Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 89732 times)

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Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Everywhere I look I see @jobsworth avatar ... Heidi ... And I constantly have to think about Tool Time since it was brought up here, and I've watched the DVD Set I have again ...

So random picture today ... Just because ... TOOL TIME !!!!



Without looking——who was the original Binford Tool girl and what was her name on Tool Time? (she returned for one episode towards the end of the series).

Tom

Kind regards,
Oliver

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Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Tom,

Lisa - Pamela Anderson

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
 [thumbs up] [thumbs up]

Tom

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi,

I'm happy to announce Snap-On finally named a product after me.  [eek] [blink] [scared] [eek]



 [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] Just kidding, of course ...   [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

On the more serious ;) side: I've been watering the backyard after dusk during the last couple of weeks, and two days ago my sprinkler/nozzle behaved strangely. So I opened it up to find quite a bit of sediments/residue in it's filter.





I collect rain water for watering the backyard in two large underground tanks/reservoirs, during the drought these were obviously empty, so I guess when the rain came, more sediments than usual got carried from tank/reservoir 1 into tank/reservoir 2 where the pump is connected. Might need to check the pumps filter, too.

And yeah, life is sloooooowww here, currently ;) Not my kind of weather.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 788
I collect rain water for watering the backyard in two large underground tanks/reservoirs, during the drought these were obviously empty, so I guess when the rain came, more sediments than usual got carried from tank/reservoir 1 into tank/reservoir 2 where the pump is connected. Might need to check the pumps filter, too.

Awesome that you can capture water and use it!

When will people here get it?  I would love to store rainwater for lawn & garden use, but it's illegal here due to water law.  There is a move afoot to make it legal to store water that falls on roofs in one 55 gallon drum, but otherwise all I can do is direct the rainwater from my downspouts to the places I want it most.

The downstream states (California, Kansas, are you listening?) are so jealous of the water rights that they have from water that falls in Colorado that we aren't allowed to capture water that falls from the sky, even for residential use where the alternative is using treated water from the public utility.  Silly.

I would gladly clean out a hose filter occasionally for the privilege of catching the water and using it :).

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
That sounds interesting Harvey. So basically your rain water from the roof, spreads "freely" around the property - it's just an opening on the downspouts?

Here, most downspouts are connected to the public utilities sewerage/sewer system. We pay for this: Every bit of fresh water I take from the public utility I pay for. And for every drop I take out, I pay an additional waste water fee. I also pay a waste water fee for rain water from my roof. (This is calculated based on roof size). With me setting up the reservoirs, I only pay waste water for half of the roof's size. So it even saves me money to do this. Tapping water costs next to nothing, but the waste water fee ....

There was a time where this was frowned upon because people believed this would hurt the sewerage/sewer system by being to dry then - if everyone did it. But that rumor was gone after some time.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Here are 3 pictures I'm willing to share on the "setup". :)







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
So, today a family member asked me if I could look after something in her car, the AC's outlet selector (head/feet/windshield ...) was stuck.

I said I can take a look ... I sat down, tried it - stuck. Since this car still uses a manual selector (bowden cable) and I'm not an expert I popped open the hood, to see if I could get access with my inspection camera. While looking for access I found a loose bolt that had nothing to do with the problem itself, but I guess it's better when properly tightened.






Obviously I had no chance to access anything from there. So, I just closed the hood, and tried one of the outlets. Obviously that still doesn't allow you to see the actual mechanic behind the dashboard ... But I tried.

I got the inspection camera back out. Tried the selector, and it worked flawless ...

I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose ...  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

I still had to reassure the family member that the selector was really stuck on my first try ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 3533
@HarveyWildes that’s a crazy water policy! Here in NYC they had a limited supply program giving away rain collection barrels for citizens to use. The idea was to reduce the load on the storm drains, which when overloaded during a heavy downpour discharge into the bays.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3658
My Brother in law in Germany  (departed last fall) captured his roof water and saved it for his gardens. His vegetable garden was nearly a half mil from his house. During dry weather, every day he would back pack water to that garden. At the base of the mountain close by, he captured water from his tiny cabin roof (The  Vacation House) and would walk to that plot in the evening to water his fruit trees. He and his wife, my wife's sister, would can the vegetables not used in the growing season. The fruit from his trees made the best refreshments all winter long. Schnapps, Brandy, Wine. Many a cold nite I spent with him as we argued good naturally over many glasses of the results from all that watering.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3658
quote>>>I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose<<<quote

A few years ago, like nearly, well, let's just say "well before I was 39" I was helping out at a service station on days when I was short of work. One of the highschool kids that was pumping  gas, made a big mistook. A Renault came to the pump wanting gasoline. In those days, Renault had a strange set up under the hood. The gas filler and the coolant filler were side by side in front of the engine. The kid was not familiar with the setup and put gasoline into the coolant filler. The unsuspecting driver got only about three or four miles up the road when "poof!". The car was totaled. Nobody hurt, luckily.
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 788
@HarveyWildes that’s a crazy water policy! Here in NYC they had a limited supply program giving away rain collection barrels for citizens to use. The idea was to reduce the load on the storm drains, which when overloaded during a heavy downpour discharge into the bays.

Yeah - it's a result of the fact that we are semi-arid (~ 14" of precip a year) and the way that water was contractually distributed in the west back when the original distributions were negotiated.

