Author Topic: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool  (Read 994 times)

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Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« on: August 09, 2017, 01:02 AM »
Hi Everyone

i am getting ready to jump into the Festool obsession.  This is to compliment my DIY speaker obsession and other projects.  Needless to say this is a hobby and not a profession for me.  I have a couple of needs to help with my 1st compulsion of building speakers, that is a track saw and a plunge router.   I do not have a dedicated workspace and the portability of the Festool system plays well with my limited space.  I have seen a Multifunction Worktable video on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5YzIwK-g0E&t=98s)for Festool that really looks appealing for me for a quick workspace setup on an outdoor patio I have.

My questions comes in that there appear to be a myriad of options for just the 2 items I need most. i.e. the TS55 I can get the standard track or the "holy" tracks.  What would the holy tracks give me down the road?  Initially I will be working with mdf the most.  There may be some Hard wood boards.  I am thinking of speaker baffles.  This woulds require 1/2 or 3/4 inch round overs and the ability to route the speaker holes.  Will the 1010 be fine for this work?  Also with the 1010 is there an easy way to get the Jasper Jig to mount to it?  The research I have done shows it will not mount to the Jasper Jig without mods. 

I will be looking to a CT Midi system (or?) and Domino down the line.

Your recommendations are appreciated.

Thanks!



Offline LooseSox

  • Posts: 71
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2017, 01:20 AM »
As a constructor of speakers myself, unless you plan on making matching entrainment cabinets with adjustable shelves or heading into kitchen carcases, the holey rail would be of little benefit to you.

My front baffles are typically 18mm thick as a minimum so the small router may take a while longer to work its way through the board in a few passes. I'd go the OF1400. That will be able to do small roundovers without being too bulky and will make short work of the cutouts with am agressive 1/2" shank bit. I can't speak for compatibility with the Jasper jig as I have never used it.

The TS makes short work of cutting the boards to size, especially if you don't have a table saw. It's plenty accurate enough to cut all the bevels on a MDF box for a seamless finish. The domino is great for reinforcing long mitres too so there's now issie of a box blowing itself apart with high power bass drivers.

I'd look into the MFT3 table setup or just get yourself the Parf Guide system amd make your own custom sized top and use Parf Dogs. Cheaper than the MFT3 and you can use the savings towards the domino or extractor.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2544
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2017, 01:39 AM »
Mmm! Limited space immediatly  brings to mind the CT Midi or larger CT as a short term rather than long term purchase. Both the router and track saw are big dust and chip generators, and you work with MDF which has some 'nasties' within. Better in a vac than your lungs!

In most Festool markets you can bundle a CT with a tool and get some discount on the purchase.

And a big welcome to the FOG.

 [welcome]
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 01:43 AM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline eddomak

  • Posts: 261
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2017, 01:49 AM »
I do not have a dedicated workspace and the portability of the Festool system plays well with my limited space.  I have seen a Multifunction Worktable video on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5YzIwK-g0E&t=98s)for Festool that really looks appealing for me for a quick workspace setup on an outdoor patio I have.

Welcome! Just a quick note that the worktable you linked to in YouTube is the "MFTC (Multi Function Tool Cart)" which cannot be purchased as a unit, but you can buy plans and it needs to be constructed by yourself. The main thread for that is here. This might take you a bit of time, and might put the Domino on your "immediate purchase" list instead.

Depending on how much space you have in regards to having an MFT style top, you might want to have a quick look at how some people have put a folded MFT on a rolling cabinet, or perhaps at an "MFT Slab", or creating a table with the grid pattern holes using various methods.


Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2017, 08:40 AM »
As a constructor of speakers myself, unless you plan on making matching entrainment cabinets with adjustable shelves or heading into kitchen carcases, the holey rail would be of little benefit to you.

My front baffles are typically 18mm thick as a minimum so the small router may take a while longer to work its way through the board in a few passes. I'd go the OF1400. That will be able to do small roundovers without being too bulky and will make short work of the cutouts with am agressive 1/2" shank bit. I can't speak for compatibility with the Jasper jig as I have never used it.

The TS makes short work of cutting the boards to size, especially if you don't have a table saw. It's plenty accurate enough to cut all the bevels on a MDF box for a seamless finish. The domino is great for reinforcing long mitres too so there's now issie of a box blowing itself apart with high power bass drivers.

I'd look into the MFT3 table setup or just get yourself the Parf Guide system amd make your own custom sized top and use Parf Dogs. Cheaper than the MFT3 and you can use the savings towards the domino or extractor.


Thanks for the heads up on the OF1400.  I am looking to build a entertainment center and closet organizers down the line.  Thanks for clarifying why I would need it.

I have built Finalists and Volts but I want add Statement IIs for the ribbon tweeters.  These will be one of my first build with the new tools.

Thanks for the info.

