Author Topic: Garage cabinets  (Read 8181 times)

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Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Garage cabinets
« on: November 15, 2017, 01:41 PM »
I'm looking for a way to build modular type of cabinets for my garage.  I've had an account on here for a long time, with very little activity.  I've got a nice shop, and a garage, all of which is a little un-organized.  I want to build a 30' run of cabinets with a desktop in the middle.  I can provide more details later, but I'm just getting started. I have a nice table saw, but looking at festool, looks like it will make the job much easier.

I kind of want to get the process down before shopping for tools. I know it's expensive, but that's not an issue, I'm willing to spend the money on nice things that make my life easier.

This is the order I'm looking at.

1. Find the process I want to use to make the cabinets
2. Determine the material
3. Get the necessary tools, if I dont' already have them
4. Convince my neighbor that this will be fun
5. Build the cabinets

Thanks in advance

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Offline VW MICK

  • Posts: 868
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #1 on: November 15, 2017, 01:53 PM »
Hello and welcome

There are loads of posts on sys ports
Have a look at them

Mick

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #2 on: November 15, 2017, 02:03 PM »
"sys ports". I'm not sure I understand, sorry, can you explain?

Offline RKA

  • Posts: 1077
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #3 on: November 15, 2017, 02:42 PM »
Those are Festool's cabinets sold to accomodate the systainers the tools come in.  Lots of people have made DIY versions. 

A good resource for cabinet building using Festools is Eric kitchen build out series on youtube.  I think he changed the name to poplarshop.  You'll find a series of ~14 videos he put together which might be a nice primer on using Festools in a cabinet project. 
-Raj

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2017, 02:48 PM »
I'm sitting here watching poplar shop.  Great stuff.   I do way to much analysis.  I need to start the work. :)

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #5 on: November 15, 2017, 02:57 PM »
Is there any good reading material?  That works better for me than videos!  Something I can use in the shop. I'm a slow learn. I read, apply, break, fix, read, etc.


Offline Mr_Mod

  • Posts: 64
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2017, 03:25 PM »
Another good way to build your garage cabinets is to take a look at Ron Paulks mobile workshop, his ideas have been my inspiration in doing my garage from being a tip to something that has work space and storage. He is currently running a load of how to videos

Offline zapdafish

  • Posts: 465
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2017, 03:59 PM »

Looking to extend the batcave?

Kinda curious why you have to convince your neighbor its fun.
CT22, TS55, Kapex, RO150, Domino, RS 2 E

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2017, 04:09 PM »

Looking to extend the batcave?

Kinda curious why you have to convince your neighbor its fun.

I really don't have to.  We have fun.  We work together in a way that it's fun.  We think through just about every move and we miss very little.

Offline live4ever

  • Posts: 771
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2017, 04:43 PM »
If you really want a book, you might look at a good kitchen cabinet book.  Something like Bob Lang's Kitchen Cabinetmaker.  These will give an overview and how-to of how cabinets are typically constructed.  They will NOT cover how you'd, say, optimally use the Festool system to accomplish that.  You'll have to stick to YouTube for that. 

Essentially you're going to be making a run of simple "pantry" (read: tall) cabinets, with base cabs below the counter and uppers above.  Those are all just different sized plywood or melamine boxes stuck together.  You dress the whole thing up by making the interiors fit your needs (drawers vs doors), and by deciding aesthetically how you want them to look (face frame vs frameless, slab doors vs shaker, etc.).  It gets a little more complicated than that of course depending on what you choose.

The simplest method would be to go with a frameless system with "Euro" hinges (e.g. Blum).  Instead of a face frame, you edge band the 3/4" plywood/melamine that makes up the cabinet boxes.  The door or drawer fronts overlay this 3/4" edge.  Bore 32mm system holes on the inside of all cabinet sides to accommodate shelves or drawer slides or whatever else.  It's modular in a way, perfect for a garage.

A good way to learn how to construct this stuff is to consider what the process would be like if you bought, say, Ikea cabinet boxes.  You'd basically be doing the same thing from scratch.  Make sure your efforts are getting you something that is worth more to you than what you can buy for cheaper.  I know the experience and knowledge is worth something, but still.  Just saying.