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 788
Here are 3 pictures I'm willing to share on the "setup". :)

Nice - maybe one day here...

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
quote>>>I think that poor Renault Kangoo was so afraid of me and what I might come up next with, it simply gave in and let the selector loose<<<quote

A few years ago, like nearly, well, let's just say "well before I was 39" I was helping out at a service station on days when I was short of work. One of the highschool kids that was pumping  gas, made a big mistook. A Renault came to the pump wanting gasoline. In those days, Renault had a strange set up under the hood. The gas filler and the coolant filler were side by side in front of the engine. The kid was not familiar with the setup and put gasoline into the coolant filler. The unsuspecting driver got only about three or four miles up the road when "poof!". The car was totaled. Nobody hurt, luckily.
Tinker

Hi Wayne,

This sounded so familiar, I have heard a similar stories about a little more recent "Smarts"

https://carbuzz.com/news/smart-fortwo-bursts-into-flames-after-driver-pours-gasoline-into-wrong-hole

Crazy to think about this can happen.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online RKA

  • Posts: 1223
Oliver, I'm curious, do you know why they put the runoff from your roof into the sewer system?  Is there not enough undeveloped soil around to absorb the run off from the roofs?  Is this very specific to your town or geography?  Over here it's verboten to dump any kind of runoff from your roof or sump pumps into the sewer lines.  The underlying theory is the sewer water has to be treated and processed first and the runoff water can bypass the treatment and go back into the ground, reservoir, lake, etc.
-Raj

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Raj,

I'm not an expert, but I doubt there is enough undeveloped soil around to absorb all that water. There are places that certainly can/could do it, but I dare to say that in most places the run off from the roofs is connected to the sewer system. There is so much concrete, asphalt/tarmac and buildings everywhere ...

I tried to look up some numbers, what seems to be fact for 2010 is that: 78.1 million people in Germany were connected to the public sewer system leading waste water to treatment plants/sewage plants. At the same time there were 81.8 million people living in Germany. Of course that doesn't mean that all of the 78.1 million people live in places that lead run off water into the sewer system, but again, I dare to say it would be the majority - and especially in and around all types of cities.

There was a time when people argued about wether to mix rain water with waste water in the sewer system or not. So some places still have two different sewer systems. One for rain water, one for waste water. But todays consensus is that most rain water, once it hit the streets, roofs ... is polluted and should be treated as well as/ like waste water. Originally the idea was - like you say - that rain water didn't need any treatment.

Personally I think using rain water for watering the backyard was a good choice, as was putting in these underground reservoirs. If you'd ask me today, I'd still do it different though. More accessible, more repairable more maintenance friendly.

Our situation is even a little more "painful" because the connections for both downspouts are lead back "into the house" and connected behind the the official hand over point. No one would do that in todays world, totally crazy to bring water from the outside back inside and leading it outside again. But that's how it was done back then.

But generally installing the reservoirs lead to less pressure on the sewer system which certainly saved us and others from flooded basements over time. But then again, when it's as bad as it was 2 months ago, all bets are off.

I guess, you and also others will be surprised when I document the repair of what was the real issue two months ago and where the water came from.

Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Online RKA

  • Posts: 1223
Interesting.  Yeah, with all the concrete and nowhere else to put the water, it has to be managed somehow.  But excessive rains and your sewer line don’t sound like a good combo.  If the sewer line can’t accomodate the flow due to blockage or insufficient capacity, that water will find another path, otherwise known as your basement.  [mad]
-Raj

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi,

About every two years I install a new, flexible side cover to the patio's roofing. Today was the day.

Back in the day I wanted to use the same quality-material that was used for the roof, while cutting it to spec. isn't a problem - there are no fixtures/hardware readily available to mount these horizontally. So I decided to go with a milky plastic foil, but that of course only lasts two winters before it needs replacing.









Kind regards,
Oliver

Hi,

So this time it only lasted 13 months, no wonder with the heavy rain and storm 2 months ago. I went looking for greenhouse foil as suggested by @Peter Halle and @Cheese 13 months ago, but I didn't really like the look of what I've found locally - mostly also with webbing inside. So I went with an extremely strong, high-quality clear foil - let's see how that goes. I also changed the support a bit. The clear-foil was also chosen because the tree is an apricot tree - we had some delicious fruits - and I want them to get as much sun as possible.





(Old set-up, pre storm, apricot tree with fruits ...)


Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 4940
Hey Oliver, FWIW...you'll probably have to purchase the greenhouse liner over the internet. I tried to find some locally and it never came to fruition. I just pulled up my old receipt and I installed the poly in October of 2011. I also expect it to make it through this winter and hold out until spring. So come spring, it will have lasted 8 winters.  [big grin] [cool] [big grin]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Today marks exactly 4 months after I had that wee-bit of water in my basement.

Finally, today my pro started working on it, after I told him to go for it  and that I will take care of the rest. (The insurance company is still undecided on this [censored] [bite tongue] [popcorn] )



















Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
There are problems with the host I use to share my pictures. Sorry. I re-uploaded them, directly to the forum now.

















Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online RKA

  • Posts: 1223
The first set of pics showed up fine for me Oliver (and still do). 
-Raj

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 714
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Yeah, Thanks Raj! Looks like the host fixed that security certificate issue.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver