Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 66720 times)

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Offline Tinker

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When I was a kid, that must have been, oh, 10 years ago or maybe a little longer, I would put my glasses over the steam kettle spout to clean them after coming in from the cold. The last time I tried doing that, the steel frames expanded, the lense fell out onto the hot stove lid and shattered into many splinters. That was in the days before safety lenses were common.  Maybe they weren't invented yet, so there were a few splinters to cleanup. Maybe the glass broke first and then fell out of the frame.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

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Offline six-point socket II

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Quite possible if the glass was really cold and then heated by the steam.

--

So I found a way to upload that small video about the new ceiling light:

https://streamable.com/w0h4i

The light is called "Sidney" manufactured in China for a German company called "Näve Leuchten".

It's a 5500 Lumen ceiling light that can change color temperature between 6000 and 2700k via remote. It features quite a couple of double-LED stripes - and each has a set of cold white and warm white LED which - depending on your choice of color temperature - either work simultaneously or only the corresponding cold white/warm white.

You can also dim the light and switch between day and night mode. The light will remember the last setting before it was switched off - it will also return to the last used setting when it is switched back from night to day mode.



All this is done via a small remote. Quite cool.




Offline HarveyWildes

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...
And the Wallpaper. Designed by Barbara Becker (Yes, tennis player Boris Becker's ex-wife) manufactured by a German company. Liked it and compared to all the other stuff they sell in our equivalent of "Home Depot" it's really "golden". Good to work with, hangs great ...
...
Kind regards,
Oliver

And looks very nice - good job.

Offline six-point socket II

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Thank you Harvey!

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

More progress today. :)

The plumber finally came to install the new radiator/heating element. This took a little longer than initially expected but I'm happy it is done now.

Old radiator/ heating element in place.


First support/brace removed.


One is still standing.


Installation materials for extending pipes and connecting the radiator/ heating element.


Knipex & Wera - what could go wrong?


Close up of the Knipex.


Old pipe that needed an extension with new extension fitted.


Old pipe that needs shortening.


Taps and dies.


Die powered by a Knipex. [eek] [blink] [scared]    [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]


Old pipe with new threads.


Cutting old pipe to new length.


First parts fitted.


A


B


Parts fitted to radiator/ heating element. A


B


After this was done it was temporarily installed to make sure the two connections line up. Then it was put aside, the plumber went to another client and I hung the remaining wallpaper - which I hadn't done because it might have gotten dirty otherwise. So here's a picture of the new supports (which are basically rails) to/in which the radiator is hung into. When the radiator hangs it can be moved left and right - this is very neat for installation purposes obviously, as you can prepare everything and just have to line it up after that and fasten two connections.


Radiator installed and connected.


Finished, including windowsill.


This took about 3 1/2 hrs. 3 hrs to get to where I was able to hang the remaining wallpaper and 1/2 hrs to hang the radiator and install the windowsill.

After that I scrubed the floor and laid carpet. Just one picture for now, where I'm using Festool's Granat sponge abrasive to clean my hand sawn miter cuts and break the edges a little. I always keep one of these with my tools, they are very handy and they prevent rounding off edges pretty nicely. I like these!



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

Saturday and Sunday were all about setting up furniture and other "minor" stuff.

I love my CXS and the small Bosch for this type of work! It's an extra treat being able to hang the CXS from a leg pocket when working in a seated position - so comfortable!





Today we started to move the stuff back in, but of course there had to be some sort of catch...

I cannot, for the life of me, understand why cabinet manufacturers will only drill a handful of holes instead of drilling a proper (complete for the given height) system 32 hole line - especially when it's invisible anyway like in this case.

And if they must only drill a handful of holes, why don't they abide by some typical shelf heights (think lever arch files and such...)

But then again, on the other hand it's the perfect situation to get the tools back out, especially my trusty BTA HW D 5 CE (492522) 5 mm carbide drill bit with depth stop. I have done this countless times and it still amazes me how easy it is to manually add holes to any system 32 hole line with this drill bit. I also love how clean the holes are when drilled at 3800 RPM with the PDC. I use a very thin square or ruler to precisely mark/layout the new holes and then just drill away. Works perfectly.



I never get tired of taking pictures of this beast. ...