As far as tools, if you want to talk about Festools that will make this fun (but are not by any means essential):

1)  Tracksaw (55 series saws are more appropriate for sheet goods).  You've got a lot of sheet goods in your future and breaking them down on the tablesaw would NOT be fun.  At least to me.  And maybe your neighbor.

2) MFT or similar workbench.  If you've got a decent, flat workbench with good work holding solutions, you're set.  Otherwise the MFT can help in that department, but it'll cost ya. :)

3)  Router (either OF1400 or 1010) and LR32.  If you do decide to go with a 32mm system approach, the LR32 will help you do that really efficiently.  It's nothing you can't do with a drill and template - but your results will be faster and cleaner and possibly more accurate.  To use the LR32, you need a Festool rail with holes - make sure you swap the standard rail for a "holey" one when you purchase the tracksaw if you think you might use the LR32 system now or in the future.  Both the 1400 and 1010 routers work with the LR32 system.  The 1010 is a little more nimble in use with the LR32, but it can't take 1/2" shank bits, so less of an all-around router compared to the 1400.

4)  Domino (the DF500 would be more appropriate than the 700.  Some people like to do cabinet or face frame or drawer joinery with Dominos...not at all necessary...glue and screws work just fine too)

Honestly (3) and (4) are nice-to's and (4) might not even be relevant depending on how you decide to construct your boxes and doors and drawers.  But this is a Festool forum so...
Current systainer to productivity ratio:  very high

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2017, 06:10 PM »
If you really want a book, you might look at a good kitchen cabinet book.  Something like Bob Lang's Kitchen Cabinetmaker.  These will give an overview and how-to of how cabinets are typically constructed.  They will NOT cover how you'd, say, optimally use the Festool system to accomplish that.  You'll have to stick to YouTube for that. 

Essentially you're going to be making a run of simple "pantry" (read: tall) cabinets, with base cabs below the counter and uppers above.  Those are all just different sized plywood or melamine boxes stuck together.  You dress the whole thing up by making the interiors fit your needs (drawers vs doors), and by deciding aesthetically how you want them to look (face frame vs frameless, slab doors vs shaker, etc.).  It gets a little more complicated than that of course depending on what you choose.

The simplest method would be to go with a frameless system with "Euro" hinges (e.g. Blum).  Instead of a face frame, you edge band the 3/4" plywood/melamine that makes up the cabinet boxes.  The door or drawer fronts overlay this 3/4" edge.  Bore 32mm system holes on the inside of all cabinet sides to accommodate shelves or drawer slides or whatever else.  It's modular in a way, perfect for a garage.

A good way to learn how to construct this stuff is to consider what the process would be like if you bought, say, Ikea cabinet boxes.  You'd basically be doing the same thing from scratch.  Make sure your efforts are getting you something that is worth more to you than what you can buy for cheaper.  I know the experience and knowledge is worth something, but still.  Just saying.

As far as tools, if you want to talk about Festools that will make this fun (but are not by any means essential):

1)  Tracksaw (55 series saws are more appropriate for sheet goods).  You've got a lot of sheet goods in your future and breaking them down on the tablesaw would NOT be fun.  At least to me.  And maybe your neighbor.

2) MFT or similar workbench.  If you've got a decent, flat workbench with good work holding solutions, you're set.  Otherwise the MFT can help in that department, but it'll cost ya. :)

3)  Router (either OF1400 or 1010) and LR32.  If you do decide to go with a 32mm system approach, the LR32 will help you do that really efficiently.  It's nothing you can't do with a drill and template - but your results will be faster and cleaner and possibly more accurate.  To use the LR32, you need a Festool rail with holes - make sure you swap the standard rail for a "holey" one when you purchase the tracksaw if you think you might use the LR32 system now or in the future.  Both the 1400 and 1010 routers work with the LR32 system.  The 1010 is a little more nimble in use with the LR32, but it can't take 1/2" shank bits, so less of an all-around router compared to the 1400.

