Author Topic: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting  (Read 11074 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline J0hn

  • Posts: 116
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2017, 08:38 PM »

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #31 on: August 21, 2017, 08:58 PM »
Works for me. I tried the quoted link and it also worked.

I'm not good at all with computer stuff.

Tom

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #32 on: August 21, 2017, 09:01 PM »

Offline J0hn

  • Posts: 116
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #33 on: August 21, 2017, 09:07 PM »
Maybe Yes?

That worked - very nice

"Baron Basement"

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #34 on: August 21, 2017, 09:10 PM »
Maybe Yes?

That worked - very nice

"Baron Basement"

Thanks.

Remodeling is easy for me---computer stuff eludes me.

Tom

Offline johnesher

  • Posts: 21
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #35 on: August 21, 2017, 09:54 PM »
I received a PM telling me the other link did not work. Maybe this will..

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipP1Nd2-dVYT81n6oW4TxoaaYFonW0QnLrHmy12b

Tom

Still no go...

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #36 on: August 21, 2017, 10:59 PM »

Offline johnesher

  • Posts: 21
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #37 on: August 22, 2017, 08:22 AM »
I received a PM telling me the other link did not work. Maybe this will..

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipP1Nd2-dVYT81n6oW4TxoaaYFonW0QnLrHmy12b

Tom

Still no go...

@johnesher,

Try the link in post 32.

Tom

That link worked. Nice work down there. Love the LED lights in the handrail on the stairs.

How did you secure the replacement flooring? And was that your damage, or theirs?

Offline tjbnwi

  • Posts: 5702
  • Cedar Tucky Indiana
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #38 on: August 22, 2017, 11:34 PM »
I received a PM telling me the other link did not work. Maybe this will..

https://photos.google.com/album/AF1QipP1Nd2-dVYT81n6oW4TxoaaYFonW0QnLrHmy12b

Tom

Still no go...

@johnesher,

Try the link in post 32.

Tom

That link worked. Nice work down there. Love the LED lights in the handrail on the stairs.

How did you secure the replacement flooring? And was that your damage, or theirs?

Trimmed the bottom of the groove off, a little bit of glue to secure it to the existing flooring.

Not my damage, their son dropped a weight on the floor.

Tom

Offline Tim Raleigh

  • Posts: 3522
    • Oakville Cabinetry
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #39 on: August 24, 2017, 06:08 PM »
Now I need some advice – I've had three people ask for something similar in their house (since posting on FB yesterday).

What would you charge for something like this?
It depends, are you quoting design, installation and painting/finishing?

4 x material costs works out to about 20hrs @ 50.00 hr. A pro could install it in that time. Finishing/ and or painting is additional.

Tim

Offline mkasdin

  • Posts: 119
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #40 on: September 27, 2017, 10:02 PM »
The wainscoting on the stairwell looks more involved. I think a flat rate is the best way to go. It's mostly finish work, paint grade with angled cuts and no coping and not staingrade. So i would add a little to make up for any time discrepancies and snags. Any misalignments you could fill. Also it's repetitive pattern so some templates and jigs could speed up the task?  Just my thought never done wainscoting I like simple.

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 610
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #41 on: January 15, 2018, 07:54 PM »
Another way to gauge what you should charge is find a couple of trim carpenters come and price out work at your place.  Play kinda dumb and say you would like to replicate your work in another part of the house, just say it was there when you bought it.  You could also do the same with the people who asked you to do the work.  As for materials, make sure you keep track of everything, glue, caulk, nails, brushes, etc.  In the end it all factors in.

Not cool to waste anyone's time.

Offline JimH2

  • Posts: 610
Re: My Wife's Take on Wainscoting
« Reply #42 on: January 15, 2018, 08:45 PM »
...wanted a 2/3 wall height, but because of the stair ceiling I didn't think it would look right. So I matched it to an existing entry coat/shoe cubby and it ended up being 54". I understand that's a little untraditional, but the "client" is very pleased.

Your work looks great and the client is happy with it and that is all that matters. There is a lot of material on proportions that can help you make decisions on future projects. I also take pictures and measurements (sometimes) or use a person as a point of reference when I am in an historical home. This is where you can find solutions to difficult transition and termination problems that are not covered in books, but always occur. Some of my opinions and advice based on my experience:

  • Go large on trim and avoid one-piece baseboard (chair rail and crown as well). I rarely go smaller than a 1"x6" with a separate base cap (looks better and solves the problem of walls that are not flat. For casing a 3 1/2" or wider material at a minimum with the option to go a little wider with a back band. This adds depth to avoid returns or to at least minimize their impact.
  • Avoid using the stock moldings from the home improvement centers. You can do build-ups with stock moldings or find a distributor with access to infinitely more options. I realize that sometimes you can't because of the rest of house or adjacent rooms, but if you can it might generate additional work for you. I have had customers order new work to other rooms once they see what properly sized trim looks in a room. I am yet to see a McMansion interior with trim that is not massively undersized or even worse windows with no trim and/or undersized stools.

  • Prime the front and backside of all trim before installing it to seal it. It's an extra step, but minimizes issues from shrinkage. It never looks good to see unpainted wood showing that was originally hidden.
  • Put the same amount of time into woodwork that will be natural or painted. Don't even think that caulk is the answer to a short cut or a bad cope.
  • Take lots of pictures of your finished work with closeups along with some of the before photos.