm speaking solely for Germany here, those screw barrier terminals are solely permitted for the installation/connection of lights. (Hence their German name "Luesterklemme/Lüsterklemme" "Luester" or "Lüster" = chandelier and "Klemme" = connector) (And as you can see in that picture, I installed a light :) ) The, lets call it basic variant of these screw barrier terminals is not rated for higher amps. (Only between 2,5 - 6 Amps which is suitable for lighting, as the lamp/illuminant limits the drawn amps)

Now it get's tricky because basically the same product, although rated for higher amps, exists under a different German name: "Dosenklemme" -> "Dose" = junction box "Klemme" = connector. Those may be used for other applications than lighting.

Personally I install lighting with the correct screw barrier terminal and make sure no wires are exposed/screws are fitted correctly. I rarely use the the junction-box type for other applications, if I do, same caution is applied as with the others.

As you, I do prefer Wago connectors for all lasting connections. If installed correctly, they offer the crucial benefit of having no exposed parts that could conduct electricity/current whereas screw barrier terminals (under certain circumstances) do.

I'd say, nowadays Wago is far more common than screw barrier terminals (except for lighting). And Besides safety, they are quicker and easier to install, too. All pros I know, use them - so do I.

I've seen wire nuts, but have not found one in my house.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 02, 2015, 11:03 AM
Thanks for the answer Oliver, it seems that even the rules and regulations in Germany can be dodgy at times. [eek]

So the Lüsterklemme and the Dosenklemme look alike but have different amperage ratings. Are there any exterior markings to differentiate the 2 connectors?

Why wouldn't you just use Wagos on lighting instead of the Lüsterklemme?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 02, 2015, 12:52 PM
Oh, absolutely  [eek] [scared] ;)

Well, foremost it's habit and convenience. Convenience because a lot of the wiring coming out of the walls and ceilings is pretty short, because they have been cut at least once or twice during the lifetime of this house, so I didn't want to use the "permanent" Wago connectors, chances are high the wires break if you have to remove them for whatever reason, and then it gets really iffy. In many instances there is not a lot of space, so you can't simply add some extensions, which would then require 2 Wago connectors per line. Of course, now with the Wago lever connectors that isn't an real issue anymore.

As a rule of thumb: if it has 2 screws it's generally a "Lüsterklemme", if it has 1 screw it's a "Dosenklemme".

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 03, 2015, 09:56 PM
Picture especially taken for @Cheese  [big grin]

[attachimg=1]

--

The Festool collection grows... CTL SYS arrived today.

[attachimg=2]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 08, 2015, 12:25 PM
Today's two small projects.

1st repairing the outlets on my patio.

2nd preparing christmas decorations.

So, after removing a plant on my patio, the outlets close by became loose and I had to make a new tray for them.

Setup. ;)

[attachimg=1]

The situation.

[attachimg=2]

Checking if the outlets can be re-used. (1)

[attachimg=3]

Checking if the outlets can be re-used. (2)

[attachimg=4]

Preparing to cut my tray.

[attachimg=5]

Countersinking, back.

[attachimg=6]

Countersinking, front.

[attachimg=7]

Fitting to wall, after having cleaned the outlets.

[attachimg=8]

Finished.

[attachimg=9]

Now the second part. I bought three lanterns I want to setup in front of the house sometimes after Thanksgiving - since the lanterns are very lightweight and could easily fall over or get stolen, I bought round stone plates to affix them to.

Setup. ;)

[attachimg=10]

Drilling through the baseplates of the lanterns.

[attachimg=11]

Drilling the stones.

[attachimg=12]

M6x30.

[attachimg=13]

Finished lanterns.

[attachimg=14]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Staniam on November 08, 2015, 12:40 PM
What a cool thread to read while sitting at the dinning table to eat breakfast and drink my coffee. It's cool to see little home DIY projects on here. I love that 12v Bosch drill, every time I see it in think about getting it again and replacing my CXS with it  [eek]. I just love how compact and smooth it is. Kind of big words considering how in love I am with the CXS.

Keep posting pictures!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Alex on November 08, 2015, 12:55 PM
I hope you used outdoor cable in your new set up to connect the two boxes, because using the single insulated wire is not according to specs.

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on November 08, 2015, 01:12 PM
I hope you used outdoor cable in your new set up to connect the two boxes, because using the single insulated wire is not according to specs.

(Attachment Link)

I don't see a space/gap between the boxes. How does this affect the cable used? Here it would not be considered exposed so outdoor cable would not be required. Of course the feeder cable would have to be outdoor rated.

Tom
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 08, 2015, 01:18 PM
Used H05RN-F 3G1,5 mm² for the internal wiring and connection. Supply cable is something similar, don't have it's specs at hand.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Alex on November 08, 2015, 02:02 PM
I don't see a space/gap between the boxes. How does this affect the cable used? Here it would not be considered exposed so outdoor cable would not be required. Of course the feeder cable would have to be outdoor rated.

Just butting two boxes against each other is not a water tight seal and doesn't count as such legally. In practice it probably won't do any harm the way it is done now, just pointing out it is not according to official specs. 
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on November 08, 2015, 02:26 PM
I don't see a space/gap between the boxes. How does this affect the cable used? Here it would not be considered exposed so outdoor cable would not be required. Of course the feeder cable would have to be outdoor rated.

Just butting two boxes against each other is not a water tight seal and doesn't count as such legally. In practice it probably won't do any harm the way it is done now, just pointing out it is not according to official specs.

Here we can get a sealed connector for that.

Tom
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Wuffles on November 08, 2015, 06:21 PM
Picture especially taken for @Cheese  [big grin]

(Attachment Link)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Once you go Wago. Love them.

Interesting fact btw, I once met an electrician who swore blind they were single use (the push in ones) because you can't just pull them out. Idiot.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 08, 2015, 07:15 PM
@Wuffles
He was right, you can't pull the wires out if you pull them straight out of the Wago, it's like a Chinese finger puzzle, but if you walk the wires out from side to side and kind of unscrew them they'll come out without damaging the connector or wire.

@six-point socket
Thanx for the personal photo...I owe you one. [big grin]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Wuffles on November 09, 2015, 02:53 AM
@Wuffles
He was right, you can't pull the wires out if you pull them straight out of the Wago, it's like a Chinese finger puzzle, but if you walk the wires out from side to side and kind of unscrew them they'll come out without damaging the connector or wire.

No mate, I know that, I mean he was cutting them off and throwing them away after one use with the stubs of wire still sticking out.

Pull and twist they come out easily, or if you have a single wire with a short length, just turn it, pops straight out. Which you also know, so don't know why I'm saying it.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 09, 2015, 09:46 AM

No mate, I know that, I mean he was cutting them off and throwing them away after one use with the stubs of wire still sticking out.


Maybe he owned Wago stock... [eek]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: CrazyLarry on November 09, 2015, 10:05 AM
Picture especially taken for @Cheese  [big grin]

(Attachment Link)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Once you go Wago. Love them.

Interesting fact btw, I once met an electrician who swore blind they were single use (the push in ones) because you can't just pull them out. Idiot.

He's right in a way ... sounds like he would be single use :)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: richy3333 on November 09, 2015, 03:55 PM
A 'spark' who was working on a site I was on, but not working with me was given some 3 port Wagos. He proceeded to push the line, neutral and CPC all into the one Wago. He couldn't fathom the tripping when the power was turned on again!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 09, 2015, 06:00 PM
A 'spark' who was working on a site I was on, but not working with me was given some 3 port Wagos. He proceeded to push the line, neutral and CPC all into the one Wago. He couldn't fathom the tripping when the power was turned on again!

lol  [eek] [eek] [eek] ;D ;D ;D

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on November 12, 2015, 10:58 AM
Decided to make a little roof for my outlets...

Setup. LOVE the CTL-SYS!!!  [eek] [eek] [eek] ;D ;D ;D

[attachimg=1]

Measuring.

[attachimg=2]

Cut.

[attachimg=3]

Fitting.

[attachimg=4]

Overview.

[attachimg=5]

Roofing felt.

[attachimg=6]

Attached.

[attachimg=7]

The Bosch felt neglected and insisted to get in the picture... ;)

[attachimg=8]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on May 16, 2016, 09:15 AM
Quick'n'dirty repair job for my CXS aka more CXS fun  [eek] [scared] [big grin] - I guess next year I have to replace the complete patio of my garden shed.  [scared] [scared]  [eek]  [big grin]

[attachimg=1]

old screws out.

[attachimg=2]

cutting replacement panels to length.

[attachimg=3]

new screws in.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on May 25, 2016, 05:27 PM
Hi!

Yesterday was the day I replaced my old attic ladder with a new, quality product one from Dolle. Obviously I used a couple of tools for that, some Festool - some not.

Old attic ladder. (what you can't see in this picture is that this ladder has been fixed numerous times on the lowest steps, and I deemed it to be to dangerous for any further use)

[attachimg=1]

Getting it out. I had to remove a lot of rusted 10 mm nuts, an impact driver is worth it's weight in gold during this type of work.

[attachimg=2]

[attachimg=3]

Only the frame left.

[attachimg=4]

Up until this point everything went as planned and was one smooth ride. The bolts you are about to see in the next picture, I thought they were used to hold the old frame in place and and load bearing. To get them out, I removed the nut and washer, placed my ratcheting box end wrench on the bolt, re-applied a nut and the washer in front of it, then used a 2nd nut to lock it. That worked fantastic until I realized that I was just spinning the whole bolt. I tried with another bolt - same thing.

[attachimg=5]

I decided to remove the frame with a pry bar then. That did the trick. What you can see in that following picture is part of the hole in the ceiling where the frame was. If you examine it closely you will see that the original builder of the house had small blocks of wood installed, I guess while the slab was poured. Now you might ask what the bolts were for. When I got everything out with the pry bar I noticed that those bolts were used to center/align the frame. The frame was then nailed into place - and the only thing bearing the load were those nails.

[attachimg=6]

Then, to install the new attic ladder I needed 2 pieces of wood that would hold the new frame and align it with the ceiling. Drilling the holes with my CXS.

[attachimg=7]

Of course, the ceiling needed some holes, too. The CTL-SYS with the drilling attachment came in very handy.

[attachimg=8]

Using the CXS and the angle attachment to remove the ladder from the frame of the new attic ladder.

[attachimg=10]

Drilling of the new frame with the CXS.

[attachimg=9]

Frame in place, ladder installed.

[attachimg=11]

Almost finished. (To be continued.)

[attachimg=12]

Today I relaxed, had a lazy day and just poured a small slab of concrete for a to be installed water tap.

[attachimg=13]

[attachimg=14]

Kind regards, and as always I hope you enjoy my postings.
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Holmz on May 25, 2016, 06:03 PM
...
Of course, the ceiling needed some holes, too. The CTL-SYS with the drilling attachment came in very handy.

(Attachment Link)
...

Kind regards, and as always I hope you enjoy my postings.
Oliver

@six-point socket -Oliver .
That drill dust sucker-upper looks nice. What is the Festool number of it?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on May 25, 2016, 06:12 PM
Hi Holmz,

Festool# is: 500483

https://www.festool.com/Products/Accessories/Pages/Detail.aspx?pid=500483

Great accessory for sure! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on May 28, 2016, 02:24 PM
Insulation.

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]

Rough leveling.

[attachimg=3]

--

Placing hammer set anchors in my slab for the water tap.

[attachimg=4]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Holmz on May 31, 2016, 02:31 AM
...
Placing hammer set anchors in my slab for the water tap.

(Attachment Link)

Kind regards,
Oliver

They (the local bolt supply) sell a nut insert that can be cast in concrete. When I used them once in the past I put a nylon bolt in it and some wax to seal the ends.
But you can install them on a board to have the hole pattern ideal and "smash it" into the wet concrete.
It doesn't do anything too much better than a ramset type of concrete bolt, but it is an option.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on June 02, 2016, 12:17 PM
Hi!

Thanks for the info @Holmz :)

--

Finished water tap.

[attachimg=1]

--

Then I posted in the "What Festool did you buy today"-Thread a couple of days ago that I had fished a Festo DX 93 E out of ebay for some pocket change. I was up very early, I think around 4 AM and found the auction running until 6:45 AM. No bid yet, starting bid was 80,00 Euro / 89,00 USD. This was the picture from the auction - no further description except for that it was in working condition.

[attachimg=2]

I guess that held a lot of people from bidding. I saw that the front portion of the sander was damaged - checked EKAT and bid on it. I was eager to make something from it/with it. Got it for 81,00 Euro / 91,00 USD + shipping 7,00 Euro / 8,00 USD.

This 88,00 Euro / 98,00 USD got me this:

[attachimg=3]

[attachimg=4]

[attachimg=5]

Tool works as expected.

As I was aware of the condition I ordered: 488899 for 18,00 Euro / 20,00 USD and 488716 for 17,00 Euro / 19,00 USD - I did not order the also defective plate (Part 26) because I wanted to be sure of the Model# first.

[attachimg=6]

Disassembly and throughout cleaning.

[attachimg=7]

[attachimg=8]

Current situation: cleaned and in working condition - turned out pretty nicely - waiting on Festool to deliver Part 26, which I ordered today for 10,00 Euro / 11,00 USD plus 3,50 Euro / 4,00 USD shipping and should be here by tomorrow or Saturday. Current total: 136,50 Euro / 152,00 USD. The fun I'm having: priceless. :)

[attachimg=9]

After work snack. :)

[attachimg=10]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Holmz on June 02, 2016, 03:05 PM
That water tap is nice.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on June 03, 2016, 12:38 PM
Thanks! :)

--

Festool delivered spare part 26 in less than 24h... AMAZING!

[attachimg=1]

Installed. DX 93 E finished.

[attachimg=2]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on June 03, 2016, 01:31 PM
Nice repair and a good deal!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 03, 2016, 02:56 PM
Hey Oliver...Love the water tap, I may need to borrow that idea from you. [cool]

Also, real nice job on the restoration of the DX 93, she looked a bit rough in the original photos.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on June 03, 2016, 04:16 PM
@neilc & @Cheese  Thank you very much! :)

For the record I have to admit that the water tap itself was not my idea/work, I saw it and bought it from a German company: "bellissa Haas GmbH" -> http://www.bellissa.de/index.html

If you make one Cheese, I definitely would love to see it :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 03, 2016, 04:37 PM
Hey Oliver,
I'll definitely make one because I've been looking at the big box stores and really don't like what they have to offer. Because the location of the installed faucet is not protected, the faucet has to be very robust and must withstand the daily abuse of children, dogs and anyone else that happens to come by.

Interestingly enough, a few years ago I built a concrete bench from some leftover concrete blocks and a cement slab so that the passersby could sit down and relax and just enjoy the view or have a picnic. However, one day as I drove down the alley, I noticed that the bench was being dismantled and the local 10-12 year old delinquents were trying to roll the pieces down the embankment and onto the railroad tracks.  [jawdrop]
Like I said...robust it needs to be.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: DB10 on June 03, 2016, 08:52 PM
  Hey Oliver, Great bit of bargain hunting going on there.
 I'm also very impressed with the 24hr parts delivery from Festool for 3.5 euro. I tend to forget how everything is so more automated in Europe. Sevice like that unfortunately down here just doesn't exist, we have to be very patient people, last parts I ordered up took over three weeks to turn up, and I had to drive to collect them. We have to plan ahead and usually have a few different projects on the go.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Holmz on June 03, 2016, 11:53 PM
...
Interestingly enough, a few years ago I built a concrete bench from some leftover concrete blocks and a cement slab so that the passersby could sit down and relax and just enjoy the view or have a picnic. However, one day as I drove down the alley, I noticed that the bench was being dismantled and the local 10-12 year old delinquents were trying to roll the pieces down the embankment and onto the railroad tracks.  [jawdrop]
Like I said...robust it needs to be.

Do they sell hungry pitbulls in the cities?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 04, 2016, 09:44 AM
Do they sell hungry pitbulls in the cities?

That's a thought... [smile]

So...after I retrieved all of the concrete blocks from the RR tracks (they couldn't push the bench top down the hill because it weighs 120-130#), I decided to pay their parents a visit.
I politely described the situation but was told, that their children would n e v e r do anything like that...and besides the children didn't have enough time to do it because "they just returned from Bible Camp a few hours ago."  [huh] [huh]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Kev on June 04, 2016, 09:56 AM
Do they sell hungry pitbulls in the cities?

That's a thought... [smile]

So...after I retrieved all of the concrete blocks from the RR tracks (they couldn't push the bench top down the hill because it weighs 120-130#), I decided to pay their parents a visit.
I politely described the situation but was told, that their children would n e v e r do anything like that...and besides the children didn't have enough time to do it because "they just returned from Bible Camp a few hours ago."  [huh] [huh]

Video on your phone .. forget the parents, just engage the police. A stunt the derails a train could kill a lot of people.

Delinquency like that shows there's something really sick and evil in those children. What's next? [eek]

Parents never see the bad in their children until it's too late .. unfortunately that's a fact.

@Cheese
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket on June 04, 2016, 09:59 AM
Hi!

@Cheese It's always sad when one builds something for the general public of the town, and then some crazies (minors or not...) try to pull it apart / destroy it. And even worse that they would really try to put concrete blocks on a RR track...

When I read you went to their parents I already thought they would deny their kids did it... Even bringing out the bible camp...  [eek]  [scared]  [big grin]

@DB10

Thank you very much and I'm sorry to hear it's such a trouble getting Festool spare parts in Australia. If there is ever anything you need to have in really short time, let me know - I'm an UPS and DHL customer myself, so when Festool delivers within 24 hrs to me, I can have it in another 24 to 48 hrs at your door/site if necessary, of course shipping will be a little more on the $$$ side then - but sometimes downtime is even more expensive. Just let me know if the need should ever arise.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: DB10 on June 04, 2016, 09:46 PM
@six-point socket Thanks Oliver for the kind offer it is much appreciated.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Holmz on June 04, 2016, 09:51 PM
...

That's a thought... [smile]

So...after I retrieved all of the concrete blocks from the RR tracks (they couldn't push the bench top down the hill because it weighs 120-130#), I decided to pay their parents a visit.
I politely described the situation but was told, that their children would n e v e r do anything like that...and besides the children didn't have enough time to do it because "they just returned from Bible Camp a few hours ago."  [huh] [huh]

The Lord works in strange ways.

These large wire jobs with the rocks also make attractive walls.
I am not sure how they would work where there is snow and frost.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 29, 2016, 11:06 PM
"Home improvement" from the spectator's side is really, really hard for me, it makes me wanna grab a tool and do something. Maybe someone finds this type of work interesting - so I thought I'd cover it here in my thread.

Preface: Our city's mayor along with other elected individuals from the city council and the heads of our electricity/gas supplier decided they would step up their game and also offer "multimedia"-services (Internet, Phone, TV ...) And, lets say because our Mayor made some moves that could be discussed most diversely depending on "who" you are - the city has a lot of money right now.

In fact so much, that everyone who signed up is getting a fiber optic cable right into his basement and a handover point installed for free. You can then decide if at some point you want to switch over to their services or stay with what you have. Anyway - this is a no brainer as it adds value to the house/property - so I said they could do it. Additionally, for a grand they connect you to the gas line if you want - you have then 10 years to replace your current oil-fired heating with a gas heating. Also a no brainer - regularly it costs 2.5 grands and it's not going to get cheaper over the years - so I said again: Do your thing... ;)

--

Today they started by placing plastic tubes from the sidewalk (public property) to/into my property for the optical fiber cable.

I came from the bakery this morning to find this:

(http://up.picr.de/26045881pa.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26045883iz.jpg)

Then they rolled in a little compressor
(http://up.picr.de/26045884tu.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26045885bf.jpg)

And some strange looking tubes and tool
(http://up.picr.de/26045886qq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26045888fc.jpg)

I guess it's a pretty robust tool
(http://up.picr.de/26045892kg.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26045899vg.jpg)

Here's a video how it works, please excuse the babbling in the background, not me.... https://sendvid.com/n2oyprha

Then the first outer tube is inserted
(http://up.picr.de/26045901kv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26045903rz.jpg)

Followed by a second tube
(http://up.picr.de/26045906dg.jpg)

A little loop is placed in the hole and everything back filled up and closed
(http://up.picr.de/26045915qp.jpg)

This is now rolled, waiting for the other team.
(http://up.picr.de/26045917mh.jpg)

--

It's 5 AM here right now, and I guess at 8 AM civil engineers will arrive and dig another, much larger hole for the gas tubes and connection. I don't know, but I hope they will leave everything that was done yesterday intact - otherwise it would be a profound waste of time... but I have no real say in this. lol. I'm just the spectator...

If there's some interested I will add more of this to this thread.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Kev on June 30, 2016, 03:47 AM
Are the dark pavers all just the public footpath? Have they started to dig into your property yet?

Kev.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 30, 2016, 05:05 AM
Hi,

Yes, everything dark = public. Grass = my property. So they dug one hole where the tubing comes out on my property already.

But wait for tonight, this is becoming pure slapstic - they are busy now, I have to watch closely, so I'm off again.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 30, 2016, 10:00 AM
Hi!

I'm at a loss for words, at least a little.

Yesterday two guys came and put the fiber optic cable in the ground with their special tool. You can find the pictures and video posted above.

Today two civil engineers came to lay the gas tubing in the ground.

Please keep in mind these sub-contractors work all for the same client who schedules everything.

Who finds the "mistake"? Still lolling about this - basically unbelievable. 2 people have wasted a complete day yesterday.

(http://up.picr.de/26056291ms.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26056290bw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26056288oy.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjskinny on June 30, 2016, 11:12 AM
So let me guess..

Yesterday the guys with the special tool showed up and managed to get the line installed without having to dig a trench.   The gas line guys came in today and had to dig a trench in the same spot as the fiber line. So the fiber line was taken out, the gas line put in and then the fiber line was placed back into the trench.... 

Timing is everything... And unfortunately I also see integration of services not always work out.  Something always gets done at least twice.. [blink]

Been enjoying your posts.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Kev on June 30, 2016, 11:47 AM
In our local council when work on a paved footpath happens, the pavers are taken up .. they vanish .. the work is done, then covered in black tar. Many months later someone will come along, dig up the black tar and replace it with new pavers.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on June 30, 2016, 12:54 PM
While you're right in thinking it's a complete waste, sometimes scheduling in an additional dependency for the fiber guys to drop the cable when the gas line is being run (for those residents that opted in) can be problematic. But if most residents opted in, yes, you would think there is an opportunity to save money...unless the mayor paid way too much and the contractor doesn't really care because they are getting well paid.

Who knows what the real story is!  But it's good for a laugh as long as my taxes aren't paying for it (then I cry).  :)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: copcarcollector on June 30, 2016, 01:24 PM
I like to see the process.

Two questions:
1) What are the two small copper looking lines running perpendicular to your property?

2) More of an observation, I like these blocks, I have not seen them before. Seems they would make curved walls pretty easy to construct...

[attachimg=1]

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 01, 2016, 01:21 AM
Hi!

So let me guess..

Yesterday the guys with the special tool showed up and managed to get the line installed without having to dig a trench.   The gas line guys came in today and had to dig a trench in the same spot as the fiber line. So the fiber line was taken out, the gas line put in and then the fiber line was placed back into the trench.... 

Timing is everything... And unfortunately I also see integration of services not always work out.  Something always gets done at least twice.. [blink]

Been enjoying your posts.

Thank you! And yes, you nailed it. Still laughing when I think about it... :)

In our local council when work on a paved footpath happens, the pavers are taken up .. they vanish .. the work is done, then covered in black tar. Many months later someone will come along, dig up the black tar and replace it with new pavers.

Sounds interesting! Here, at least on those sites I have seen, the pavers are stored neatly on site (if space permits I got to add, I have seen them stored in containers and drove off) and after completion of the work re-installed.

While you're right in thinking it's a complete waste, sometimes scheduling in an additional dependency for the fiber guys to drop the cable when the gas line is being run (for those residents that opted in) can be problematic. But if most residents opted in, yes, you would think there is an opportunity to save money...unless the mayor paid way too much and the contractor doesn't really care because they are getting well paid.

Who knows what the real story is!  But it's good for a laugh as long as my taxes aren't paying for it (then I cry).  :)

I can imagine that - and I'm really not mad or anything - just funny because it happened exactly 24h after. Possible that in other streets the fiber cable was run, connected, and then the gas guys came weeks later... :)

I like to see the process.

Two questions:
1) What are the two small copper looking lines running perpendicular to your property?

2) More of an observation, I like these blocks, I have not seen them before. Seems they would make curved walls pretty easy to construct...

(Attachment Link)

(Attachment Link)

1) Cable TV and phone main lines. (And if you look closely in the corner of your marking you see a red brick, beneath that is the main power line.)

2) Those are basically planting pots. Direct translation would be "planting ring" (Pflanzring) -> http://www.hornbach.de/shop/Pflanzring-LusoFlor-Grau-48x38x30-cm/5231919/artikel.html made from concrete. You can use them to hold back a slope: http://www.kann.de/files/downloads/aufbauanleitung_pflanzwandsteine_603_37c126.pdf

But I don't think they are legal/allowed to be used for "real" construction - at least I have never seen it being used for that.

Thanks!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 01, 2016, 08:09 AM
Hi!

I decided to re-join Instagram: @the_black_tie_diyer

Has a little bit of everything "me". ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Sparktrician on July 01, 2016, 05:07 PM
Suggestion - if you choose to use Wiremold surface-mount conduit (or any other form of EMT), be absolutely sure to de-burr the cut edges before you pull in the wiring. 
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 05, 2016, 12:59 PM
Hi!

I've been quite for a couple of days as things have been pretty busy around here and early Monday morning work continued on the fiber optic and gas handover points.

Around 7 AM two workers showed up to drill through my basements outer wall and to install the handover points.

They brought the smallest SDS-Max type rotary hammer from DeWalt along with Hilti drill bit and core drill bit. I felt sorry for the machine, the chuck and drill bits were dry as f*rts, some unidentifiable thick black liquid dripped out of the gearings... Clearly not the right tool for the job - but they had nothing else - and I was surely not giving them my 5 KG SDS-max rotary hammer after seeing how poorly they treat their tools.

(http://up.picr.de/26108214hm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108215gc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108217bm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108209ya.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108213xb.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108323tm.jpg)

The drilling itself took pretty long with this underpowered (max. diameter 43mm) machine but it got through eventually.

(http://up.picr.de/26108344fq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108345vm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108347wr.jpg)

After that they were back up to their original speed. The gas handover point was fitted. It's fit through the wall and then a foam collar is added.

(http://up.picr.de/26108349rj.jpg)

On top of that foam collar another plastic collar is fitted - from both sides.

(http://up.picr.de/26108350vj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108352cb.jpg)

From the outside, a cement mixture of very runny consistency that hardens within minutes is filled through a funnel. This serves to fix the handover point and to seal the wall again.

(http://up.picr.de/26108354fy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108353gq.jpg)

A product called Tangit is used to place and seal the fiber optic handover point. It's a 2-components expansion resin.

(http://up.picr.de/26108356dq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108357vl.jpg)

Then they had finished their part and told me a second team would arrive shortly to connect the gas line.

While I was waiting for them, I decided to use the time to clean out the hole of my basement window. This resulted in a rescue mission:

This little guy right here had somehow managed to fall through the light grid above said window/hole. His very lucky day, 2nd birthday if you want - I only very rarely open those light grids...

(http://up.picr.de/26108439dn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108440mh.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108441tq.jpg)

I set him free in the backyard where he took off right for the neighbors pond.

(http://up.picr.de/26108443hi.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108446yk.jpg)

Shortly after this, the 2nd team arrived.

They brought a special welder.

(http://up.picr.de/26108475ww.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108478cg.jpg)

To weld/melt the gas tube connections. All connection pieces feature metal lines on the inside, than when connected to the welder get hot and weld/melt the plastic tubes together.

(http://up.picr.de/26108476ek.jpg)

But first things first:

Piping/tubing is laid out and cut

(http://up.picr.de/26108565kl.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108574sv.jpg)

The connector to the main line is installed

(http://up.picr.de/26108575to.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108576ro.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108577nn.jpg)

Realizing they should have placed the connector the other way around. ;)

(http://up.picr.de/26108587gy.jpg)

Turned around.

(http://up.picr.de/26108592fn.jpg)

EVERYTHING gets wiped down with some alco-pads.

