Author Topic: A dominoed zigzag end table  (Read 3227 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rocker

  • Posts: 63
  • Furniture maker, Queensland, Australia
    • Build your own rocking chair
A dominoed zigzag end table
« on: May 13, 2007, 05:42 AM »
Here is a jarrah zigzag end table that I built with domino joinery to match my zigzag chairs. The leg miter joints are each aligned with a 6 x 40 mm domino, and locked by a single shop-made 6 x 40 mm through locking tenon, whose mortise was milled after the miter joint had been glued up with epoxy. Since the Domino's maximum milling depth is 28 mm, the bottom of the mortise had to be drilled out and cleaned up with a file. The feet, legs, and top rails of the table are made from 25 x 35 mm stock. The end-rail's miter joints are reinforced by 5 x 30 mm dominoes in horizontal mortises. The table's frame was easily able to bear my weight.

Rocker
Free downloadable plans and articles on jigs and furniture on my blog:
http://rockerswoodwork.blogspot.com/

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline Matthew Schenker

  • Posts: 2619
Re: A dominoed zigzag end table
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2007, 07:01 AM »
Rocker,
Excellent work, again!  Thanks for sharing this latest design with us.  You are definitely opening my eyes to even more potential Domino joinery.

Just one question -- what did your neighbors think of you standing out there on a zigzag platform?  Or are they used to seeing this sort of thing?

Matthew
FOG Designer and Creator

Offline Rocker

  • Posts: 63
  • Furniture maker, Queensland, Australia
    • Build your own rocking chair
Re: A dominoed zigzag end table
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2007, 12:56 AM »
Matthew,

Minor eccentricities are well tolerated in Oz, and anyway most of my neighbors are horses, who have better things to think about.

In making the frame for a second table, I found that it was easier to rout the mortise for the locking tenon on my mortising jig (see my blog below for free plans of the jig) with a 3/8" spiral bit with a 2" cutting length; in this way I could rout the full depth of the through mortise.

David
« Last Edit: May 14, 2007, 12:59 AM by Rocker »
Free downloadable plans and articles on jigs and furniture on my blog:
http://rockerswoodwork.blogspot.com/

Offline Barryduck

  • Posts: 19
Re: A dominoed zigzag end table
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2007, 04:56 AM »
HI Rocker,
It's great to have other Aussies contributing to this site and I have added your website to my favourites for a more in depth review when I get time. On first impression your work looks very impressive and its very generous of you to provide plans etc for others to enjoy.

cheers

Barry

Offline Dave Rudy

  • Posts: 771
  • Coloroda Front Range, in the lee of Pikes Peak
Re: A dominoed zigzag end table
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2007, 09:29 AM »
Here is a jarrah zigzag end table that I built with domino joinery to match my zigzag chairs. The leg miter joints are each aligned with a 6 x 40 mm domino, and locked by a single shop-made 6 x 40 mm through locking tenon, whose mortise was milled after the miter joint had been glued up with epoxy. Since the Domino's maximum milling depth is 28 mm, the bottom of the mortise had to be drilled out and cleaned up with a file. The feet, legs, and top rails of the table are made from 25 x 35 mm stock. The end-rail's miter joints are reinforced by 5 x 30 mm dominoes in horizontal mortises. The table's frame was easily able to bear my weight.

Rocker

Rocker,

I'm still waiting for the pic of you SITTING on the table with the other three guys in your lap.

LOL

Dave


Great table, BTW.  I'm adding it to the list of projects right after the zigzag chair.

Dave
« Last Edit: May 14, 2007, 09:31 AM by Dave Rudy »