4)  Domino (the DF500 would be more appropriate than the 700.  Some people like to do cabinet or face frame or drawer joinery with Dominos...not at all necessary...glue and screws work just fine too)

Honestly (3) and (4) are nice-to's and (4) might not even be relevant depending on how you decide to construct your boxes and doors and drawers.  But this is a Festool forum so...

Very nice.  Thank you.

Offline harry_

  • Posts: 1169
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2017, 06:55 PM »
Disclaimer: This post is for educational and entertainment purposes only. Any resemblance to real persons, living or dead is purely coincidental. Void where prohibited. Some assembly required. Batteries not included. Contents may settle during shipment. Use only as directed. No other warranty expressed or implied. This is not an offer to sell securities. May be too intense for some viewers. No user-serviceable parts inside. Subject to change without notice. One size fits all (very poorly).

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3559
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #12 on: November 15, 2017, 06:57 PM »
You might want to consider using a french cleat system to support your cabinets and keep them off the garage floor, allowing you to clean under them and keeping the cabinet bottoms up out of any spills. 

Space cleats at 12", 30", 48", 66" and 84" AFF, measured to the bottom of the bevel.  Use a minimum of two cleats per cabinet so any cabinet is supported by no less than two cleats.  Base cabinets are supported by two cleats plus two Ikea Capita (http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/60263574/) legs at the front for strength and to make under-cabinet cleaning easier.

Four standard cabinet heights:
31-1/2", 2 cleats
49-1/2", 3 cleats
67-1/2", 4 cleats
85-1/2", 5 cleats

Point of bottom cleat bevel spaced 7-1/2" above cabinet bottom, then every 18". 

Start 32mm system holes from top of cabinet sides on all cabinets. 

There's much more to this system.  I don't remember right now where I put the info on the cabinets, but I developed standardized sizes so that four sizes address all my needs and can be hung at any interval for best utilization.  If you're interested, PM me and I'll see if I can find the other stuff.  The LR 32 and the DF 500 play a big part in this system.  Also, one screw anchors the individual cabinets to the cleats, so it's very easy to reconfigure on the fly and re-secure them. 

- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Wooden Skye

  • Posts: 1120
  • My little girl was called home 12-28-15
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #13 on: November 15, 2017, 07:51 PM »
I'm going to take a complete opposite approach, and probably get bashed for saying.  If I had to do 30 feet of cabinets for a garage, and had to buy tooling to do the job, materials, time and place to store while building, would go to Home Depot, Lowe's or ikea and buy them. 
Bryan

TS 55, (2) 1400 Guide Rails, 1900 Guide Rail, MFT/3, Domino DF 500, 2 domino systainers, ETS 150/3, RO 90, CT 26, (2) OF1400, RO 150. RTS 400, LR 32 set, PS300 jigsaw, 3 abrasive systainers, (2) sys toolbox, (2) sys mini, clamps and other accesories

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #14 on: November 15, 2017, 08:06 PM »

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2017, 08:13 PM »
I'm going to take a complete opposite approach, and probably get bashed for saying.  If I had to do 30 feet of cabinets for a garage, and had to buy tooling to do the job, materials, time and place to store while building, would go to Home Depot, Lowe's or ikea and buy them.

I never said I had to buy tooling.  I've got more tools than most, I just need to buy more for this project. I really want something to help break down plywood, my table saw works great, but I think these products will work better.   I could go on and on with different scenarios, like why I have so many rifles, shotguns and 9mm pistols. 4 4x4's in my driveway, with two drivers in the home.

I've worked hard all my life and now I'm just having fun and looking for a way to make it a little easier.

And I agree, what you said does make sense. :)
 

Offline RussellS

  • Posts: 206
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2017, 08:21 PM »
I'm going to take a complete opposite approach, and probably get bashed for saying.  If I had to do 30 feet of cabinets for a garage, and had to buy tooling to do the job, materials, time and place to store while building, would go to Home Depot, Lowe's or ikea and buy them.