(http://up.picr.de/26108593uu.jpg)

Connectors are placed. They feature a barcode that can serve different purposes. If necessary it can be used to trace it back to the manufacturer and the worker that installed it. In this case, they are used in conjunction with the welder - which then automatically detects how long it has to run for the type of connector.

(http://up.picr.de/26108594hs.jpg)

Barcode scanned.

(http://up.picr.de/26108595rb.jpg)

Welding.

(http://up.picr.de/26108597lq.jpg)

Worker writes something on the connector...

(http://up.picr.de/26108599cc.jpg)

This procedure is now repeated for all connections.

(http://up.picr.de/26108600yq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108610zw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108612ye.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108614rl.jpg)

In the meantime the 2nd worker places a mechanical barrier on the gas handover point.

This is what it looks like

(http://up.picr.de/26108624hn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108625xs.jpg)

Placed on the handover point.

(http://up.picr.de/26108631wt.jpg)

Now, the magic happens. Did I mention that the gas line is life over the whole time?

A bolt is inserted to the side of the T-connector and turned. Inside the T-Connector a cutter moves closer to the gas main line with each turn and opens it eventually. The bolt is unscrewed, the cutter head moves back in its original position and the gas can flow freely through the tubing. By that time the second worker opens the mechanical barrier to get all of the air out till he sniffs some gas. You can see the cutter in the first picture, the copper thingy inside the cut out.

(http://up.picr.de/26108476ek.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108616qq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108617iz.jpg)

Then it is also sealed.

(http://up.picr.de/26108619la.jpg)

The second connector, connecting the hose to the T-connector serves also as a flow switch.

(http://up.picr.de/26108620gs.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108621ey.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108622yw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108623qn.jpg)

By the end of day it looked like this:

(http://up.picr.de/26108627ls.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26108629fe.jpg)

I then proceeded to cover up the damage inside with some plaster and re-placed my shelvings.

(http://up.picr.de/26108632rz.jpg)

Kind regards and I hope you guys are enjoying the journey so far,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Goz on July 05, 2016, 01:24 PM
The gas connections are fascinating.  You say the line was live the entire time?  I don't think I would have been standing around taking pictures while they were "welding" to the main.  [eek]

Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rizzoa13 on July 05, 2016, 01:34 PM
That was all for a new gas line service? That seems pretty excessive but obviously high quality.

In the states there would either be a threaded black pipe or some gas-tite flex lines run and some pope dope slathered all over the threads.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 06, 2016, 06:02 PM
Hi!

The gas connections are fascinating.  You say the line was live the entire time?  I don't think I would have been standing around taking pictures while they were "welding" to the main.  [eek]

Thanks for sharing!

Yes, Sir, the gas line was live over the entire time they worked on it. The two guys who worked on it are professionals so I had faith and trusted them enough to stand there - I mean, where would I have gone/be safe anyway? - If that main line had blown up...

This "system" was designed to work this way. I'm not a professional in this line of work, and I haven't talked to them about this, but I could imagine that it is done like this for safety reasons:

If the gas line was shut off, all consumers connected to this part of the line would have extinguished and in this instance are supposed to close all feeding valves shut immediately and shouldn't re-open until it's manually done and the gas ignited again.

Now since you never know what kind of consumers all those people on this part of the line have and what state they are in - I guess the danger of a basement/room filling with gas because a valve of a heating, oven... (or the like) didn't shut off, and they don't automatically re-ignite is much higher than anything going wrong with this system. Of course this is the absolute worst case.

These are my un-professional thoughts.

Thank God, all went well - we're all still here to enjoy life! :)

That was all for a new gas line service? That seems pretty excessive but obviously high quality.

In the states there would either be a threaded black pipe or some gas-tite flex lines run and some pope dope slathered all over the threads.

Yes, Sir, all done for just two new gas lines from main line to handover point. Maybe nice to know for relation: The cost for this would normally be 2500 Euro (2775.75 USD at todays exchange rate) because of the work done all over town, we got the offer to do it at a heavily reduced price of 1000 Euro (1110,30  USD at todays exchange rate). Which is kinda a no-brainer because, we now got 10 yrs. time to install a gas-heating - our current oil-heating would then be over 20 yrs. old - so this is definitely a good investment.

--

Today everything was closed up. And now, slapstick hits again: Tomorrow everything on public/municipal property will be re-opened over the whole length of the street to put in the fiber optic main line in... Not sure if it's just the main line being put in or if they also make the connection to our handover point. At least the line from my handover point right into public/municipal property is there - so chances are good. Anyway, no more digging on my property - that's finished.

Just two pictures today, closed pavement and me posing with that little excavator.

(http://up.picr.de/26122342os.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26122378uh.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 07, 2016, 08:39 AM
Hi!

So today at 7AM came a lot of workers who placed the fiberoptic main line in the ground and closed it back up. They are so quick, I had to capture pictures at different sections and still didn't get everything... They work "in line": Removing pavers, excavating, placing the line, closing, adding the pavers again.

Small excavation.
(http://up.picr.de/26125743kx.jpg)

Every house got a temporary bridge... (Safety is a BIG factor in Germany...)
(http://up.picr.de/26125737gh.jpg)

And already re-installing the pavers...
(http://up.picr.de/26125740vt.jpg)

What I didn't see, and sadly it's not really possible to communicate with the workers, if they connected the handover lines to the main line or if that will again be done separately...

For now, I consider this journey finished :)

Kind regards and I hope you had fun,
Oliver


Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on July 07, 2016, 09:21 AM
I have been fascinated by this post.  At the planning level it seems really inefficient, but at the least the workmen seem to know how to get in and out pretty cleanly.

With all the moving of pavers, how are they going to keep the sidewalk level as everything settles?  Do they replace all excavated dirt with sand?  Who comes back to fix pavers that go wonky?  Also, who is responsible for the grass from the sidewalk to the house?  I assume they level it out and you provide the grass seed?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 07, 2016, 09:49 AM
I have been fascinated by this post.  At the planning level it seems really inefficient, but at the least the workmen seem to know how to get in and out pretty cleanly.

With all the moving of pavers, how are they going to keep the sidewalk level as everything settles?  Do they replace all excavated dirt with sand?  Who comes back to fix pavers that go wonky?  Also, who is responsible for the grass from the sidewalk to the house?  I assume they level it out and you provide the grass seed?

The workers are good, all-round talents if you want. They do everything from excavating, setting pavers, drilling....

They bring sand, they bring very fine gravel and re-set the pavers. If it should settle further below the original level in future, especially after some rainfall, it's one call and they are going to fix it.

The Grass is on my property, where they removed it they filled the excavation with topsoil and provided grass seed on their own. I had to do nothing but watch and take pictures. Basically when they leave it's all like it was before - of course except for the grass that still needs some time to grow. Pretty sure that if I had especially asked for it, they would have provided turf.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on July 07, 2016, 10:01 AM
It brings a smile to see how cleanly they work, the end result and how neat the site appears after the job is done. I was thinking about this thread this morning as I drove down a familiar street littered with potholes patched and filled 1000x over. My car just rumbles over this stuff at 25 mph. This is a quiet suburb, not even in the city, but you would never see this in Germany. Yet here, good 'nuf is the norm.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on July 07, 2016, 01:19 PM
Hey Oliver,
Just curious if they do any hand tamping of the sand or gravel before they replace the pavers?

This has been a rather interesting post...it's always interesting to see how others do things, especially if the others are German!
I wouldn't even want to think how something like this would be done in the States.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 08, 2016, 05:08 PM
Hey Oliver,
Just curious if they do any hand tamping of the sand or gravel before they replace the pavers?

This has been a rather interesting post...it's always interesting to see how others do things, especially if the others are German!
I wouldn't even want to think how something like this would be done in the States.

Hi @Cheese ,

They spread the soil and gravel with a shovel, than place the pavers on top and then proceed whack them a few times by hand with a rubber-mallet. After that is done, the re-placed pavers are still a little higher than the rest - then a vibrator/shaker is run once or twice over the complete length and they sit perfectly. Of course, only after a couple of rainy days we'll see if they need to re-do a section or two... :)

--

With all the praise for "German" work - I have to admit there was not one German worker. The two guys doing the excavating and drilling were originally from Turkey, the two guys doing the gas-connection, one was originally from India the other from Kazakhstan but all work for the same German company.

The two guys from the very first day, who used that rocket came from a company based in the Netherlands but were also originally from Turkey and the couple of guys running the fiber optic mainline were from the same company, but came originally from everywhere. Couple of guys originally from Estonia, one guy probably originally from Africa, and some others I didn't talk to because they were already working a street farther...

What I can say is that they all seemed pretty happy someone showed interest in what they do and how they do it, they executed their work very professional and did a great job.

The sad truth is that you won't find many Germans working in this kind of setting. Because they want to achieve "more" given the cost of living in Germany it's no wonder. So when they have their journeyman's certificate or even better their master craftsman certificate they fly off to stand on their own feet.

Establish their own company and won't ever be considered for this type of work because they can't come up with the necessary manpower needed.

And the companies doing this kind of jobs don't even pay close to enough to keep someone with a master craftsman certificate - if they do - it's for one position only - kinda the one master craftsman overseeing it all. And who absolutely needs to be there if the company want's to train/qualify apprentices.

(It's a law: only a master craftsman is allowed to take on new apprentices for training/education, so a company wanting to train/educate needs to have a master craftsman).

Given all these circumstances, and taking Turkey as an example: The two guys would get a 400,- Euro wage person/month after tax in Turkey for this kind of work. Here in Germany they are paid by the hour - the driver for example 15,- Euro/hour. They get paid for 7 - 8 hrs. a day. They don't do weekends so its 22 days/month. Lets say: 15 Euro x 7.5 x 22 = 2475 Euro before tax. So realistically they take 1732,50 Euro home. Add some perks like additional vacation/christmas gratification - that's huge for them compared to "Home".

For Germany that is rather low. No one with a college degree, journeyman/master craftsman certificate would work for that kind of money, there  may be exceptions that do, if they have some sort of "gun" to their head.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 08, 2016, 06:02 PM
I called it finished early. I just learned a large section is re-excavated - probably on Tuesday next week. My neighbor has no TV signal, they found a broken cable and fixed it - but it didn't help - so there must be more damage. And since we have a TV signal - starting at my neighbor and then down the street it's re-excavated. I'm very curious as from what I saw they never even came close to those cables - and where they came close to them, everything was A-OK when they closed the excavations...

I feel this is going to be a loooooooong story...  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]  [scared]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rst on July 08, 2016, 06:03 PM
This is the difference between Germany and the US.  In Germany you must actually be a licence tradesman in order to work publicly.  In the US, you can lose your desk job one day and the next be a "trunk slammer"...some who goes to Sears, Lowes, or Home depot,buy a hammer, square (if you're lucky) and a $50.00 saw and suddenly you're a contractor.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on July 08, 2016, 07:27 PM
I think the observation is the standard of work and work ethic is generally higher in Germany than the US, not necessarily a commentary on the nationality of the workers involved.  I had a fiber line run into my house 7 years ago.  They took a drill, punched the hole in the side of my garage, fished the cable through, globbed some caulk around the cable and called it done.  Outside the house the cable comes out of the ground and runs up the side of the house to the hole they drilled.  One day the landscapers are going to clip it with the mower or string trimmer.  At least I'll know where to start looking when I can't get on FOG!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 08, 2016, 08:30 PM
Hi!

This is the difference between Germany and the US.  In Germany you must actually be a licence tradesman in order to work publicly.  In the US, you can lose your desk job one day and the next be a "trunk slammer"...some who goes to Sears, Lowes, or Home depot,buy a hammer, square (if you're lucky) and a $50.00 saw and suddenly you're a contractor.

Sure, it's a relief knowing that someone you hire has some sort of training/education, is eligible to have an insurance that covers his doings and the like. But then I still always wonder how many great craftsmen/workers/employees are simply lost within "the system" because they didn't make the cut. Be it because of some school grades, a mishap with the law, ... *whatever*. Personally something I always admire when thinking of the USA is that there are, at least a lot more than in Germany, bosses who think outside the box and promote talent rather than just strictly following/adhering to a procedure. I know this is a long shot, given we were talking about "trunk slammers" - and I surely don't endorse it because this can end very, very bad. Both health and monetary wise.

I think the observation is the standard of work and work ethic is generally higher in Germany than the US, not necessarily a commentary on the nationality of the workers involved.  I had a fiber line run into my house 7 years ago.  They took a drill, punched the hole in the side of my garage, fished the cable through, globbed some caulk around the cable and called it done.  Outside the house the cable comes out of the ground and runs up the side of the house to the hole they drilled.  One day the landscapers are going to clip it with the mower or string trimmer.  At least I'll know where to start looking when I can't get on FOG!

I got that :) I just wanted to give credit where credit is due :) My plumber is a German master craftsman, asks 40,- Euro/hr and I'd certainly agree that his work ethic and standard of work are higher than what I have seen from other craftsmen that have worked for me so far with other nationalities.

I get that the hole they drilled and finally caulked for your fiber optic line is above the ground/soil, right? I'd dare to say, that could happen here too if the line goes in above the ground/soil. The problem, and we had it happening to our front basement wall, is that it draws moisture if it's not sealed off properly.

In our case we have a concrete foundation, then a sealing layer and on top of that bricks and mortar. For some reason that seal was damaged and the wall drew moisture, additionally during construction of the house some water must have collected on that foundation so they drilled trhough right into the soild beneath. (Additional intake of moisture there of course...) So what was done is, that they drilled at an angle right into the first layer of bricks and injected some 2-component expansion resin. It was really injected under high pressure with a pump - not like they did for the fiber optic handover point with a caulking gun.

Here's a picture: (I marked the injection valves/ports red, and the goo that came out after removing them 24 hrs later green...)

(http://up.picr.de/26140427oe.jpg)

And another to give an idea of size and hole distance

(http://up.picr.de/26140426dc.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 13, 2016, 03:33 PM
Hi!

One of the big disadvantages of having a home office and working from there for about 65% of my time is that everyone around you assumes you're on vacation/don't need to work and have time for everything if you open the door. Monday the door bell rang - and when I opened I was greeted by a worker from or energy supplier - he wanted to exchange the power meter. Although it really didn't fit my schedule I wanted it to be over quick so I let him do his job.

Old power meter
(http://up.picr.de/26191844dm.jpg)

Old power meter with circuit breakers
(http://up.picr.de/26191845ri.jpg)

Main line in and breakers - those were needed to be pulled of course - luckily my NAS and other stuff didn't get damaged as I didn't think of them and don't have a UPS... But now it's on the list of stuff to do.
(http://up.picr.de/26191846ec.jpg)

breakers
(http://up.picr.de/26191847vv.jpg)

New power meter
(http://up.picr.de/26191849uw.jpg)

It works... *yay*... ;)
(http://up.picr.de/26191851dx.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 26, 2016, 04:04 PM
So here is what happened about 11 days ago, a Neighbor complained - after the works had been finished - that his TV cable was dead.

Workers came and the pavement was re-opened in 3 spots. To search for the defective line and an obviously also defective connector.

(http://up.picr.de/26318022ex.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26318024ce.jpg)

When they found what they were looking for, defective parts of the cable were cut and re connected with a pretty special type of coax-cable connector (I haven't seen those before, only a couple of years old this technique/connector-system)

(http://up.picr.de/26318026ge.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26318030lv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26318029xy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26318033dk.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26318032cq.jpg)

All connectors in place - ready for heat shrinking.

(http://up.picr.de/26318035gf.jpg)

Heat shrinked.

(http://up.picr.de/26318057vx.jpg)

The defective connector (from the 80ties, looking pretty good for being buried for more than 30 years)

(http://up.picr.de/26318043tf.jpg)

Smaller connector in another of the holes they dug.

(http://up.picr.de/26318055xm.jpg)

---

The whole thing is far from over, I overheard two neighbors talking today who won't agree with the replacement of the pavers, they say it's not good enough and have already complained - so I'm pretty sure we will see some workers soon who will redo the whole pavement.... And I'm going to laugh my  off if that happens, before it's re-opned for final connection of the fiber optic cable to the main line.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on July 27, 2016, 08:36 AM
Interesting Oliver, thanks for the photos & update, FWIW, I Googled the connectors and this is what I found:

http://www.intica-systems.de/en/products/industrial-engineering/high-frequency-engineering.html

Then I Googled HFC network and found this:

A hybrid fiber coaxial (HFC) network is a telecommunication technology in which optical fiber cable and coaxial cable are used in different portions of a network to carry broadband content (such as video, data, and voice). Using HFC, a local CATV company installs fiber optic cable from the cable head-end (distribution center) to serving nodes located close to business and residential users and from these nodes uses coaxial cable to individual businesses and homes. An advantage of HFC is that some of the characteristics of fiber optic cable (high bandwidth and low noise and interference susceptibility) can be brought close to the user without having to replace the existing coaxial cable that is installed all the way to the home and business.

Scientific Atlanta lists four reasons why cable TV and telephone companies are upgrading facilities to HFC:

1) The use of fiber optic cable for the backbone paths allows more data to be carried than coaxial cable alone.

2) The higher bandwidth supports reverse paths for interactive data flowing back from the user.

3) That portion of the infrastructure with fiber optic cable is more reliable than coaxial cable. Reliability is perceived as more important in an interactive environment.

4) Fiber optic cable is more efficient for interconnecting cable TV or phone companies that are consolidating with geographically adjacent companies.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 31, 2016, 03:45 PM
Hi!

You're absolutely correct in your findings @Cheese !

They did this years ago, all main distribution frames were upgraded to fibre optical cables & hardware. And as stated above, the lines to homes and businesses stayed coaxial. With a mayor disadvantage - most of the old connectors/distributors (like our's from the 80'ties, that was replaced as you can see in the pictures) have major problems with many of the higher frequencies used today - so while we could get all 280 (actually more...) tv-channels, phone and internet over it, it never really worked 100%. (That's why we personally, still use different companies for TV, Phone & Internet with all different lines)

If the "new" company does it right with their fibre optical cable only installation - I guess it will be the end of the company still using the coax lines that were now repaired. I know, the neighbor it was repaired for is definitely going to switch companies - so sooner or later all these coax lines will be pretty much unused - just as the upgraded distribution frames, because the "new" company built their own.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 04, 2016, 02:18 AM
Hi!

Did some minor work on the shed yesterday: new holders for the tubed flexible lighting (think Partys and Christmas...).

Two still lives.

(http://up.picr.de/26710421zh.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/26710423bz.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: mrFinpgh on September 04, 2016, 09:40 AM
Wonderful photo.  Love the contrast of Axe and Systainer. 
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 04, 2016, 12:41 PM
Thanks!  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on September 04, 2016, 12:56 PM
These updates are amazing to see the level of detail your utility providers go to.  We don't see this much in the US!

Love your tool choices as well!  Keep them coming -

neil
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 04, 2016, 01:08 PM
Glad you're enjoying the posts, Neil!  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: shanegrilah on September 06, 2016, 08:31 AM
Oliver,

What is in the "Systainer of evil"?

Shane
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 06, 2016, 10:53 AM
Hi Shane,

I simply empty my pockets in it when I'm working on a project. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: shanegrilah on September 06, 2016, 01:31 PM
Now I can sleep again. I thought maybe Pandora had modernized.

Regards,
Shane
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 06, 2016, 02:24 PM
Now that's a great thought, hahaha  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

The term refers to, or better is a reminiscence of someone I "know" and who's wisdom on various topics I admire - but further explanations are not suitable to be had on here. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 12, 2016, 11:56 AM
Hi!

Some tinkering I did over the weekend, installed a new fence gate. Please disregard the miserable paint job on it - I'll re-paint next week with another type of coating - this one didn't work on the wood the fence gate is made of...

Had root canal treatment on Saturday morning anyway before I went and bought the gate and painted it....

(http://up.picr.de/26803303qu.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803304gp.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803306np.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803308hh.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803310vv.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803312ls.jpg)


(http://up.picr.de/26803315xy.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver



Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 13, 2016, 03:59 PM
Hi!

I just got a notification that on Thursday they will install my indoor handover point for the fibre optic cable. At the beginning of last week they "shot" the fibre optic cable through that tiny orange hose - I sadly didn't have the time to go out and cross the couple of streets to take pictures from the location they were working their "magic" at.

So if it's still interesting, stay tuned for new pictures :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 15, 2016, 04:38 PM
Hi,

So the handover point for the optical fibre cable was installed today.

This is what the actual cable looks like:
(http://up.picr.de/26834319cy.jpg)

This is how it was left when they "shot" the cable through:
(http://up.picr.de/26834335fb.jpg)

Today they started by drilling some holes for the cable clips. They asked for a vac, so I gave them my CTL-SYS - they were pretty amazed and liked it - especially the auto on/off - lol. Seems there is a lot left to do for Festool marketing ;) This, + a BHC 18 (instead of the corded Bosch 2-28 and a C or T 18 instead of the Metabo + Systainers and a Sortainer for all the fasteners and clips would make their life soooooo much easier... @festool I'll handover the company's address for a little revenue in Festools....  :P :P :P [eek] [eek] [eek] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] :
(http://up.picr.de/26834722vr.jpg)


The Bosch 2-28
(http://up.picr.de/26834349eh.jpg)

Some tinkering with cable ties
(http://up.picr.de/26834356ss.jpg)

Drilling for the handover point
(http://up.picr.de/26834358by.jpg)

Needs to be screwed to the wall...
(http://up.picr.de/26834359oi.jpg)

Some tweaking.
(http://up.picr.de/26834368vj.jpg)

This is what the handover point looks like on the (visible) inside - on the back there's some sort of reel where some of the cable goes - I guess as a kind of strain relief.
(http://up.picr.de/26834371xo.jpg)

The connector cables inside the handover point get "welded" to the incoming cables. This is done with this fun little machine, a fusion splicer (Fitel S177). Here's a video on how it is used (not mine) -> http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09NOSxjGESQ
(http://up.picr.de/26834376lq.jpg)

Testing and measuring. A-OK.
(http://up.picr.de/26834394lm.jpg)

So this was the last post on this matter - hope everyone enjoyed the journey!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on September 16, 2016, 09:40 AM
Thanks Oliver, that's pretty interesting. That "fun little machine" costs around $16k to $17k. [jawdrop]

So do you have 2 fibre optic taps in that box?

Also, there seems to be about 2 feet of extra cable wound around that reel area, I wonder if the connections can go bad and that's the reason for the extra cable?

Finally, I'm curious what that yellow spigot is that comes out of the wall.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on September 16, 2016, 10:03 AM
That's a tap.  Isn't this standard in German homes?  In honor of Oktoberfest I think I need to put one in while I'm redo-ing the electrical in my basement!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on September 16, 2016, 10:09 AM
Hi!

Since I don't know if you need 1 or 2 lines to communicate via fibre optical cable it's either 2 ports, or 4.

I think its more meant to be a strain relief, but of course - extra cable is always nice to have if something goes wrong... I'll ask them if I see them in the street! :)

Thats the handover point for gas. When we decide to change from oil to gas, that's where it will be connected. The silver-shiny thing is actually a mechanical safety, the red knob is to open the valve... ;)

LOL @ Raj  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 12, 2016, 10:57 AM
Hi!

Oh the joy of adding additional holes to an existing but somewhat incomplete system 32 hole line. But thanks to the exceptional BTA HW D 5 CE tungsten carbide drill bit it can be done fast and accurate.

(http://up.picr.de/27105761ta.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RickyL on December 13, 2016, 07:19 PM
Nice thread.

Who takes the pictures when both your hands are in view?

Nice watch by the way.  ;)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 15, 2017, 02:50 PM
Hi!

Mobile-Sysport - Project coming *yay*  [eek]  [scared]  [big grin] [big grin]

So I found this 3D-Modell by Sketchup-User "Jared D." -> https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model.html?id=8339ecb1-4997-4bc6-86fe-236749b9fb8b

I will add some wheels.

I had some questions/trouble regarding the 18mm plywood but once they got squared away, I bought some ply at the local lumber yard. Since I'm still not even close to be back at 85% health wise, I had it cut to final dimensions - so I don't need to stand as much as when cutting the sheet myself.

(http://up.picr.de/28333158ax.png)

Went there with my layout and this is what I came back with. :)

(http://up.picr.de/28333175gm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28333176en.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 21, 2017, 05:43 PM
Hi!

Here are a couple of "Festool-Shots" that I like from a another recent "project".

(http://up.picr.de/28393790lt.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28393791mk.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28393792ci.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Wooden Skye on February 21, 2017, 07:29 PM
Oliver

Be honest, you are just showing that the mailman finally showed up with the new PDC!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on February 21, 2017, 10:44 PM
Nice watch by the way.  ;)

A black 40mm Explorer II...what's not to like?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 22, 2017, 04:29 AM
Oliver

Be honest, you are just showing that the mailman finally showed up with the new PDC!

Hi Bryan,

actually and honestly, no. I utilized it during a pretty urgent modification to the electrical circuit for the backyard. After finding out that there is current on the ground wire. An we're not talking the inductive/inductance kind.

So among a lot of work, mainly digging, that didn't require any Festool tools. I transformed this, the last dirty little secret  [eek]  [scared] :

(http://up.picr.de/28395329gz.jpg)

into this:

(http://up.picr.de/28395331nx.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 23, 2017, 06:41 PM
Hi,

another day of work.

This time I went to work on the other side.

First some demolition work.

(http://up.picr.de/28411806rq.jpg)

Catching the last rays of this days winter sun.

(http://up.picr.de/28411807ha.jpg)

Worked until after dark.

(http://up.picr.de/28411808gn.jpg)

And then some more. Installation time...

(http://up.picr.de/28411809nl.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 26, 2017, 05:01 PM
The aftermath.

(http://up.picr.de/28439974ho.jpg)

And a still life from the workbench  [tongue]  [cool]  [big grin] [big grin]  [wink]

(http://up.picr.de/28439973cq.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 28, 2017, 04:00 PM
  ;) ;D ;) [big grin]

(https://up.picr.de/28456378jj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/28456455sz.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on March 01, 2017, 11:21 PM
Hi!

So I visited the Fischer (dowels) Tour Truck to learn about new Fischer products and dowel technology and of course to meet cool people.

(https://up.picr.de/28462141bl.jpg)

Didn't leave empty handed - got these uber-cool dowel bottle openers.

(https://up.picr.de/28462321ez.jpg)

And to support the shop where the truck stopped, bought some Fischer stuff. For example this really great dowel pliers for drywall dowels. Got to try this at the truck, it's amazing and sooo strong (20kg/dowel) It's not really new, but was to me.

(https://up.picr.de/28462327yg.jpg)

Before I try to explain with a lot of words, watch the video and be amazed ;) ;) ;)  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

https://youtu.be/uZd_zYywHpA

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on March 05, 2017, 02:41 PM
Hi,

Some pictures from the weekend, building a Sys-Port...

Cutting a couple of pieces for my "add-ons"
(http://up.picr.de/28507154nb.jpg)

Old school System 32  [scared]  [big grin]
(http://up.picr.de/28507155nd.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28507157yd.jpg)

240 holes. The battery of my CXS had only one bar left and is still going...  [scared] [scared]  [eek] [eek]  8) 8) [big grin] [big grin]
(http://up.picr.de/28507159tf.jpg)

Cleaning up.
(http://up.picr.de/28507163mt.jpg)

Old school dowel jig.
(http://up.picr.de/28507170ce.jpg)

Square
(http://up.picr.de/28507171bs.jpg)

68mm hole-saw in 18mm ply - no problem for the PDC.
(http://up.picr.de/28507172ti.jpg)

Todays goal was met - more work tomorrow.
(http://up.picr.de/28507176by.jpg)

Precision aka this is why I love the TSC 55.
(http://up.picr.de/28507179ij.jpg)

I have to say, I learned a lot in the last two days. As you all know I'm far away from being a woodworker, but it was a fun and much needed project. I will clean it up, sand it and finish it in the coming days - then I will post more pictures and a couple of explanations.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Euclid on March 05, 2017, 05:07 PM
I have the same Rotring compass, Oliver!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on March 14, 2017, 11:50 AM
Some fun with auger drill bits...  [eek]  [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/28590697ng.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590698rb.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590699uy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590701wy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590703ce.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590707xa.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590708jf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590709nl.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590710ks.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28590712hq.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 07, 2017, 04:05 PM
Hi!

So this is a little followup to the pictures I posted in February in regards to the electrical work. Since there is not much interest in this thread anymore, I will put it to rest after this post.