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2017, 08:43 AM »
Mmm! Limited space immediatly  brings to mind the CT Midi or larger CT as a short term rather than long term purchase. Both the router and track saw are big dust and chip generators, and you work with MDF which has some 'nasties' within. Better in a vac than your lungs!

In most Festool markets you can bundle a CT with a tool and get some discount on the purchase.

And a big welcome to the FOG.

 [welcome]


Ya, just not sure my pocket book can handle all the entry tools I need at once.  Thanks for the tip to look at a bigger CT.  It was a concern that the one I was looking at would be big enough. 

I'll definitely look into a package deal especially if it can save a few dollars. 

Thanks for the info.

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2017, 08:49 AM »
I do not have a dedicated workspace and the portability of the Festool system plays well with my limited space.  I have seen a Multifunction Worktable video on youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5YzIwK-g0E&t=98s)for Festool that really looks appealing for me for a quick workspace setup on an outdoor patio I have.

Welcome! Just a quick note that the worktable you linked to in YouTube is the "MFTC (Multi Function Tool Cart)" which cannot be purchased as a unit, but you can buy plans and it needs to be constructed by yourself. The main thread for that is here. This might take you a bit of time, and might put the Domino on your "immediate purchase" list instead.

Depending on how much space you have in regards to having an MFT style top, you might want to have a quick look at how some people have put a folded MFT on a rolling cabinet, or perhaps at an "MFT Slab", or creating a table with the grid pattern holes using various methods.

Ya I knew it needed to be built.  Not sure that it will be my first project though. I need to have a project or two under my belt and in front of my wife to ensure I keep the WAF (Wife Acceptance Factor) on my side  ;) 


Thanks for the info.

Offline HarveyWildes

  • Posts: 525
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2017, 09:29 AM »
When I bought my track saw (TS 55), I asked the salesperson to switch out the standard rail for a holey rail.  No problem, so the holey rail was no additional cost.  Most places will do that if they have the holey rail in stock.

I've not heard that there is any downside to the holey rail in terms of function or stability, so doing that kind of swap seems like a net plus to me.


Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 34
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2017, 09:32 AM »
I'm in a similar situation but at least I have the back area of my 1 car garage to keep systainers and an MFT/3 setup along with a 6' craftsman workbench.

So far between Craigslist wheeling and dealing and some generous gifts I've acquired a CT26, TS55, Domino w/ tenon kit, MFT/3, and a Pro 5 Ltd sander. Only the TS55, CT26, and Pro 5 were purchased new. I saved $500 buying the Domino second hand virtually unused with a complete tenon set and the MFT/3 virtually unused with a dent in the leg. I have my eye on the OF 1400 next. What you're going to run into like me is having everything organized to where you can use it. It's a chicken and egg scenario. You need to be setup to make things but to make things you need to be setup. I wanted the MFTC then I thought about making the MFTslab. Ultimately the MFT/3 deal fell in my lap and I pounced on it because if you want to fold it up it doesn't take much space and when you want to use it I just don't see a better option. Having a rail mounted on adjustable height hinges squared up to the dog holes ready to go is going to be a big time saver over the other DIY options. But if space is at a premium you have to make that decision for yourself.

The other issue you're going to run into is storing and cutting down the sheet goods. I really don't have much space for that so I imagine I'll be buying it as I need it and cutting down 4'x8' sheets the same day I get them.

I went the CT26 over the midi since it's more capable with accessories if I decide down the road I want them and the price jump wasn't really horrendous. I think either would be fine capacity wise.

I imagine at some point I'm going to phase out the Craftsman 6' bench and build the MFTC and side tables so I can roll it out to the driveway to work with the larger sheet goods and double as an assembly table then bring them in for smaller cuts. I have the plans and they're a bit intimidating for me so like you I'll do some easier projects first to get comfortable with the tools.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 09:36 AM by DynaGlide »

Offline Gregor

  • Posts: 414
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2017, 05:13 PM »
Holey rail, as others have stated: get in with the saw for free so you have it should you ever go for a LR32, no downsides here.

CT Vaccum: A router will make lots of chips quickly (as you remove plenty of material in a short time) so a bigger vac makes sense (or add a cyclone infront to save on bags, but that's not supported by Festool). You don't want to run a router or the TS without a vac when working on MDF (as it's a mess and quite unhealthy), plus you can't with the Domino (as it would destroy the tool, or at least the cutter).

Should you decide on a MFT/3: look at the topics here regarding setting it up the first time (before you do a cut into the surface), it might not be perfectly square out of the box.

Also keep in mind that you'll need clamps (Bessey Revo KVR are nice for building boxes) and stuff, also some material to play with your new tools before you let them loose on expensive material (where you get the quantity you need and not 50+% more to destroy in experiments) obtained for a special project...

Online SRSemenza

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  • Posts: 7817
  • Finger Lakes Region, NY State , USA
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2017, 05:27 PM »
Welcome to the forum, Hogster!  [smile]

   I see you have already received plenty of input above. 1010 or 1400 will do the job but the 1400, in my opinion, has more versatility and is better on DC and easy set up than the 1010.

