Author Topic: Framing modifications  (Read 844 times)

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Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 526
Framing modifications
« on: September 28, 2017, 04:10 PM »
I’m doing some basic seismic retrofitting, insulating, and drywalling of our garage located under our home, which is also my shop.  The home is late 1930s.  Since all the framing is currently exposed, I’m taking the opportunity to also stiffen the bouncy floor above, and modify framing to shore up weak spots...eg repair herringbone struts. 

My question concerns some existing framing that I don’t know the term for but have always wondered about.  These are 45 degree supports made from 1x6 that connect floor joists above to wall studs below.  Originally they were located on every other joist/stud, but one side of the house has seen most of them cut/removed over the decades I assume for plumbing/electrical  projects.  What exactly is the function of these supports and how effective are they?  I assume they partly support the joists somewhat reducing the effective span, and also prevent twisting of the joist?  Since they take up a decent amount of headroom and also present drywall challenges, I’m wondering about removing them, but replacing their “function” with the appropriate measures.  Thoughts?
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Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 629
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #1 on: September 28, 2017, 04:20 PM »
Just for clarification, that photo should be rotated clockwise 90 degrees correct?

Never run across anything like that here 3000 miles away but building methods
differ greatly especially when the structure was built before there probably was
a building code.

Maybe part of the problem you are having now is because some of these braces
were removed in the past.
« Last Edit: September 28, 2017, 04:26 PM by Bob D. »
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Offline rizzoa13

  • Posts: 545
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #2 on: September 28, 2017, 04:26 PM »
That's rack bracing like you would see on the underside of some two story decks. I've never seen it in a house but if it was on every other joist I'd assume when it was built that the house was specced with them in mind. Ie I wouldn't remove them. Sorry I can't be of more help.

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 526
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #3 on: September 28, 2017, 05:04 PM »
Thanks guys.  Yeah rizz I agree it seems, based on the fact these are 1x’s and land on either side of the joist and stud, that the purpose of these is sway/rack bracing as opposed to any meaningful joist load support.  I am adding H10ARs to every joist, which I believe should provide at least the same shear and uplift resistance as these, if not significantly better.  I thought I’d ask in case some have run across this before and what common practice is, but maybe this technique was rarer.
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1937
Framing modifications
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2017, 06:37 PM »
Is there a hole in the middle of those 1x boards?  Reason I ask is that my first house in the states was a 1930’s Craftsman and the basement had those same boards. The hole was for a chin-up bar that had been removed some time ago. I stored lumber above it like you have the clamps.

Cheers. Bryan.

Edit:  sorry, I completely missed the point that there used to be many more of the braces.


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Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 526
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2017, 06:47 PM »
Is there a hole in the middle of those 1x boards?  Reason I ask is that my first house in the states was a 1930’s Craftsman and the basement had those same boards. The hole was for a chin-up bar that had been removed some time ago. I stored lumber above it like you have the clamps.

Cheers. Bryan.

Edit:  sorry, I completely missed the point that there used to be many more of the braces.


Sent from my iPhone using Taps talk

Hehe, no holes for chin-up bars.  Yeah they do make for a nice little niche for storing long things, like extra molding or rarely used pipe clamps.  I will miss all the storage nooks and crannies I’ve had with the walls bare, but the truth is I was just collecting clutter and scraps anyways.  Like you see in the photo...never know when I might need 2x4 offcuts!  Sheesh.
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 526
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #6 on: September 28, 2017, 06:54 PM »
Just for clarification, that photo should be rotated clockwise 90 degrees correct?

Not sure what you’re seeing but on my computer the thumbnail is rotated 90 degrees but the photo opens in the correct orientation.  For reference, that’s the top of my drill press, which last I checked is still standing upright. :)
"What you have to do tomorrow, do today.  What you have to do today, do now."  - a wise grandfather who was clearly talking about purchasing Festools

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 629
Re: Framing modifications
« Reply #7 on: September 29, 2017, 06:24 AM »
Nope, for me both the thumbnail and the full size image are rotated CCW 90°.

Too bad there is not a way to rotate images after uploading to the forum. So
many different pieces or hardware not to mention the various software packages
out there for post-processing of images that are inconsistent in how they handle
images, not to mention the different file formats that it must be difficult for any
forum software to handle them all without a few glitches. But having the ability
to rotate the image in the forum software after uploading would solve all that.

It's not just here, I've seen it on other forums too over the years.

I'm getting tired of flipping my monitor on it's side. :)
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It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?