This posting is solely meant to give a little advice in regards to old electrical installations if someone should stumble over this thread when doing some research.

So after my work from February I was pretty happy that I had eliminated the main problem of the backyards electrical circuit: current on ground wire. I also took it as an opportunity to re-wire/install everything else in connection with it. So needless to say after a week's work - all in all - I thought it was all good to go and I would not have to touch any of it again anytime soon.

Turns out I was wrong as only a couple of weeks later the breaker for this circuit kept tripping. Sometimes immediately, sometimes only after minutes or even hours.

Since I re-wired everything myself I knew this had to be a problem with the only cable I couldn't replace in the process because doing that would have either required major demolition work or pulling a brand new brand cable through the entire basement right into the backyard. The latter would have been an option but after having finished the basement some time ago, I didn't want to start all over by installing a temporary-looking solution.

I decided to re-open the spot where old and new cable connect and it wasn't long after that I found the culprit. My initial thoughts were to closely inspect and then decide wether to give it another try or go with pulling another cable. After finding the culprit:

(http://up.picr.de/28830786dj.jpg)

(Please disregard the shrink tube, that was just an experiment - after.)

You can see that one of the wires was broken, this probably happened during dismantling (lead...) of the old, stubborn cable and another one of the wires also had defective insulation which lead to a lot of sparks - you can see the residue of that.

I decided to give this another shot with the existing cable. So I cut and dismantled the cable once anew and made a connection. This time I used special connector sleeves filled with insulating, non-conductive gel made by a company called Cellpack. I'm using the Easycell 3 V model.

So first come the preparations, you need to connect the replacement cable to the connectors - I additionally decided I would use shrinking tube on bot ends where it connects to the old cables - thats what my trusty Snap-On butane soldering iron is for.

(http://up.picr.de/28830584su.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28830586xa.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28830592xf.jpg)

Connecting.

(http://up.picr.de/28830599co.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28830616rs.jpg)

Shrinking.

(http://up.picr.de/28830619tn.jpg)

Adding the sleeve.

(http://up.picr.de/28830620pu.jpg)

It may be called easy, but it actually isn't. You're not supposed to cut the sided where the cables go in/out you just have to press down, hard. Really hard. I ended up using to pieces of scrap wood and screw clamps - that worked like a charm.

Finished.

(http://up.picr.de/28830622st.jpg)

--

Just for fun, 3 more pictures from another "culprit". ;) You gotta love quality screws....  [eek]  [scared]  [blink]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/28830624lf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28830625kp.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28830627af.jpg)

Like I said - gonna leave it at that.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on April 07, 2017, 05:12 PM
Keep posting Oliver!  I don't say much, but I follow along as you have your fun!   [smile]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: awil66 on April 07, 2017, 07:33 PM
Yes, I really like this thread.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on April 08, 2017, 09:21 AM
A couple of observations Oliver:

Back on the Feb 26th post, all of the items you removed appear to be made from plastic, in the US those same pieces would all have been fabricated from metal.  [eek]

That Fischer pliers is really slick. We have those same style fasteners in the US, however they are supposed to be set with a screwdriver only, an almost impossible task.
In drywall, the prongs just dig in and revolve before the toggle compresses fully, a mess.  [crying]
In wood (oak) either the tangs bend or break off or the screw head rounds-out before the toggle compresses fully, another mess. [mad]
That pliers is ideal... [cool]

When it comes to the cellpack connectors, do you just slather the gel material over the wire and connector ends and hope for the best or is there a specific process and quantity of gel that gets used? It seems like the best method would be to "pack" the connectors with gel as if you were using a grease gun.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on April 08, 2017, 11:35 AM
I also like this thread.  I noticed two things reviewing the pictures.

Looks like there is an awesome wooden jack or jointer plane in one of the pics.  I'd like to see a couple of angles on that one.

In another picture, it looked like there was a wooden electrical box.  My inspector would go all red and explode if he saw that.  Was I imagining things?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 08, 2017, 05:57 PM
A couple of observations Oliver:

Back on the Feb 26th post, all of the items you removed appear to be made from plastic, in the US those same pieces would all have been fabricated from metal.  [eek]

That Fischer pliers is really slick. We have those same style fasteners in the US, however they are supposed to be set with a screwdriver only, an almost impossible task.
In drywall, the prongs just dig in and revolve before the toggle compresses fully, a mess.  [crying]
In wood (oak) either the tangs bend or break off or the screw head rounds-out before the toggle compresses fully, another mess. [mad]
That pliers is ideal... [cool]

When it comes to the cellpack connectors, do you just slather the gel material over the wire and connector ends and hope for the best or is there a specific process and quantity of gel that gets used? It seems like the best method would be to "pack" the connectors with gel as if you were using a grease gun.

Hi Cheese,

I know that in the US wiremold (among others, I guess?) is used. In Germany that is not readily available "off the shelf" - and it would need to be grounded anyway, since it is conductive (metal). Don't know if that can even be used at all here. Side note: of course large industrial raceways are a different story.

The go to material for us is heat/fire-resistant plastics. Everything from junction boxes, fuse/breaker boxes (some of them have metal doors), cable pipes/tubing, housings and much more is made from it. If used in the right way/ for the right application that's all good and according to code.

Now quite a bit of what I removed was put in before I was even born, code was different back then, other materials were used. Sure there's wear and it shows ;) That's why I decided to remove and replace it once and for all. ;)

Yes, those pliers work like a charm. Let me know if you want one shipped to your door ;)

For the cellpack stuff. They come ready to use from the factory, like you see them in the pictures. Then you lay the connector on top and press. The gel gets everywhere that it needs to get to as the connector is so big it drives out/away enough of the gel. I understand what you mean by hoping for the best, but it's a proven and reliable system. Similar stuff is used by some of the largest energy and telecommunications companies here.

The gel is actually pretty funny, it's "stable" but will terribly stick to anything, yet with enough force it can be separated from whatever it was sticking to. And of course, it's non conductive. ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 08, 2017, 06:15 PM
I also like this thread.  I noticed two things reviewing the pictures.

Looks like there is an awesome wooden jack or jointer plane in one of the pics.  I'd like to see a couple of angles on that one.

In another picture, it looked like there was a wooden electrical box.  My inspector would go all red and explode if he saw that.  Was I imagining things?

Hi Harvey,

I can take a couple of pictures of the plane for you tomorrow in daylight :)

For the wooden box - it depends on which one you're referring to ;)

If it is this one:

(https://up.picr.de/28523016fp.jpg)

That is totally fine. As it is not used for anything else than "holding" the outlet (that has a separate housing on the inside made from fire/heat resistant plastics, and that's also where the cable connects to the outlet) and a fully insulated cable.

It's the same type housing we would use to mount an outlet in a drywall/hollow space scenario. -> https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hohlwanddose // http://www.kopp.eu/en/productcatalogue/isolation-tubes-cable-ducts-boxes-cable-ties/distribution-boxes-and-switch-outlets/cavity-wall-switch-outlet-o-68-mm-depth-61-mm/348600003

However if you are referring to this wooden box:

(https://up.picr.de/28439974ho.jpg)

Which was located here (upper, left corner) This picture was obviously taken before I removed all of it. ;)

(https://up.picr.de/28395329gz.jpg)

That is indeed completely against (todays) code and ultimately why I removed it. As I mentioned before in my reply to Cheese this stuff was put in before I was even born - so I don't know if this was considered to be OK back then. Honestly, I doubt it because bakelite was already around and used for a lot junction/fuse/breaker boxes (the black one you can see in the above picture) it was also utilized for switches and other things. The small connector/junction box right next to the wooden box (where I'm testing for voltage in the above picture) is another perfect example - it's made from bakelite, too.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 08, 2017, 06:31 PM
What does that underground line feed?   A few posts back you covered what I thought might be fiber coming into your home. 

I'm curious why i this latest set of pics you are repairing what I would think might be the utility responsibility.

Also, how are you taking the pics since you always seem to be in the photo with both hands?

Thanks for keeping this thread alive.  You have a nice collection of tools.  And a nice way of walking through what you are doing.

BTW, I have several of those Snap-on screwdrivers.  But I'm finding the ratchet mechanism goes out on them and I have to get them replaced.  No issue with Snap-on dealer doing that, but I have been surprised as I have now replaced maybe three of them.

Final question - the photo a few back that pulls the expanding anchor forward.  I'd love to have one of those.  What's it called and who makes it?!

Thanks Oliver -

neil
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 08, 2017, 07:08 PM
What does that underground line feed?   A few posts back you covered what I thought might be fiber coming into your home. 

I'm curious why i this latest set of pics you are repairing what I would think might be the utility responsibility.

Also, how are you taking the pics since you always seem to be in the photo with both hands?

Thanks for keeping this thread alive.  You have a nice collection of tools.  And a nice way of walking through what you are doing.

BTW, I have several of those Snap-on screwdrivers.  But I'm finding the ratchet mechanism goes out on them and I have to get them replaced.  No issue with Snap-on dealer doing that, but I have been surprised as I have now replaced maybe three of them.

Final question - the photo a few back that pulls the expanding anchor forward.  I'd love to have one of those.  What's it called and who makes it?!

Thanks Oliver -

neil

Hi Neil,

I would never touch something that is not my responsibility ;) That is a (my) private line from the basement into the backyard. It's used for shed lighting, backyard lighting, grass mower and so on. Don't be distracted by that bit of masonry down the hole (Loooooooong story.........)  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

And yes, this is was a completely different "project" than the fibre line which was finished quite a couple of posts back. :)

Since you're the second one to ask about my pictures - well, it might be hard to believe but I'm actually not single ;) lol. Additionally I do have tripods for my camera and iPhone and remotes for both of them, add a 3 to 10 sec. delay and that works like a charm. And then there are also friends, family or neighbors around from time to time and I'm not afraid to ask if they take a picture while they're standing around, babbling anyway [eek] [eek]  [scared] [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] ;)

Thanks! :)

For the ratcheting screwdrivers from Snap-On. Well, I think you know how pedantic I am with cleaning/storing my tools... I have yet to run into a single problem with mine. And I too, have a couple of them. One that is my dirty-jobs-workhorse, that has been put through the paces and is one of those with the multimaterial/cushioned grip red/black. Then I have the same one but with a replaceable shaft. And I have the stubby one, also cushioned. Then I do have a orange classic hard handle classic and the one which is pictured here is also a classic hard handle - but was a limited/special edition for RedBull racing.

For the pliers. They are called Installation Pliers HMZ (1-3) - there are different manufacturers and styles, here's one example from Fischer. http://fischer.de/en/Product-Range/Cavity-fixings/Accessories/Installation-pliers-HMZ

They don't have mine, which is a HMZ-3, on the site yet.

If you want one, and can't source them in the US, let me know and I can ship you one. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver


Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on April 08, 2017, 07:29 PM
Oliver, the reason it never occurred to us that your SO might be taking the pics is most of us would get a few eye rolls for making such a request, followed by silence as the SO vanished from the shop!

Hmmm, now that I think about it, that might be the recipe I need for shop time!  "Honey, can you take a pic of this for the guys on the FOG?  Oh, just one more, this is a good one!"
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 08, 2017, 07:39 PM
lol, Raj :)  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Most of these pictures actually serve a real purpose: documentary of what was done, how and when. The rest is fun and games... :) It's also just a select few that I end up posting that fit my personal guidelines for online posting ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on April 08, 2017, 09:52 PM
Most of these pictures actually serve a real purpose: documentary of what was done, how and when.

I'm with you Oliver...all of my rehabs have been thoroughly documented, so that in the future when I need to modify a particular area, I know exactly where the sub-structure lies and what it will take to get to where I want to be. I don't just take pictures, rather I will mark on the drywall and the studs the heights and the distances between structural members so that I can then relocate the datum lines that will allow me to continue to modify a structure with minimal disturbance...then I take a picture. It works well. [thumbs up] That's been part of my MO for the last 20+ years...it's a tough habit to break.

For instance, after removing a conventional toilet and installing a wall mounted unit, if I want to mount shelving to the wall later, I'm completely aware of the routing of the PVC venting.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 08, 2017, 10:11 PM
Thanks for the clarification on the digging, Oliver.  So can I assume that is a 220 v line then?

As for the Installation Pliers, that's a cool tool.  I just went to Amazon with the search 'expandable anchor installation pliers' and low and behold I found this - https://www.amazon.com/ASIBT-Rivet-Wall-Anchor-Setting/dp/B01NCQ9BMY/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491703009&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=expandable+anchor+installation+pliers

I think I'll add one to my cart.  Looks to be so much better than using a drill to tighten the screw and seeing the head spin and tearing up the wall rather than setting the bolt.

I also take really good care of my tools, but for some reason two of the Snap-on drivers have failed.  Both saw occasional use and one was in my trunk, the other in my wife's trunk.  So it might have had something to do with humidity or temperature extremes over time that caused the ratcheting mechanism to no longer catch.  My rep says he sees it a lot on the older style like you have with the yellow cap.  I have that style and the newer one and have had no issues with the newer models.

BTW, I'd have to pay my SO to take photos of me!  You've got it good!

Thanks!

Neil
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 09, 2017, 10:45 AM
Thanks for the clarification on the digging, Oliver.  So can I assume that is a 220 v line then?

As for the Installation Pliers, that's a cool tool.  I just went to Amazon with the search 'expandable anchor installation pliers' and low and behold I found this - https://www.amazon.com/ASIBT-Rivet-Wall-Anchor-Setting/dp/B01NCQ9BMY/ref=sr_1_fkmr1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1491703009&sr=8-1-fkmr1&keywords=expandable+anchor+installation+pliers

I think I'll add one to my cart.  Looks to be so much better than using a drill to tighten the screw and seeing the head spin and tearing up the wall rather than setting the bolt.

I also take really good care of my tools, but for some reason two of the Snap-on drivers have failed.  Both saw occasional use and one was in my trunk, the other in my wife's trunk.  So it might have had something to do with humidity or temperature extremes over time that caused the ratcheting mechanism to no longer catch.  My rep says he sees it a lot on the older style like you have with the yellow cap.  I have that style and the newer one and have had no issues with the newer models.

BTW, I'd have to pay my SO to take photos of me!  You've got it good!

Thanks!

Neil

Hi Neil,

yes, it's a 220V line.

The pliers look good!

I will keep an eye on my old-style ratcheting wrenches then, maybe I'm just lucky for now.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 19, 2017, 06:17 PM
@HarveyWildes

Hi Harvey,

a little later than promised, I apologize for that - but here are the picture of that plane you spotted in my previous pictures.

It was made by: Busch, Jacob; Jacob Busch, Werkzeugfabrik, Remscheid, Hochstrasse 26-30 established in 1823, "Garantiewerkzeuge" "Marke "Spannsäge"" - In 2009 they were bought by Wilh. Schmitt & Comp., Königstr. 59, 42853 Remscheid who produce everything that you know/buy as "Kirschen".

Anyway, here are the pictures:

(http://up.picr.de/28961486ky.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961487jx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961488cj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961489qb.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961490kt.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961491jn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961492bm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961493kr.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961494fx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961497pi.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961498cy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961499jc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/28961500sa.jpg)

Hope you like them ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver



Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on April 19, 2017, 07:19 PM
Awesome - thanks!

Any idea how old this particular plane is?  Any plans to refurbish it?  If so, what do you think it would take to get it operating like new?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 19, 2017, 08:53 PM
Hi Harvey,

well, I have no exact idea about it's age. My (uneducated) guess is: definitely not pre 1900 and not much younger than WWII. It's hard to find backed up information on this, most of what I found regarding old tools from Solingen/Remscheid is focussed on chisels.

Getting it in working order is somewhere on my list and that list is looong and it's certainly not a priority. Now that I got the blade out I will take it as an opportunity to get the rust off and sharpen it. Then someday take it from there...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 12, 2017, 04:19 PM
Hi,

Long time no hear, I thought I'd post an update.

So shortly after my last post in this thread I had unwanted, nightly visitors. Long story short: Nothing happened, but they managed to get on my backyard patio without tripping any of the cameras. Then one of them tripped a camera with two of his fingers in motion while obviously showing/pointing out the camera to his partner in crime. I saw the e-mail notification 10 minutes late, gladly I was still awake - but when I went out they were gone. Additional measures were put in place - but I also decided I would add another camera (different angle) and replace the low rising elements of my fence by high rising elements.

Preparations - No work without Jerky and Ginger Ale.

(https://up.picr.de/29753926px.jpg)

Getting out old slotted screw from the wall where the new post would be installed.

(https://up.picr.de/29753927il.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29753929gc.jpg)

Connecting the high rising elements.

(https://up.picr.de/29753935gz.jpg)

Drilling holes for attaching the post to the wall.

(https://up.picr.de/29753937vz.jpg)

Sorry, no more pictures on this.

Then I needed to fix a small gate which posts are too weak. At some point I will have to replace the 70x70 with 90x90 posts but for now I just gave it some additional hold.

Adjusting and attaching angular mount to the board.

(https://up.picr.de/29753944fx.jpg)

Attaching board(s) to post.

(https://up.picr.de/29753953ly.jpg)

Attaching angular mount to concrete wall.

(https://up.picr.de/29753956cf.jpg)

Next up, I needed to re-adjust 2 panels of my patios roof. So I had to unscrew and re-position them.

I prepared a ratchet and my impact wrench as I didn't know if maybe the impact wrench's power would be to much. As the beams have obviously dried over the years and I needed to put the screws back in the exact same holes they came out. I got lucky, it worked like a charm using the impact wrench.

(https://up.picr.de/29753959pq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29753961tb.jpg)

Then, Casper Kjerumgaard called for "Cut out a wooden heart day" - I followed his call. In case you don't know Casper, this is his Website: http://www.casperkjerumgaard.com And this is his Instagram feed: https://www.instagram.com/casperkjerumgaard/ He is a very cool guy, awesome craftsman and I think following him will be well worth your while if you do social media.

So I cut out a wooden heart.

(https://up.picr.de/29753962kb.jpg)

Next thing up was a rather quick re-design of a small portion of the back yard, building a little wall from shell limestone.

(https://up.picr.de/29753963qq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29753966tm.jpg)

Of course this wasn't enough and there's a second part.

But for that I needed to remove a European Yew.

(https://up.picr.de/29753972ym.jpg)

That went very well, I felled it completely by hand using only my Tajima G-Saw 240.

(https://up.picr.de/29753975od.jpg)

https://vimeo.com/224834345

But of course there was still it's root.

So I had to spent quite a bit of time to get that dug out.

(https://up.picr.de/29753918bi.jpg)

Then I went to buy a new tool to get the soil freed from smaller roots.

(https://up.picr.de/29753977ha.jpg)

This is what it looked like after.

(https://up.picr.de/29753978zk.jpg)

Now I was able to build the second part of the new small shell limestone wall.

(https://up.picr.de/29753919ll.jpg)

And this is what it looks like finished. Still needs some new plants. And I'm still looking for something to make that "ramp" look a little nicer.

(https://up.picr.de/29753925rt.jpg)


Now for some just for fun tool shots:

(https://up.picr.de/29759829nt.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29759830bm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29759832ha.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29759833nq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/29759834wt.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 15, 2017, 04:55 PM
Hi,

About every two years I install a new, flexible side cover to the patio's roofing. Today was the day.

Back in the day I wanted to use the same quality-material that was used for the roof, while cutting it to spec. isn't a problem - there are no fixtures/hardware readily available to mount these horizontally. So I decided to go with a milky plastic foil, but that of course only lasts two winters before it needs replacing.

(http://up.picr.de/29799263tz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799264wf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799268ho.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799274th.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on July 16, 2017, 06:00 PM
Great selection of drills / drivers / impacts, Oliver!

How do you like the Snap-on impact?

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 16, 2017, 06:39 PM
Thanks Neil!

I love the Snap-On CT 761. It has a 3/8" drive and is packed with plenty of power (officially 120 ft-lb/ 162.7 Nm of torque output) reality is: it can loosen bolts that are torqued to 150 ft-lb/ 203 Nm. Which is pretty amazing for such a small package.

I mainly use it as impact driver with impact bitholder and impact bits or as pictured with an impact six-point socket when working around the house. Used it for demolition of my old, foldable attic ladder and other stuff like that (works great breaking lose old, rusted bolts and nuts...) - or as pictured to drive large diameter screws on my patio and the patio's roofing. It's capable of doing far more than what you would normally throw at a 3/8" compact impact wrench and that's what makes it, at least to me, so appealing. I did try it on some lug nuts and was impressed - though I wouldn't do that to it if I was changing tires daily. I figure using it constantly at outer maximum torque will at some point lead to premature wear and tear and finally result in a broken tool.

There might be more powerful and cheaper options out there by now and Snap-On obviously uses their own battery design. But I wanted and want Snap-On. I'm really, really happy with it.

I put a complete 3/8" impact socket set metric, shallow & deep with the CT 761, extensions, a 1/2" ratchet, adapters, 1/2" impact sockets for lug nuts, impact bits, impact bitholders, charger, spare battery... all into that red Systainer T-LOC 2 :)

If you have specific questions, I'll be glad to answer them. :)

If you like, you can watch it - next to the PDC - driving a SPAX (R) HI.FORCE (R) 6x120 Washer head, T-STAR plus (R) drive, steel, Wirox (R), Partial thread.

https://vimeo.com/220070186

And, again if you like, you can watch it - next to PDC and Bosch GSR 12V - driving 4,5x80 Wuerth Assy 3.0 screws (AW 20 head)

https://vimeo.com/220609322

Kind regards,
Oliver



Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on July 17, 2017, 12:13 PM
Nice videos and additional detail, Oliver! 

Love your choice of tools.  Got to watch the wallet when I read your posts!

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2017, 01:58 PM
Hi Neil,

glad you enjoyed that bit of information and the videos :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on July 17, 2017, 02:51 PM
Thanks Neil!

I love the Snap-On CT 761. It has a 3/8" drive and is packed with plenty of power (officially 120 ft-lb/ 162.7 Nm of torque output) reality is: it can loosen bolts that are torqued to 150 ft-lb/ 203 Nm. Which is pretty amazing for such a small package.

I mainly use it as impact driver with impact bitholder and impact bits or as pictured with an impact six-point socket when working around the house. Used it for demolition of my old, foldable attic ladder and other stuff like that (works great breaking lose old, rusted bolts and nuts...) - or as pictured to drive large diameter screws on my patio and the patio's roofing. It's capable of doing far more than what you would normally throw at a 3/8" compact impact wrench and that's what makes it, at least to me, so appealing. I did try it on some lug nuts and was impressed - though I wouldn't do that to it if I was changing tires daily. I figure using it constantly at outer maximum torque will at some point lead to premature wear and tear and finally result in a broken tool.

There might be more powerful and cheaper options out there by now and Snap-On obviously uses their own battery design. But I wanted and want Snap-On. I'm really, really happy with it.

I put a complete 3/8" impact socket set metric, shallow & deep with the CT 761, extensions, a 1/2" ratchet, adapters, 1/2" impact sockets for lug nuts, impact bits, impact bitholders, charger, spare battery... all into that red Systainer T-LOC 2 :)

If you have specific questions, I'll be glad to answer them. :)

If you like, you can watch it - next to the PDC - driving a SPAX (R) HI.FORCE (R) 6x120 Washer head, T-STAR plus (R) drive, steel, Wirox (R), Partial thread.

https://vimeo.com/220070186

And, again if you like, you can watch it - next to PDC and Bosch GSR 12V - driving 4,5x80 Wuerth Assy 3.0 screws (AW 20 head)

https://vimeo.com/220609322

Kind regards,
Oliver
  I have that same Impact from them , in Red. Started out with it to compliment my Snap-On Impact Driver with its 1/4" Quick Change Chuck[ CT725QC]  Finally decided after a few months to upgrade to the 18 volt platform with the CT8810A, and take the 14 volt impact home. While the 18 volt impact has far more power, I do miss the smaller 14 volt version from time to time since as you noted, it has more power than its size would leave you to believe possible.
 I may STILL bring that 14 volt unit back to work someday.... [embarassed]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2017, 03:38 PM
I bet you love the 18V Snap-On impact @leakyroof - It's a beast for sure. I eyed it a couple of times but decided that it would see no real use anyway and skipped on the purchase - but it is tempting. Especially with the "flat gearbox/head" 18V angle grinder they offer and once one has the batteries...... *lol*

I do own a very old 1/4" Snap-On driver, CTSE561CLSK which has a 7.2V NiCd battery. But it's very useful because you can remove/pull out the 1/4" hex shaft and put a 1/4" square shaft in for direct attaching of 1/4" sockets... all of these shafts can also be placed in a instinct-ratcheting handle that came with the set. And of course a big load of bits... One of my very first Snap-On purchases. Love that kit for very light tasks.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2017, 03:45 PM
Here's a pic of back when the madness started... @leakyroof

(http://up.picr.de/29822615ed.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on July 17, 2017, 04:54 PM
I have those slip joint pliers...I ****g love them!   [smile]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter Halle on July 17, 2017, 06:58 PM
You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Knight Woodworks on July 18, 2017, 08:57 AM
I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rylim on July 18, 2017, 10:04 AM
I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 18, 2017, 11:29 AM
You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter

Hi Peter,

thanks, I will look out for that material and see if I can install it vertically. Would be great to have a cover that lasts longer.  [smile] [smile]

I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John

Hi John,

that was made by a German knifemaker, I would need to look up his information as that was loooooong ago.



I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?

Hi,

In Germany that is readily available from every Spax dealer.


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rylim on July 18, 2017, 01:30 PM
You always have neat projects.  Next time you look for the plastic covering try and get greenhouse plastic 4 to 5 years of life and usually a very reasonable cost.

Peter

Hi Peter,

thanks, I will look out for that material and see if I can install it vertically. Would be great to have a cover that lasts longer.  [smile] [smile]

I too enjoy seeing your tool collection. Who made the knife shown with the wrenches?

John

Hi John,

that was made by a German knifemaker, I would need to look up his information as that was loooooong ago.



I'm wondering where did you Spax screw with Sortimo?

Hi,

In Germany that is readily available from every Spax dealer.


Kind regards,
Oliver

Oliver,

At first I thought you got it from USA dealer. Sigh...

I wish I have a chance to visit Germany, and bring some tools back

Ryan
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 18, 2017, 01:36 PM
Hi Ryan,

I'm sorry. But as always, to you and anyone else, my offer stands: If you need anything such as a Spax Mini-L-Boxx from here, write me a PM and we work something out and find an economical shipping rate.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on July 18, 2017, 01:48 PM
Oliver, I used a white poly film made for greenhouses...exactly what Peter was talking about. I purchased a 18' x 24' piece for $65. It's a 6 mil poly film with a 55% opacity rating. It's been up for 6 years now and still looks fine. White film is also a lot cooler temp wise. 

Google greenhouse poly film. I know there's at least one available that now has a 10 year warranty. [cool]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Knight Woodworks on July 18, 2017, 04:03 PM
Oliver,

Thanks for responding. No need to research the maker of your knife. My knowledge of German knife makers is non existent.

Keep up the good work.

John
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 22, 2017, 09:51 AM
Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)

(http://up.picr.de/29861911nz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29861917pc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29861919vy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29861920dw.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on July 22, 2017, 03:01 PM
Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)
...

Lignum Vitae sole?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 22, 2017, 03:42 PM
Hi!

my Dad gifted me his old (pre 1970) Goldenberg Zornhoff plane this morning. I gave it a quick cleaning and honed the edge (need to do this more thoroughly again because there's a little chip in the edge...). Pretty happy right now. :)
...

Lignum Vitae sole?

Yes, Sir. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 22, 2017, 06:51 PM
Hi,

So I thought I'd share a story where everyone can have a little laugh, or maybe just a little chuckle at my expense as I did something incredibly stupid a little while ago. Additionally be as amazed as I was by the generosity of one of my buddies.

The story starts with me looking for a used, (approximate 2005 model year) Hilti T2 - M because this is a discontinued model - and later models of this type don't offer the same functions. Namely the "precision hammer mode" combined with 2 different speed gear settings for drilling and another gear for "full hammer mode". Current models only offer three of them combined.

I wanted this rotary hammer for my video (series, more to follow) about different types of drilling and what happens to certain materials when either not enough or too much power is involved.

So I found the TE 2-M I wanted on ebay and bought it. Well used, working condition.

