Author Topic: Deck repair question  (Read 9978 times)

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Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3998
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #30 on: May 04, 2017, 06:29 AM »
I hadn't heard of POR15.  I was going to look for something at one of the home centers or Sherwin Williams.  Is the POR15 system a better than average product?
...

GTS1 The POR15, it is the best and only thing if you are serious. Usually only used for boats or automotive where there is water or salt water.


1) GTS = " google that s$$!"

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Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #31 on: May 09, 2017, 12:10 AM »
I googled POR15 after you had mentioned it.  Looks like a thorough 3 step system.

Any idea how long it would last before needing repainted?

Tom

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3998
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #32 on: May 09, 2017, 06:21 AM »
I googled POR15 after you had mentioned it.  Looks like a thorough 3 step system.

Any idea how long it would last before needing repainted?

Tom

All I know factually is that the cost is not cheap.. But the car guys all swear by it, and the yachtsomen/women also use nothing else.

I am ordering some as the Au supplier of Epifanes also peddles the POR-15.

Offline Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 353
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #33 on: June 17, 2017, 08:02 AM »
A lot of suggestions have been posted, but I didn't see any reference to what is really carrying the load. From the pictures, it appears that the rim joist of the deck is carrying the outbound side of the deck joists, while blocking or rim joist of the house is carrying the inbound side of the deck joists. Therefore, sistering may not work everywhere, because you are relying on a strong connection of the existing joist to the deck's rim joist. If that connection is weak, a sister joist will only give you surface area to find purchase for deck board fastening.

The other observation is that if you do too much repair, you may be required to update the entire deck to current code (I.E. all new guardrail).  Do your research before diving in.  I see the potential for a lot of work and it's never fun to do something twice.

Good luck!
Dance with who brung ya...

Offline WastedP

  • Posts: 343
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #34 on: June 18, 2017, 12:46 AM »
Above all, just make sure you do the job right. 

I've been listening to the medivac helicopter flying over our house all afternoon, retrieving casualties from a deck collapse this afternoon, the second year in a row.  The area had a deck collapse of even greater magnitude about a dozen years ago.  All together, these three incidents injured over 120 people.  No inspections and hillbillies that think "that looks good enough" are dangerous.

Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #35 on: June 20, 2017, 11:59 PM »
Since I figured out that the deck will need to be rebuilt rather that repaired, I've been reading articles on decks and researching different products available.  I certainly don't want to build it twice or build it only to have it fall off the house. 

My wife and I haven't yet made the decision on if we want to keep the deck the same size and style or if we want to make some of it larger and use support posts.  We will have to change the railing to meet current standards.  We also talked about designing it so we could add a screened in porch under it sometime. 

While the original deck was nailed together, I will make use of the metal hardware used now. The stores in my area sell both the nails and screws for the metal hardware, is it better to use screws for their holding power?

Tom

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 663
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #36 on: June 21, 2017, 07:01 AM »
I would use screws or bolting depending on the connection being made and make sure
that the fastener material, be it stainless or galvanized or something else, is compatible
with your choice of decking material. I am dealing now with my house which has a large
deck that was built just 2 years before we bought the place (1998). The screws used are
all rotting away and over the past few years I find a few deck boards have loose and I
have re-secure them. I've been using coated deck screws for that. My deck is low, only 18
inches above grade which probably contributes to the problem due to the higher moisture
level near grade and little room for air to circulate beneath the deck, but pressure-treated
wood can eat your nails or screws up too. I would try not to face nail (or screw) if possible.
Any penetration through the face of a deck board is just a path for water to get inside and
do damage.

If you think you might want to convert some of the deck to a screened-in porch later
on then design your support system for that additional load now, including snow load
if that's a concern in your area and don't forget wind-loading now that you will have
a surface (the underside of the roof) that wind forces can act upon.
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Offline kevinculle

  • Posts: 150
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #37 on: June 21, 2017, 08:33 AM »
Either the screws or nails designed to be used with joist hangers and related deck structural supports will provide plenty of strength and meet codes.  I have recently redone two decks I originally built 30 years ago.  On both I made some changes that involved revising the framing underneath.  Removing the 10d galvanized nails in those joist hangers was quite difficult and they showed no loss of holding power.

If you go the nail route I would strongly recommend using a compressor and one of the "bang-bang" palm nailers that magnetically hold the nail while you align the tip with the hole in the hanger, then you just press and it drives it in.  Much easier than swinging a hammer in those tight confines.

Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #38 on: June 23, 2017, 12:57 AM »
kevinculle,  I do have a palm nailer.  That would be good for nailing into the hangers, although I do like the idea of using the screws designed for the hangers too.  The nails on the house do not show any corrosion but there isn't much left of some of them used on the outer section of the deck.

Bob,  I wasn't clear, but I was thinking of adding a screened in porch under the deck.  The deck is on the main floor over a walk out basement. 

What are some of your favorite hidden fastening systems for wood (cedar)?  I would want something that it would be possible to replace a board without taking up the boards around it too.  A while ago I was looking into Kreg's system, but it seems there are several other systems on the market too.

