Author Topic: Materials for making a porch lattice  (Read 1721 times)

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Offline Deke

  • Posts: 229
Materials for making a porch lattice
« on: April 23, 2018, 07:34 AM »
I need to replace quite a bit of porch lattice, would like it to last  long time and look nice, but am going back and forth on materials. Ideally I would like the whole thing to be in nice looking PVC type products, but there are a few problems. 1) Short of re-sawing on my bandsaw, the available PVC wood product material is fine for a frame, but too thick for making a lattice (and not cheap). 2) Pre-made lattice is either cheapo plastic/vinyl or some pretty rough looking wood products (at the big box guys) AND most is diagonal when I want vertical. I'm thinking I will go for the PVC wood stuff for a frame, buy a wood lattice and spray it (paint).

If anyone here has some tips or can describe what they have done, much appreciated.

 

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Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7337
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2018, 08:08 AM »
My experience is you don't want wood lattice if you can avoid it.  Painting it is a hassle and most pre-made lattice doesn't hold up well over time.  You can make your own, but again its a hassle.  The advantage is you can make it any way you want.  If your panels are large then a beefy, self made wood lattice is a good choice. 

You can get vinyl lattice in both diagonal or vertical/horizontal.  Vinyl holds paints better than pressure treated lumber (or any wood).  Vinyl has its limits on the size of panels you can make.  Its great on smaller panels, say 2' by 4'.  When the panels are much larger than that you can have issues with rippling and the panels can feel a bit flimsy.

Can you tell us a little more on what you're doing and where you intend to use the panels?           
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Offline tomp

  • Posts: 40
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2018, 08:48 AM »
Here's the vinyl lattice under my deck, bought the material at Lowes. Installed in 4' wide sections, they make an H-molding to connect vertically, and the top/bottom molding is screwed to the deck frame with SS screws. I power wash it twice a year and it still looks good after 4 years. I've taken it down once to power wash the deck posts and put on new finish, had to label the parts with masking tape so I could get them back in the same place. My wife is happy with it which is all that matters, but it does look good and dresses the deck up.

Offline Deke

  • Posts: 229
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2018, 09:05 AM »
My experience is you don't want wood lattice if you can avoid it.  Painting it is a hassle and most pre-made lattice doesn't hold up well over time.  You can make your own, but again its a hassle.  The advantage is you can make it any way you want.  If your panels are large then a beefy, self made wood lattice is a good choice. 

You can get vinyl lattice in both diagonal or vertical/horizontal.  Vinyl holds paints better than pressure treated lumber (or any wood).  Vinyl has its limits on the size of panels you can make.  Its great on smaller panels, say 2' by 4'.  When the panels are much larger than that you can have issues with rippling and the panels can feel a bit flimsy.

Can you tell us a little more on what you're doing and where you intend to use the panels?         

Thanks! We have two porches. One is over dirt, the other over a patio. The old wood lattice is falling apart. Each is about 7 feet by 20" Can you tell me where you found vertical vinyl lattice? I have only seen "diamond." Thanks again.

Offline Brice Burrell

  • Posts: 7337
  • Remodeling Contractor
    • The Green and Dark Blue blog
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2018, 09:33 AM »
Thanks! We have two porches. One is over dirt, the other over a patio. The old wood lattice is falling apart. Each is about 7 feet by 20" Can you tell me where you found vertical vinyl lattice? I have only seen "diamond." Thanks again.

Its what my local supplier has.  I'm sorry I don't know the brand.  A quick search shows you can order vinyl square lattice from Home Depot, https://www.homedepot.com/p/Veranda-0-2-in-x-48-in-x-8-ft-White-Vinyl-Square-Privacy-Lattice-73004051/202847977.  I've never used this particular product so I can't comment on the quality.
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Offline Deke

  • Posts: 229
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2018, 09:42 AM »

Its what my local supplier has.  I'm sorry I don't know the brand.  A quick search shows you can order vinyl square lattice from Home Depot, https://www.homedepot.com/p/Veranda-0-2-in-x-48-in-x-8-ft-White-Vinyl-Square-Privacy-Lattice-73004051/202847977.  I've never used this particular product so I can't comment on the quality.

Thanks, Yes, I saw that, but am wary of ordering sight unseen. Meanwhile this looks good, but $200 a shee, so I would be $400 into this project! http://www.permalatt.com/products/lattice/durashell/1-square/

I'm going to make the rounds of various lumber and building supply places. However, thanks for validating my concern about using wood. I'm going to avoid that 100%. I'm sure I can find something that looks good and wont break the bank.

Offline TinyShop

  • Posts: 182
Re: Materials for making a porch lattice
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2018, 12:13 PM »
The lattice around our house (which encloses a total of two porches) consists of Western red cedar lattice and "2-by" Western red cedar framing. I fabricated the framing out of an old red cedar picnic table that I salvaged (for free) and disassembled. I came by the lattice (which was new) via craigslist. Total cost (not including stainless deck screws) was about US$50 (and I still have eight sheets of 4X8 lattice left over - about $50 worth based on the $100 that I paid for the entire load). This was 8 years ago and I accomplished the mitered joinery solely via the use of screws (no glue, dominos, etc.).

Cedar lattice will last for many decades (or longer?) if protected by decent overhangs and properly guttered roofs (assuming proper allowance is given for regular drying). Toward this end, I also made sure to bed the bottom of the lattice in 3/4" crushed stone - a 2' deep X 3' wide band of which runs around the entire perimeter of the house; a crushed stone "drip line", if you will (even though the entire house is fitted with gutters meaning water doesn't actually "drip" from any of the eaves). We have full-on snow winters where we are and, aside from the cedar darkening/blacken'ing (which is easily removed, if desired, using a pressure washer), it looks to be in perfect condition (no rot, no insect damage, etc.).

As a related aside, half of the property is enclosed by northern white cedar fencing & posts (that we purchased and installed), and we used white cedar decking and trim on an out building (accompanying salvaged redwood clapboards over a rain screen wall), all of which is the same age (~eight years) and all of which is going strong. Cedar (and redwood, for that matter) will dramatically change color if one abstains, like we did, from the use of all finishes/preservatives, etc. We happen to like the natural color variations that result from exposure to the elements. To do it again, we would likely make use of the Japanese technique of Shou Sugi Ban since we've come to realize that we like the deep color it imparts to wood (and since it supposedly further adds to the wood's longevity). We've learned much about the ills of industrial toxics and now do what we can to totally avoid (or greatly minimize) our use of synthetic chemicals and materials, in all areas of life.       
« Last Edit: April 23, 2018, 12:15 PM by TinyShop »