I get the rotary hammer, unpack and check it. All good, works like a charm - but it is really dirty. So being pedantic about clean tools as I am, I decided to sit down and clean it. I have never taken a rotary hammer apart, but I thought if I wasn't supposed to - some sort of barrier would prevent me from opening something I shouldn't open. With that in mind I unscrewed the 4 screws that hold the two parts of the housing together. A little pull and there it is, a rattling noise and three parts - all for gear selection/gear switch lay on my table.

After hours of searching I find a exploded-view drawing and I now know where the parts have to go. Additional hours later - I can't piece it together. By now I also dismantled the complete gear switch for the sake of accessibility. All to no avail.

I was already on the phone with Hilti to get this repaired, when I thought of a buddy of mine who has an unbelievable knowledge of power tools (albeit from a different brand). So I thought I would ask him if he could help me out because I was sure he had opened, maintained and repaired power tools before.

This is what it looked like at that moment - I placed most of the parts back inside.

(http://up.picr.de/29866607dn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866609ay.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866611kz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866614he.jpg)

His response came fast: I can try.

I packed her up and shipped her to him.

Same day he got her, I get a reply in the evening: She runs, all back A-OK. But she needs some new grease.

I was delighted and unbelievable thankful.

Now getting Hilti grease isn't easy, it took awhile before we found an offer that suited the overall situation - but we found it and fast forward my TE 2-M was back on her way to me.

So this is what she looked like when I took her out of the package.

(http://up.picr.de/29866616rv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866619ok.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866621tn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866623fe.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29866627ox.jpg)

Can you imagine how baffled and even more grateful then ever I was? Not only had my buddy fixed the initial problem, but he cleaned her completely and re-greased her for me. Still in awe when thinking about it, and this was quite a little while ago.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 29, 2017, 06:02 PM
Hi,

So today's project was about re-painting the suspended ceiling above the entrance to the backyards patio, which double functions (partly) as housing for a large shutter. The shutter housing's covers/ ceiling boards are removable - they had to come out first

(http://up.picr.de/29933647ux.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29933654eu.jpg)

Power for sander and dust extractor - I always use a PRCD-S (Portable Residual Current Device) on the main feed, even though I know my electrical circuits are a-ok.

(http://up.picr.de/29933660as.jpg)

Let's start sanding.

(http://up.picr.de/29933663qr.jpg)

Even though there's only mininmal dust, I really don't want to inhale this stuff. Actually it's the first time I'm using my hearing protection while sanding - what a difference. The noise never bothered me, that's why I didn't use it before - but it definitely makes a huge difference. - Additionally PPE pics are always great to have a laugh ;)

(http://up.picr.de/29933664dh.jpg)

I've said it earlier, virtually no dust left after using a Festool Sander and Festool dust extractor. Even if you use the smallest one, the CTL-SYS like me for this task.

(http://up.picr.de/29933665pp.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29933666yl.jpg)

I really like the DTS. So versatile and an absolute specialist when it comes to delicate sanding tasks. I didn't want to remove the spotlights originally, thats and I had no trouble sanding around them. But for painting I had to get them out - my idea of using some masking tape didn't work out so well. You might ask why: Those are pretty old - so they don't have the springs that are common nowadays but two very, very thin flaps made from steel - scary sharp and they pop out when the spotlight is pushed in. For removal you need to press these flaps against the spotlight's housing and push the whole unit back out. Of course this doesn't got without some force and you can cut yourself bad on them. It worked, didn't cut myself - but I would have loved it if I didn't have to get them out.

(http://up.picr.de/29933667ah.jpg)

Over head sanding. Goes well but is of cause pretty exhausting. It's a small area - that's why I didn't want to go the extra mile getting a small, mobile scaffolding...

(http://up.picr.de/29933668lt.jpg)

As I use it in the backyard, I had the Bosch jobsite radio at hand, I love listening to Gregory Porter while painting - makes it go so smooth. :)

(http://up.picr.de/29933669jo.jpg)

I'll add a pic of the finished project tomorrow. Forget to take some pics while painting, had to do the DWC video in between plus the doorbell rang...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter_C on July 29, 2017, 06:11 PM
Might I recommend a good pair of bluetooth headphones. Noise cancelling and you get to listen to books, music, or podcasts. I tear thru books myself, which makes me full of stupid facts and statistics.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 30, 2017, 07:48 AM
Hi,

@Peter C Thanks for the suggestion!

--

Here's the promised picture showing a part of the finished ceiling.

(http://up.picr.de/29937978qk.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 03, 2017, 04:59 PM
Hi,

Today I got a package containing a "grey vanisher" and "oil wipe on care"

(http://up.picr.de/29981710kh.jpg)

At a german woodworking forum I was one among a couple lucky winners to receive a package containing some neat stuff. Among it: a sample of Complex hard oil and a catalog. I looked through the catalog and the afore mentioned products catched my eye.

I thought the "grey vanisher" would be a great product to clean my old backyard table.

Grabbed some stuff.

(http://up.picr.de/29981711cq.jpg)

Before:

(http://up.picr.de/29981694ya.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29981697at.jpg)

After using Complex "grey vanisher" and cleaning it off - still wet:

(http://up.picr.de/29981702up.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29981704ja.jpg)

Base before:

(http://up.picr.de/29981705ih.jpg)

Base after:

(http://up.picr.de/29981709gv.jpg)

Dried:

(http://up.picr.de/29981713lt.jpg)

I'm downright amazed by the result. This table never had any sort of maintenance done to it, I always wanted to, never got around doing it and it's outside year round. I think given the circumstances the result ist fantastic!

What happened, or what I learned (and what you will see in the video) is that obviously this table was coated by the manufacturer. This coating, being old and porous came off after being thoroughly wet and then scrubbed. Long, plastic like, strings came off...

Hier also noch das dazugehörige Video :)

https://vimeo.com/228247283


After the table had dried, I decided to coat it with the Complex hard oil.

Because of my prior experience with the porous coating (and strings) that still covered part of the table I decided to scrub off the now dried residue with a copper wire brush.

(http://up.picr.de/29983506be.jpg)

Ready to coat.

(http://up.picr.de/29983508wg.jpg)

Wider angle.

(http://up.picr.de/29983510ki.jpg)

While coating/oiling.

(http://up.picr.de/29983516bl.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29983520za.jpg)

I'll provide a picture of the result once the oil has dried.

Up to this point I really like the result and the products by Complex were a joy to work with. The "grey vanisher" emits almost no odor and is a pretty "green" product - as is the hard oil - although that does smell quite a bit. ;) One key point: There is no self ignition with Complex hard oil. Although you see me wearing gloves while using the "grey vanisher" - it's probably not needed - like I said, these products are pretty "green". If you like to take a look: http://www.complex-farben.eu/en/home.html

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on August 03, 2017, 05:12 PM
I know the feeling.....
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on August 03, 2017, 05:15 PM
And the after picture.  This table is Teak, washed with a brightener, then Sanded, then oiled with Epifanes Teak Sealer and finally varnished with multiple coats of different Epifanes Varnishes.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 03, 2017, 05:18 PM
WOW! That's an uber-fantastic result.  [eek]  [big grin] Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on August 03, 2017, 05:23 PM
WOW! That's an uber-fantastic result.  [eek]  [big grin] Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...

Kind regards,
Oliver
. Thank you Oliver... [embarassed]
I had five of them to do, some smaller, some large like the one shown.  11 chairs as well, they were much fussier than the Table Tops
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on August 03, 2017, 05:40 PM

Makes me wonder if I should have forced myself to use the sander first...


If you use the sander Oliver, you'll probably get a more even overall finish on the table.  [smile]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 03, 2017, 09:29 PM
Yeah, but that's too late now. I guess I'll see what the oil coat looks like when dry. And take it from there ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 04, 2017, 07:30 AM
Hi,

dried.

(https://up.picr.de/29987259qh.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 04, 2017, 05:06 PM
Hi,

I re-discovered one of my first "woodworking" projects some time ago. I built it with my Dad in my parents basement workshop/boxroom. Mom wrote Christmas '90 on the backside, I was 4 back then.

(http://up.picr.de/29992381xw.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 07, 2017, 05:14 PM
Hi!

I finished a rather unintentional project today. After a busy Friday and Saturday I wanted to clean out the shed on Sunday. Albeit I was pretty upset on Saturday as I had a lot of trouble getting a much needed radiant heater out of the shed.

So I get everything out and while putting a shelf aside, the floor sags - a little. <- Not good!

I take a look and find this  [eek] [scared] [blink]

(http://up.picr.de/30022976ul.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022979it.jpg)

Not the biggest surprise because the outer side of this wall faces a flower bed and there's constantly wet soil building up. I did install some sort of fence/ sacrificial board but that didn't hold up so well - you're going to see that later.

Of course I can't get any materials on a Sunday, but I can have a look.

Cutting a peephole with my MultiMaster.

(http://up.picr.de/30022981oy.jpg)

Ok, there's enough space to make a clean cut with my TSC.

(http://up.picr.de/30022982uj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022984er.jpg)

The old beam has to come out, another job for the Fein MultiMaster.

(http://up.picr.de/30022985it.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022986oj.jpg)

Then I just took measure and thought of what I would do. This morning I went to buy materials and started again.

The first beam went right in without much effort.

(http://up.picr.de/30022989ny.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022990tw.jpg)

The second one had to be cut.

(http://up.picr.de/30022992yz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022993sz.jpg)

Fits.

Now a new floorboard, another job for TSC.

(http://up.picr.de/30022994we.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022995fq.jpg)

Fits again.

Then comes the wallboard.

(http://up.picr.de/30022996ya.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30022997ro.jpg)

Also fits. - Now the inner wall is finished.

Old sacrificial boards on the outside.

(http://up.picr.de/30022998xo.jpg)

Removing all soil and cleaning the foundation/ concrete framing for holding the gravel

(http://up.picr.de/30023002ku.jpg)

And now the new sacrificial board/ protective cover.

(http://up.picr.de/30023008ex.jpg)

To build this I used self-tapping screws with sealing washer to attach the pool liner to the board. Then I had the pool liner travel behind the board and used the same screws to attach this construction to a healthy board - closing the gap. Hopefully the pool liner makes a good enough seal, but at least it will definitely keep all wet soil away. Additionally I will build another fence to keep the soil of the flower bed from running down. That should do the trick.

Kind regards and thanks for reading,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter Halle on August 07, 2017, 06:22 PM
When you do something you don't waste any time do you?  [thumbs up]

Ultimately I think you will have to do more on the exterior than what have done because water will always wick from wet to dry and even defy gravity.  But if you had airspace involved then it won't.  Translation would be that ultimately I think that you will have to dig deeper outside and install coarse stone inside of a fabric (to prevent soil from eliminating the air spaces) and then do something like you did to move the initial water away.

Love this thread!

Peter

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 08, 2017, 05:26 AM
Hi,

Thanks Peter!

I will dig a little deeper, there should be a bit of the foundation sticking out to the side and then build a drain.

Thanks for the advice! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: SoonerFan on August 08, 2017, 11:06 PM
Oliver,
This is a great thread.  You do some really cool stuff and do it all really well.  If it weren't for this thread reminding me about all of stuff I should do around my house I would say this is the perfect thread  [blink].  Seriously, keep up the good work, thanks so much for taking the time to share and thanks for all your great contributions to FOG.   You make this a better place for sure.

PS - I enjoyed seeing your first woodworking project.  Reminded me of the catapult I made many years ago to fire pennies in the driveway.  My kids found it recently.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 09, 2017, 04:36 AM
Hi,

@SoonerFan , Thank you!  [smile]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: VW MICK on August 09, 2017, 02:48 PM
@six-point socket II

I really enjoy these posts too. I think most of my favourite threads are ones based on a progression of a project

I wish I was organised enough to post like this

Thanks you are a great contributor to the FOG

Mick
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 09, 2017, 06:47 PM
Hi,

@VW MICK

Thank you very much for the compliments Mick! Glad you enjoy my posts! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on August 09, 2017, 10:45 PM
Oliver

Your productivity and tool selection make us all look bad!  But keep it up, because it does inspire us to try to keep up with your work ethic and tool collection!

Great stuff!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 10, 2017, 04:52 AM
Hi,

@neilc

Thank you very much! But you're giving me way too much credit here  [eek]  ;)  [smile] , I'm just having fun and share a bit of it  [big grin] [big grin] and I love this place!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on August 11, 2017, 06:36 AM

Thank you very much! But you're giving me way too much credit here  [eek]  ;)  [smile] , I'm just having fun and share a bit of it  [big grin] [big grin] and I love this place!

Kind regards,
Oliver

@six-point socket II
Your modesty honors you.
You really bring a lot to this place with all your postings and especially the extra mile you are going on almost everything you get involved with!

This is highly appreciated and the outcome of this and the vibe it creates (also from the same behavior of others) is what makes the FOG such a tremendous place to hang out!

Grüße aus Hessen. ;)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 11, 2017, 11:24 AM
Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you very much!

Viele Grüße aus NRW ;)
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 17, 2017, 04:40 PM
I love how easy the SYS-SB transforms back from Toolbox to it's intended purpose of being a storage box, thanks to the Sortainer inset boxes. Especially on days where good amounts of installation material are needed.

(http://up.picr.de/30109390ay.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on August 20, 2017, 08:43 AM
I love how easy the SYS-SB transforms back from Toolbox to it's intended purpose of being a storage box, thanks to the Sortainer inset boxes. Especially on days where good amounts of installation material are needed.

(http://up.picr.de/30109390ay.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
. Oliver, what are those pieces on the right side of the photo, the yellow and red ones?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: antss on August 20, 2017, 08:58 AM
They look like push in wire connectors to me  [unsure]

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 20, 2017, 09:28 AM
Hi,

@leakyroof , @antss is right those are push in wire connectors.

I use Wago exclusively: http://global.wago.com/en/products/product-catalog/terminal-blocks-connectors/installation-connectors/overview/index.jsp

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Bob D. on August 20, 2017, 02:18 PM
Some style Wego connectors are UL approved for use in the US. I say some because I don't if they all have been approved or not. They can be handy for special situations. Not sure what the bulk pricing is but buying them a hundred at a time they cost much more than traditional twist-on wire nuts.

Great for mixed wire types, you when you are wanting to connect 16G stranded wire in a fixture with your 12 or 14G solid wire and the wire nut doesn't want to grab them both.

I've seen some informal testing on YT loading them to the point of melt-down at current loads that far exceed their rating.

They are small and take up less space than a Red wire nut, so they can be helpful in that regard too.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on August 20, 2017, 02:55 PM
I use the Wago connectors exclusively for low voltage outdoor lighting. They will work with 18-12 gauge wires. Real nice when trying to connect 6 different wires. With wire nuts, sometimes the connection isn't that solid and there can be some flickering on a light standard. Wago's eliminate that issue. 

In the picture below you can see the bare wire after it is inserted into the connector. If you can see the wire, you'll have a functional circuit.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: antss on August 20, 2017, 06:08 PM
They are available in the U.S. under the Wago, GB and Ideal brands.

In some instances, they are actually cheaper than trad. wirenuts.   :o   Orange BORG  ::)

They run anywhere from 6 to 18 cents ea. depending on what size, how many a pack and where you buy them.   Trad. wirenuts are rarely over 10 cents a piece.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 01, 2017, 02:28 PM
Hi!

Some snapshots of some small stuff I have been busy with in between... (If you follow me on IG you have seen these already, sorry.)

(http://up.picr.de/30519032xz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519039al.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519041lf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519043fb.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519046ye.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519051ae.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519056jr.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519062pf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519069mf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30519072us.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on October 01, 2017, 04:35 PM
Hey Oliver, 
What's in the Fluke package?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 01, 2017, 04:38 PM
Hi Cheese,

that's my trusty T150 VDE voltage and continuity tester -> http://www.fluke.com/fluke/uken/electrical-testers/Electrical-Testers/T90-T110-T130-T150-Voltage-and-Continuity-Testers.htm?PID=73757

I think this specific model is NAINA, so I gave you a link to their UK site for a description in english.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on October 01, 2017, 04:52 PM
Hey that's pretty slick. I like the audible and vibration feedback. I'm not familiar with this Fluke product, is it something new?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 01, 2017, 05:00 PM
I'm not sure it qualifies as new? I have mine for more than a year now, and it's on the market even longer. But then again it's really NAINA (I just checked) -> http://en-us.fluke.com/products/electrical-testers/

Also companies like Benning ( http://www.benning.de/duspol-voltage-testers-en.html ) and Testo ( https://www.testo.com/en-US/electrical/voltage/c/parameters_electrical_voltage ) make similar products.

Still, I'm a Fluke kinda guy ;) *lol* But before that I had a very old Benning Duspol...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: SRSemenza on October 01, 2017, 09:40 PM
Oliver,


    How do you like the Vario version of the VDE screwdrivers compared to the regular VDE?

    Nice pics as usual  [thumbs up]


Seth
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on October 01, 2017, 09:57 PM
Fluke has been around for 70 years or so.  They've been doing voltmeters for at least 35 of those years, if not more.  The brand is now owned by the same company that owns Tektronix (oscilloscopes) - they are both subsidiaries of Fortive, which was spun off of Danaher (who also owned Stanley Tools for a while).  Danaher went on a T&M buying jag a while back and bought Fluke and Tektronix at about the same time.  Both had been independent companies until that point, and both have kept their respective brands as part of Danaher and Fortive.  Fluke makes high-end voltmeters as well as the hand-helds.

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: SRSemenza on October 01, 2017, 10:05 PM
Oliver,


    How do you like the Vario version of the VDE screwdrivers compared to the regular VDE?

    Nice pics as usual  [thumbs up]


Seth


Oops. I mean Kompakt not Vario.  Also do you like the reduced blade versions? I went with the regular for philips head because I like the laser tips and the reduced aren't available with laser tips.

Seth
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 01, 2017, 10:44 PM
Hi Seth,

thanks! :)

It really depends from which side you're looking at them. I'll try to explain:

The Snap-On bag pictured is my "grab and go"-bag. It holds a not so basic set of tools, my toolholder should I need/want it and some speciality items. Last but not least a handful of consumables. This is my #1 tool bag and it more or less goes everywhere I go, metaphorically speaking.

It's the bag I bring in addition to a drill/driver when a friend calls at 9PM on a Sunday and asks for last minute help setting up a piece of furniture and I already know by 10PM it will have turned into: can you install this, oh and this, oh that over there, too. ;)

So what I originally wanted was a set of VDE screwdrivers for this bag.

Going with regular drivers the bag would have been half full: Slotted, PH, PZ, Torx, PH/S and PZ/S.

With this set, and by adding a 2nd handle I was able to have a full set of VDE screwdrivers occupying only one compartment of the bag. Additionally they are sturdy enough for most everything "non-VDE" in case typical bits and bit holders, ratcheting bit holders and the much loved bit ratchets are to bulky, not long enough or to wide to reach into some sort of "pocket hole". They are also a lot less wobbly than other solutions. By adding a 2nd handle you don't have to switch blades that often.

Personally I haven't come across any situation where these would break, but obviously it should be considered that these are not as heavy duty as Wera's other lines. Also when you use the #2 PH/PZ or other larger blade sizes it's a little strange feeling at first having a smaller handle than on the regular screwdrivers. But to me they feel great in the hand nonetheless - I can work with them, no problem. The handle size is a medium, a bit like on the #1 PH/PZ, maybe a tiny little bit thicker...

I think these are an excellent choice if you need a full set of VDE screwdrivers but want the smallest footprint possible. They come in a really nifty case with all blades neatly sorted and accessible. (I ditched it because it would have taken up to much space in the bag, but if you can "afford" losing that additional space, it's definitely a great case!)

Last but not least, when you apply quite a bit of torque you'll notice these are interchangeable, there is a little bit of movement you can feel. But nothing to worry about or bothering.

Sometimes I don't want to carry that bag around my place, because I really just need a select few tools, thats when I grab a few of the regular VDE from my workshop. Makes no real difference to me speaking of application.

What's cool with the Kompakt(s) is that you can also get blades for opening maintenance doors, control cabinets and so on.

However, if I was working in a industrial/commercial setting knowing exactly what three, four maybe five sizes and types of screwdrivers I need and use them everyday 9-to-5. I would spear the Kompakt(s) the wear and tear and go for the regular VDE(s)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 01, 2017, 11:08 PM


Oops. I mean Kompakt not Vario.  Also do you like the reduced blade versions? I went with the regular for philips head because I like the laser tips and the reduced aren't available with laser tips.

Seth

Yes, I like (use) the reduced blades. It's very practical for some tasks, especially inside control cabinets and corresponding components. But that's Germany. I have to admit I have no idea how a typical control cabinet and it's components look like in the US and if the reduced blades would be of any help.

One other application that they are perfect for is installing these: https://www.kitchenking.de/thebo-3-fach-energie-ecksaeule-st-3007-320-3-ecksteckdosen-edelstahl-steckdosenleiste-steckdosen.html (Link just for reference) You need to reach far, and at a slight angle through the two holes on top and bottom to screw them into place. Only few screwdriver blades fit.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on October 15, 2017, 06:24 AM
Even the smallest possible chores need to be done...

(https://up.picr.de/30639610ef.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/30639611gv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/30639612zx.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/30647838mb.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/30647839dn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/30647837av.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: VW MICK on October 15, 2017, 09:57 AM
Hi Oliver

You have a knack of making very normal jobs look very interesting

cool

Mick
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on November 04, 2017, 10:30 AM
Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.

(http://up.picr.de/30852346rc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30852435fm.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on November 04, 2017, 10:52 PM
Here are two pictures that don't fit anywhere else for the moment, but I really like how they turned out. I took them while taking pictures and filming for a larger, coming review of accessories/consumables. But that will still take a little while.

(http://up.picr.de/30858480gf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/30858481yq.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on November 05, 2017, 03:07 PM
Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

Replacing all of the handles or all of the windows? - I assume handles, but I've always found that the prospect of replacing windows leads to thoughts of buying a new house.  Now we have aluminium clad wood windows, so I probably will need to replace the handles before the windows.

Also, why did you have to replace this handle?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on November 05, 2017, 03:29 PM
Hi Harvey.

Thankfully, it's just the handles. Windows are plastic frame windows, double glazing. They are all still good. The only reason for changing them would be another major step: getting a sliding door to the backyard, thus replacing the old door and window combination in the living room. And if that was done, it would be the perfect time to replace the living room's radiators... Meaning: If it's done - everything in conjunction will be done. I don't see that happening before 2020... And if it came to that in 2020, it would mean that our original plans were shattered yet another time... Let's leave it at that, don't want to think about it right now. But just for the record, I couldn't get a new place like this for the cost of new windows. ;)

For the old handle: See that white plastic ring that bursted in the first picture? It's an retention ring that holds the square shaft in place that connects the handle to the window's lock. It bursted and offered no retention anymore so the square shaft simply traveled further down the lock and the handle simply fell off. Old stuff... ;) I already replaced two of them, but those were intentional replacements, I wanted the locking feature. This one was simply necessary. And now I'm already sitting here with 3 of the new... Time to go all in. lol. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver


Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on November 06, 2017, 12:13 AM
Hi Harvey.

Thankfully, it's just the handles. Windows are plastic frame windows, double glazing. They are all still good. The only reason for changing them would be another major step: getting a sliding door to the backyard, thus replacing the old door and window combination in the living room. And if that was done, it would be the perfect time to replace the living room's radiators... Meaning: If it's done - everything in conjunction will be done. I don't see that happening before 2020... And if it came to that in 2020, it would mean that our original plans were shattered yet another time... Let's leave it at that, don't want to think about it right now. But just for the record, I couldn't get a new place like this for the cost of new windows. ;)

For the old handle: See that white plastic ring that bursted in the first picture? It's an retention ring that holds the square shaft in place that connects the handle to the window's lock. It bursted and offered no retention anymore so the square shaft simply traveled further down the lock and the handle simply fell off. Old stuff... ;) I already replaced two of them, but those were intentional replacements, I wanted the locking feature. This one was simply necessary. And now I'm already sitting here with 3 of the new... Time to go all in. lol. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Thanks for the info, and good luck on your handle replacements and your longer term plans.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on November 06, 2017, 01:06 AM
Here are two pictures that don't fit anywhere else for the moment, but I really like how they turned out.

Posting pictures just for the sake of posting interesting pictures...I like 💕 that Oliver.  [big grin]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on November 06, 2017, 03:16 AM
This is probably way off topic, but I laughed when it happened. 

As I was reading thru this discussion and had gotten to the discussion about window handle replacement, I came to Harvey's point about window replacement meaning house replacement.  As soon as I read to the end
Thursday night, a couple of minutes before the hardware store's closing time. But I got there in time and was able to mount a new handle to the window... Now it's time to think about replacing all of them.
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

Replacing all of the handles or all of the windows? - I assume handles, but I've always found that the prospect of replacing windows leads to thoughts of buying a new house.  Now we have aluminium clad wood windows, so I probably will need to replace the handles before the windows.

Also, why did you have to replace this handle?

I heard a beep and looked to the upper corner of my computer, knowing that a new Email was being sent to me.  I looked up, and what should I be looking at but a notice that I was receiving and add for Anderson windows.  I have often wondered how closely these add companies monitor our communications. I laughed as i thought, "there's  my answer."

Now, back to the very interesting subject at hand.
Tinker

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on November 24, 2017, 03:31 PM
Hi!

Little documentation on how to change the filling valve on a Geberit in-wall flushing cistern. Couldn't wait any longer, had to replace it before the old one broke down completely. (Took over 5 minutes to fill up the cistern...)

I had never done this before so I asked on a German forum for advice - and it worked out great.

Starting point.

(http://up.picr.de/31042228bl.jpg)

Removal of cover - on this model by shifting the whole plate to the right.

(http://up.picr.de/31042234gp.jpg)

Unscrewing of baseplate.

(http://up.picr.de/31042236nl.jpg)

Removal of yet another cover.

(http://up.picr.de/31042237zs.jpg)

I have no idea how this can get that dirty...

(http://up.picr.de/31042238zy.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31042241rw.jpg)

Look around the corner. Per the advice I got I marked the position of the rods.

(http://up.picr.de/31042242wz.jpg)

I also marked the rods which the baseplate is mounted to.

(http://up.picr.de/31042247dn.jpg)

taking out the bearing block.

(http://up.picr.de/31042251xs.jpg)

Shutting off water and emptying the cistern.

(http://up.picr.de/31042252go.jpg)

Unscrewing the connection between hose and filling valve. (I'm amazed how well this works, even though my hands are pretty big...)

(http://up.picr.de/31042264ws.jpg)

This is what it looks like now.

(http://up.picr.de/31042266et.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31042267os.jpg)

Bringing the female part of the connection back to the end of the hose.

(http://up.picr.de/31042270qo.jpg)

Put new filling valve in place, tighten the connection between hose and valve lightly.

(http://up.picr.de/31042281ck.jpg)

When in place, tighten the connection and click the hose in place.

(http://up.picr.de/31042282fi.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31042284se.jpg)

Put bearing block and rods back in place. (So easy because of the great advice to mark them...)

(http://up.picr.de/31042285wl.jpg)

Works.

(http://up.picr.de/31042286iu.jpg)

Finished. :)

(http://up.picr.de/31042287gy.jpg)


Here are 3 additional random pics I took while customizing a drill bit to fit a hole saw adaptor.

(http://up.picr.de/31042731qx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31042734ot.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31042736bx.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on December 09, 2017, 10:14 AM
"Come to the dark side, we got Snap-On and Festool tools"  [scared] [eek] [big grin] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/31180208xw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31180210av.jpg)

Then we finally got some snow... I'm so delighted... Sadly it's already almost gone...

(https://up.picr.de/31180176ft.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31180181mr.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31180182hj.jpg)

And some minor DIY. I finally got around to finish the trimming of the attic ladder. I used an acryl from Soudal that has some sort of granules inside. Pretty awesome stuff if you ask me, didn't expect it to be this good - both in how to work with it and the result. It's applied like silicone.

(http://up.picr.de/31180287qv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31180203ad.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31180204db.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter_C on December 09, 2017, 12:47 PM
WAIT! You don't have an electric caulking gun? I would recommend the Milwaukee M12 gun, or in whatever battery platform you have. It lays a really consistent bead... I use the heck out of mine and it is one of those tools I had kinda questioned it usability, until I started using it and now I don't want to go back to a manual gun. Especially for glues like PL400 which are hard to pump all day long. It does take different attachments for the smaller and larger tubes though.

Fancier welding helmet than I have. Mine is over a decade old, and I have gone thru more than a few of the forward glass covers.

