Author Topic: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.  (Read 10329 times)

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Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« on: April 03, 2016, 10:04 AM »
With additions to the tools and equipment required for the landscape care of over 5 acres, a store shed I built ten years ago needs to be rebuilt and enlarged. I want this enlarged and refurbished shed to be representative of the true Australian shed - post and rail framing and clad in slab timber and/or rusting galvanised iron.

I have second hand galvanised iron from partial demolition of a small cottage, colourbond remnants from our house build and Oregon posts and treated pine rails from a demolished dog enclosure. At the moment I am cutting to approx size and preasure washing the galvanised iron prior to treating it with Penetrol. This I am told will assist in preserving its current patina. The Oregon posts are also having rot removed from their base, stain sanded off and paint applied.

I do not want the new shed to look like the new iron sheds now dominating the Australian rural landscape, many of which are poor representations of Nth American barn heratige rather than our own rural history.
http://www.fairdinkumsheds.com.au/products/products-0

I have started looking through some image collections representing some of the look and design of what I am after -
http://oldsheds.com.au/?page_id=7

If your are further interested you might  like to google - 'the historical australian shed' and then select images.

To assist in refining my ideas I have created some image collages; here are two -





As this project proceeds over our winter months, interrupted I am sure by rain (we really need some) and other projects, I will post further comments and images.

Meantime, please feel free to make any comments.
« Last Edit: April 09, 2016, 08:05 PM by Untidy Shop »
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Offline iamnothim

  • Posts: 1423
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2016, 10:22 AM »
Now, this is going to be very cool.
My reputation pre-deceases me.

Offline Festoolfootstool

  • Posts: 2076
  • The trouble with Bob is its all about Bob
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2016, 10:41 AM »
Do have any local stone you could incorporate into the design ?
If the milk turns out to be sour, I ain't the kind of **** to drink it.......

Why do Festool accessories only have a two month guarantee here in the UK ?

Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2016, 10:52 AM »
If your going to be designing / making your own space there will be no excuse for it to be "Untidy" anymore.

Good luck this should be a rewarding project for you, I looked at the old sheds link - image 1 would offer great ventilation but I'd stay away from that one. Images 2 and 3 are my favorites with 2 the best, the two sections could offer a material storage, breakdown and prep area and the other an assembly and finish area.  lots of options should be fun.


Offline Jbmccombe

  • Posts: 43
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2016, 12:26 PM »
Maybe time to get the film crew over and produce the Saturday morning show "This Old Shed".

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2016, 06:44 PM »
Thank you to those who have commented so far.
Do have any local stone you could incorporate into the design ?

@Festoolfootstool

Many historical stone agricultural buildings can now only be seen publicly on Natuonal Trust sites or Private Property Open Days and are mainly found on estates originally owned by 'landed gentry' or pastoral squatters who eventually became wealthy as wool prices increased over the 1800s. One of the views from our property is the Victorian Western District Plains, which are an extensive larva plain with extinct and dormant volcanos and lakes. Consequently there are many historical dry stone fences and buildings made from basalt rock, mainly cleared from the ground surface.




Not Our View
http://www.astoneuponastone.com/coranga.html
http://otway.biz/stoneyrises.html

I do not have the skill for this work, nor is it the style or material I have in mind. However, I do have a slight slope to one corner to contend with, perhaps some stone work with mortar along the footings on that corner? The floor will be a continuance of the compacted crushed basalt in the original shed area.

@Woodn't It Be Neat
No the Untidy Shop is another project - slowly happening. This is a shed for ride on mowers, slashers, chain saws and sprayers. Hence the historical agricultural design concepts being explored. Hopefully - it will 'Be Neat'.



View of inside current shed. At the moment the mowers have to be backed out to get to other items.

@iamnothim
Once again you inspire me.  [smile]

@Jbmccombe
Thanks, I think The Shed Show will be this Thread, and certainly not weekly.  [smile]

@Tinker  - Thought you might be interested in the Dry Stone Wall links.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2016, 03:01 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7647
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2016, 12:27 AM »
Will this "shed" have space for the traditional Australian outback bar ?? [wink]

For the nozzies .. look up "outback pub" images.

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7647
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2016, 02:47 AM »


Pertaining to my last post ,...

