Author Topic: six-point socket's tidbits of Home Improvement, small projects and other stuff.  (Read 116989 times)

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Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1640
It appears you just need a bigger hammer to silence it.  Shall we send you one?   [tongue]
-Raj

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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6130
Hey Oliver, is your new plan to bury both the older Mr :hager & the younger Mrs :hager in the same burial plot?  [smile]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Good luck Oliver!

Regarding you previous post, the filter you used processing the B&W pics makes my eyes itch  [scared]

Thanks Michael! And I'm sorry about the processing/filter. I process most of my pictures on my iPhone for my Instagram account nowadays.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
It appears you just need a bigger hammer to silence it.  Shall we send you one?   [tongue]

Raj, yes please. Maybe one of those cool, indestructible sledgehammers made in USA?  [big grin] [big grin] [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hey Oliver, is your new plan to bury both the older Mr :hager & the younger Mrs :hager in the same burial plot?  [smile]

Currently my fear is that it will be an involuntarily cremation ...  [scared]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Today some Festool content. Yeayyyyy :)

Sanding some rough spots of my own plastering job.







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline grobkuschelig

  • Posts: 537
Hi Oliver,

How are you liking the GranatNET vs the normal Granat?

I only bought some boxes of Abranet some time ago and am so happy with normal Granat for Woodworking that I am hesitant to dip my feet into the GranatNET... :)

BR,
Uli

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi Uli,

Personally I'm all sold on the GranatNet. I love it. Results are superb and dust extraction is even better than with the regular paper type Granat. (And you know that dust extraction is (probably) best in class anyway with Festool tools and dust extractors. So yeah, I was really impressed from the first time using it - and it's basically the only abrasive I use these days. I do have paper type Granat, Brilliant 2 and Rubin 2 in my box, but I only rarely use them anymore.

One occasion were the really badly weathered spots on my patio, on those (and those with ivy roots ...) Brilliant 2 was better/ more effective than the GranatNet as the pores of the latter clogged almost immediately, it was better to use the Brilliant 2. So I keep it around. I'm lucky I never bought massive quantities, so it doesn't bother me to have the other types still sitting around. They'll get used up over time. Buying new abrasives, it will only be GranatNet.

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

More Festool content from today. PERFECT weather for sanding skirt boards in the backyard and then finishing them with O'Cedar Cire Liquide (Bee's wax, turpentine basis).

















Kind regards,
Oliver

Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Advertisement because of visible Klein Tools.

Here I had an interesting problem.

I already exchanged radiators in the past and since the overall situation is very similar, I ordered all the parts I had already used in the past. Installing the radiator was a breeze, but then I had a rude awakening when I tried to connect the radiator.

Flow was a couple of millimeters short, return about 20 millimeters. The problem here is not length itself, that is easily adjusted. But "depth" is. I called it a day and started to search for a solution.

During my research I found a flexible connector made by Hummel AG from Denzlingen hummel.com .

Could that be the remedy I had hoped for? These connectors, or problem solvers as Hummel AG calls their product, run 30,00 Euro including VAT/TAX (street price) a piece. This rises your expectations on one hand, and on the other it’s a reassurance you’re not buying some crap but a high quality, professional product that will last.

These problem solvers arrived a couple of days ago, I bought them at alternative-haustechnik.de - and today I used them to finally install my radiator.

I’m actually super happy/ they work like a charm.

The way these flexible connectors are constructed/built lets you bend them, I’d like to say almost kinda three dimensional for the most exact fit to your unique situation.

There is no „forcing“ them into place necessary, they fit without putting any stress on pipes, radiator or other connectors/materials.

Bending and fitting them is a breeze, the euro cone connection fits perfectly - thus seals tight. Personally I’d recommend this product for all type of renovation, when old pipes of the heating system are to be re-used/ left in place.

Everything OK, except for the connection.


The new flexible connectors from Hummel AG.


Removing some of the no longer needed connectors.


Close up of new connectors.


Still all leveled. ;)




Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: March 01, 2019, 05:07 PM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4014
That’s some handy hardware! Worth the price.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 6130
That reminds me of that stainless gas connection hose. However yours seems a bit more flexible.

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
This morning I picked up a nicely finished oak slab from a local carpenter. The new windowsill.







Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5726
  • Festool Baby.....
Nice work Oliver. I think yer going to e bored when ya finally finish working on the house. You'll have to sell it buy another and start over  [scared]

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Don't ever worry about me getting bored  [big grin] So many ideas, wishes, dreams ...

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Advertisement of Klein Tools product.

Hi!

So, this is the first time I will be focussing solely on one product from my partner Klein Tools.

My new, favorite tool: KleinTools Tradesman Pro (TM) Knee Pads (55629).







Ok, lets start at the beginning: My obesity is no secret, and with a BMI over 50 speaking of obesity is putting it mildly. I know this, I’m working on it and I’m actively being treated/ under medical supervision. That never held me back being active and won’t stop me in future.

A big problem for years now: sitting on my knees. It’s painful and using a cushion(s) or blanket(s), especially during remodeling and renovation, is extremely obstructive. Now there are plenty of knee pads available, but most of them lack some sort of cushion for the knee, so pressure is still passed onto the knee which causes the pain for me.

Someone without troubled knees might just consider this some additional comfort: With theTradesman Pro (TM) Knee Pads from Klein Tools the knee rests comfortably in a cup that is cushioned by two layers, one made of neoprene and one made of "gel". For me this really makes all the difference. Not only can I sit on my knees for a longer time again, I can also move around without having to re-position cushions or blankets. They don't obstruct/limit my movement and don't cut into my leg - everything feels pretty much "natural". This really is an incredible enhancement of my personal situation!

When I saw these first in the catalog, I had hoped they would work for me where many others failed - that's why I put them on my "wishlist". After receiving and testing them I'm totally blown away and super happy. I will chime in from time to time on how they're holding up.

















Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Online Peter Halle

  • Global Moderator
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  • Posts: 11950
Oliver, it takes guts to publicly talk about a challenge such as yours.  Godspeed to you as you work thru this.  Also a shout out to Klein for recognizing quality over all else.  Your imagery is fantastic!

Regarding kneepads:  I have never met yet a set of kneepads that I can wear.  I have a challenge opposite of yours - I have extremely low BMI and skinny legs  [eek].  Kneepads simply won't stay in place on my legs without super tightening the straps.  Then you have the hardware and straps digging into the back of the leg when kneeling and that pain is worse than not wearing them.  For me the only solution that didn't hurt more than it helped is the insertable pads that fit the various carpenter pants that have been popular for decades on your side of the Atlantic ocean.  I have different issues with those pants,

Perhaps there is a product like those you show that would work great for my situation, but after spending tons of money over my career trying product after product, I, and more importantly, others like me are probably hesitant to try "just one more..."

Perhaps you can pass on this suggestion to Klein:  Whereas they really do focus on the trades, and longevity in the trades does lead to brand loyalty, especially when it comes to hand tool manufacturers, perhaps setting up a program for  something that is valuable for the long-term well-being of their customers along the lines of the Festool use it in your situation for 15 to 30 days would be beneficial for all.

I would love to hear about a long-term usage from you.  I trust your opinions.

Peter

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1640
It’s not just obesity that leads to extreme pain, it’s age and deterioration of tissue or a myriad of other issues, so it’s particularly helpful to get a review from someone who *needs* them and doesn’t just use them for comfort.  That pain is like nails being driven into your knees.  I would be interested in your long term feedback.  I’m skeptical because everyone produces something purported to be the better mousetrap. 

I haven’t grown to like this style.  I got a set from Lee Valley.  They just didn’t grow on me.  They shift too much as I’m kneeling and standing.  If I’m largely stationary, I far prefer the 1” CLC foam pad.  It’s large enough that I can move around to get more leverage when working on the car.  But doing baseboard work almost requires these types of pads.  Like Peter, I’m not keen on spending anymore money.  I would rather move a foam pad across the floor than spend money on another product that doesn’t measure up.
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 02:34 PM by RKA »
-Raj

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

Peter, thank you very, very much!

I understand the problem you describe with having kneepads strapped super tight, and then straps and hardware cutting in. I had that happen myself with kneepads that have rather thin straps, and I agree that doesn't work at all for long term use.

I have also used the insertable pads, although with a very different kind of trouser back when I still exercised another hobby. Back then these worked for me when the pants fit 100% and the padded knee portion would move up when kneeling. Nowadays these are way to thin for me, so I haven't looked into them in more recent times.

I'll pass along your idea to my contact, personally I think it's really good and could get people to try these more easily/freely.

Spring is around the corner, I will probably use these in the backyard a lot - so yeah, I keep some updates coming. :)

Raj, yeah, nails driven into knees - best description I've read so far. It's exactly like that for me without them.

What I like is that they only use one strap, so one doesn't feel trapped and movement when climbing stairs i.e. is not obstructed/limited. But I totally understand anyone who is skeptical after trying a couple of different kneepads that didn't work out.

I'll keep this thread updated how I get along with these, as I wrote above - I will use them a lot in the coming months.

You had to bring up CLC  [scared]  [eek]  [big grin] [big grin] I had just forgotten about that camo toolbag I always liked from them ...   [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1640
LOL!  I have enough problems finding tools I put down, a camo tool bag would disguise the whole lot!   

The other thing that just occurred to me is that everyone is a bit different.  If they offered different models or inserts under a trial program that Peter suggested, that might be helpful.  When I first started using a kneeling pad, It was a 3/4" low density gardeners kneeling pad.  It worked fine, but 5 years ago I suddenly realized it wasn't sufficient.  I switched out to a thicker medium density CLC pad which works perfectly right now.  I can imagine in a molded knee pad, that extra thickness may be a hindrance for some, but if you need it, you need it.  In 10 years I would not be shocked if it no longer works for me and I need to get something different. 
« Last Edit: March 14, 2019, 02:46 PM by RKA »
-Raj

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4014
Shuffling stuff in my shop storage I came across a banker’s box full of an assortment of knee pads. They all failed to continue to be used for an assortment of reasons.

Now I prefer a kneeling tray. It’s a thick (~1-1/2”) neoprene foam on a polyethylene tray with robust raised handles. It’s easy on the knees. It’s easy to kick across the floor to where it needed next. When done it’s easy to step on one of the raised handles so they other raises up to a easily reached height.

Don’t know who actually makes it. I have three with three different names bought from three different places and all three say it’s no longer available.

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3711
I am in agreement with all of you above. I don't have @ six-point socket's problem. I am even skinnier than@ Peter Halle and i have never found the perfect knee pad. The most problem I had (masonry) was troweling concrete. For the same reason Peter described, i found just kneeling on a piece of scrap 1x the most comfortable. By "most" I am not describing as totally comfortable. I guess I am describing "least" uncomfortable. In my present job, I no longer kneel for any more than a minute or two. I am spending longer hours in front of my computer and I still find need for padding, altho for another area of my body. There is just no padding anywhere on me.  [unsure]
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 4014
I am in agreement with all of you above. I don't have @ six-point socket's problem. I am even skinnier than@ Peter Halle and i have never found the perfect knee pad. The most problem I had (masonry) was troweling concrete. For the same reason Peter described, i found just kneeling on a piece of scrap 1x the most comfortable. By "most" I am not describing as totally comfortable. I guess I am describing "least" uncomfortable. In my present job, I no longer kneel for any more than a minute or two. I am spending longer hours in front of my computer and I still find need for padding, altho for another area of my body. There is just no padding anywhere on me.  [unsure]
Tinker

I hope you’re setting all your best life stories down.

Offline leakyroof

  • Posts: 2279
It’s not just obesity that leads to extreme pain, it’s age and deterioration of tissue or a myriad of other issues, so it’s particularly helpful to get a review from someone who *needs* them and doesn’t just use them for comfort.  That pain is like nails being driven into your knees.  I would be interested in your long term feedback.  I’m skeptical because everyone produces something purported to be the better mousetrap. 

I haven’t grown to like this style.  I got a set from Lee Valley.  They just didn’t grow on me.  They shift too much as I’m kneeling and standing.  If I’m largely stationary, I far prefer the 1” CLC foam pad.  It’s large enough that I can move around to get more leverage when working on the car.  But doing baseboard work almost requires these types of pads.  Like Peter, I’m not keen on spending anymore money.  I would rather move a foam pad across the floor than spend money on another product that doesn’t measure up.
   Yes, the pad for many types of work is what I use. I too have tried different knee pads, and like Peter, my skinny legs[ which match my 'chicken feet'.... [wink]] allow a lot of shifting on the pads unless they're a bit too tight on the straps.... [embarassed]
Not as many Sanders as PA Floor guy.....

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2192
I solved the knee pad issue (probably have 3-4 pair of strap ons), bought a pair of euro style CAT work pants off Amazon and Steel-Flex Pocket Knee Pads For Work Pants With RedBacks Cushioning from Toolnut to insert into the knee pockets.  I don't wear these as every pants, Duluth carpenter firehose flex for that, only when I'm sure I'll have to be kneeling on jobsite.

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 1152
I picked up a cement finishers pad from Lowes for use when working close to the ground and when working in the yard. I have knee pads and they work fine for me but the kneel pad is nice for a quick job and works very well when working in the yard or garden.

Marshalltown and Goldblatt both make a kneel pad for about $25 but the Lowes pad seems to be just as good and only $15.
The dense foam pad on a roughly 12"x18" hard plastic base. With a handle on each side it is easy to maneuver and you can sit on it too if that's more comfortable for certain jobs.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3711
I am in agreement with all of you above. I don't have @ six-point socket's problem. I am even skinnier than@ Peter Halle and i have never found the perfect knee pad. The most problem I had (masonry) was troweling concrete. For the same reason Peter described, i found just kneeling on a piece of scrap 1x the most comfortable. By "most" I am not describing as totally comfortable. I guess I am describing "least" uncomfortable. In my present job, I no longer kneel for any more than a minute or two. I am spending longer hours in front of my computer and I still find need for padding, altho for another area of my body. There is just no padding anywhere on me.  [unsure]
Tinker

I hope you’re setting all your best life stories down.

that's my milieu
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline six-point socket II

  • Posts: 990
  • aka @the_black_tie_diyer
Hi!

ADVERTISEMENT Because of visible Klein Tools 


Yesterday was the perfect day to correct the botched filling/ coverage of nails on my canopy. Still mad at the guys that build it ...

An acquaintance from another forum gave me great advice wich paint and filler to use on this, very thankful as those are not your typical DIY/home depot store products. And it shows, both from working with the material and result.

First, setting up "shop".



Music via my Klein Tools wireless, bluetooth job-site speaker, my trusty Festool DTS 400 with 120 grit GranatNet and CTL-SYS extractor. My trusty Estwing hammer and a 4mm drift pin/punch for setting/ sinking nails.

Now lets start getting out the caulking that should have never been there in first place.

First without gloves.



Finding that putty knife/ spatula is way too sharp, so gloves from here on now.



Uncovered nail, and the withered acrylic caulking ..



Setting/sinking of nails.





Filling.





Sanding.





After a test coat, I decided to paint directly, no primer.







I couldn't be happier with the result. All of that botched and withered acrylic caulking is gone, nails are covered properly and the paint job is good. This is how it should have been done in first place. But hey, at least this way I had another fun day with tools ... ;)  [big grin]

Kind regards,
Oliver
« Last Edit: April 17, 2019, 05:50 AM by six-point socket II »
Kind regards,
Oliver

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 529
Good example of how much of the pride that proper craftsmen use to have in their work has been lost lately. Botched up jobs seem to be par for the course nowadays.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + TSB1-MW 1000 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · OF2200 · CMS-GE … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 · Hammer HS950 (soon!) 

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 5726
  • Festool Baby.....
As always Oliver you do it right with pride of craftsmanship. most pros go by time is money they finish the job as fast as they can get paid and go on to the next one.

We Homeowners do it with pride as we can take our time ,as much time as we need to and do it right.