If you haven't seen them already Sperian makes a really nice face shield that can house plasma, grinding, and flame cutting shields too. I have a couple and swear by them for face/eye protection.

Yeah I like spending other peoples money :)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on December 09, 2017, 02:35 PM
Hi Peter,

Not yet. ;) Can't decide on a manufacturer/battery platform. It's not an imminent need, I only use my hand press once or twice a year and mostly for acrylic and silicones - and that presses fairly easy...

DeWalt, Milwaukee, Metabo, Makita and Hilti all make one (or more)

Personally I'd like the Hilti best given it's ergonomics but it's a different battery platform than I already have from them.

So I was thinking to get the Milwaukee (since I have to get a new battery platform anyway) and use it as a gateway into their 12V line. Which I see me buying more tools from than from Hilti's 22V line at the moment.

Would you recommend the 12V Milwaukee caulking gun?

Metabo and Makita both don't do it for me.

Then there is DeWalt.

But like I said, since it's really not imminent for me, I just buy other stuff all the time. lol. ;)

I will take a look at Sperian, but right now the Snap-On is more than enough since I don't weld on my own currently. I have different shields/"glasses" for it. But I will definitely look at Sperian, love learning about manufacturers. :)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on December 14, 2017, 06:15 PM
Hi,

 [scared] [blink] [eek] 8) [big grin] [big grin] [tongue] [big grin] [big grin]

(https://up.picr.de/31237818gq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31237827dm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31237826ui.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/31237825cn.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on December 14, 2017, 08:34 PM
Lol!  Very nice, happy holidays Oliver.  My wife would throw me out of the kitchen/house if Knipex “utensils” found a way into the kitchen!

Oh, the M12 caulk gun is great!  I haven’t used it with construction adhesive, but with regular acrylic caulk I can lay out consistent smooth beads that I just can’t do when I’m always squeezing the trigger.  And the rest of the 12v lineup ain’t bad either.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: SRSemenza on December 14, 2017, 09:24 PM
Those look yummy  [tongue]


     Some seriously tough packaging though, if you needed the Cobolts!

Seth
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 17, 2018, 03:08 PM
Sign of life.  [scared] [eek] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/31555367cw.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on January 17, 2018, 07:11 PM
Hey Oliver,
I have the 1st gen Milwaukee 12V/14V caulk gun. It’s gotta be 12-15+ years old. I originally purchased it for laying subfloor. I’ve put a lot of tubes of PL400 through it, high recommend and I’d assume Milwaukee has made it even better in the current 12V battery platform. Certainly their battery platform has been enhanced by a factor of 4x or 5x.

Besides eliminating the hand cramps from a manual caulk gun it also lays down a real uniform bead of caulk.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 18, 2018, 11:27 AM
Hi!

Thank you @Cheese ! When the next opportunity comes up I will get the M12 caulk gun :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rst on January 18, 2018, 05:21 PM
While I don't have the M12 Milwaukee Caulking gun, I do have the 18v.  I do commercial/industrial glazing and entrances.  Gunning hundreds of feet of polyurethane caulk in the dead of winter is a hand numbing experience.  The cordless guns make caulking "almost" an enjoyable task...actually no...still a pain in the dupa, just easier.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 23, 2018, 06:14 PM
Thanks @rst

--

So today I had a rather interesting little "problem".

I had to replace a TV that sits in a cabinet, built from oak by a carpenter/joiner in the 70's. So with the new TV having significantly less of a frame and being much lower than the old one it was supposed to sit higher in the cabinet.

I still had the old shelf that divided the space back when it was used as a cabinet for a Revox tape, record player, amplifier and tuner (That's what the cabinet was originally made to measure for)

I put in the shelf, of course it was a little to high to accommodate the TV  - I needed to get it down by 6 cm - but then the shelf would sit on the hinges which doesn't work obviously.

I decided to to make a cut out for the hinges on each side of the shelf and lower it as much as needed.

Now comes the part that explains perfectly what I meant when I posted in the "Does holding a Festool make you feel better?" ( http://festoolownersgroup.com/fun-games-diversions/does-holding-a-festool-make-you-feel-better/ )


(...)

The complete "Festool experience" makes me feel better and somehow gives me more confidence to do stuff I haven't done before.

(...)

Last but definitely not least, the results I can achieve with Festool tools and the fact that I try for my results to meet the quality of the tools - which simply makes me work more accurate, but also, as already mentioned, makes me dare more and go further one step at a time.

(...)

This cabinet is of unbelievable great value to me, one of the reasons I even kept that shelf that was not needed for years. It's not about money.

Now this is a simple modification for most here and of course the professionals around us and might probably not even seem noteworthy to most, but I would have never thought I'd use my tools on this cabinet one day. But my experience with my Festool tools gave me the confidence I needed to do this.

Bracket in original position
(http://up.picr.de/31618970ky.jpg)

New holes marked
(http://up.picr.de/31618971gx.jpg)

Bracket in new position
(http://up.picr.de/31618972jv.jpg)

Making the cut outs for the hinges on the shelf. What I didn't take a picture of is my clamped down level that I used to guide the Carvex. This worked out perfect. Of course I used my trusty CTL-SYS with the Carvex.
(http://up.picr.de/31618974hp.jpg)

Here you can see the difference in cut quality. The cut out made with Carvex and the original, completely untouched cut above it.
(http://up.picr.de/31618976mt.jpg)

Finished for now.
(http://up.picr.de/31618977om.jpg)

I'm currently thinking if I should maybe round of the edges of the cut out to match the front side of the shelf, but I'm undecided.

Tomorrow I'll use some wax/polish to get off some residue from my Pica pencil's red wax lead.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 25, 2018, 06:59 AM
Hi!

Some pictures from yesterday.

Long (boring and up to ridiculous) story short: No matter how many CAT cables your network infrastructure has, you always need one more. ...

I started by drilling the 68mm hole for the flush box. (I decided against the 82mm hole for a junction type flush box because the cable will just pass through, and beside the cable I will just store the left over part from a nylon rope to pull another cable through the conduit.)

(http://up.picr.de/31630522zp.jpg)

Then I drilled through the wall for the conduit to pass through.

(http://up.picr.de/31630524yu.jpg)

small Festool stack (CTL-SYS and SYS-PH on SYS-CART) on the roof. I needed to widen the first couple of centimeters of my 16mm hole to 18mm.

(http://up.picr.de/31630525tk.jpg)


After I had prepared everything on the 1st floor, I went down to the basement to beginn the conduit install and pull the cable.

(http://up.picr.de/31630526uj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31630527qr.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31630528zx.jpg)

To be continued. ... :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 25, 2018, 05:01 PM
Also from yesterday.

First fitting of the conduit on 1st floor, outside.
(https://up.picr.de/31635212bk.jpg)

Working my way up from here (basement).
(https://up.picr.de/31635213vm.jpg)

This is where the flush box will be. CAT cable and pull rope are now on 1st floor, inside.
(https://up.picr.de/31635216bp.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on January 25, 2018, 09:33 PM
CAT?  I assume these are like CAT-5 or CAT-6 8 conductor network cables, right?  I wired my house for CAT-5e about 20 years ago but so much stuff is wireless now!

That Hilti looks like a beast of a drill!  Looks like the core you drilled was only about 2.5 inches thick or so.  Is than an interior wall?  Can't tell from the photos -

Really enjoy your updates and tool selection!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 26, 2018, 03:45 AM
Hi Neil,

Thank you very much!

Yes, CAT-5e. The house is CAT-5e wired, but as with everything - sometimes you need just one more (direct/straight) line than you have/ can somehow connect. ;)

You're correct about the core's diameter, it's in fact 68mm.

The Hilti is awesome. I bought this on purpose because, to the best of my knowledge, this T2 - M was the last Model to feature: Hammer drilling, drilling in 1st gear, hammer drilling precision mode (reduced number of blows), drilling in 2nd gear. So it has 4 "gears" - the only thing it's understandably missing is a hammer only mode. But I have others for that...


Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 26, 2018, 05:03 PM
Hi.

Drilling multiple (combinations of) outlets/switches made easy with the Kaiser drilling template. ( http://www.kaiser-elektro.de/catalogue/catalogue.do?oid=D7BE24A7EA4EA9D19E0F727991BAF14F&act=showIO&forward=showProduct&lang=en )

Drill first pilot hole, place pin of drilling template into that hole, adjust and drill next pilot hole. (71 mm standard combinations, 91mm off-set combinations)

(http://up.picr.de/31643366rn.jpg)

Drill, drill, drill ... ;)

(http://up.picr.de/31643367vg.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31643368mi.jpg)

Perfect & ready to plaster.

(http://up.picr.de/31643369pf.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on January 26, 2018, 05:35 PM
Hi Oliver,

Nice jig!
I just got myself the Stabila Electric Type 70 level. It also features neat drilling guides for outlets in the standard distances and I was missing a longer level for general stuff.

But I definitely will have a look for the Kaiser, die to the compactness. :)

Oh. And I got some wood glue, too. Since it was on clearance...

(https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20180126/d4c0d34903175d3e7244a23237030e59.jpg)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on January 26, 2018, 05:38 PM
BTW: how do you like the Bosch drill-dust-collection? Seems to cover the complete range of sizes one would drill... [emoji15]

Might be a good addition to the Festool one.
Any thoughts on comparison, besides the possible drill size?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 26, 2018, 06:06 PM
Hi!

Neat stuff!

A word of advise on the Stabila Type 70 electric: It's not meant to drill through/guide the drill bit. The Kaiser drill template has hardened bushings that are meant to guide the 6mm drill bit. On the Stabila electric, the holes are far to large to be a guide and are only meant for marking with a pencil. (See the no drilling icon)

(http://up.picr.de/31644048kx.png)
Screenprint from stabila.com - (c) Stabila.

--

Well the Bosch Professional GDE 68 is one of those accessories you need to try to actually "believe the magic". It's simply amazing and as great in collecting dust as the Festool one. I use both side by side. The Festool 500483 drill dust collecting nozzle for anything up to 12mm and the GDE 68 for anything larger. Of course the GDE works best wenn the drill bit is large enough to hit the bristles, but spillage is minimal even if it dosen't. And the Festool, if you have it, you know how great it is, especially while working over head it's a game changer. Just as the GDE when drilling those 68mm holes... Also it's larger brother the GDE 162 is worth every penny if you plan on drilling diameters larger than 68mm.

Both have the two-chamber system, so even if the "drilling chamber" takes in additional air from a gap they will still stick to the wall.

They have limitations: Clinker for example is a no-go.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on January 27, 2018, 10:32 AM
Yes, I know that the level is not meant as a drill guide. I don’t mind, since I mainly bought it as a normal level with the „added benefit“ of being able to quickly put down markings for outlets...

But the Kaiser jig looks like a handy little thing, especially for those occasions, where you do not know what needs to be done on site, or while helping people move etc...
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 27, 2018, 04:02 PM
Hi!

Then its all as good as it gets. :)

--

Today was all about plastering...  [big grin]

Had a couple of these... Being busy anyway I took the opportunity to do this room once and for all. Now trying to source a new plumber to exchange the radiator/ heating element - as I don't have the means to temporary freeze part of the pipes to do this while the rest of the system is still running - and I don't feel like emptying the whole system, otherwise I'd do it myself.

(http://up.picr.de/31652920ys.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31652926oc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31652928lm.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on January 27, 2018, 06:02 PM
Hey Oliver, aren’t those Ridgid style pipe freezing machines available for renting?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 27, 2018, 06:58 PM
Hi!

They are, I looked for one. ;)  But sadly not locally and that "kills" it for me, to much of a hassle.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 28, 2018, 05:55 PM
Let's continue the fun, shall we?  [eek] [scared] [blink] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

First I "MacGyver-ed" a temporary outlet for the currently still needed phone/dsl copper wire that is going to disappear soon. Then the wire will go in the flush box and a neat lid cover it.

(http://up.picr.de/31665375bj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665376zs.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665394rt.jpg)

Then more plaster work. Fine tuning around the flush boxes.

(http://up.picr.de/31665378qb.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665379pa.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665383vd.jpg)

In between two pictures of the finished conduit on the outside.

(http://up.picr.de/31665381ss.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665382ay.jpg)

Day-dreaming for a minute.

(http://up.picr.de/31665385km.jpg)

Installing switches and outlets.

(http://up.picr.de/31665384sl.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665388pk.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31665386rt.jpg)

Oh, and I just love this thing!

(http://up.picr.de/31665380wt.jpg)

To be continued. ...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 29, 2018, 04:30 PM
Another day, another conduit. This time for an outlet that will supply power to the hardware needed for the switch of regular phone, internet and TV to fiber optic.

Didn't get done much else except for phoning plumbers for the radiator/ heating element I want replaced. If I get lucky this get's done on Friday. I also went to the hardware store to return some unused consumables.

(http://up.picr.de/31673519gx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31673521md.jpg)

To be continued. ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Mario Turcot on January 30, 2018, 08:25 AM
Nice and clean work  [smile]

Thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 30, 2018, 08:45 AM
Thank you very much, Mario!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 30, 2018, 10:56 AM
Hi,

Just in case you ever wondered what a German distribution/ circuit breaker panel/ box looks like /can look like.

(http://up.picr.de/31679120cw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31679119zw.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 31, 2018, 02:52 AM
There won't be any updates in the coming days, my new plumber called: he's sick. So no installation on Friday. But with some luck, todays appointment will be on Friday and installation sometime next week.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Jimdude on January 31, 2018, 05:42 AM
Hi there,

I love your thread and the work you do, but I might have a remark about the following:

(http://up.picr.de/31665381ss.jpg)

Due to the angle of the picture, it is a bit hard to tell, but it looks as if that conduit runs downwards into the wall. If so, that could potentially lead to leaks. Connections like these really should always use 'droop loops' as wel call them, i.e. run the conduit a tad below the hole, then curl it upwards again. Rainwater will now fall from the low spot, and not creep into your wall.
(https://www.ers.be/afbeeldingen/kabel2.jpg)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on January 31, 2018, 07:23 AM
Hi Jim,

Thank you very much!

That is great advice, I hadn't thought of that possibility. Easily fixed, I will re-assemble that part and create a drop-loop!

Thanks again! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 01, 2018, 01:02 PM
I love totally unexpected failures of electrical components!

So I was getting ready to do the dishes, cranked up the hot water tab and filled the sink. When I checked, it was cold. So I tried again, still cold. Went downstairs, fumbled with the flow heaters setting, still nothing.

Then I got my Fluke out to check and find that one of two conductors is without power/voltage. I check some more stuff and find that the load shedding relay and the contactor are also partly without power/voltage ...

Sorry no pictures for now - I thought and hoped this would be a real quickie. ...

That's when I called my electrician. Only got the lady on the phone who runs his office, he was supposed to call me back, still waiting. A couple of hours in, waiting for his call, I called the manufacturer of the contactor and got me some first hand information on the parts.

So let's see what happens tomorrow.

At least those of you who read this thread will benefit, there will be - hopefully interesting - pictures of the repair sometime soon. :)

And while this isn't repaired, I'll boil water on the stove to do the dishes. Love oldschool.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on February 01, 2018, 05:52 PM
Hi Oliver,

Best of luck! Hope it is only the water that stays cold for now. Could be worse. :)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 02, 2018, 12:04 PM

(http://up.picr.de/31706810rd.jpg)

It is with great sadness that I announce the premature passing of :hager contactor ESC 440S which paid the ultimate price today after literally lifelong bravery even though it was facing excessive misuse.

Nevertheless it ensured that no one showering in this house would be met with a stream of cold water should someone have turned on another flow heater and I deeply thank you for that.

The truth is, it never stood a chance. Made with great care by the fine people of :hager your estimated lifetime was 60.000 switching cycles and if it had been installed correctly it would have lived happily for decades.

Being installed incorrectly it cycled for as long as someone kept a hot water tap open and did so for almost 6 years which is remarkable under the given circumstances.

Thank you my dear :hager ESC 440S - you will never be forgotten and one of your brothers/sisters now, correctly installed, performs in your spot and for rememberance of your heroic acts.

The person responsible for wrong installation will be dealt with accordingly. :P ;) ;) ;)

---

(I better write a disclaimer in todays world: This post is meant funny/ as a joke. …)

---

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on February 02, 2018, 07:14 PM
The person responsible for wrong installation will be dealt with accordingly. :P ;) ;)

What a shame!
Joe do they say? „Switch fast, die young..“?

Hopefully no need for self-inflicted punishment? [emoji6]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on February 02, 2018, 07:28 PM
Hey Oliver,
Is that out of a tankless water heater?

What was improper about the poor :hager install?

😢  RIP :hager ⚰️
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on February 02, 2018, 08:09 PM
He took a bite out of the apple
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 03, 2018, 03:38 AM
The person responsible for wrong installation will be dealt with accordingly. :P ;) ;)

What a shame!
Joe do they say? „Switch fast, die young..“?

Hopefully no need for self-inflicted punishment? [emoji6]

Glad to report, NO need for Seppuku. It was installed by an electrician.

Hey Oliver,
Is that out of a tankless water heater?

What was improper about the poor :hager install?

😢  RIP :hager ⚰️

Hi Cheese,

out of the installation for them, yes. But not out of the water heater itself.

Wrong phase connected to the load shedding relay which then gave inconclusive signal to the contactor and send it cycling.

For my tankless water heater the load shedding relay was supposed to go on Phase 2 it was on Phase 3.


He took a bite out of the apple

 [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 03, 2018, 05:30 PM
Hi!

Today was all about painting the ceiling (and installing a new ceiling light, I made a little video about the light which is quite cool but I have some trouble uploading it so that will have to wait for another day).

(http://up.picr.de/31719204ig.jpg)

"Moses, stop messing with the paint in the paint bucket"  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]
(http://up.picr.de/31719206mi.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31719207hm.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 04, 2018, 02:36 PM
I started the day by thoroughly cleaning the window, frame and windowsill with hot steam.

(http://up.picr.de/31732389rs.jpg)

Then it was time to prepare the paste. This stuff is quite good because it only needs 5 minutes to get ready.

(http://up.picr.de/31732390ac.jpg)

And the Wallpaper. Designed by Barbara Becker (Yes, tennis player Boris Becker's ex-wife) manufactured by a German company. Liked it and compared to all the other stuff they sell in our equivalent of "Home Depot" it's really "golden". Good to work with, hangs great ...

(http://up.picr.de/31732391eq.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31732393ck.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on February 04, 2018, 08:22 PM
When I was a kid, that must have been, oh, 10 years ago or maybe a little longer, I would put my glasses over the steam kettle spout to clean them after coming in from the cold. The last time I tried doing that, the steel frames expanded, the lense fell out onto the hot stove lid and shattered into many splinters. That was in the days before safety lenses were common.  Maybe they weren't invented yet, so there were a few splinters to cleanup. Maybe the glass broke first and then fell out of the frame.
Tinker
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 05, 2018, 06:53 AM
Quite possible if the glass was really cold and then heated by the steam.

--

So I found a way to upload that small video about the new ceiling light:

https://streamable.com/w0h4i

The light is called "Sidney" manufactured in China for a German company called "Näve Leuchten".

It's a 5500 Lumen ceiling light that can change color temperature between 6000 and 2700k via remote. It features quite a couple of double-LED stripes - and each has a set of cold white and warm white LED which - depending on your choice of color temperature - either work simultaneously or only the corresponding cold white/warm white.

You can also dim the light and switch between day and night mode. The light will remember the last setting before it was switched off - it will also return to the last used setting when it is switched back from night to day mode.

(http://up.picr.de/31736591on.jpg)

All this is done via a small remote. Quite cool.



Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on February 05, 2018, 10:21 AM
...
And the Wallpaper. Designed by Barbara Becker (Yes, tennis player Boris Becker's ex-wife) manufactured by a German company. Liked it and compared to all the other stuff they sell in our equivalent of "Home Depot" it's really "golden". Good to work with, hangs great ...
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

And looks very nice - good job.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 05, 2018, 10:28 AM
Thank you Harvey!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 09, 2018, 06:26 PM
Hi!

More progress today. :)

The plumber finally came to install the new radiator/heating element. This took a little longer than initially expected but I'm happy it is done now.

Old radiator/ heating element in place.
(http://up.picr.de/31778525sf.jpg)

First support/brace removed.
(http://up.picr.de/31778526jx.jpg)

One is still standing.
(http://up.picr.de/31778527tz.jpg)

Installation materials for extending pipes and connecting the radiator/ heating element.
(http://up.picr.de/31778531az.jpg)

Knipex & Wera - what could go wrong?
(http://up.picr.de/31778532vo.jpg)

Close up of the Knipex.
(http://up.picr.de/31778534yy.jpg)

Old pipe that needed an extension with new extension fitted.
(http://up.picr.de/31778537mh.jpg)

Old pipe that needs shortening.
(http://up.picr.de/31778538rd.jpg)

Taps and dies.
(http://up.picr.de/31778539ya.jpg)

Die powered by a Knipex. [eek] [blink] [scared]    [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]
(http://up.picr.de/31778541ox.jpg)

Old pipe with new threads.
(http://up.picr.de/31778542lg.jpg)

Cutting old pipe to new length.
(http://up.picr.de/31778543xq.jpg)

First parts fitted.
(http://up.picr.de/31778546yk.jpg)

A
(http://up.picr.de/31778549vi.jpg)

B
(http://up.picr.de/31778551yg.jpg)

Parts fitted to radiator/ heating element. A
(http://up.picr.de/31778552ze.jpg)

B
(http://up.picr.de/31778555ty.jpg)

After this was done it was temporarily installed to make sure the two connections line up. Then it was put aside, the plumber went to another client and I hung the remaining wallpaper - which I hadn't done because it might have gotten dirty otherwise. So here's a picture of the new supports (which are basically rails) to/in which the radiator is hung into. When the radiator hangs it can be moved left and right - this is very neat for installation purposes obviously, as you can prepare everything and just have to line it up after that and fasten two connections.
(http://up.picr.de/31778670gj.jpg)

Radiator installed and connected.
(http://up.picr.de/31778556rt.jpg)

Finished, including windowsill.
(http://up.picr.de/31778558uj.jpg)

This took about 3 1/2 hrs. 3 hrs to get to where I was able to hang the remaining wallpaper and 1/2 hrs to hang the radiator and install the windowsill.

After that I scrubed the floor and laid carpet. Just one picture for now, where I'm using Festool's Granat sponge abrasive to clean my hand sawn miter cuts and break the edges a little. I always keep one of these with my tools, they are very handy and they prevent rounding off edges pretty nicely. I like these!

(http://up.picr.de/31778671ui.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 12, 2018, 02:18 PM
Hi!

Saturday and Sunday were all about setting up furniture and other "minor" stuff.

I love my CXS and the small Bosch for this type of work! It's an extra treat being able to hang the CXS from a leg pocket when working in a seated position - so comfortable!

(http://up.picr.de/31809673pj.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/31809674wc.jpg)

Today we started to move the stuff back in, but of course there had to be some sort of catch...

I cannot, for the life of me, understand why cabinet manufacturers will only drill a handful of holes instead of drilling a proper (complete for the given height) system 32 hole line - especially when it's invisible anyway like in this case.

And if they must only drill a handful of holes, why don't they abide by some typical shelf heights (think lever arch files and such...)

But then again, on the other hand it's the perfect situation to get the tools back out, especially my trusty BTA HW D 5 CE (492522) 5 mm carbide drill bit with depth stop. I have done this countless times and it still amazes me how easy it is to manually add holes to any system 32 hole line with this drill bit. I also love how clean the holes are when drilled at 3800 RPM with the PDC. I use a very thin square or ruler to precisely mark/layout the new holes and then just drill away. Works perfectly.

(http://up.picr.de/31809677sr.jpg)

I never get tired of taking pictures of this beast. ...

(http://up.picr.de/31809678jf.jpg)

And the amazing, the one and only, 5 mm carbide drill bit with depth stop. Love this thing.

(http://up.picr.de/31809680ox.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on February 12, 2018, 03:39 PM
Oliver! Stop pushing me to buy more stuff with your fine pictures! [emoji51][emoji41]

...I recently added the 3.5mm with counter sink. I really like it so far, but have not used it much.

I will be cannibalizing my CXS charger soon to enable me to fit the CXS in a SYS-1 with DF to store some more Centrotec accessories with the tool. Maybe I’ll fill up the PDC SYS with the 5mm on that go..

Nice pics, as always!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 12, 2018, 04:25 PM
Hi!

Thank you very much!

--

Depending on how many drill bits you already have, think about getting the Installer's kit (Montagepaket SYS 1 CE-SORT 497628) instead of buying "singles".

Depending on what I do, I either have the SYS 1 CE-SORT connected to my CXS- or PDC-Systainer - or I take all three. This also ensures that you have (rather) drill specific bits and pieces with the corresponding drill at all times and the Installer's kit on a need basis.

Literally it's what saved my butt more than once during projects, because everything is in one place and not scattered over different Systainers.

This way I know when I grab my PDC/CXS it comes with everything to serve it's main purpose/ core functions and when I see the slightest chance that I might run into the need for more/ different bits, I just connect the kit.

Last but not least, you save a ton of money in the long run by getting the kit. I did the math a couple of years ago when I bought it and back then it was (MSRP's compared) already about 150,- to 200,- Euro cheaper than buying "singles". Price in the discount I got from a local dealer when I bought the kit, it basically was a steal. One of my best purchases because first it is so enabling and secondly the quality of those speciality drill bits is absolutely excellent.

I customized mine over time, threw out the short and long bitholder for example (have those with every drill anyway), used the space for a 15 mm Zobo which I need a lot, added Spax T-Star bits because I work a lot with those screws, 6 and 8 mm drill bits for tile ....

It's a great solution and I can only highly recommend it - before you start investing in singles and at some point it doesn't make sense (rationally) anymore.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on February 12, 2018, 05:15 PM
Hi Oliver,

Thanks for the tip. I looked long and hard at the kit. But since I got the Zobo set early on, I could not really justify the rest of it.
I have a good Bosch set of metal drills and have equipped the Lid-Case of the PDC with the wood, stone and long bit sets, which I got cheap from eBay...
Plus the 3.5 countersink and the 2-8mm pure countersink.
For bits I‘m using sets from Metabo or Wera.

My goal is to have every drill equipped for its direct use cases.
- CXS for screwing or assembly
- PDC for tough work/masonry etc.
- C18 for projects/shopwork whatever in between.

What are the parts you mostly use out of your CE-SORT?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on February 12, 2018, 05:58 PM
Hi!

The drill bits that have seen most use/ my top ten, if you want: (All original kit's content)

1. HSS D3-10 CE/10 drill bit case (I also use these for wood, a lot.) Especially 3 & 10 mm.
2. BKS D3-8 CE/W-K drill bit case (I use these with tape as "depth stop" both for pilot holes and free-hand doweling) Especially 3, 6 and 8 mm.

3. BTA HW D5 CE drill bit with depth stop (as described)
4. BSTA HS D3.5 CE drill countersink with depth stop (I use this mainly for garden projects)

5. CENTROTEC-DRIVE screwdriver handle + long bits for manual screw driving
 
6. QLS D5-15 CE deburring countersink
7. QLS D2-8 CE deburring countersink

8. ZB HS D5 EURO CE centering bit
9. HD D18 CE hook driver

10. BA-CE CENTROTEC drill adapter (Especially handy for use with my Hilti TE 2-M - since this drill has a 2nd gear for high(er) speed...)

--

Personally I think they could have left out all of the 25 mm standard bits (except for the twinBox) and made that space more customizable. I realize there might be tradesman that go through a lot of these bits and want quick and easy access. Personally I need/want to sort/keep more different bits than 50 replacements of standard sizes. Like I said, I added the T-Star's, some 50 mm, some hex, some +- ... You get the picture. Additionally, every drill has the standard bits short/long anyway - so the chance that I run out of a standard size/profile is highly unlikely even without the original set of 50 from the kit.

In my experience people who go through a lot of bits buy exactly their sizes/profiles in bulk anyway - exceeding the storage capacity of the kit by far.

Personally, I honestly have so many bits by now... I really need to slap myself on the wrists every time the urge to buy a set overcomes me. And I have already given away plenty...