And the amazing, the one and only, 5 mm carbide drill bit with depth stop. Love this thing.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Online grobkuschelig

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Oliver! Stop pushing me to buy more stuff with your fine pictures! [emoji51][emoji41]

...I recently added the 3.5mm with counter sink. I really like it so far, but have not used it much.

I will be cannibalizing my CXS charger soon to enable me to fit the CXS in a SYS-1 with DF to store some more Centrotec accessories with the tool. Maybe I’ll fill up the PDC SYS with the 5mm on that go..

Nice pics, as always!

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

Thank you very much!

--

Depending on how many drill bits you already have, think about getting the Installer's kit (Montagepaket SYS 1 CE-SORT 497628) instead of buying "singles".

Depending on what I do, I either have the SYS 1 CE-SORT connected to my CXS- or PDC-Systainer - or I take all three. This also ensures that you have (rather) drill specific bits and pieces with the corresponding drill at all times and the Installer's kit on a need basis.

Literally it's what saved my butt more than once during projects, because everything is in one place and not scattered over different Systainers.

This way I know when I grab my PDC/CXS it comes with everything to serve it's main purpose/ core functions and when I see the slightest chance that I might run into the need for more/ different bits, I just connect the kit.

Last but not least, you save a ton of money in the long run by getting the kit. I did the math a couple of years ago when I bought it and back then it was (MSRP's compared) already about 150,- to 200,- Euro cheaper than buying "singles". Price in the discount I got from a local dealer when I bought the kit, it basically was a steal. One of my best purchases because first it is so enabling and secondly the quality of those speciality drill bits is absolutely excellent.

I customized mine over time, threw out the short and long bitholder for example (have those with every drill anyway), used the space for a 15 mm Zobo which I need a lot, added Spax T-Star bits because I work a lot with those screws, 6 and 8 mm drill bits for tile ....

It's a great solution and I can only highly recommend it - before you start investing in singles and at some point it doesn't make sense (rationally) anymore.

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: February 12, 2018, 04:30 PM by six-point socket II »

Online grobkuschelig

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Hi Oliver,

Thanks for the tip. I looked long and hard at the kit. But since I got the Zobo set early on, I could not really justify the rest of it.
I have a good Bosch set of metal drills and have equipped the Lid-Case of the PDC with the wood, stone and long bit sets, which I got cheap from eBay...
Plus the 3.5 countersink and the 2-8mm pure countersink.
For bits I‘m using sets from Metabo or Wera.

My goal is to have every drill equipped for its direct use cases.
- CXS for screwing or assembly
- PDC for tough work/masonry etc.
- C18 for projects/shopwork whatever in between.

What are the parts you mostly use out of your CE-SORT?

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

The drill bits that have seen most use/ my top ten, if you want: (All original kit's content)

1. HSS D3-10 CE/10 drill bit case (I also use these for wood, a lot.) Especially 3 & 10 mm.
2. BKS D3-8 CE/W-K drill bit case (I use these with tape as "depth stop" both for pilot holes and free-hand doweling) Especially 3, 6 and 8 mm.

3. BTA HW D5 CE drill bit with depth stop (as described)
4. BSTA HS D3.5 CE drill countersink with depth stop (I use this mainly for garden projects)

5. CENTROTEC-DRIVE screwdriver handle + long bits for manual screw driving
 
6. QLS D5-15 CE deburring countersink
7. QLS D2-8 CE deburring countersink

8. ZB HS D5 EURO CE centering bit
9. HD D18 CE hook driver

10. BA-CE CENTROTEC drill adapter (Especially handy for use with my Hilti TE 2-M - since this drill has a 2nd gear for high(er) speed...)

--

Personally I think they could have left out all of the 25 mm standard bits (except for the twinBox) and made that space more customizable. I realize there might be tradesman that go through a lot of these bits and want quick and easy access. Personally I need/want to sort/keep more different bits than 50 replacements of standard sizes. Like I said, I added the T-Star's, some 50 mm, some hex, some +- ... You get the picture. Additionally, every drill has the standard bits short/long anyway - so the chance that I run out of a standard size/profile is highly unlikely even without the original set of 50 from the kit.

In my experience people who go through a lot of bits buy exactly their sizes/profiles in bulk anyway - exceeding the storage capacity of the kit by far.

Personally, I honestly have so many bits by now... I really need to slap myself on the wrists every time the urge to buy a set overcomes me. And I have already given away plenty...

I was thinking of placing one of those bubblegum vending machines on my front porch so people who pass by can get a random bit for a penny a twist. ... Just kidding of course. ;)

Additionally I have really awesome bits like the ones from PB Swiss for assembling furniture and other applications where some of the screw's heads are visible later on, and those last. First because they are high quality, perfectly cut, sharp & hard - and secondly I typically don't use them when I can foresee slippage because of sh*tty/cheap screws, worn heads or other sh*tty circumstances. I'd rather "kill" one of those rather soft/ more tough than hard standard bits and throw it away afterwards than foreseeable ruining excellent bits on purpose. But still, even that happens so rarely that I don't need so many of them for one project.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi!

I had the pleasure of a meeting/appointment at hardware Cologne trade fair today. ( http://www.eisenwarenmesse.com/IEM/index-3.php )

Here are a couple of impressions from the show floors. Quite a couple of exhibitors didn't want pictures being taken of certain stuff and show cases so I skipped the detailed shots completely and just tried to convey how big this trade fair is. (2700 exhibitors)





















A special area was designated to 3D printing/additive manufacturing including show cases of work and presentations.



Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline HarveyWildes

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Too bad you couldn't sneak in the "what's coming" pictures.

The one German trade show that I've been to was in Munich, and it was top notch.

Offline Svar

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Quite a couple of exhibitors didn't want pictures being taken of certain stuff and show cases so I skipped the detailed shots completely
So, the exhibitors came to advertise their stuff, but did not want pictures taken of what they came to advertise? Interesting approach to advertising. The next step would be to not let you look.  [wink]

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

Maybe important to clarify: This is not a trade fair for the consumer - so stuff on display might not yet be ready to be introduced to the market fully or there might be an introduction coming within weeks/months from now. Some stuff might still be prototype stage or not within the specs that a production run will have later.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi,

this was delivered today, I guess @Cheese knows what that means.  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]



--

Also got some other stuff needed for the next project.



--

And we're getting new "long distance neighbors", a house that was rotting away for two decades was finally torn down and a new one will be build - they brought the "big guns". I was hoping it had some lighting for nighttime, but sadly (pretty sure the direct neighbors are very happy) it's not lit at all at night, not even the sign.  [crying]





Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Michael Kellough

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Must be some serious counterweight on that thing!

Offline six-point socket II

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Hi Michael,

yeah, that's for sure. :) I can see if I can walk by there tomorrow take another pic up close. Until then, and since I'm not really sure I will get there tomorrow, it's a Liebherr crane. If I'm not mistaken it's anything between a 34 K up to a 53 K.

https://www.liebherr.com/en/deu/products/construction-machines/tower-cranes/fast-erecting-cranes/k-cranes/k-cranes.html

If you select one, you can go to Downloads and then take a look at the fact sheet, weights are listed there. :)

Another thing on my bucket list, lift something with such a crane - or even cooler, lift something with one of their mobile cranes ...

However, this would be my ultimate dream come true: http://demagmobilecranes.com/ac-300-6/

Let's just say I have a thing for big machinery, ever since working for a certain company quite a couple of years ago, for some time... I had to edit my ex-employers name from my hard hat, and the colleague that took that first picture was a little shaky, sorry.





Kind regards,
Oliver


Offline neilc

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Cool pics, Oliver.  That last one looks like a strip mine perhaps?

Online grobkuschelig

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Oh Oliver, if you post more pics, my Festool-addiction might connect with my model-train past and morph into something truly unhealthy. [emoji33]

I’ve been wanting to operate one of those cranes from the German open cast mining plants since I learned that a car/family van/truck will fit inside one of the shovels, when I was 8. [emoji7]

Offline six-point socket II

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Cool pics, Oliver.  That last one looks like a strip mine perhaps?

Hi Neil,

yes, exactly. :) It's actually not even a secret, I just forgot to add a link, as that mine isn't operated by my ex-employer. Here's the link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garzweiler_surface_mine and here's one directly to the operator/owner: http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/59998/rwe-power-ag/fuels/garzweiler/

The first picture was taken inside here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurath_Power_Station and again directly from the operator/owner: http://www.rwe.com/web/cms/en/12068/rwe-power-ag/fuels/kw-neurath-boa-2-3/

Kind regards,
Oliver


Offline six-point socket II

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Oh Oliver, if you post more pics, my Festool-addiction might connect with my model-train past and morph into something truly unhealthy. [emoji33]

I’ve been wanting to operate one of those cranes from the German open cast mining plants since I learned that a car/family van/truck will fit inside one of the shovels, when I was 8. [emoji7]

 [big grin] [big grin] Are you talking about a bucket-wheel excavator or a rope shovel?

Bucket-wheel excavator I can help with, rope shovel not so much as I have never had the opportunity to see one up close and live.



I'm really sorry I have to cut these pics, but there's always at least one other ex-colleague somewhere in them ...

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline neilc

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This was one of the most impressive mining machines I have heard about... Big Muskie



Big Muskie was the length of 1 1/2 football fields!  About 140 meters!

Then I googled it and the Wikipedia page mentioned a German mining machine -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagger_293

It was 225 meters long!

The big machines are fascinating.  You can spend hours on Youtube on videos on large machines!  Or we can buy tools!  I'm torn!

Offline six-point socket II

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Maybe it's finally time to thank God for tabbed browsing?  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

But yeah, so many interesting machines... I could spent days watching History & Discovery channel ...

I'll write you a PM shortly, Neil.  [smile]

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

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...it's a Liebherr crane. If I'm not mistaken it's anything between a 34 K up to a 53 K.

A typical round-table discussion with the Liebherr production group on a Monday morning, "Should we build a crane this week or just a refrigerator?"   [big grin]

Now I know where they get their hinges for their refrigerator doors... [poke]

Offline Euclid

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I have a Liebherr refrigerator-freezer. It is certainly quite well-made, but the interior layout and space utilisation is a pathetically, miserably, disgracefully dumb design travesty. It was the only replacement I could find to fit an already-built and fitted kitchen scheme (the original and beautifully sleek device having been discontinued after expiring). Do you get the impression I’m disappointed with it? To be, hopefully, replaced as soon as I can remodel the kitchen…! 

(Apologies, I’ve had a frustrating day…)

On the other hand, they do quite a good job of making a backhoe climb a metal tower…


Offline Peter Halle

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When we tear down homes here we sure don't use one of those.  Would it be safe to venture a guess that the average family wouldn't have lived in that home?

Peter

Online rst

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That shovel climbing the tower is insane...their insurance company was certainly doing anal contractions!

Offline six-point socket II

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When we tear down homes here we sure don't use one of those.  Would it be safe to venture a guess that the average family wouldn't have lived in that home?

Peter

Hi Peter,

those cranes are really quite common here throughout all types of construction sites, especially when the new house is build brick by brick. When prefabricated elements are used however, its mostly a mobile crane.

For your question, while these are definitely not your "average income family" homes, especially given the size of home and surrounding property (compared to average houses & properties of today) but on the other hand these aren't especially "posh" either. I'd say well situated middle class and upper middle class homes.

The house in question is/has a rather sad story: Original owner(s) deceased and there were/are a community of heirs - for whatever reason that is anyway completely unknown to me - they couldn't get this sorted out. Over time it became a kind of prime example for the broken windows theory and it was simply left to rot. My best guess for the current "progress" is: the community of heirs got this finally sorted, one way or another and "rescuing" what was left was probably more expensive than a tear down and re-build. Given that even if it would have been heated, aired from time to time, the water tapped and kept clean any new owner would have had to do a "structural restoration" by now. Because there would be (at the very least for waste water) lead pipes, electrical installation without RCD's for bathrooms/kitchen/sockets, not split (lighting/sockets), no network/LAN cables, screw type fuses instead of breakers and so on, iron pipes for heating, no under-floor heating, ... I think you can easily picture what I mean.

Given that another, much closer neighbor, is pulling through such a "structural restoration" on a house of similar age, but not left to rot, currently I can see how a tear down made sense in the other case.

Kind regards,
Oliver