Tom

Offline Peter Halle

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Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #39 on: June 23, 2017, 07:59 AM »
If you go with screws versus nails for "hangers" so to speak, make sure that you are using hangers and screws from the same manufacturer so that you have an assembly.  Last thing you would ever want would be a catastrophic event and then have brand a not compatible with brand b.

If you were to consider the Kreg system - don't.  Very time consuming.  The Camo system does the same thing, is mor readily available and is quicker.  I have used both and posted my thoughts here about the Kreg years ago and did a deck a month or so ago with the Camo for the first time.  Fewer steps = less time.

Peter
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Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3998
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #40 on: June 23, 2017, 08:33 AM »
If you go with screws versus nails for "hangers" so to speak, make sure that you are using hangers and screws from the same manufacturer so that you have an assembly.  Last thing you would ever want would be a catastrophic event and then have brand a not compatible with brand b.
...

Sounds like a system?

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 663
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #41 on: June 23, 2017, 12:51 PM »
+1 on the Camo system. I haven't used it extensively but
did a repair on a small deck and it worked well.

I was considering the Kreg system but after checking in with
a few friends and some online research decided on Camo.
-----
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Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #42 on: July 01, 2017, 01:53 PM »
I did notice the number of steps involved with the Kreg when watching a few videos on it.  Very similar to their woodworking jigs which  I have used.

I have also looked in to the Camo system which seems to do away with predrilling the hole.  It looks like it would speed things up a bit.

Peter,  the fasteners and metal connectors will be from the same manufacturer - probably Strong Tie

Tom

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1939
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #43 on: July 01, 2017, 03:38 PM »
The Cano system is great. Takes a bit longer (obviously) than face screwing, but looks great when done. If you are using a harder wood (like Ipe), you will still want to predilection. Those screws won't "drill" through on their own.

Here is a portion of a PT deck I did recently.





Cheers. Bryan.


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Offline rvieceli

  • Posts: 725
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #44 on: July 01, 2017, 03:53 PM »
@bkharman Bryan looks good. Are those 5/4 X6inch PT boards for the deck surface?

Thanks

ron

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1939
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #45 on: July 01, 2017, 04:06 PM »
@bkharman Bryan looks good. Are those 5/4 X6inch PT boards for the deck surface?

Thanks

ron

You would be correct Ron!  We only replaced the boards and handrails. Looks kind of funny until the PT boards dry out a bit and everything gets a coat of stain. We did it to help sell the place and it was well worth the time and money!

Thanks for the comments!

Cheers. Bryan.


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Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3615
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #46 on: July 01, 2017, 04:13 PM »
I did a cedar deck with the Camo system. Very happy with the results. The Camo tool automatically spaces each board and stainless fasteners are available.

Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #47 on: July 07, 2017, 04:03 PM »
Camo it is!

Cheese,  do you have any experience with cedar decks?  The reason I ask is a contractor advised against using cedar for the deck boards because it tends to splinter.  I was going to go with cedar before that advice. 

Have any of you guys had issues with cedar splintering?  I want to buy the right deck boards the first time and want them to last.  I've been looking at everything from pressure treated to Azek.

Tom

Offline Holzhacker

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Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #48 on: July 08, 2017, 10:43 AM »
I've done numerous cedar decks. No idea what that contractor is talking about in terms of a splintering issue. Maybe crappy quality cedar or him not wanting to deal with staining. I guess if you leave the cedar un-stained maybe but then it would be no different than a treated wood 5/4 deck. I always treat cedar with Sikkens or equivalent. Just sort of dumb not to.
One of the things I tell clients about treated 5/4 and staining or even cedar is that staining extends the useable life span of the deck. What that means is less cupping, splitting or splintering so you can walk around with your bare feet.
Around here at least decks run in price and quality from 5/4 treated as the entry level, then cedar, then the composites.
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Offline Naildrivingman

  • Posts: 353
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #49 on: July 09, 2017, 07:12 AM »
I've done a lot of decks using natural wood (cedar, Ipe, treated, fir).  The one common factor with all wood on the flat is that eventually they will crack and the grain will lift.  In the case of splintering, I wonder if that person was referencing grain lift?  I've not personally seen a deck with splinter, but I have seen plenty with grain lift.

I always tell people that all wood is like our skin.  To keep our skin from deteriorating prematurely, we need to use lotion and sunscreen.  Anything made of natural wood and exposed to the elements needs to be treated the same way.  I like products like Sikkens.  They dry slower, which to me means they penetrate better, but nothing is going to be a magic bullet treatment for natural wood on the flat exposed to the elements.
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Offline tvgordon

  • Posts: 501
  • Springfield, Ohio
Re: Deck repair question
« Reply #50 on: July 13, 2017, 11:01 AM »
Thanks guys,  I hadn't heard that cedar isn't a good choice either until I talked to that contractor. 

Holzhacker,  the decks are priced the same around here too.  One estimate I got was $12k for treated,  $18k for cedar and $25k for composite.

I did see Menards has bamboo deck boards for special order. 
Tom