Offline Locky

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2016, 04:43 AM »
Can't wait to see what you do, we had a 150yr old homestead in Mudgee it the style your after. The walls were slabs of ironbark and the rafters were tree branches about 100mm thick, it even had a mister ed door as the front door

Offline jobsworth

  • Posts: 4572
  • Burger Babe Says: I Even Buy Green Bananas
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2016, 01:46 PM »
Will this "shed" have space for the traditional Australian outback bar ?? [wink]

For the nozzies .. look up "outback pub" images.

Not to mention a outback BBQ and a fridge for the shrimp and beer
Loving the Calif sun....

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Garden Shed.
« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2016, 11:56 PM »
Spent the last few days cutting and treating recycled corrugated iron and further refining my design ideas.

My supplies of  recycled corrugated iron have been rough cut to approx. 2400mm and pressure washed. i have started cleaning them with Metholated Spirits and experimenting coating with Penetrol to protect the current patina. Great stuff but 24 hrs to dry. The metal off cuts were taken to the metal recyclers and the trailer returned with basalt crush for the shed floor.



Further refining the design intention. The extension will be clad in the recycled corrugated iron with the vertical posts but not the rails visible outside. There will be some rock work to support and contain the fine crushed rock extension flooring  on the sloping NW corner [@Festoolfootstool].

Looking at the existing shed exterior, the vertical  150/25mm rough sawn treated pine boards will be painted in Wilderness Grey. The current Truedeck cladding and other timber cladding will be replaced with a mixture of remnant colorbond  corrugated sheets in Wilderness Grey and some corrigated iron. The existing Zincalume corrugated roof line will continue over the extension.

Inside the extension the rear wall will be slabbed with rough sawn timber, and together with all the new rails, oiled with sump oil or laninen  [@Locky ] and hooks for implements attached. This will also make an excellent home for the Red Back Spiders  [big grin]. The painted rails and racking in the original shed areas will be re painted. The two new additional metal door frames will be clad in corrugated iron.



Over the next week, I will have other projects, but do expect to complete the Penitrol treatment. These projects include tidying/landscaping the area where the iron was previously stored.   [eek]
____________________
Can't wait to see what you do, we had a 150yr old homestead in Mudgee it the style your after. The walls were slabs of ironbark and the rafters were tree branches about 100mm thick, it even had a mister ed door as the front door

Indeed Locky. At the end of the day what is it but a Mower Shed! However I am trying to reflect some of the history in the design and construction of small rural sheds. It can only be an acknowledgement to the past though, some construction methods will be less basic and most of the recycled timber will be square edged rather than round. Just hope it does not end up, to quote Kevin McCloud, 'looking like something from Disneyland.' @Locky
__________________
@Kev @jobsworth
Yes gentleman, I got hold of the longest bar in Australia after it was removed from the Mildura Working Mans Club in 1995. However you should know that Zero Turn mowers and alcohol certainly do not mix. This is despite the fact that a majority of models have stubby holders. Consequently at some time in the distant future the bar will be installed in the Untidy Shop, for occasional drinking, and as the longest sliding compound saw infeed table in the world.  [eek] [big grin] With tongue in Cheek!

« Last Edit: April 09, 2016, 04:38 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Holmz

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #11 on: April 05, 2016, 01:39 AM »
I'll get the GPS ready, and make the long drive.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2016, 04:38 PM »
Coating the recycled Corrigated Iron Sheets with Penetrol
to preserve the Patina.




Preasure wash - further clean with Metolated Spirits - paint on Penetrol by brush.
24hrs drying time.
May give them  a second coat during construction, as sheets are cut to final size.


http://www.floodaustralia.net/brochures_guides/pdf_files/Penetrol-brochure.pdf

« Last Edit: April 10, 2016, 07:30 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #13 on: April 25, 2016, 04:09 AM »
Having returned to this from other projects, we had a productive day.

Most recycled materials now brought to worksite.

Laying and pegging out extension and setting levels with string line, straight edge and level.

Commenced pouring concrete footings by using high strength concrete mix in stirrup holes [600mm depth]

Tools: Makita 18V 3amp Impact drill, Stabila 800mm Level, Straight Edge [3 metre], Stanley Frame Square, Cyclone Shovel and Crow Bar and  Brickie’s String,  Hardwood scraps and recycled cement bricks for pegging layout.

Materials: Stirrups X 3 [600, 450 and 350mm] and High Strength Concrete [55MPa] mixed in wheelbarrow.

Next: concrete collars around Stirrups and other works to retain crushed rock floor and account for ground slope.

This could be a slower build than I thought as Ms Untidy has other
project priorities! [eek]


« Last Edit: April 25, 2016, 10:06 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2016, 08:13 AM »
Some more work -



Footings complete, some demolition started as required to side of existing structure, three recycled Oregon posts up and first horizontal beam up. Beam joined to existing beam structure by over lap lamination using coach bolts and battan screws. Beam cut as 140x45mm, using TS55, from a 240X45mm MP12 Pine remainent left over from our house construction. 100X45mm left from this process will be used as a wall rail. Paint color is Wilderness Grey in Taubmans Endure Exterior.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 08:33 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Kev

  • Posts: 7647
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #15 on: May 16, 2016, 08:35 AM »
Some more work -

(Attachment Link)

Footings complete, some demolition started as required to side of existing structure, three recycled Oregon posts up and first horizontal beam up. Beam joined to existing beam structure by over lap lamination using coach bolts and battan screws. Beam cut as 140x45mm, using TS55, from a 240X45mm MP12 Pine remainent left over from our house construction. 100X45mm left from this process will be used as a wall rail.


@Untidy Shop the angle of the photos make it look like the base is on a slop [smile]

Nice to see you've immortalised Monty [wink]

Ironically I was thinking today of building a larger and more comfortable kennel for Holly. All being good I still fear the old girls only got a couple of years in her [sad] Jane thinks a companion for her will give her a new lease of life - I'm not so sure.

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #16 on: May 16, 2016, 08:51 AM »

@Untidy Shop the angle of the photos make it look like the base is on a slop [smile]


 [eek] Kev!
Well the ground is sloping, but I assure you that all levels have the bubble in the middle. As some tradies say around here, "a blind man would be glad to see it".

There is some parallel distortion created by the IPad lens. Also in the first image there is some white painted formwork timber left lying on the ground, which makes the concrete footing appear at an angle when it is not. The only item not true is the left hand post, which needs to move 5mm back to line up with the other two. I will do this soon when the concrete fully cures. At the moment the posts are only attached to the stirips with roofing screws. These will be later replaced by M10 bolts.

Give Holley a big hug from me.

@Kev
« Last Edit: May 16, 2016, 09:13 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Tinker

  • Posts: 3556
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #17 on: May 16, 2016, 12:01 PM »
@Untidy Shop
>>>@Tinker  - Thought you might be interested in the Dry Stone Wall links.<<<

They were very interesting.  How do you build with stone when they are all, very obviously, upside down? [unsure]
Tinker
Wayne H. Tinker

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #18 on: May 16, 2016, 06:23 PM »
@Untidy Shop - The Oracle has failed me.

I give. What's an "Oregon post"?

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #19 on: May 17, 2016, 02:20 AM »
@Richard/RMW

Hi Richard.  You might know it as Douglas Fir, but given that for many years it was imported from Oregon, we call it 'Oregon'. It was a favourite species here in the past for building ware houses and similar. Once, even only ten years ago, it was easy to find in most timber sales yards. Not so easy now, more now a specialist sale. Here  are some 'down under' links -
http://www.timber.net.au/?option=com_species&name=Oregon&Itemid=448
http://www.simplyoregon.com.au
http://www.justwoodaustralia.com.au/history-of-oregon

___________________________
Comercial
Oregon has long been regarded as a superior material for structural components and in heavy timber applications. It is used extensively for pilings, railway ties, sawmill and warehouse construction and numerous other areas where structural performance is of the utmost importance.

The species is highly resistant to chemical reaction and is often used in the manufacture of vats, tanks, containers, flumes, conduits and similar industrial components.
Oregon's stability and workability make it the perfect choice for form work and scaffold planks where a strong, lightweight timber is required.

Domestic
The strength and beauty of natural Oregon beams enhance the warmth and visual appeal of any home, whether is be used extensively in a post and beam construction or utilised simply in a pergola.
Its high strength to weight ratio makes the timber easily employed in the construction of concealed house framing, roof beams and rafters or fascia.
Previously Oregon could not be used in some external structural applications such as bearers and joists under weather exposed decks - this has now changed since the introduction of our H3 Treatment (above ground treatment for borers, termites and decay)

Quoted from -
http://www.justwoodaustralia.com.au/applications
« Last Edit: May 17, 2016, 04:51 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2016, 06:24 AM »
Ahh, thanks for clarifying. I had no idea Doug Fir was exported to Oz. In the US we forget how fortunate we are for having (having had?) such vast forests. & global trade is fascinating.

It still boggles my mind (admittedly not a hard thing to accomplish) that someone in AU can grow grapes, make wine, buy a bottle & package it, ship it to the US from importer to wholesaler to retailer to me for $7 bucks.

The shed project looks like fun, especially enjoy seeing the materials recycled.

RMW

@Richard/RMW

Hi Richard.  You might know it as Douglas Fir, but given that for many years it was imported from Oregon, we call it 'Oregon'. It was a favourite species here in the past for building ware houses and similar. Once, even only ten years ago, it was easy to find in most timber sales yards. Not so easy now, more now a specialist sale. Here  are some 'down under' links -
http://www.timber.net.au/?option=com_species&name=Oregon&Itemid=448
http://www.simplyoregon.com.au
http://www.justwoodaustralia.com.au/history-of-oregon

___________________________
Comercial
Oregon has long been regarded as a superior material for structural components and in heavy timber applications. It is used extensively for pilings, railway ties, sawmill and warehouse construction and numerous other areas where structural performance is of the utmost importance.

The species is highly resistant to chemical reaction and is often used in the manufacture of vats, tanks, containers, flumes, conduits and similar industrial components.
Oregon's stability and workability make it the perfect choice for form work and scaffold planks where a strong, lightweight timber is required.

Domestic
The strength and beauty of natural Oregon beams enhance the warmth and visual appeal of any home, whether is be used extensively in a post and beam construction or utilised simply in a pergola.
Its high strength to weight ratio makes the timber easily employed in the construction of concealed house framing, roof beams and rafters or fascia.
Previously Oregon could not be used in some external structural applications such as bearers and joists under weather exposed decks - this has now changed since the introduction of our H3 Treatment (above ground treatment for borers, termites and decay)

Quoted from -
http://www.justwoodaustralia.com.au/applications
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 385
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #21 on: May 17, 2016, 10:37 AM »
It still boggles my mind (admittedly not a hard thing to accomplish) that someone in AU can grow grapes, make wine, buy a bottle & package it, ship it to the US from importer to wholesaler to retailer to me for $7 bucks.

To my knowledge a lot of wine is bottled in the markets where they are to be sold (in the style and design of the producer). There are specialized companies doing that.
The wine itself is shipped over in shipping containers with giant plastic bags in them that hold a couple of thousand liters. It sounds improbable, but these bags are sturdy enough to stand on when filled & because they are filled to capacity, without any air included, the wine stays 'fresh'.

It would be rather daft to ship a product in bottles that weigh as much as the product, right?
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · TF2200-Set … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #22 on: May 17, 2016, 10:52 AM »
It still boggles my mind (admittedly not a hard thing to accomplish) that someone in AU can grow grapes, make wine, buy a bottle & package it, ship it to the US from importer to wholesaler to retailer to me for $7 bucks.

To my knowledge a lot of wine is bottled in the markets where they are to be sold (in the style and design of the producer). There are specialized companies doing that.
The wine itself is shipped over in shipping containers with giant plastic bags in them that hold a couple of thousand liters. It sounds improbable, but these bags are sturdy enough to stand on when filled & because they are filled to capacity, without any air included, the wine stays 'fresh'.

It would be rather daft to ship a product in bottles that weigh as much as the product, right?

Understood, but still $7?

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 385
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #23 on: May 17, 2016, 11:59 AM »
>>Understood, but still $7?

Yep, that is really unbelievable. But FYI only about 30% of that amount goes to the producer, who has to foot the packaging out of that, which could cost up to a dollar or so. The rest of those 7 bucks go to importer, distributor and retailer (the latter being the one that gets most of it).

If only wine producers could sell their wine at my local Farmers Market… Much fairer to them. But quite impossible, I guess. Or maybe I should move to my fave wine region (Marlborough in NZ)?
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 · TF2200-Set … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed - Rain
« Reply #24 on: June 14, 2016, 08:47 PM »
Whilst there has been some progress on the shed, and there is sunshine this week, the really great news of the past month is that there has been rain, rain and more rain! 

1/5th of our long term average annual rainfall in May and drought braking. [big grin] [smile]



Trouble with sunshine after rain, it's mower time!  [eek]
« Last Edit: June 14, 2016, 08:52 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Kev

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Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2016, 10:01 PM »
I should run you a pipe from my place for the overflow (it's down hill). The rain we had through the storms was insane!


Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #26 on: June 15, 2016, 04:05 AM »


Brilliant June sunshine yesterday afternoon and today, so managed to complete most of the framework. Essentially frame complete except for front eve work and the batons are still to come.

