Author Topic: Making your own T-moulding  (Read 5062 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline webpp

  • Posts: 49
Making your own T-moulding
« on: April 07, 2017, 07:34 PM »
Hello guys,

Anyone here makes their own t-moulding? If so, could you tell me how?

I would like to make a t-moulding transition piece for the situation shown below. I would like the t-moulding to go at least 1inch deep into the ceramic side to cover some defects (scratches) and maybe 1/2inch the walnut hardwood side.

I have not installed the hardwood floor in yet, so the 7mm spacing is still adjustable, but I can't get anything less then 7mm.

Your instructions and help will be much appreciated, thanks.



« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 07:37 PM by webpp »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Steve Rowe

  • Posts: 824
  • Teach them safety when they are young.
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2017, 07:46 PM »
I have made tee molding for flooring on the spindle shaper using both rebate and adjustable groover cutters.  I recommend using an outboard fence to support the cut making the second rebate.  You could also do this on a router table with a dado/planing bit.  Using the router table gives you the option of routing a dado (leaving a bridge) and then rip the excess off at the table saw.  I leave about 3/4" space between the hardwood and tile flooring to leave enough meat to screw the molding into place using trim screws.  Your 7mm dimension is too thin IMO.
Steve

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1937
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2017, 07:57 PM »
I just made a custom one recently. All I used was my 850 planer. I did the rabbets on each side to leave the "T" and was able to trim to make each side according to my needs. Mine were a bit more even than your diagram.

I also did a 45d chamfer on each side to ease it a bit. I think it looks great and is the same wood as the tigerwood flooring. I will take a pic tomorrow if you want.

Do you have a planer?

Cheers. Bryan.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5167
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2017, 08:09 PM »
What tools do you have. Knowing this will help us help you.

Tom

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 634
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2017, 08:26 PM »
What tools do you have. Knowing this will help us help you.

Tom

Ditto.

This is a simple Table Saw exercise if you have one, and could be done
with nothing more than a good rip blade. A dado is not required.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline webpp

  • Posts: 49
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2017, 11:21 PM »
Hello guys, thank you for your quick replies.

I will take a pic tomorrow if you want.

Do you have a planer?

Cheers. Bryan.

Yes Bryan, I would love to see the picture.

I do have the Ridgid 13” planer. I don’t have a hand planer.

What tools do you have. Knowing this will help us help you.

Tom

Ditto.

This is a simple Table Saw exercise if you have one, and could be done
with nothing more than a good rip blade. A dado is not required.

Tom and Bob, here’s the list of relevant (I think) tools I have:

Bosch miter saw
Bosch table saw with Freud dado blades
Festool OF-1400
Festool TS-75
MFT top
Ridgid 13” Planer

I don’t have a router table, I want the European CMS that can accept both the OF-1400 and the TS-75. That’s why I’m still waiting.

Thank you both in advance for helping.

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5167
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2017, 11:46 PM »
Use the table saw.

Tom

Offline bkharman

  • Posts: 1937
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2017, 02:17 PM »
Hello guys, thank you for your quick replies.

I will take a pic tomorrow if you want.

Do you have a planer?

Cheers. Bryan.

Yes Bryan, I would love to see the picture.

I do have the Ridgid 13” planer. I don’t have a hand planer.



A hand plane or portable power one is where I was headed.  Like Others have said, the table saw can easily do this task.

Here are a few pics of the one I made. Might be difficult to see it, but it looks great in real life!

Cheers. Bryan.







Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?

Offline Don T

  • Posts: 1696
  • Phoenix, Az
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2017, 04:37 PM »
I have done it with a router table and two router bits. You will need to make a jig to do it safely.
RO150, C12, DF 500 Q, CT33, TS75, MFT3, Kapex 120, MFT3/Kapex, MFK 700, RO 90, ETS150/3, CT22, Centrotec Installers Kit, Parallel Guides & Ext, Carvex, OF1400, LR32 Set, MFS400 w/700 rails, KA UG Set, First Aid Kit, RTS 400 EQ, Vecturo OS400 Set, CT Wings, CT Drill Guide, Pro 5, CXS

Offline webpp

  • Posts: 49
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2017, 02:42 PM »
Hello guys, thank you for your quick replies.

I will take a pic tomorrow if you want.

Do you have a planer?

Cheers. Bryan.

Yes Bryan, I would love to see the picture.

I do have the Ridgid 13” planer. I don’t have a hand planer.



A hand plane or portable power one is where I was headed.  Like Others have said, the table saw can easily do this task.

Here are a few pics of the one I made. Might be difficult to see it, but it looks great in real life!

Cheers. Bryan.







Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Thank you very much for sharing the pic, Bryan.

Offline webpp

  • Posts: 49
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2017, 02:43 PM »
I have done it with a router table and two router bits. You will need to make a jig to do it safely.

Don, I'm planning to get the Grr-Ripper jig for the table saw. I think it should help cutting the t-moulding safely.

Offline Don T

  • Posts: 1696
  • Phoenix, Az
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2017, 03:28 PM »
I made a small board to fit the first cut so I could not rock the piece during the second cut.
RO150, C12, DF 500 Q, CT33, TS75, MFT3, Kapex 120, MFT3/Kapex, MFK 700, RO 90, ETS150/3, CT22, Centrotec Installers Kit, Parallel Guides & Ext, Carvex, OF1400, LR32 Set, MFS400 w/700 rails, KA UG Set, First Aid Kit, RTS 400 EQ, Vecturo OS400 Set, CT Wings, CT Drill Guide, Pro 5, CXS

Offline Bob D.

  • Posts: 634
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2017, 03:54 PM »
I made a small board to fit the first cut so I could not rock the piece during the second cut.

Yes, that works, I have done that too.
-----
It's a table saw, do you know where your fingers are?

Offline Getmaverick

  • Posts: 75
Re: Making your own T-moulding
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2017, 06:47 PM »
The way I made mine was with the table saw. Give yourself a big enough piece to safely work with. I wanted my t mold to be 1 1/2" wide, so I milled a piece of oak 1 1/2 x 3. Angled the blade and made the first pass for the facing then flip to do the other side. I wanted a radius on the facing not flat. Set for your dado and cut those, then just rip the t mold off with a regular blade. If you are doing a radius its best to sand and shape after the first step on the table saw.