I was thinking of placing one of those bubblegum vending machines on my front porch so people who pass by can get a random bit for a penny a twist. ... Just kidding of course. ;)

Additionally I have really awesome bits like the ones from PB Swiss for assembling furniture and other applications where some of the screw's heads are visible later on, and those last. First because they are high quality, perfectly cut, sharp & hard - and secondly I typically don't use them when I can foresee slippage because of sh*tty/cheap screws, worn heads or other sh*tty circumstances. I'd rather "kill" one of those rather soft/ more tough than hard standard bits and throw it away afterwards than foreseeable ruining excellent bits on purpose. But still, even that happens so rarely that I don't need so many of them for one project.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on March 05, 2018, 03:14 PM
Hi!

I had the pleasure of a meeting/appointment at hardware Cologne trade fair today. ( http://www.eisenwarenmesse.com/IEM/index-3.php )

Here are a couple of impressions from the show floors. Quite a couple of exhibitors didn't want pictures being taken of certain stuff and show cases so I skipped the detailed shots completely and just tried to convey how big this trade fair is. (2700 exhibitors)

(http://up.picr.de/32012675vh.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012677jd.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012678bv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012680ef.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012681vl.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012682in.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012683mc.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012685bu.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012686gx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32012687zk.jpg)

A special area was designated to 3D printing/additive manufacturing including show cases of work and presentations.

(http://up.picr.de/32012688kl.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on March 05, 2018, 03:32 PM
Too bad you couldn't sneak in the "what's coming" pictures.

The one German trade show that I've been to was in Munich, and it was top notch.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Svar on March 05, 2018, 05:15 PM
Quite a couple of exhibitors didn't want pictures being taken of certain stuff and show cases so I skipped the detailed shots completely
So, the exhibitors came to advertise their stuff, but did not want pictures taken of what they came to advertise? Interesting approach to advertising. The next step would be to not let you look.  [wink]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on March 05, 2018, 05:23 PM
Hi,

Maybe important to clarify: This is not a trade fair for the consumer - so stuff on display might not yet be ready to be introduced to the market fully or there might be an introduction coming within weeks/months from now. Some stuff might still be prototype stage or not within the specs that a production run will have later.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 13, 2018, 03:39 PM
Hi,

this was delivered today, I guess @Cheese knows what that means.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/32387191qx.jpg)

--

Also got some other stuff needed for the next project.

(http://up.picr.de/32387193xd.jpg)

--

And we're getting new "long distance neighbors", a house that was rotting away for two decades was finally torn down and a new one will be build - they brought the "big guns". I was hoping it had some lighting for nighttime, but sadly (pretty sure the direct neighbors are very happy) it's not lit at all at night, not even the sign.  [crying]

(http://up.picr.de/32387189yp.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32387190ae.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Michael Kellough on April 13, 2018, 03:45 PM
Must be some serious counterweight on that thing!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 13, 2018, 05:59 PM
Hi Michael,

yeah, that's for sure. :) I can see if I can walk by there tomorrow take another pic up close. Until then, and since I'm not really sure I will get there tomorrow, it's a Liebherr crane. If I'm not mistaken it's anything between a 34 K up to a 53 K.

https://www.liebherr.com/en/deu/products/construction-machines/tower-cranes/fast-erecting-cranes/k-cranes/k-cranes.html

If you select one, you can go to Downloads and then take a look at the fact sheet, weights are listed there. :)

Another thing on my bucket list, lift something with such a crane - or even cooler, lift something with one of their mobile cranes ...

However, this would be my ultimate dream come true: http://demagmobilecranes.com/ac-300-6/

Let's just say I have a thing for big machinery, ever since working for a certain company quite a couple of years ago, for some time... I had to edit my ex-employers name from my hard hat, and the colleague that took that first picture was a little shaky, sorry.

(http://up.picr.de/32387958ln.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32387960rh.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 13, 2018, 06:06 PM
Cool pics, Oliver.  That last one looks like a strip mine perhaps?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on April 13, 2018, 06:07 PM
Oh Oliver, if you post more pics, my Festool-addiction might connect with my model-train past and morph into something truly unhealthy. [emoji33]

I’ve been wanting to operate one of those cranes from the German open cast mining plants since I learned that a car/family van/truck will fit inside one of the shovels, when I was 8. [emoji7]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 13, 2018, 06:15 PM
Cool pics, Oliver.  That last one looks like a strip mine perhaps?

Hi Neil,

yes, exactly. :) It's actually not even a secret, I just forgot to add a link, as that mine isn't operated by my ex-employer. Here's the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garzweiler_surface_mine and here's one directly to the operator/owner: http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/59998/rwe-power-ag/fuels/garzweiler/

The first picture was taken inside here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurath_Power_Station and again directly from the operator/owner: http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/12068/rwe-power-ag/fuels/kw-neurath-boa-2-3/

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 13, 2018, 06:24 PM
Oh Oliver, if you post more pics, my Festool-addiction might connect with my model-train past and morph into something truly unhealthy. [emoji33]

I’ve been wanting to operate one of those cranes from the German open cast mining plants since I learned that a car/family van/truck will fit inside one of the shovels, when I was 8. [emoji7]

 [big grin] [big grin] Are you talking about a bucket-wheel excavator or a rope shovel?

Bucket-wheel excavator I can help with, rope shovel not so much as I have never had the opportunity to see one up close and live.

(http://up.picr.de/32388061di.jpg)

I'm really sorry I have to cut these pics, but there's always at least one other ex-colleague somewhere in them ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 13, 2018, 06:29 PM
This was one of the most impressive mining machines I have heard about... Big Muskie

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcmGKsHZXZ8 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcmGKsHZXZ8)

Big Muskie was the length of 1 1/2 football fields!  About 140 meters!

Then I googled it and the Wikipedia page mentioned a German mining machine -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagger_293 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagger_293)

It was 225 meters long!

The big machines are fascinating.  You can spend hours on Youtube on videos on large machines!  Or we can buy tools!  I'm torn!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 13, 2018, 06:41 PM
Maybe it's finally time to thank God for tabbed browsing?  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

But yeah, so many interesting machines... I could spent days watching History & Discovery channel ...

I'll write you a PM shortly, Neil.  [smile]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on April 14, 2018, 02:38 PM
...it's a Liebherr crane. If I'm not mistaken it's anything between a 34 K up to a 53 K.

A typical round-table discussion with the Liebherr production group on a Monday morning, "Should we build a crane this week or just a refrigerator?"   [big grin]

Now I know where they get their hinges for their refrigerator doors... [poke]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Euclid on April 14, 2018, 03:30 PM
I have a Liebherr refrigerator-freezer. It is certainly quite well-made, but the interior layout and space utilisation is a pathetically, miserably, disgracefully dumb design travesty. It was the only replacement I could find to fit an already-built and fitted kitchen scheme (the original and beautifully sleek device having been discontinued after expiring). Do you get the impression I’m disappointed with it? To be, hopefully, replaced as soon as I can remodel the kitchen…! 

(Apologies, I’ve had a frustrating day…)

On the other hand, they do quite a good job of making a backhoe climb a metal tower…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VBMUvAUPTGM
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter Halle on April 14, 2018, 03:34 PM
When we tear down homes here we sure don't use one of those.  Would it be safe to venture a guess that the average family wouldn't have lived in that home?

Peter
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rst on April 14, 2018, 04:43 PM
That shovel climbing the tower is insane...their insurance company was certainly doing anal contractions!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 14, 2018, 06:53 PM
When we tear down homes here we sure don't use one of those.  Would it be safe to venture a guess that the average family wouldn't have lived in that home?

Peter

Hi Peter,

those cranes are really quite common here throughout all types of construction sites, especially when the new house is build brick by brick. When prefabricated elements are used however, its mostly a mobile crane.

For your question, while these are definitely not your "average income family" homes, especially given the size of home and surrounding property (compared to average houses & properties of today) but on the other hand these aren't especially "posh" either. I'd say well situated middle class and upper middle class homes.

The house in question is/has a rather sad story: Original owner(s) deceased and there were/are a community of heirs - for whatever reason that is anyway completely unknown to me - they couldn't get this sorted out. Over time it became a kind of prime example for the broken windows theory and it was simply left to rot. My best guess for the current "progress" is: the community of heirs got this finally sorted, one way or another and "rescuing" what was left was probably more expensive than a tear down and re-build. Given that even if it would have been heated, aired from time to time, the water tapped and kept clean any new owner would have had to do a "structural restoration" by now. Because there would be (at the very least for waste water) lead pipes, electrical installation without RCD's for bathrooms/kitchen/sockets, not split (lighting/sockets), no network/LAN cables, screw type fuses instead of breakers and so on, iron pipes for heating, no under-floor heating, ... I think you can easily picture what I mean.

Given that another, much closer neighbor, is pulling through such a "structural restoration" on a house of similar age, but not left to rot, currently I can see how a tear down made sense in the other case.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 28, 2018, 05:35 PM
Hi!

Before I start writing on my overall project report, here's a little something that still has me facepalming ...

First of all, my DIY radiator install was a huge success - worked out fantastic. I had one small leakage (a couple of drips...), because I didn't use enough hemp on one connection, but that was easily fixed. In the end all I lost was a bit of time and a bit of water, because I had to empty the circuit once more and re-fill it.

Now for the facepalm.

As you know I had a radiator replaced by a professional some weeks ago. All good, basically. Since I do have windowsills on the inside, I needed brackets for them, and he brought and installed them. I didn't think any of it, even when he said to me smiling: "Oh, I have two metal plates left, I don't know where these belong, probably for another/different radiator"

This is what it looks like on those he installed:

(http://up.picr.de/32531994zd.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32531995ny.jpg)

Please pay attention to the small metal plate/foot resting directly on the radiators ribs/lamella. When looking through the grille.

I found it a little odd he had to cut the grille back then, but again - I didn't think any of it - he is a professional. Because these brackets went in so deep, we also joked that there finally was a task to use those extra long hex keys on.

Fast forward I'm ready to install the brackets to the radiator I just had installed, and for good measure I decide to read the instructions that came with the brackets. Then I facepalmed multiple times ...

So here's how these are installed correctly - and it also explains why you need the larger metal plates underneath -> weight distribution.

(http://up.picr.de/32532084vq.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 29, 2018, 11:52 AM
Hi,

I have to start today's post with a, basically two, disclaimers:

I feel very honored and it is a great pleasure to announce that Klein Tools will be supporting me by supplying high-quality tools from their line up, for my upcoming projects. Klein Tools USA is manufacturing high-end tools since 1857 mainly for line man, electricians and phone-/ network-technicians. Since early 2017 these tools are also directly available in Germany from selected partners.

Because of current legal uncertainty in Germany in regards to labeling requirements for this type of postings, I will be labeling all my postings in conjunction with this cooperation advertisement.

However it is very important to me to point out that I’m not being paid for my postings and their content and furthermore they reflect my own personal view/opinion.

As is customary for this type of cooperation, I’m allowed to keep the products after my projects and testing are finished.

I’m not an employee of Klein Tools.

--

Advertisement.

I recently renovated what we call the guest bedroom, in this post I will write about how I exchanged the radiator.

First I had to get the right fittings. If you go to one of our local equivalents of "Home Depot" / "Lowe's" you'll find a lot of different fittings - the ones they don't have are those made from "gunmetal" - which last a lot longer and are of much higher quality than those made from more or less pure copper. It's a product professionals use around here but you can't buy them in typical DIY hardware stores.

It wasn't hard to find a place online that sells them, but then you obviously have to know exactly what you need.

I made a plan, took some measurements and this is what I ended up with:

(http://up.picr.de/32538163st.jpg)

Trivia: In old houses the pipe system is still 3/8" - today 1/2" is common and 3/8" will be gone for good pretty soon.

So I started with a reducer 3/8" internal thread to 1/2" external thread, then it's a thermostatic radiator valve (flow) / radiator lockshield valve (return), followed by a connector with union nut, right angle connector, a longer connector, a connector with external threading on both sides, and finally the connector that is screwed into the radiator.

Hemp and sealant.

I dry fitted everything and both parts had the same length as I had hoped for.

What I also needed was a radiator spud wrench. Normally those are made for "push-through" ratchets, I was happy to find one for my 1/2" drive ratchet.

(http://up.picr.de/32538656rk.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538657ad.jpg)


Then came radiator replacement day  [big grin]


(http://up.picr.de/32538112mg.jpg)

This needs a little explanation. As you can see the old radiator sits on brackets that go through the screed and are fastened in/to the concrete ceiling/floor. I didn't want to "dig" (hammer/chisel) these out so I planned to cut them flush. The plumber did this in the other room with an angle grinder, I'm not the biggest fan of angle grinders, so I wanted to give my MultiMaster a try. From prior experience with multi cutters I was pretty sure I'd be needing two batteries. I had a fully charged one and one that was nearly empty, so the first step was actually to charge the empty one while I still had to do some other stuff.

Then it was time to drain the pipe system and radiators.

(http://up.picr.de/32538113id.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538115rk.jpg)

I know, not the nicest view - but this is straight and true after opening the drain. (Washing machine and condense dryer are both connected to this drain "inside" the floor, so there is no need for me to open this ...)

Next step was to remove the old radiator. I apologize for the lack of pictures, but I had no chance to pause and take some, as the old radiator was really heavy and I wanted to take it off the brackets, empty it and then move it over in one attempt.

(http://up.picr.de/32538116io.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538118lr.jpg)

The black water is basically pure iron, smells like "blood". So here's a shout out to the preppers and urban survivalists among us: If you think of using water from your heating system (and have old "iron" pipes and radiators) in a doomsday emergency, this is what it looks like. Luckily this stuff collects on the bottom of radiators, so water drained from the system is (will be) much cleaner looking - but still has some iron in it and smells ...

Next the old brackets had to go. I did this with the MultiMaster as planned and I'm really happy to report this was one smooth ride. I used a simple E cut universal metal/wood (BIM) blade from Fein on speed 6 and it held up great. Still sharp and fully functional.

(http://up.picr.de/32538122pg.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538124cg.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538126so.jpg)

I was also very surprised to find that I just "lost" one stripe on the batterie's charge.

Next I dry fitted my parts one more time and took some final measurements.

(http://up.picr.de/32538128ez.jpg)

Then it was time to install the new brackets.

Preparing tools. The Tradesman Pro™ Rolling Tool Bag is one of the items I received from Klein Tools, I will post more about it soon - but what I can already say after using it for a couple of weeks, taking it on the road and shopping is: that it's surely one of the finest tool bags I ever owned. Large, heavy duty, versatile - but again I will write an in depth review on it soon. For now, please just take my word for it, I had a great time working on my projects with it so far. :)

(http://up.picr.de/32538130vx.jpg)

I can't say this often enough, but I love the PDC. It's a delicate spot: Plastered insulation board and then a very thin wall. So I needed absolutely clean and tight holes for the wall plugs. Drilling these at 3800 rpm (percussion mode switched off) with the carbide tipped CE-Stone drill bits is a breeze. The wall plugs fit most excellent.

(http://up.picr.de/32538131ub.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538132fn.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538134dd.jpg)

To tighten the bolts I used my trusted 1/2" Snap-On ratchet an adapter down to 3/8" and a 13 mm 3/8" socket. Since these screws are pretty long I used my 3/8" Snap-On impact to overcome most of the length.

(http://up.picr.de/32538135mm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538138pm.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538139mx.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538142mp.jpg)

Next I had to prepare the radiator. I used the radiator spud wrench (socket) on my ratchet.

(http://up.picr.de/32538145zj.jpg)

Again I apologize for not taking more pictures, but my fingers were covered in sealant and hemp residue and I was fully concentrated on obtaining watertight connections.

Then I cut threading on/to the return pipe as I needed to shorten it.

(http://up.picr.de/32538147yp.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/32538149sb.jpg)

Installed brackets for the windowsill.

(http://up.picr.de/32538160te.jpg)

And this is what it looks like in the finished room.

(http://up.picr.de/32538164ew.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on April 29, 2018, 12:52 PM
Hi Oliver, nice post!
And congratulations on the Klein deal!

I think it is always good to get a better insight on tools from across the pond, there are so many things out there in the world and every bit of information helps finding the right tools.

If you need someone to field test the Klein Hacksaw-Bag, I can offer my services, been looking at that recently.[emoji41][emoji51]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 29, 2018, 02:09 PM
What tool did you for the pipe threading?  And did it havea handle or just the pliers, which I would not think would be up to the task.  Don’t know if I would trust threading a pipe in the wall in place due to fear of it potentially breaking from wear and deterioration,over the years.

Great walkthrough of the process. 

Looks like you also scraped/papered the walls before final install.  So much easier with the radiator removed.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on April 29, 2018, 03:11 PM
Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you!  [smile] [smile]

@neilc

Hi Neil,

Thank you!  [big grin] [big grin]

While planning I thought about these points. The plumber who installed the other radiator also just used a threading die and pliers.

Since I had to buy the 3/8" threading die, I thought of ordering a ratcheting handle with it. Ultimately I decided against it because I wasn't sure how this would turn out: I have two other rooms that could use a new radiator, and given my recent experience I will replace these myself. But I wasn't so sure about that in the beginning, so now I will buy the ratcheting handle. ;) If this hadn't worked out the way it did, I wouldn't need the threading die anymore and didn't want to be stuck with additional accessories for it.

So yes, I did just use the pliers to turn the threading die and did so directly on the pipe without any other tools/support. This was fairly easy, a little bit of cutting oil - not much force needed, the pipe didn't move at all and it felt safe to do it this way, at least to me. If the pipe had moved or if I had the feeling that something wasn't right, I would have stopped immediately.

Would you please share if you know a safer way or know about useful additional tools/supports to do this? Always eager to learn. :)

And yes, I did hang wallpaper before final install. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: jobsworth on April 29, 2018, 10:19 PM
Man Oliver,
you do keep busy and do such nice work.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on April 29, 2018, 10:55 PM
I have threaders with the ratchet handle.  Don't use it much, but never thought about threading without one!  I don't trust slipjoint pliers for a good grip on something like that.  But I don't have Klein for a sponsor either!  And I never saw a plumber do it either.

Congrats on that sponsorship, BTW!

I would probably have unscrewed the pipe from the wall and taken it to a vise rather than run the risk of threading it in place and it potentially breaking.  I only say that because the radiator pipes in our home were 80 years old before we replaced them with copper 20 years ago.  When we changed the pipes out I remember some of them being pretty corroded, thus wanting to be careful with any wrenches!  They are all 3/4" copper replacing 3/4" iron pipes.

It doesn't even look like you had a pipe wrench on the pipe for extra support while threading.  You live dangerously!

Good stuff.  Keep the projects coming.

neil
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on April 30, 2018, 04:52 AM
Hi!

@grobkuschelig

Thank you!  [smile] [smile]

@neilc

Hi Neil,

Thank you!  [big grin] [big grin]

While planning I thought about these points. The plumber who installed the other radiator also just used a threading die and pliers.

Since I had to buy the 3/8" threading die, I thought of ordering a ratcheting handle with it. Ultimately I decided against it because I wasn't sure how this would turn out: I have two other rooms that could use a new radiator, and given my recent experience I will replace these myself. But I wasn't so sure about that in the beginning, so now I will buy the ratcheting handle. ;) If this hadn't worked out the way it did, I wouldn't need the threading die anymore and didn't want to be stuck with additional accessories for it.

So yes, I did just use the pliers to turn the threading die and did so directly on the pipe without any other tools/support. This was fairly easy, a little bit of cutting oil - not much force needed, the pipe didn't move at all and it felt safe to do it this way, at least to me. If the pipe had moved or if I had the feeling that something wasn't right, I would have stopped immediately.

Would you please share if you know a safer way or know about useful additional tools/supports to do this? Always eager to learn. :)

And yes, I did hang wallpaper before final install. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver

@six-point socket II, This has been a great info thread on many levels. Very interesting all the way. A while back, you showed some cranes in Germany. Each time I have visited I have noted, even in my inlaws' small village, how many cranes ae in use, even for individual houses. However, cranes are not the subject for now.

When I was a HS sophomore, I was taking shop. For the first half year, I was in the metal working class. I had a neighbor who was a plumber.  He found out I was learning about metal working. One afternoon, he asked me if i knew how to sweat.  Of course I knew all about sweating. I had lived and worked on a farm for the last few years. But, I knew that wasn't the kind of sweating he was asking about. I replied, "Well. I know how to solder."  That was the beginning of a long relationship in the plumbing trade.

I learned how to sweat, but also earned about other phases of the trade. My neighbor's specialty was pump installation. I learned how to pull wells and install pumps either at the top of wells or to drop a pump down 300 feet into a well. Either way, we had to fabricate fittings. That was in 1946 and there are not as large selections of parts that are available today. We were working mostly on old houses and changing ancient piping for more modern equipment into house that were not built to any code and building codes were just being thought out and developed.

On one job, a short nipple just would not line up and the boss was stumped to make a short pipe fit at both ends without bending. His torch could not develope enough heat to anneal the pipe soft enough to bend without kinking. He would have to go home and get his tanks and bigger torch.  He had a drinking problem and I knew if I let him go home, I would not see him again that day.  In my ignorance, I suggested we mount the die at each end of the pipe off center and thread the pipe crooked.  My neighbor told me it was impossible to thread a pipe crooked, but I persuaded that we should try it.

to make a long story short, we tried it and it worked. Ken was flabbergasted, but forever after, he would tell the story about "Tinker's wobble threads." He is gone now, but eventually, he quit drinking. He used to tell the story with the addendum that if he wasn't drinking, there would have been no lubrication to make it work.

My aunt had a better answer to the impossible: She always told me "Ignorance is bliss." I like that explanation much better.
Tinker


 
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 01, 2018, 10:57 AM
Man Oliver,
you do keep busy and do such nice work.

TOOL TIME!!! :) :) :) I loved that show, even have the DVD Box ... Oh, and I got T-Shirts ... But obviously Heidi is much better looking than me  [eek] [blink] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(http://up.picr.de/32562350uj.jpg)

Thank you very much for the compliment on my work!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 01, 2018, 11:17 AM
I have threaders with the ratchet handle.  Don't use it much, but never thought about threading without one!  I don't trust slipjoint pliers for a good grip on something like that.  But I don't have Klein for a sponsor either!  And I never saw a plumber do it either.

Congrats on that sponsorship, BTW!

I would probably have unscrewed the pipe from the wall and taken it to a vise rather than run the risk of threading it in place and it potentially breaking.  I only say that because the radiator pipes in our home were 80 years old before we replaced them with copper 20 years ago.  When we changed the pipes out I remember some of them being pretty corroded, thus wanting to be careful with any wrenches!  They are all 3/4" copper replacing 3/4" iron pipes.

It doesn't even look like you had a pipe wrench on the pipe for extra support while threading.  You live dangerously!

Good stuff.  Keep the projects coming.

neil

Hi Neil,

Funny you mention Klein, that was my Knipex  [scared]  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] - But only because they sent me so much neat tools, I didn't dare to ask for another additional pair of pliers and I don't think I would have used insulated pump pliers for this anyway. :)

Thank you very much!!

I think there lies our little misunderstanding. Maybe I should have put this in my original post. I can't unscrew the pipe. It's completely incased within the brick & mortar wall. It was put in when the house was build, never to be taken out again. (Basically)

Here's a picture from the bathroom when it was remodeled, the pipes were taken out and replaced as the whole room was "stripped" to the core. This view is after tiling and plaster were removed. (In the other rooms the pipe(s) lies even deeper)

(http://up.picr.de/32562656fx.jpg)

But I totally agree with you, when one can take out the pipe, one should do it!

EDIT, I forgot this in my original reply: You're also absolutely right on the pipe wrench, I could have placed one on the pipe for additional support. I will do that next time, didn't think of that before!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 01, 2018, 11:22 AM


@six-point socket II, This has been a great info thread on many levels. Very interesting all the way. A while back, you showed some cranes in Germany. Each time I have visited I have noted, even in my inlaws' small village, how many cranes ae in use, even for individual houses. However, cranes are not the subject for now.

When I was a HS sophomore, I was taking shop. For the first half year, I was in the metal working class. I had a neighbor who was a plumber.  He found out I was learning about metal working. One afternoon, he asked me if i knew how to sweat.  Of course I knew all about sweating. I had lived and worked on a farm for the last few years. But, I knew that wasn't the kind of sweating he was asking about. I replied, "Well. I know how to solder."  That was the beginning of a long relationship in the plumbing trade.

I learned how to sweat, but also earned about other phases of the trade. My neighbor's specialty was pump installation. I learned how to pull wells and install pumps either at the top of wells or to drop a pump down 300 feet into a well. Either way, we had to fabricate fittings. That was in 1946 and there are not as large selections of parts that are available today. We were working mostly on old houses and changing ancient piping for more modern equipment into house that were not built to any code and building codes were just being thought out and developed.

On one job, a short nipple just would not line up and the boss was stumped to make a short pipe fit at both ends without bending. His torch could not develope enough heat to anneal the pipe soft enough to bend without kinking. He would have to go home and get his tanks and bigger torch.  He had a drinking problem and I knew if I let him go home, I would not see him again that day.  In my ignorance, I suggested we mount the die at each end of the pipe off center and thread the pipe crooked.  My neighbor told me it was impossible to thread a pipe crooked, but I persuaded that we should try it.

to make a long story short, we tried it and it worked. Ken was flabbergasted, but forever after, he would tell the story about "Tinker's wobble threads." He is gone now, but eventually, he quit drinking. He used to tell the story with the addendum that if he wasn't drinking, there would have been no lubrication to make it work.

My aunt had a better answer to the impossible: She always told me "Ignorance is bliss." I like that explanation much better.
Tinker

Hi!

Thank you very much Tinker!

I have to say "Tinker's wobble threads." was an amazing read, thank you so much for sharing, love it!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: jobsworth on May 01, 2018, 09:16 PM
@six-point socket II

TOOL TIME!!! I loved that show, even have the DVD Box ... Oh, and I got T-Shirts ... But obviously Heidi is much better looking than me....


Nahhhhhhhh  [eek] [big grin]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rst on May 02, 2018, 06:53 AM
Im the Tool Man...still have a hat   [big grin]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 25, 2018, 05:45 AM
Hi!

Yesterday I was caught saying: “Let me just change that tire real quick.” Even though I know so well, I should never use "just" and "real quick" in the same sentence.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

So, we have this garden/hand cart - it's really great when it works as intended, but it's also kinda "high maintenance" ...

We ordered this a couple of years ago from a backyard/gardening stuff related dealer located in one of the next bigger cities. It wasn't cheap but on the same hand also not really expensive. What we didn't know back then, this dealer gets almost everything that is not seeds/plants from China and sells it here by "pretending" and advertising to be a local, high quality/expert gardening market ... After ordering a couple of times (mainly seeds and plants) we went there once, and instead of a gardening market it was just a big warehouse and many greenhouses. You could only access a part of the warehouse where they either hand out products from stock, or look through returns/factory seconds ... We were pretty disappointed, as his advertising clearly sounded a lot different.

Anyway, back to the cart. I think it was in a picture or two before, but just in case, here it is:

(https://up.picr.de/32787551ws.jpg)

Comes in handy for anything from intended use as garden cart to getting groceries from the car to the house or transporting other materials ...

After the first year I had to change all 4 tires for the first time, because all of them had cracked, some tubes were punctured, some had defective valves. This then turned out to be another lesson: I tried sourcing these tires/wheels locally. From our equivalent of home depot to specialized tool/hardware stores - no one could (or wanted to?) really help me. Then I typed the numbers embossed in the tire into amazon's search... LOL! Of course, there were plenty of sellers and offerings .........

Speaking of high maintenance, the coatings of paint are really thin so it started to rust after the first week, so I we have to keep this pretty clean and dry ... (I'm thinking of investing in a small paint spray setup ...)

So fast forward, gardening season is upon us and of course, another flat. So I bought another tire, in fact I bought two, to have a spare at hand. While unpacking I think they look kinda odd but I couldn't put my finger on it ...

Just brought my wrenches.
(https://up.picr.de/32787552ha.jpg)

Old tire comes off easy
(https://up.picr.de/32787553mm.jpg)

New tire goes on, that looks good. - Almost finished.
(https://up.picr.de/32787554vg.jpg)

But wait, what's this? Where's the bolt?
(https://up.picr.de/32787555iz.jpg)

Put the old tire back on - looks good.
(https://up.picr.de/32787557ia.jpg)

Well ...
(https://up.picr.de/32787556sm.jpg)

First thought: I gotta pack these both back up, and send them back. Pay return shipping as they don't qualify for free return shipping.

Second thought: I could simply change the hub, as tire and tube are supposed to be the same.

To make this as quick as possible I got my impact ...