I agree with Wooden Skye.   years ago I bought, built, installed kitchen cabinets in a house my parents had.  Did it as cheaply and easily as I could.  I found somewhere kitchen cabinets that you could assemble on site.  Kind of like Ikea cabinets I guess.  Although I have never seen an Ikea cabinet so not sure.  They were particleboard boxes that I screwed together and then attached the doors.  Already predrilled for shelves, drawers, hinges.  They looked OK when done.  And maybe most importantly, they were cheap.  A HUGE criteria for my parents.  I'd suggest finding assemble yourself kitchen cabinets somewhere.  Make a "counter top" be ripping some sheets of 4x8 plywood in half.  Making 30 feet of plywood cabinets does not sound like much fun or enjoyment.  Plywood is not a "fun" wood.  Its very useful and has great purpose, but its just a tool, sort of.

Offline Chris Perren

  • Posts: 85
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2017, 09:00 PM »
@Sparktrician

I'm interested in this information .. I want to build a miter station with cabinets underneath.  I want each cabinets to be 30" deep to allow two systainers. The goal is to use the 32mm system to allow slides to be installed based on the systainer size.  Also it would best to be slightly off the concrete to prevent any moisture problems although my garage is dry

My biggest challenge is determining the best design ?? (1)  Build a workbench and then add cabinets similar to the video produce by

OR  (2) Build the cabinets and then add the work top which is similar to Tim's SYSPORT WORKBENCH although I would need to raise the cabinets off the floor with something (i.e. cleats, legs..)..

Any suggestions or recommendations? 
   
Thanks! - Chris
     
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 09:58 PM by Chris Perren »

Offline Peter_C

  • Posts: 600
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2017, 09:48 PM »
My preference for garage cabinets is ones that can handle the larger plastic bins. 4'x8'x24" with HD shelving that is non adjustable and routed/dado'd in for strength, with a solid back. Cheap white melamine doors, 2 per cabinet full height, with plywood for the carcass. 2"x4"s underneath for extra support above legs allows long junk to be stored under the cabinets and level the cabinets on what will most likely be an uneven floor.

Bins are what I build my own cabinets around. What you store and how you store it should dictate your design.

Largest cabinets are vertical, and some are horizontal, that my tool boxes sit under. One of my tool boxes has 1/4" plate on it along with a vise for HD work.

Offline ktb153

  • Posts: 9
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #19 on: November 16, 2017, 12:08 AM »
I know a lot of people might disagree but for garage/shop cabinets I prefer melamine. I'd only recommend melamine if you have a supplier to get cabinet grade though because the box store stuff is garbage. My supplier gets some pretty nice stuff that has a "textured" grain to it so it looks a lot nicer than just the regular maple look melamine like the insides of most kitchen cabinets. Frameless melamine cabinets can be built extremely quickly once you get a system down and I find the surface to be very durable. The Festools that I'd say would be most beneficial for this are the track saw and domino. Crosscut the sheets to your cabinet height with the tracksaw and then rip to your depth on the table saw. The domino makes it super easy to make the boxes and then just use some confirmat screws for assembly. The lr32 system is nice but is definitely pricey if this is the only time you'd be using it and it has a little bit of a learning curve, there's other options to drill 32mm holes that are much cheaper and will give you the same result. If the money you saved on the lr32 is burning a hole in your pocket throw it towards an edgebander, that'll make the job a million times easier and give you the best results.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 4010
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #20 on: November 16, 2017, 05:15 AM »
I'm looking for a way to build modular type of cabinets for my garage.  I've had an account on here for a long time, with very little activity.  I've got a nice shop, and a garage, all of which is a little un-organized.  I want to build a 30' run of cabinets with a desktop in the middle.  I can provide more details later, but I'm just getting started. I have a nice table saw, but looking at festool, looks like it will make the job much easier.

I kind of want to get the process down before shopping for tools. I know it's expensive, but that's not an issue, I'm willing to spend the money on nice things that make my life easier.

This is the order I'm looking at.

1. Find the process I want to use to make the cabinets
2. Determine the material
3. Get the necessary tools, if I dont' already have them
4. Convince my neighbor that this will be fun
5. Build the cabinets

Thanks in advance

I have a table saw as well.
Here is what I did...

Looked at the avalanche of crap,of crap in the garage like a snow bank, and thought "it is time".