   I second the thought on the larger vac CT26 or 36 (NOT AC) due to the router work the capacity will pay for itself in bags in short order.


Seth

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2017, 05:35 PM »
When I bought my track saw (TS 55), I asked the salesperson to switch out the standard rail for a holey rail.  No problem, so the holey rail was no additional cost.  Most places will do that if they have the holey rail in stock.

I've not heard that there is any downside to the holey rail in terms of function or stability, so doing that kind of swap seems like a net plus to me.

Good to know thank you.  If my saw doesn't come with the holey rail I will be sure to ask for it.

Thanks.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2017, 05:44 PM by hogster »

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #12 on: August 09, 2017, 05:43 PM »
I'm in a similar situation but at least I have the back area of my 1 car garage to keep systainers and an MFT/3 setup along with a 6' craftsman workbench.

So far between Craigslist wheeling and dealing and some generous gifts I've acquired a CT26, TS55, Domino w/ tenon kit, MFT/3, and a Pro 5 Ltd sander. Only the TS55, CT26, and Pro 5 were purchased new. I saved $500 buying the Domino second hand virtually unused with a complete tenon set and the MFT/3 virtually unused with a dent in the leg. I have my eye on the OF 1400 next. What you're going to run into like me is having everything organized to where you can use it. It's a chicken and egg scenario. You need to be setup to make things but to make things you need to be setup. I wanted the MFTC then I thought about making the MFTslab. Ultimately the MFT/3 deal fell in my lap and I pounced on it because if you want to fold it up it doesn't take much space and when you want to use it I just don't see a better option. Having a rail mounted on adjustable height hinges squared up to the dog holes ready to go is going to be a big time saver over the other DIY options. But if space is at a premium you have to make that decision for yourself.

The other issue you're going to run into is storing and cutting down the sheet goods. I really don't have much space for that so I imagine I'll be buying it as I need it and cutting down 4'x8' sheets the same day I get them.

I went the CT26 over the midi since it's more capable with accessories if I decide down the road I want them and the price jump wasn't really horrendous. I think either would be fine capacity wise.

I imagine at some point I'm going to phase out the Craftsman 6' bench and build the MFTC and side tables so I can roll it out to the driveway to work with the larger sheet goods and double as an assembly table then bring them in for smaller cuts. I have the plans and they're a bit intimidating for me so like you I'll do some easier projects first to get comfortable with the tools.

Hi DynaGlide.  I love the name.  I rode a softail for years.  I miss the bike but do not miss the crazy drivers out here in California.

It does sounds like we have similar situations and potential solutions.  Like you I will also be buying my sheet goods on an as needed basis.

Thank you for the advice.  A larger CT seems to be a common theme,  I'm taking the recommendation to heart.


Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #13 on: August 09, 2017, 05:48 PM »
Holey rail, as others have stated: get in with the saw for free so you have it should you ever go for a LR32, no downsides here.

CT Vaccum: A router will make lots of chips quickly (as you remove plenty of material in a short time) so a bigger vac makes sense (or add a cyclone infront to save on bags, but that's not supported by Festool). You don't want to run a router or the TS without a vac when working on MDF (as it's a mess and quite unhealthy), plus you can't with the Domino (as it would destroy the tool, or at least the cutter).

Should you decide on a MFT/3: look at the topics here regarding setting it up the first time (before you do a cut into the surface), it might not be perfectly square out of the box.

Also keep in mind that you'll need clamps (Bessey Revo KVR are nice for building boxes) and stuff, also some material to play with your new tools before you let them loose on expensive material (where you get the quantity you need and not 50+% more to destroy in experiments) obtained for a special project...

I typically use a resperator or mask when working with MDF but I would like to get away from that.  Thanks for all the tips, Ill definitely be looking a the MFT setup topics.


Thanks again.

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #14 on: August 09, 2017, 05:57 PM »
Welcome to the forum, Hogster!  [smile]

   I see you have already received plenty of input above. 1010 or 1400 will do the job but the 1400, in my opinion, has more versatility and is better on DC and easy set up than the 1010.

   I second the thought on the larger vac CT26 or 36 (NOT AC) due to the router work the capacity will pay for itself in bags in short order.


Seth

Thanks for the welcome SRSemenza.  A larger CT seems to be the consensus,  I will definitely be looking into it.

Thanks again.

Offline hogster

  • Posts: 10
Re: Getting Ready to Jump into Festool
« Reply #15 on: August 09, 2017, 06:00 PM »
When I bought my track saw (TS 55), I asked the salesperson to switch out the standard rail for a holey rail.  No problem, so the holey rail was no additional cost.  Most places will do that if they have the holey rail in stock.

I've not heard that there is any downside to the holey rail in terms of function or stability, so doing that kind of swap seems like a net plus to me.

Awesome.  I'll be asking.  Thanks for the input.