Dismantling of old tire.
(https://up.picr.de/32787559hk.jpg)

Deflating new tire.
(https://up.picr.de/32787560lc.jpg)

Both tires dismantled.
(https://up.picr.de/32787561yy.jpg)

Putting my "new" tire together. Old hub, new tire and tube.
(https://up.picr.de/32787562cv.jpg)

Works.
(https://up.picr.de/32787564kz.jpg)

Fastening.
(https://up.picr.de/32787567jw.jpg)

Let's see when I will need the spare...  [eek] [blink] [eek] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on May 25, 2018, 08:21 AM
I hope you just learned your lesson real quick. [emoji6]

It seems to be the week for this. I wanted to quickly repair my old Nintendo NES this week, spent two nights and still have things to finish. Postponed for now, due to other projects ranking up in priority.

At least now you know how quickly you can dismantle and reassemble the tire. [emoji6]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on May 25, 2018, 08:37 AM
I feel your pain Oliver... Last night I drained the gas and the oil out of our SnowBlower to put it to rest for the Summer and Fall until we awaken it again for Winter.  The Oil Drain tube backed out of the engine block when I was trying to just remove the cap at the end of the pipe to drain the oil like usual.  There wasn't enough room next  to the engine to get pliers or a Visegrip to hold the drain pipe so I could loosen and remove that stuck cap..... Ended up with a mess of oil that I couldn't stop.... [embarassed]  Now it's all fixed, drain pipe/tube is secure in the engine again.... but what a time waster..... [mad]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 26, 2018, 09:19 AM
Hi!

@grobkuschelig Good luck with the NES!

@leakyroof

Thank you, but your situation sounds a lot less fun and more serious then my little odyssey - I hope you have flooring that was easily cleaned up at least. What a mess  [eek] [scared] Glad it is back OK now!!



I visited our hardware rental this morning and reserved some mobile scaffolding for next week, the beams of my patios roof need to be sanded and painted. FUN FUN FUN  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]
 
5l. of paint and 123.3m FrogTape will be delivered on Monday.

Kind regards,
Oliver


Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on May 26, 2018, 10:56 AM
Hey Oliver, I have the same style wagon and was constantly re-inflating the tires on a bi-weekly basis and replacing tires. I finally got fed up and purchased solid urethane tires for it. Fantastic conversion, right now the wagon has probably 500# of porcelain tile sitting on it, been like that for about a year.
[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 26, 2018, 11:00 AM
That sounds great @Cheese do you have a link to the source for me by any chance? Would be highly appreciated. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on May 26, 2018, 11:18 AM
Sorry Oliver,  [sad]  I looked but the receipt is not in the proper folder. They came as a set of 4 tires with hubs & bearings just like the picture. You simply pulled a cotter key and then removed a nut, pulled the old one off and slipped the new one on.

I purchased the wagon at Northern Tool so it's likely that I also purchased the tires from them. The name Marathon also sounds familiar.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_lawn-garden+wagons-yard-carts+hand-pull-towable-wagons

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/category_tires-wheels
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 26, 2018, 02:42 PM
Thanks @Cheese those links help a lot! Great! :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on May 26, 2018, 03:45 PM
Hey Oliver, just checked the wagon and they’re Marathon Flat-Free.

No wonder Marathon sounded familiar.  [doh]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 27, 2018, 09:32 AM
Thanks Cheese!

I'm going to get me some of these for sure!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 27, 2018, 09:42 AM
Hi,

"There's always something ..."

I finished a little something in my basement which required me to move a gel joint installed in 2015 by professionals from Germany's largest telephone company.

After touching it, I had some kind of liquid all over my hand ... Checked the second gel joint, that was never moved/touched, even more of this liquid substance on the underside ...

Right now I'm trying to find out if it is normal for the gel/silicone to liquify over time/ "sweat". But I guess no matter what, I will have to call the telephone company on Monday. ...

(https://up.picr.de/32810668pa.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32810671rb.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32810672vq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32810674av.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on May 27, 2018, 10:08 AM
The gel joints I have seen were used by the phone company here.  Far smaller than yours!


They never harden.  Gel is for moisture displacement. 

https://goo.gl/images/MPcwdE (https://goo.gl/images/MPcwdE)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 27, 2018, 01:50 PM
Hi Neil,

Thank you! You made me look for the file I have on this, and I found this picture, taken by the pros when they installed it.

(https://up.picr.de/32814741qj.jpg)

As you can see, the joints inside that box are probably the same. :) Thank you again!

So it might be just the outer gel/silicone seal of that box that is "leaking"/"sweating" ...

I guess I won't get around interacting with the phone company on Monday.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 30, 2018, 07:50 AM
Wooohooo this happened today:

(https://up.picr.de/32837741oc.jpg)

Goodbye copper DSL, welcome fiber optic ...

Wooohooo!!!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on May 31, 2018, 03:53 PM
Advertisement.

Hi!

Today I prepared my patio's roof "substructure" for tomorrow's sanding extravaganza.

Minimalistic tool kit.

(https://up.picr.de/32849538qv.jpg)

I started by removing cramps (Don't ask ...)

(https://up.picr.de/32849539uc.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32849540lx.jpg)

And cable clamps. These snap easily and then you need some quality pliers to get a good grip and pull them out. I have to say that I really like the Klein Tools J2000-9NECR Journeyman 2000 series pliers. I've used these before on the other project to get some really long and stubborn nails out of masonry so I knew they were the right tool for this. They just  grip everything, even if there’s not much left to grip. Optimal transmission of force right into the tip of the jaws and a sure grip you can rely on. Very happy with them and by now they have become my go to pliers for everything that needs a sure grip and lots of force.

(https://up.picr.de/32849541zw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32849542hc.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32849543vb.jpg)

Then it was time to remove the brackets from my "party lighting". Although I did install these, I had no idea the (at least partly) slotted screws were this small. I must have forgotten - and I have no Idea how/ with what tool I installed these originally.

So I got my SIR Tools Mini-Hexdriver Bit-Kit to find a 3mm slotted bit, and put it in my PDC's quick (ex)change chuck.

(https://up.picr.de/32849544wc.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32849545ln.jpg)

Of course, and this is totally not like me, there were also very small PH screws on some of them ...

(https://up.picr.de/32849546fm.jpg)

Back to the PDC.

(https://up.picr.de/32849547fx.jpg)

Well I'll spare you the pictures of moving stuff off the patio and so on...

Very early tomorrow morning I will be at the local hardware rental to get my mobile scaffolding - and hopefully I can post about it in the evening when the sanding is completed. Saturday is reserved for painting. Monday the mobile scaffolding needs to be back, and I honestly don't plan on working on Sunday. So let's see and hope for the best.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on May 31, 2018, 06:02 PM
Hi Oliver,

Best of luck that you get it finished in the time planned. :)

How many meters of beams are there to cover?
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on May 31, 2018, 07:36 PM
Don't you have a bigger drill for that small screw bit?!

I have a 40 year old set of very similar Klein pliers.  Here, they are called lineman's pliers as any electrician was guaranteed to have a pair in their toolbelt.  Here's a brief history of how they got started - making a pair that sound similar to what you are using today!  In 1857, so 161 years ago!  Amazing.  http://www.kleintools.com/content/history (http://www.kleintools.com/content/history)

Klein Tools is headquartered here in Chicago and has had several factories in the Chicago area.  Fantastic tools.


Good luck with the project!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on May 31, 2018, 09:39 PM
Hey Oliver, don't want to rain on your parade,  [unsure]   but I couldn't help but notice the divot in the linesman's pliers' edge.

An object was obviously cut and the jaws of the pliers were either too soft, and they deformed, or the edges were too hard and they chipped...just curious...there's a story there....[big grin]

[attachimg=1]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 01, 2018, 02:07 AM
Good morning everyone! :)

08:07 AM - It's raining, and a tiny storm with lightning and thunder is rolling through, so I let that pass before picking up my small scaffolding.

@grobkuschelig

Thanks! Well:

10 m x2 sides
10 m x3 sides
3.7 m x3 sides x10 beams

And some smaller parts.

So it's roughly 161 m + ...

@neilc

Thank you so much! Have you been to the factory?

@Cheese

Advertisement.

It's not the rain, that ruined the parade...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

But I'm afraid there's no real story. I did some extensive cutting tests with these Lineman's pliers - after all, that's what the series 2000 side cutting pliers are meant to do.

It went smooth through everything I threw at it, and then I found this "little" rusty nail, probably from my grandfathers hardware assortment. I pondered for some seconds, I knew it was a 50/50 chance, I cut it. There was a louder than normal "crack", that's when I knew that was a hardened steel nail. Actually I was surprised there wasn't more damage to the cutting edge.

I cut bolts, nails, spring hardened wire - no problem. And even after my "mishap" it would still pass my paper test. I took a small file to smoothen the dent a little. I originally wanted to cover this in my overall review of the pliers. :)

(https://up.picr.de/32850998ld.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32850999uv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32851000jb.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on June 01, 2018, 08:47 AM
I have not done a tour of their factory.  I will check to see if they even offer one.



Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 01, 2018, 05:15 PM
Advertisement. (Marked as advertisement because of visible Klein Tools tools & products ...)

Hi!

So here are some impressions from my sanding extravaganza. :)

As I wrote this morning, shortly before I got out of bed it started to rain quite a bit and thunder and lightning decided to come along ... Not ideal to be messing with scaffolding ...

I sat out the first round and then picked up the scaffolding and brought it home.

(https://up.picr.de/32857796yz.jpg)

Sat out a second round of thunder and lightning and then I could set it up start working.

(https://up.picr.de/32857802uv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32857803yq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32857804fy.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32857805uv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32857808qm.jpg)

Sometime into the job I decided that the mask I was wearing was too heavy duty/overkill for this and changed to a lighter one. You can easily spot where I sanded and where not.

(https://up.picr.de/32857798sl.jpg)

Close up.

(https://up.picr.de/32857809he.jpg)

Moving on.

(https://up.picr.de/32857811vo.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32857812sk.jpg)

Lunch break.

(https://up.picr.de/32857813lu.jpg)

What I can say is that Granat Net is by far my favorite abrasive, even with the "old" DTS 400 it works it's magic and if you could see my tack cloth you'd ask me if I even used it ...

(https://up.picr.de/32857815ra.jpg)

Progress and already masked

(https://up.picr.de/32857817ed.jpg)

There's one task were the old "Brilliant 2" abrasive outperforms Granat Net - when sanding over a wet/ strongly weathered spot and when "cleaning" residue from roots of ivy ...

(https://up.picr.de/32857818fg.jpg)

I'm happy to report that everything got sanded, except for a few small spots I will take care of tomorrow. Everything is masked so I'm well within my schedule.

This screamed for a cigar break along with some adult beverage, I shouldn't, but sometimes I can't resist.

(https://up.picr.de/32857800zv.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on June 02, 2018, 04:22 AM
The steel staging brings me o another quick story from out of the past.

I had just started my mason contracting biz and had landed a job doing fireplaces, chimneys, foundations (concrete block) footings and clear slabs for a local developer of somewhat shady reputation. Luckily, I knew about him long before he knew about me and I eventually left him with no more loss to me than $165. His carpentry crew were old country Swedes.  I have many stories of my experiences with the builder and some about working with that Swedish crew. Let it be known that i have nothing against Swedes, in fact my best friend from college days was a "first generation" Swede. It is just that I worked with that crazy crew for nearly a year and. for the most part, I thoroughly enjoyed their antics. BUT, i could not understand a word they said.

As mentioned, that was my first really big job that got me off and running. For running up my first chimney for the development, I was continuing to use 2x lumber for framing and ledgers with 1x's for bracing. I did not figure that newly developed steel staging was within my budget. On the side of the house where I was doing the chimney, I had already put in footings and foundation for a garage. The carpenters, I thought, would not be starting the garage framing for a couple of days. My chimney would be completed by then. As I neared the top and completion, I felt a slight, unfamiliar, jolt to my scaffolding. I looked down to see, surprisingly, one of the carpenters  sawing off one of my scaffolding ledgers and a couple of lower braces.  I yelled, but he could not understand any better than I could understand him.  Right then, I decided to invest in steel.

I scrambled down my ladder, left directions for my helper to tear down our staging and headed for Bridgeport and my equipment supplier. By the time I returned a few hours later, the carpenters had the garage all framed with roof sheathing in place. I did have to reframe my scaffolding to finish that chimney above the garage, but for ever after, I used steel where ever possible.
Tinker
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on June 02, 2018, 04:39 AM
Hi Oliver,

Nice work! Congratulations on finishing in time.
Love the pictures, as always.
But the cigar break is the best of the bunch! Great shot! And earned!

Thanks for the tip regarding Brilliant 2 for Ivy removal. Might come in handy sooner than I‘m hoping. ;)

Let us know how you get along painting today.
Looks like less thunder and lightning today, at least over here in Hessen...
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Peter_C on June 02, 2018, 12:14 PM
Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA. Shutters are very common in France. My French wife says it is a look, and I say they have a high crime rate. In the USA in high crime areas they do use bars on the windows, which are also common in France's bigger cities. I have yet to visit England, but it is near the top of the list :)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RustE on June 02, 2018, 12:33 PM
Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA.
 ...

I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on June 02, 2018, 06:26 PM
Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA.
 ...

I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.
. Anti Zombie Shutters..... [wink]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 03, 2018, 05:46 PM
Hi Oliver,

Nice work! Congratulations on finishing in time.
Love the pictures, as always.
But the cigar break is the best of the bunch! Great shot! And earned!

Thanks for the tip regarding Brilliant 2 for Ivy removal. Might come in handy sooner than I‘m hoping. ;)

Let us know how you get along painting today.
Looks like less thunder and lightning today, at least over here in Hessen...

Hi!

Thank you! :) Will start working on the update in the next couple of minutes.

Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA. Shutters are very common in France. My French wife says it is a look, and I say they have a high crime rate. In the USA in high crime areas they do use bars on the windows, which are also common in France's bigger cities. I have yet to visit England, but it is near the top of the list :)

Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA.
 ...

I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.


Curious what the aluminum roll up shutter is for? Security?

We don't have things like that here in the USA.
 ...

I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.
. Anti Zombie Shutters..... [wink]

Hi!

Where do I start? Maybe here: originally the house had wooden roll up shutters for both large window/door fronts facing the backyard. These were installed in all houses when they were built, back then the part of town started to grow significantly but could still be considered rural. The houses across the backyard, our backyards "meet" - are even older and those have cast iron bars in front of the windows because back in the day their backyards were pretty much "endless" - nothing but fields.

At some point we wanted to electrify these roll up shutters and were told there's no way to do this with the old wooden shutters, they are simply to heavy. (Rolling these up at least twice a day was a nice workout ...) So we went with new shutters.

Obviously they are part of our security concept, there's no denying. However our town is definitely not a high crime area.

But we're in a vulnerable spot - some banks whose ATM's were blown up and a lot of owners of new campers/mobile homes/caravans had to learn the hard way. Let's just say you're on the highway faster than the police can dispatch an officer to any given location, unless they're patrolling the area. Once you're on the highway, it's merely an hour before you reach the Netherlands and that's possible in two different directions  - at night, with a highly motorized vehicle there's nothing going to stop you. I think it's the same in the US now a days, police won't go into a high speed pursuit unless absolutely necessary to not endanger civilians/themselves?

At least here, no one is going to try to keep up with Audi S-Lines, Mercedes AMG or BMW M series that they never really saw (if at all), are stolen/ or at least have stolen plates and have anything between a 5 to 15 minutes head start and are pretty much exchanged before they cross the border ... For money/ stolen goods at least.

So yeah, we try to keep ourselves and our belongings safe. There's also no denying that while we don't see increasing numbers of crimes, actually they are going down, the crimes itself tend to get more violent with more "unnecessary" physical assaults while they rob you or create a lot of collateral damage (house burned down...) and stuff like that. There have been a couple of disturbing crimes within an area/radius closer than my "comfort zone" - so we step up our game.

But like I said, the shutters have been there forever, we just modernized them. They are primarily used as shades in the summer, they take some load of the AC - and during winter they help save some energy while heating.

The "end game" will be new windows for this house - highly likely with new shutters ;) - there's no way around it. No matter how our life continues, or if we even will be the ones replacing them. New windows is a must in future.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 04, 2018, 08:28 AM
Advertisement.

Hi!

Here's the update. :)

Saturday started like Friday had finished - a couple of spots still needed to be sanded. Since I couldn't get there with the scaffolding, I had to use a ladder - the shoulder strap for the CTL-SYS comes in very handy here.

(https://up.picr.de/32882023xs.jpg)

Then I needed to prepare everything for painting/varnishing. Laying out floor protection.

(https://up.picr.de/32882024zf.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882026mt.jpg)

Since the scaffolding is a rental, and I didn't want to spent hours cleaning it, I wrapped it. If you're wondering about the ladder, it's easier to get on that way with paint/varnish and all...

(https://up.picr.de/32882048lc.jpg)

Painting/varnishing.

(https://up.picr.de/32882027at.jpg)

Some closeups to show that FrogTape (masking tape) is a real helper, even on structured surfaces.

(https://up.picr.de/32882028sm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882029io.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882030ku.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882031lz.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882033af.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882034oo.jpg)

While I let the paint/varnish dry, I shortened that black cable and installed a piece of conduit - much cleaner looking now.

(https://up.picr.de/32882035gj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882036im.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882037ew.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882049tg.jpg)

Then I painted the white stripe and removed the floor protection - by now it was about 9 PM and I called it a day.

(https://up.picr.de/32882038jb.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32882039tu.jpg)

Sunday was all about small installs for my party & BBQ lighting.

Drill/Driver Dream-Team.
(https://up.picr.de/32882040aw.jpg)

Reaming plastic conduit with my Klein Tools VDE cable shears.
(https://up.picr.de/32882041af.jpg)

If it looks stupid but works, it isn't stupid.
(https://up.picr.de/32882042qk.jpg)

CXS doing what it's supposed to do.
(https://up.picr.de/32882043bj.jpg)

The CXS loves tight spots!
(https://up.picr.de/32882045tj.jpg)

The aftermath.
(https://up.picr.de/32882046hc.jpg)

Shutter cleaned, floor scrubbed - finished.
(https://up.picr.de/32882047bo.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 04, 2018, 09:43 AM
I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.

My folks owned a condo in Florida that was on the ocean. Everyone referred to those shutters, as hurricane shutters, and every unit in their condo building was required to have working hurricane shutters. Most owners chose shutters that were operated by electric motors over manually operated units. The only problem was that with all of that salt air exposure 24/7, the motors only lasted 3-4 years and each motor was $400.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on June 04, 2018, 10:35 AM
I’ve seen shutters like that in Ohio for securing businesses after hours. Usually in downtown areas that are not the most pleasant after dark.

Also seen similar storm shutters on the east coast.

My folks owned a condo in Florida that was on the ocean. Everyone referred to those shutters, as hurricane shutters, and every unit in their condo building was required to have working hurricane shutters. Most owners chose shutters that were operated by electric motors over manually operated units. The only problem was that with all of that salt air exposure 24/7, the motors only lasted 3-4 years and each motor was $400.
   I can 2nd that.  We stayed at a friends Vacation Home in St. Augustine FL in 1994, those motorized shutters were common even back then..  Funny to watch the up and down procession of Shutters on multiple houses through the day....
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 07, 2018, 10:13 AM
 [blink] [eek] [scared]

(https://up.picr.de/32909038na.jpg)

 [eek] [eek] [eek]  [sad] [crying] [mad]

(https://up.picr.de/32909039lz.jpg)

There's always something to do ...  [smile] [big grin] [wink]

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on June 07, 2018, 11:14 AM
[blink] [eek] [scared]

(https://up.picr.de/32909038na.jpg)

 [eek] [eek] [eek]  [sad] [crying] [mad]

(https://up.picr.de/32909039lz.jpg)

There's always something to do ...  [smile] [big grin] [wink]

Kind regards,
Oliver
   As one 'might' hear in the US about this, "Well, right there's your trouble".... [wink]   [poke]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 07, 2018, 01:14 PM
Yeah, I've heard that before @leakyroof  [big grin]

--

So, a new plug was easily installed.

(https://up.picr.de/32910569ue.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32910570il.jpg)

--

Also today, part of the new party lighting (LED tube light) was delivered, and I placed it in it's brackets.

(This was also Murphy at it's best: I took down the old tube light on Thursday. I cleaned it with a moist rag and put it away. (It was fully working ...) Sunday I placed it in the newly installed brackets, turn it on and about half of the light tube didn't light up anymore ...

So I ordered a new one.

(https://up.picr.de/32910568ps.jpg)

And a couple of details from the BBQ light. I think I placed that conduit quite good, you can only see it from very few angles at all.

(https://up.picr.de/32910565ii.jpg)

(Yes, I need to ream that last part one more time.)

(https://up.picr.de/32910566oy.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32910567pe.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 07, 2018, 04:08 PM
And some shots at dusk.

(https://up.picr.de/32912512wz.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32912513yw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32912514ib.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: mike_aa on June 07, 2018, 09:08 PM
Oliver, Looks like party time!  It all came together very nicely and as usual, you did a great job.

Thank you for sharing your photos and progress.  I've been lurking around here for some time and I really enjoy this thread!

Mike A.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 08, 2018, 06:10 AM
Hi!

Thanks Mike!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 08, 2018, 10:29 PM
Hey Oliver, this is my call to party...neon signs hung outside. They’re colorful, they’re obvious, they’re mesmerizing.  [cool] [cool] [cool]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 09, 2018, 02:40 PM
Those are very cool @Cheese , Thank you for sharing them!

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 09, 2018, 03:08 PM
Advertisement.

Hi!

Sadly our local market for agricultural products (tools, chemicals, animal stuff, lifestyle products ... not a farmers market) is closing it's doors in a week or two and they're having a sale right now. So I went there yesterday to pick up some stuff. When I came across a shelve of Peugeot Saveurs Moulins (mills) I couldn't resist the discount and bought two more. I love these, and now we have an additional set to use by the BBQ.

(https://up.picr.de/32928586pc.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32928585md.jpg)

The night came and I relaxed with a cigar on the patio. Over the course of the day the 2nd party string light had arrived.

(https://up.picr.de/32928587pj.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32928588sf.jpg)

Then came today. A couple of hours ago, my better half said to me: "Honey, can you please exchange the broken light assembly/bulb in the basement storage room?" My reply was: "Yes, sweetheart." And downstairs I went.

Switched of the lights, waited a minute or two and got the broken light assembly/bulb out. When I touched the cable it felt still quite hot not just warm.

Of course I didn't have a new light assembly/bulb, when I looked for it - so I had to hurry a little to get to "home depot" in time, to get some new light assemblies/bulbs, before they close.

Back home I took some temperature measurements. ( ° C )

Lights switched on, no bulb in the one that was broken.

(https://up.picr.de/32928589az.jpg)

Lights switched on, taking temperature measurements on one that wasn't broken.

(https://up.picr.de/32928590wl.jpg)

Lights switched on, new light assembly/bulb inserted.

(https://up.picr.de/32928592fi.jpg)

Verifying results.

(https://up.picr.de/32928593am.jpg)

Not quite sure what to make of this yet. All of the cables stay at or around 30° C only the first one gets easily over 60° C over the same amount of time. Not normal.

It's not really a super high risk right now, the light assemblies/ bulbs heat up to 110° C but I'd like to find out what's up with that one cable. (They are all the same and were scope of supply.)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 09, 2018, 10:40 PM
Advertisement.

Always two there are, no more, no less.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b7SjW0vFCiI

And this holds true not just for Sith Lords, but also for surprises.  [scared] [blink] [eek]

So it's 4 AM here in a couple of minutes, and by the time I will have finished this post it will be well after 4 AM.

The weather forecast was heavy rain, storms, thunder & lightning for parts of the area where I live starting around afternoon.

Afternoon came, evening came - nothing, except for more and more clouds. Then, almost midnight heavy rain set it, strong winds and yes - thunder & lightning. This got heavier by the minute and when I figured I should take a look around, I found this in the basement.

(https://up.picr.de/32930724jz.jpg)

Not bad at all, the check valve in that drain did it's job.

I turn around to find this:

(https://up.picr.de/32930725wm.jpg)

Also not too bad at that point. I looked around but I couldn't make out where the water was coming in from - as it was still rising. I checked the window in that room, but that was dry same for the oil tanks basin/reservoir that is directly beneath the window. The water kept rising.

(https://up.picr.de/32930770ti.jpg)

So first thing I did was to de-energize all circuits that could be affected if the water continued to rise. I checked that directly in the breaker box with a designated and wired voltage tester (Fluke T150 VDE). Only then I did go into the water and as a second safety measure I used my Klein Tools NCVT-3 (Non contact voltage tester) on visible/reachable wires, simply to re-assure myself that there was indeed no voltage present and everything de-energized.

(https://up.picr.de/32930726rf.jpg)

Gladly the basement is actually very tidy and there's almost nothing that can be destroyed by water (unless it would be really flooded) so I was pretty calm and easy going.

I wanted to know where the water was coming from, so I went to look for the culprit. I determined the water came from under the heating, that made me look behind it - there is another, a second if you want, drain. Water was coming out right there, next to the wall, there was also some debris which indicates something must have burst.

(https://up.picr.de/32930729ye.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32930730ag.jpg)

At some point the pressure on the drain/sewer was reduced, probably by the local pump station, the check valve opened up again and the rest of water went through the drain. Obviously until then, we had to get the majority of the water out manually.

We're very, very thankful it was just about 3 inches in two rooms and at the worst spots. Also that it was just "clean" rain water that "came up" ... We got away really, really easy here and fell pretty lucky. There will be some more cleaning up to do tomorrow, but that's all.

Then, next week I have a plumber/HVAC specialist over anyway, so he can check that drain - quite possible that this will be something for our insurance company to take care of. And then again, I want the rest checked, too.

While we were busy, we heard the cities alarm horns, which means they had to call in every available Firefighter/EMS specialist. So I pray for those that must have been hit a lot harder, we will know for sure sometime tomorrow or Monday. I did see firetrucks at the far end of the street so there's no real question here.

When we were finished, we looked around the neighborhood if we could assist/help our neighbors, gladly all of us had the same kind of luck, just a couple of inches of "clean" rain water that was back out rather quick. Then again, everyone was busy ...

One neighbor told us the garages across the street (those are medium large underground garages/car parks) were flooded, so I went to ours but it was pretty much the same picture. Just a bit of water... No attention needed, it will dry on it's own.

Tomorrow I will be writing to our insurance company as kind of heads up, and see what the plumber/HVAC specialist has to say next week.

EDC shot  [big grin] It's surprises like this that make me happy I'm carrying quality tools/gear I can rely on everytime - and when I'm not carrying them, at least have them very close at hand.

(https://up.picr.de/32930728cs.jpg)

And this one was lit up by lightning.

(https://up.picr.de/32930727xl.jpg)



I will go and relax a little more now, before I start on cleaning these two rooms thoroughly in a couple of hours.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on June 12, 2018, 10:31 AM

Lights switched on, no bulb in the one that was broken...60.3° C

Lights switched on, taking temperature measurements on one that wasn't broken...37° C

Lights switched on, new light assembly/bulb inserted...61.4° C

Not quite sure what to make of this yet. All of the cables stay at or around 30° C only the first one gets easily over 60° C over the same amount of time. Not normal.


Hey Oliver, it seems that maybe there may be a hot water line or a steam line running close to the proximity of the recessed light in question. I'd think Klein may produce an IR thermal imager that you could borrow to validate the issue.

I have a Flir One Pro that attaches to an iPhone that I've used to find HVAC runs that are hidden in the walls.

https://www.flir.com/products/flir-one-pro/

This 1st photo is a dining room wall with 2 pictures hanging side-by-side and the purple band behind the pictures is the hidden HVAC run with the AC on.

[attachimg=1]

The 2nd photo is some ductwork on the furnace and the blue areas show where there are cold air leaks, again with the AC on.

[attachimg=2]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 12, 2018, 12:53 PM
Hi Cheese,

thanks! Yeah, I was thinking of thermal imaging, I will see - for now this electrical problem is postponed, as taking care of the waste water leak is far more important. I have quite a couple of appointments over the next few days - and additionally I had to pay the dentist an unplanned visit today. Let's see where this goes. A plumber will be here tomorrow to take a first look, then I know more.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 15, 2018, 04:52 PM
Advertisement. (Because of the Klein Tools hat ....)