All frame fastening - 100mm Treated Pine Screws, lubricated with lanolin oil; M10 and M12 Coach and Hex Bolts lubricated with Castrol Ag Grease.

Tools - Makita Compound Saw, Makita and Metabo 18V Drills, Makita 125mm Angle Grinder, and Wera Ratchet Spanners.


---------------------
I should run you a pipe from my place for the overflow (it's down hill). The rain we had through the storms was insane!

@Kev

Thanks for the offer, but most of the June rain was from the southern tip of that deep low that caused your recent severe coastal storm.

And I see you may be in for more storms this weekend!
« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 04:12 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed - Update.
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2017, 08:24 AM »


After nearly a year away from this project due to health issues and other priority projects, this Shed build is now back on this past week.

Making picket doors -
These doors will in fact be constructed as picket gates with double diagonal ie. a 'W' frame.  Door Sizes = 1900X1000 and 1900X600mm.

Stage 1 making W Frame and machining pickets.

Materials -
H3 Treated  MP10 90X35  re machined laser cut Pine.
H4 Treated 150X25 Rough Sawn Pine.
Sippo 5X8 and 10X50 Dominos.
TittBond 111 Glue
Cabbots Timbercolor Deck and Exterior Paint in Woodland Grey.

Tools - Rolex 150, RTS 400, Domino 500, KS60, TS55. Table Saw, Planer and Thicknesser, and Bessey Clamps.

150X25 Sanded with ROTEX., Ripped on one edge with TS55 and rail, then ripped on table saw to create approx. 70mm width pickets.

To accomodate the hinges and latches, two panels were made per door, one panel with three and one with two pickets and which in both cases were rejoined with 5X8 Sippo Dominos.

90X35 re machined via a Planner and Thicknesser, then table saw. Timber then cut to size, including angles with KS60 and Angle Finder to make 'W' frame. Each join made with Domino on setting 2 and with two Dominos per join. After clamping and glue drying time frame and particularly the joints were sanded with RTS400

Finished off the day painting of under side of pickets and frames, prior to assembly and final paint.

Tomorrow? Depending on weather;  continue with doors, or continue  cladding the Shed.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2017, 06:00 PM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed - Cladding
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2017, 08:48 AM »


Cladding

Spent the day cladding the Shed with recycled galvanised roofing iron; treated with 'Penetrol' as per earlier post. Also spent the evening working on the doors, but more of that in a future post.

The lower left image was taken in the same approx position as the lower left image in Reply #27. The upper right image in this and the other post also corrispond.

Tools - AEG Drill and Impact Driver, Makita 125 Grinder, Wiss Snips, straight edge, rafter square and level.

Materials - Recycled Galvanised Roofing Iron, Galavanised Metal trim, Penetrol, Brush, 25mm Hex Screws.

Iron cut to approx length with Angle Grinder to release tension, then trimmed with Snips.

Remaining tasks include - complete cladding rear wall across rear of old Shed to provide continuity, complete roof, complete and erect doors, repaint/paint older/existing Shed areas in Woodland Grey, fit out internal areas with hangers and bench [old Shed door], and lay and screed road base floor..
« Last Edit: April 26, 2017, 09:24 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values

Offline Untidy Shop

  • Posts: 2572
Re: Designing and building a true Australian Shed.
« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2017, 08:40 AM »

Making Picket Doors [cont'd]

Stage 2  attaching pickets, trimming with TS55 and rail, champhering edges with router and painting first coat.

Tools -
Timber strips as spacers, 1010 Router, CT22,  Diablo 45deg champher router bit, C15 Drill, Makita Impact Driver, TS55 and 1400 rail, paint brush and Bessy Clamps.

Consumerables - 8G 40mm Square drive Treated Pine Screws, Dulux TimberColor in Woodland Grey.

Progress continues with the Shed itself. Cladding and roofing are complete; there remains the floor and reprinting the older sections, prior to hanging the doors. Oh! And guttering too.
___________________________
As I will be having further eye surgery next Monday, it remains to be seen whether the next post reveals the completed project by then or at a future time.
« Last Edit: May 08, 2017, 12:24 AM by Untidy Shop »
If you don't like Signatures, just go to Look and Layout and tick No Signatures.

“The test of the machine is the satisfaction it gives you. There isn't any other test. If the machine produces tranquility it's right. If it disturbs you it's wrong until either the machine or your mind is changed.”
― Robert M. Pirsig, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values