First was to make a sketch. I decided on 305-mm and 610-mm spacing. Look up chaos-wall.
So I have 2 units on the floor 16" deep x 3' high x 8' long, and a wall unit 4x8 feet 16" deep which has shelving, Andrew in the other garage a wall unit 4x8'x16".

What did I use?.
Mostly a tracksaw.
A snappy tools 7x50 conformit bit, and some highpoint 7x50 conformat screws and #3 bit (the drill bit, screws and Phillip/position were via amazon)
A metric/imperial Fastcap brand tape measure, and an old square to mark holes for drilling and laying out hole positions.
And a cordless drill for the drill bit as well as driving the screws.

I used 16-mm (5/8") MDF... not pretty but better.

In other materials it would look a bit more flash.

Track saw was enough and easier than feeding sheets through.

Assemble require 2 people for most of it.

Lastly a corded hammer drill for the wall units to hang off a cleat, and Ramset to anchor the cleat and wall unit to bricks and/or 2x4s



« Last Edit: November 16, 2017, 05:42 AM by Holmz »

Offline Billedis

  • Posts: 605
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #21 on: November 16, 2017, 08:50 AM »
@Batman Also check out Marc Sommerfeld on youtube.  I have his router system and made several cabinets using it, from 30" to 96" and they also look really good.

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4993
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2017, 11:35 PM »
Here ya go

Kaos theorie AKA the guido wall

there are 3 parts, its in german but very easy to follow


Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #23 on: November 17, 2017, 07:27 PM »
I enjoyed this. My attention span is about nill, but I can watch just about any video how to using festools. 

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4993
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #24 on: November 17, 2017, 11:28 PM »
there are 3 parts to this did you watch all 3?

Offline tjskinny

  • Posts: 73
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #25 on: November 18, 2017, 01:32 AM »
Another Guido type system can be found here at Tim's site.

http://benchworks.be/en/my-projects/system-workshop/

He aslo has the design in printed format you can purchase.  The information is layed out very well.  And his new mfsc (multi fuctional shop cart) is a really good design as well.

http://benchworks.be/en/projects/mfsc-multi-function-shop-cart/

Todd

Offline mwbrewster

  • Posts: 39
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #26 on: January 09, 2018, 11:10 PM »
i watched erock's videos for sysports and just made the same ones.  Great primer for the True32 system (thanks Eric). Instead of using castors though, i mounted them along a wall at standard base cabinet height, with a 3/4" plywood countertop (in garage for shop).

I then watched his videos for the LR32 system and built some of those too.  I'm learning so the videos were tremendously helpful (monkey see, monkey do).

Only problem was that the more I watched the videos, the more tools i "had to have", the more cabinets i had to build. 

More videos, more tools, more cabinets..repeat...

Festool LR32 System

Systainer Shelves
« Last Edit: January 09, 2018, 11:20 PM by mwbrewster »

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4993
  • Does Anyone Know What Time It Is?
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #27 on: January 10, 2018, 12:49 PM »
Festool wise all you would need (minimum) , is a TS 55, 2ea 1400 tracks w/ track connectors, CT or equivalent and a cutting table. I like the MFT but its not necessary to do what you want .

Offline Jim Kirkpatrick

  • Posts: 1039
    • Jim Kirkpatrick Woodworking
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #28 on: January 10, 2018, 05:48 PM »
I'm going to take a complete opposite approach, and probably get bashed for saying.  If I had to do 30 feet of cabinets for a garage, and had to buy tooling to do the job, materials, time and place to store while building, would go to Home Depot, Lowe's or ikea and buy them.

Hear here!!!

Offline Batman

  • Posts: 18
Re: Garage cabinets
« Reply #29 on: January 11, 2018, 01:16 PM »
This probably makes the most sense, but I have never built cabinets and it's one of those things I've always wanted to do. It's really like a bucket list item for me. It's something new to learn and a challenge to me. It may be expensive but I bet when I'm done I'll have nice cabinets, a sense of accomplishment, and some nice equipment that I can sell if I want to and cabinets better than what I might have bought.

So far I've removed the old cabinets textured the garage, painted and now I'm painting the floor.