A dear friend sent me a short message today, basically last minute, that DeWalt was showing their 54Volt FlexVolt tools at a location very close to me, since I had a pretty tight schedule today I only managed to squeeze in a last minute visit shortly before they were packing up everything. They were still kind enough to let me make a cut with their new Hybrid-Technology, cordless 54Volt FlexVolt miter saw and I got to say, this thing is a beast. Obviously one straight cut isn't enough to say anything (at all) else. But I really liked it from the get go and it has power.

So here's a pic - sorry not much more. If I had known beforehand, I would have gone there early and try more/different tools and especially a little more in depth.

(https://up.picr.de/32981950jz.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 16, 2018, 05:14 PM
Advertisement (because of visible Klein Tools ....)

So I was a little hesitant to open this, but my inspection and planning had to go on. Luckily, no breach, no water.

(https://up.picr.de/32991247ts.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/32984984ni.jpg)

I had a pro over on Friday to discuss a couple of options - depending on what the insurance company wants to do as a next step. For Monday, insurance company hired a technician to take some measurements (humidity level) and apparently also to inspect the damage itself and give feedback to the insurance company. I googled the company my insurance company hired, and I'm not convinced yet, that they will do anything else besides the measuring and setting up dehumidifiers/ construction dryers. But we'll see. I'm actually surprised it only took them a week for the appointment to take place, given the damages in other parts of town and neighboring town.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 18, 2018, 11:46 AM
Hi!

Well, the technician was here, measured humidity, no dehumidifiers needed. (As I expected)

Technician not equipped and not qualified for further inspection of the actual damage to the sewer. (As I expected)

Technician wrote a report: No dehumidifiers needed. Customer wants damage/sewer inspection. (As I expected)

Technician will type this into their computer system so my insurance company will get notified about this tomorrow. He has no idea how this will proceed from here. If I don't hear from them by Thursday, he said I should call the insurance company myself.

So, I guess it's more waiting then. And while I wait, I go shopping for some tools so time passes a little quicker.

I also already bought some "quick 5 min."-concrete mix and sealant - just in case we get another weather warning in the meantime.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 22, 2018, 02:45 PM
So Tuesday my pro will come by for final discussion - then the insurance company will have to decided if they accept the proposal/offer.

And I found some more work...

(https://up.picr.de/33027758wa.jpg)

Oh, and last week, I was "featured" on Festool's Instagram-Stories - still baffled. Thank you so much Festool! :)

(https://up.picr.de/32964561lo.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on June 22, 2018, 03:33 PM
LOL!  I'm thinking they saw the picture of you taking a cigar break and that prompted the caption "Black tie DIY-er".
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 22, 2018, 03:36 PM
That's my Instagram handle  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

https://www.instagram.com/the_black_tie_diyer/

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on June 22, 2018, 09:33 PM
That's my Instagram handle  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

https://www.instagram.com/the_black_tie_diyer/

Kind regards,
Oliver
. Not a shabby handle to go by.... [thumbs up]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 27, 2018, 01:15 AM
Well, Tuesday (yesterday) came and went by, my pro didn't show up. Supposedly because his sidekick didn't show up. Obviously I learned about this when I called him to remind him of our appointment, after he was running an hour late already anyway ... Called me back, apologized, said he doesn't need the appointment on location, he will write the offer based on his last visit ...

This is exactly what happens when year after year 15000 to 20000 apprentices (over all trades) are missing. And it's only getting worse, since a lot of retiring company owners don't have suitable successors (for all sorts of reasons).

Literally right now tradespeople can choose what jobs they take on and how much they charge for it. No show? No problem, who is the customer going to call/ask anyway - everyone is busy as heck.

It's worse for those customers who are new customers, some of them wait for months for appointments and the actual work to start ...

Let's see where this goes - Meanwhile I do some more tool shopping, and I will see if I can find some information on how to fix this professionally myself if necessary.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on June 30, 2018, 02:43 AM
Good news: I got the offer and monetarily speaking, it's a lot less than what I thought it would be. (So this should be a "no-brainer" for the insurance company.)

Monday a HVAC pro will come by as the heating has to be broken down and removed for the sewer repair - and put back together after ... So we need a second offer for this work.

And then hopefully the insurance company agrees rather quick, so this can be done in a timely manner.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 04, 2018, 11:33 AM
Hi,

I know this is getting boring, I apologize!

Monday the HVAC-pro came by as promised, I'm waiting for his quote/offer to arrive.

This is going to be my last post on this "issue"/topic - as it will be, all in all, literally weeks before the actual work is going to start. I will post about it when the work has started.

Until then, I have a couple of things on my list - so I will continue with those in the meantime.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: grobkuschelig on July 04, 2018, 04:44 PM
Hi Oliver,

Best of luck in finally getting the offers in!

Just know that it is not half as annoying for us as it must be for you. [emoji6]

Can’t wait for your next posts!
Uli
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: jobsworth on July 04, 2018, 06:36 PM
Good luck Oliver. I feel you ur pain, my landscaper was the same way took for ever to get home m to finish the job.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 05, 2018, 07:12 AM
Hi,

Thank you two very much! We'll see, I'm taking this feeling pretty lighthearted, knowing it could have been so much worse ...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 06, 2018, 10:42 AM
Hi,

So I got me an DeWalt offset bit holder - impact rated. Funny enough, right after I bought it a discussion in another forum popped up about the quality and robustness of these in general.

I took this as an opportunity to do a quick demo that I'm also going to show here.

DeWalt Extreme Impact Torsion DT70578T 20° offset bit holder

(http://up.picr.de/33145799cd.jpg)

 <-Open-<->-fixed-<->-locked->

(http://up.picr.de/33145800gd.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33145801ch.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33145802dv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33145803ex.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33150477zw.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33150478hi.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33150479hv.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/33150480at.jpg)

To cut a long story short - this thing is robust. Not that I expected anything less from a bit holder that is impact rated by DeWalt - after all, it's my observation that they have some of the most unforgiving customers when - even highly abused tools and accessories - break. So I expected something that is "bomb proof".

I "hammered" in those seating bolts, and then checked if it could still be used as intended at 20° offset with a tiny Spax screw (T-Star/Torx head) - with those you can even use it single handed without encountering any problems.

If you need to change between offset and straight, it's great that you can simply fix the bit holder without having to push all the way down into locking position - and vice versa.

I bought this because I thought it was nice to have, and only the discussion that came up made me come up with this little demo/test in return.

--

Then finally the last fly screen for the door to the patio/backyard arrived - so I installed that really quick. Love the miniature box cutter the manufacturer supplied...  [eek] [blink] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] (the drill bit is a 2mm drill bit ...)

(https://up.picr.de/33167185mu.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33167187vk.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

 






Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 07, 2018, 03:42 AM
Having worked in every room, re-modeling and modernizing, correcting mistakes and safety issues ... There's really not much left in the house that I haven't looked at over the years...

Well, there is this little junction box where the heating is connected to electricity, I simply never had the need to look into it. Now with the heating getting broken down to be temporarily removed while the foundation is cut open - I did open it.

I guess at some point my curiosity is either my death or financial ruin ...  [eek] [blink] [scared] [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(https://up.picr.de/33171392uz.jpg)

I'm sure it's fine for another week or two. ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2018, 02:28 PM
Advertising (because of visible Klein Tools)

So, here just a couple of snap shots from a couple of days ago when I pulled the last coax wire and tested it. Now it's all said and done. Come November I will connect this on the other end/side.

(https://up.picr.de/33262282tl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33262284qa.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33262285ce.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33262286od.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33262288yl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33262289cs.jpg)

Some fun while BBQ'ing ...

(https://up.picr.de/33262290tm.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on July 17, 2018, 07:00 PM
What does the yellow Klein tool tool do on the end of the coax?  Don't think I've seen one.  Looks like a pass/fail but I'm wondering what it's measuring in terms of signal.

On your electrical find on the heater.... SHOCKING!

When we demoed and remodeled our home 18 years ago, the electrical in two rooms was taped with what we call 3M Scotch tape in the boxes. The kind you use to tape paper together.  So you are probably OK relatively speaking!
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 17, 2018, 07:28 PM
Advertisement

Hi Neil,

The tester is called „VDV512-101 Coax Explorer 2“ It tests for shorts and continuity. Simply put one of the four remotes on one end of the cable/installation and the tester on the other side. It‘s small, leightweight and easy to use - less bulk than the larger VDV testers and also quicker to use - especially when you don‘t need more functions or it‘s just a small installation like mine. If it‘s a bigger installation, the VDV‘s with up to 19 remotes are a better option.

I love these small gadgets, so when I was asked if I wanted to test it, albeit having the VDV501-825 Scout Pro 2 LT, I said yes :)



I know that feeling finding something like that Scotch tape in a junction box. In my case this will be OK for a couple of weeks and then these not permitted screw connectors will be replaced with Wago connectors and the wire that is just running through that box will be removed and placed next to the box in it‘s own conduit. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: SRSemenza on July 17, 2018, 11:01 PM
What's the Klein box on the end of the Systainer?

Seth
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: rvieceli on July 18, 2018, 06:03 AM
@SRSemenza Seth it looks like this wireless speaker.

https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Portable-Klein-Tools-AEPJS1/dp/B01N8TMMK5

Ron
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 18, 2018, 07:10 AM
Advertisement

Hi Seth,

Ron is correct, it's Klein's wireless jobsite speaker. :) I need my daily dose of music and Bloomberg Radio in between  .... ;)

(https://up.picr.de/33266768mh.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33266769rk.jpg)


Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: neilc on July 18, 2018, 10:43 AM
Love the Wago wire connectors. 


By far the easiest to install or update of any I've found, and more space efficient in small boxes than wire nuts in my experience.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 18, 2018, 12:34 PM
Wago rocks. :)

I'm still hoping for them to either switch to Tanos completely or simply offer Systainer in addition to L-Boxx and Mini L-Boxx

https://eshop.wago.com/JPBC/0_5StartPage.jsp;jsessionid=9C4512A97598CA5B8D93E7BB8231758D?supplierAID=887-913&catalogID=WAGO01&zone=7

https://eshop.wago.com/JPBC/0_5StartPage.jsp?supplierAID=887-950&catalogID=WAGO01&zone=7

I guess one can't have everything, but this would be such a relief for my "Systainer-OCD" ;)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on July 19, 2018, 10:18 AM
So, speaking about Wago connectors, here's a good advertisement for them. I'm changing out the luminaries in the yard and going to a different style with glass shades rather than polycarbonate shades.

I installed the old luminaries along with the Wago connectors 11 years ago. They've been exposed to the elements 24/7 for 11 years and they still look like this.  [cool]

I checked the Wagos for any rust or corrosion and found none so...back in they go into the new luminaries to provide another 11 years of service. [big grin]

The 3rd photo is a great example of why you want to tin all outside wiring connections. Compare the tinned ends and the soldered Molex connectors for corrosion, then look at the screwed connectors on the fixture itself.

This corrosion actually started one of the old luminaries on fire this winter because of arcing.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 20, 2018, 02:28 PM
Those really do look spectacular for 11 years of outdoor use, @Cheese ! Not that I expected anything less from Wago - but it's always great to be proven right. :)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 22, 2018, 04:35 PM
Advertisement (Due to visible and used Klein Tools)

So today I got to scratch something of the "Honey do list". My better half informed me she wanted to use one of our canopies soon, of course exactly the one that "I" damaged earlier, by using it in pretty bad weather while doing another "Honey do list"-job.

To my excuse, I did order a spare part right away, but when I found it wouldn't work out of box - I set it aside.

Setting up "shop".

(https://up.picr.de/33308296ov.jpg)

Broken part.

(https://up.picr.de/33308297dc.jpg)

Drilling out rivets.

(https://up.picr.de/33308298gi.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308299zt.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308300es.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308301yw.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308302fo.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308303ge.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308304kj.jpg)

Cutting new joist to length.

(https://up.picr.de/33308305hu.jpg)

Installing new joist. Originally I planned on using rivets, but the ones I had at hand were too short. So I simply used some bolts. Since the spare part beside being too long was also a little bit too thick, I made a small cut to relief stress/tension.

(https://up.picr.de/33308306rp.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308307dn.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308308lg.jpg)

Works!  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

(https://up.picr.de/33308309nm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308310hi.jpg)

Then it was time for BBQ - two really nice Irish Entrecôtes were ready to be put over the coal ...

While waiting for the coal to get ready, we had homemade Tomato soup.

(https://up.picr.de/33308311er.jpg)

And then the fun started!

(https://up.picr.de/33308312ed.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308313mi.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308314cm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33308315ce.jpg)

Irish Entrecôte with homegrown beans from our raised bed.

(https://up.picr.de/33308316he.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
 
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on July 23, 2018, 09:23 AM
I had to look up the Entrecote part-  We'd call it a Ribeye cut of Steak here in the US,- French meaning apparently is that Entrecote is a premium cut of Beef, coming from the Rib area.   The things we learn on the FOG.... [big grin]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on July 23, 2018, 10:54 AM
Yeah, I know, sorry ;) - thing is, my Mom is from Belgium - so I'm more used to the French terms regarding kitchen & cooking ... Sometimes I even use a very hearty mix of terms, originating in different countries [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: leakyroof on July 25, 2018, 11:34 AM
Yeah, I know, sorry ;) - thing is, my Mom is from Belgium - so I'm more used to the French terms regarding kitchen & cooking ... Sometimes I even use a very hearty mix of terms, originating in different countries [scared] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
  Nothing wrong with that, you're enriching our knowledge base all the time, Oliver.... [thumbs up]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Bert Vanderveen on July 25, 2018, 12:19 PM
I had to look up the Entrecote part-  We'd call it a Ribeye cut of Steak here in the US,- French meaning apparently is that Entrecote is a premium cut of Beef, coming from the Rib area.   The things we learn on the FOG.... [big grin]

True, but the French cut these quite a bit thinner than anglo-saxon meat eaters. (Saves a few bucks when cooking for a larger complement — the rib eyes I source from a herd that I have co-invested in are cut in half lengthwise to turn into entrecôtes.)
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 01, 2018, 10:35 AM
Hi,

So here's a little update on the whole "water damage"/ broken sewer issue.

First of all, it's still not being actively worked on.

And personally, I've reached a dead end, for now, too.

So let me start be re-posting a picture.

(https://up.picr.de/32964625st.jpg)

As I have said before, the water came out where the circles are. It's a fairly small hole - a little larger than a 1/2" pipe/hose.

Now I have this cool tool from Snap-On. A BK5600DUAL55 Videoscope. I love it.

(https://up.picr.de/33424925mk.jpg)

I thought I would get a better Idea of what happened and where the damage is located when I use it to look into that hole.

Right in front of the hole.

(https://up.picr.de/33424918uq.jpg)

Going in.

(https://up.picr.de/33424919rc.jpg)

Deeper.

(https://up.picr.de/33424921wb.jpg)

And a little deeper.

(https://up.picr.de/33424923om.jpg)

Honestly, I'm lost at what I'm seeing here. There is a deep cavity, I'm not sure I'm inside the actual sewer/ clay pipe - could be still in the concrete.

So I tried from the other side - I will be forever thankful my plumber put in a piece of pipe with removable cover - but even though the cable is long enough - I can't find this cavity/damage from inside the pipe. And even in total darkness, I can't see the tiniest bit of the camera head's LED shining through when looking at the hole with the videoscope in.

I spare you the pictures, they wouldn't add anything of value anyway.

So this is basically where I am with this.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 17, 2018, 07:17 AM
Hi!

So this morning my pro and his colleague came by, brought a industrial grade inspection camera and we did an extensive inspection inside the/ of the complete sewer (pipe) system. This was quite fun for me, I learned a lot.

(https://up.picr.de/33588238ye.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33588239hq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33588240ep.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33588241eq.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33588242wm.jpg)

Ladies and Gentlemen, please stay tuned. Further down the road I will say more about this, sorry for the cliffhanger - but first I want to know what the insurance company's take is on this and our results/findings ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on August 17, 2018, 12:12 PM
And even in total darkness, I can't see the tiniest bit of the camera head's LED shining through when looking at the hole with the videoscope in.

Hey Oliver, those pictures remind me of the many pieces of galvanized pipe used in water service that I've replaced. There was a piece of 9' pipe that I cut in thirds and I still couldn't see any light through it when I held it up to a 150 watt light bulb. The inside of the pipe was just a solid progression of rust and mineral stalagmites & stalagtites. It was hard to believe that water was even able to flow through those pipes.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 17, 2018, 12:18 PM
Yeah. I can relate to that, ask me how those lead sewer pipes looked when we took them out years ago, while remodeling master bathroom and guest toilette ... ;)

But I think you will probably be as surprised as I was when I found out what really has been/ is going on there actually ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on August 17, 2018, 01:18 PM
Waiting patiently....  But hurry up!   [tongue]

Meanwhile I've been reminded of your household antics recently.  One of my AC units died the other day.  I can't live without AC...really, I think I would shrivel up and die without it.  I found myself loading up a bunch of screwdrivers, pliers, nut drivers, multimeters and what not and heading out back to figure out what's going on.  It looked like one of your scenes from your household projects!  The only difference is, I seem to be identifying one problem at a time and resolving them as I go (blowing a fuse with each incremental test).
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 20, 2018, 11:27 AM
Everywhere I look I see @jobsworth avatar ... Heidi ... And I constantly have to think about Tool Time since it was brought up here, and I've watched the DVD Set I have again ...

So random picture today ... Just because ... TOOL TIME !!!!

(https://up.picr.de/33614383bn.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: jobsworth on August 20, 2018, 11:08 PM
@six-point socket II

heheheh Oliver, I really like the Binford shirt hehehehe
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on August 21, 2018, 01:24 AM
Everywhere I look I see @jobsworth avatar ... Heidi ... And I constantly have to think about Tool Time since it was brought up here, and I've watched the DVD Set I have again ...

So random picture today ... Just because ... TOOL TIME !!!!

(https://up.picr.de/33614383bn.jpg)

Without looking——who was the original Binford Tool girl and what was her name on Tool Time? (she returned for one episode towards the end of the series).

Tom

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 21, 2018, 02:38 AM
Hi Tom,

Lisa - Pamela Anderson

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: tjbnwi on August 21, 2018, 09:08 PM
 [thumbs up] [thumbs up]

Tom
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 07:56 AM
Hi,

I'm happy to announce Snap-On finally named a product after me.  [eek] [blink] [scared] [eek]

(https://up.picr.de/33638897sr.jpg)

 [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] Just kidding, of course ...   [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

On the more serious ;) side: I've been watering the backyard after dusk during the last couple of weeks, and two days ago my sprinkler/nozzle behaved strangely. So I opened it up to find quite a bit of sediments/residue in it's filter.

(https://up.picr.de/33638899jh.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33638898mj.jpg)

I collect rain water for watering the backyard in two large underground tanks/reservoirs, during the drought these were obviously empty, so I guess when the rain came, more sediments than usual got carried from tank/reservoir 1 into tank/reservoir 2 where the pump is connected. Might need to check the pumps filter, too.

And yeah, life is sloooooowww here, currently ;) Not my kind of weather.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on August 23, 2018, 02:13 PM
I collect rain water for watering the backyard in two large underground tanks/reservoirs, during the drought these were obviously empty, so I guess when the rain came, more sediments than usual got carried from tank/reservoir 1 into tank/reservoir 2 where the pump is connected. Might need to check the pumps filter, too.

Awesome that you can capture water and use it!

When will people here get it?  I would love to store rainwater for lawn & garden use, but it's illegal here due to water law.  There is a move afoot to make it legal to store water that falls on roofs in one 55 gallon drum, but otherwise all I can do is direct the rainwater from my downspouts to the places I want it most.

The downstream states (California, Kansas, are you listening?) are so jealous of the water rights that they have from water that falls in Colorado that we aren't allowed to capture water that falls from the sky, even for residential use where the alternative is using treated water from the public utility.  Silly.

I would gladly clean out a hose filter occasionally for the privilege of catching the water and using it :).
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 02:31 PM
That sounds interesting Harvey. So basically your rain water from the roof, spreads "freely" around the property - it's just an opening on the downspouts?

Here, most downspouts are connected to the public utilities sewerage/sewer system. We pay for this: Every bit of fresh water I take from the public utility I pay for. And for every drop I take out, I pay an additional waste water fee. I also pay a waste water fee for rain water from my roof. (This is calculated based on roof size). With me setting up the reservoirs, I only pay waste water for half of the roof's size. So it even saves me money to do this. Tapping water costs next to nothing, but the waste water fee ....

There was a time where this was frowned upon because people believed this would hurt the sewerage/sewer system by being to dry then - if everyone did it. But that rumor was gone after some time.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 02:51 PM
Here are 3 pictures I'm willing to share on the "setup". :)

(https://up.picr.de/33642168xm.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33642170wv.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33642171ey.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 03:06 PM
So, today a family member asked me if I could look after something in her car, the AC's outlet selector (head/feet/windshield ...) was stuck.

I said I can take a look ... I sat down, tried it - stuck. Since this car still uses a manual selector (bowden cable) and I'm not an expert I popped open the hood, to see if I could get access with my inspection camera. While looking for access I found a loose bolt that had nothing to do with the problem itself, but I guess it's better when properly tightened.

(https://up.picr.de/33642255zl.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33642257br.jpg)


Obviously I had no chance to access anything from there. So, I just closed the hood, and tried one of the outlets. Obviously that still doesn't allow you to see the actual mechanic behind the dashboard ... But I tried.

I got the inspection camera back out. Tried the selector, and it worked flawless ...

I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

I still had to reassure the family member that the selector was really stuck on my first try ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Michael Kellough on August 23, 2018, 04:33 PM
@HarveyWildes that’s a crazy water policy! Here in NYC they had a limited supply program giving away rain collection barrels for citizens to use. The idea was to reduce the load on the storm drains, which when overloaded during a heavy downpour discharge into the bays.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on August 23, 2018, 04:37 PM
My Brother in law in Germany  (departed last fall) captured his roof water and saved it for his gardens. His vegetable garden was nearly a half mil from his house. During dry weather, every day he would back pack water to that garden. At the base of the mountain close by, he captured water from his tiny cabin roof (The  Vacation House) and would walk to that plot in the evening to water his fruit trees. He and his wife, my wife's sister, would can the vegetables not used in the growing season. The fruit from his trees made the best refreshments all winter long. Schnapps, Brandy, Wine. Many a cold nite I spent with him as we argued good naturally over many glasses of the results from all that watering.
Tinker
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Tinker on August 23, 2018, 04:52 PM
quote>>>I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose<<<quote

A few years ago, like nearly, well, let's just say "well before I was 39" I was helping out at a service station on days when I was short of work. One of the highschool kids that was pumping  gas, made a big mistook. A Renault came to the pump wanting gasoline. In those days, Renault had a strange set up under the hood. The gas filler and the coolant filler were side by side in front of the engine. The kid was not familiar with the setup and put gasoline into the coolant filler. The unsuspecting driver got only about three or four miles up the road when "poof!". The car was totaled. Nobody hurt, luckily.
Tinker
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on August 23, 2018, 05:02 PM
@HarveyWildes that’s a crazy water policy! Here in NYC they had a limited supply program giving away rain collection barrels for citizens to use. The idea was to reduce the load on the storm drains, which when overloaded during a heavy downpour discharge into the bays.

Yeah - it's a result of the fact that we are semi-arid (~ 14" of precip a year) and the way that water was contractually distributed in the west back when the original distributions were negotiated.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: HarveyWildes on August 23, 2018, 05:03 PM
Here are 3 pictures I'm willing to share on the "setup". :)

Nice - maybe one day here...
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 05:07 PM
quote>>>I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose<<<quote

A few years ago, like nearly, well, let's just say "well before I was 39" I was helping out at a service station on days when I was short of work. One of the highschool kids that was pumping  gas, made a big mistook. A Renault came to the pump wanting gasoline. In those days, Renault had a strange set up under the hood. The gas filler and the coolant filler were side by side in front of the engine. The kid was not familiar with the setup and put gasoline into the coolant filler. The unsuspecting driver got only about three or four miles up the road when "poof!". The car was totaled. Nobody hurt, luckily.
Tinker

Hi Wayne,

This sounded so familiar, I have heard a similar stories about a little more recent "Smarts"

https://carbuzz.com/news/smart-fortwo-bursts-into-flames-after-driver-pours-gasoline-into-wrong-hole

Crazy to think about this can happen.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on August 23, 2018, 05:37 PM
Oliver, I'm curious, do you know why they put the runoff from your roof into the sewer system?  Is there not enough undeveloped soil around to absorb the run off from the roofs?  Is this very specific to your town or geography?  Over here it's verboten to dump any kind of runoff from your roof or sump pumps into the sewer lines.  The underlying theory is the sewer water has to be treated and processed first and the runoff water can bypass the treatment and go back into the ground, reservoir, lake, etc.
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 23, 2018, 06:20 PM
Hi Raj,

I'm not an expert, but I doubt there is enough undeveloped soil around to absorb all that water. There are places that certainly can/could do it, but I dare to say that in most places the run off from the roofs is connected to the sewer system. There is so much concrete, asphalt/tarmac and buildings everywhere ...

I tried to look up some numbers, what seems to be fact for 2010 is that: 78.1 million people in Germany were connected to the public sewer system leading waste water to treatment plants/sewage plants. At the same time there were 81.8 million people living in Germany. Of course that doesn't mean that all of the 78.1 million people live in places that lead run off water into the sewer system, but again, I dare to say it would be the majority - and especially in and around all types of cities.

There was a time when people argued about wether to mix rain water with waste water in the sewer system or not. So some places still have two different sewer systems. One for rain water, one for waste water. But todays consensus is that most rain water, once it hit the streets, roofs ... is polluted and should be treated as well as/ like waste water. Originally the idea was - like you say - that rain water didn't need any treatment.

Personally I think using rain water for watering the backyard was a good choice, as was putting in these underground reservoirs. If you'd ask me today, I'd still do it different though. More accessible, more repairable more maintenance friendly.

Our situation is even a little more "painful" because the connections for both downspouts are lead back "into the house" and connected behind the the official hand over point. No one would do that in todays world, totally crazy to bring water from the outside back inside and leading it outside again. But that's how it was done back then.

But generally installing the reservoirs lead to less pressure on the sewer system which certainly saved us and others from flooded basements over time. But then again, when it's as bad as it was 2 months ago, all bets are off.

I guess, you and also others will be surprised when I document the repair of what was the real issue two months ago and where the water came from.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: RKA on August 23, 2018, 07:14 PM
Interesting.  Yeah, with all the concrete and nowhere else to put the water, it has to be managed somehow.  But excessive rains and your sewer line don’t sound like a good combo.  If the sewer line can’t accomodate the flow due to blockage or insufficient capacity, that water will find another path, otherwise known as your basement.  [mad]
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: six-point socket II on August 26, 2018, 05:16 PM
Hi,

About every two years I install a new, flexible side cover to the patio's roofing. Today was the day.

Back in the day I wanted to use the same quality-material that was used for the roof, while cutting it to spec. isn't a problem - there are no fixtures/hardware readily available to mount these horizontally. So I decided to go with a milky plastic foil, but that of course only lasts two winters before it needs replacing.

(http://up.picr.de/29799263tz.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799264wf.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799268ho.jpg)

(http://up.picr.de/29799274th.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver

Hi,

So this time it only lasted 13 months, no wonder with the heavy rain and storm 2 months ago. I went looking for greenhouse foil as suggested by @Peter Halle and @Cheese 13 months ago, but I didn't really like the look of what I've found locally - mostly also with webbing inside. So I went with an extremely strong, high-quality clear foil - let's see how that goes. I also changed the support a bit. The clear-foil was also chosen because the tree is an apricot tree - we had some delicious fruits - and I want them to get as much sun as possible.

(https://up.picr.de/33668991kg.jpg)

(https://up.picr.de/33668992zx.jpg)

(Old set-up, pre storm, apricot tree with fruits ...)
(https://up.picr.de/33669044as.jpg)

Kind regards,
Oliver
Title: Re: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.
Post by: Cheese on August 26, 2018, 05:48 PM
Hey Oliver, FWIW...you'll probably have to purchase the greenhouse liner over the internet. I tried to find some locally and it never came to fruition. I just pulled up my old receipt and I installed the poly in October of 2011. I also expect it to make it through this winter and hold out until spring. So come spring, it will have lasted 8 winters.  [big grin] [cool] [big grin]