Author Topic: Dominos in Cutting board?  (Read 847 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline buckeyeguy

  • Posts: 9
Dominos in Cutting board?
« on: November 05, 2017, 05:39 PM »
Making an end grain cutting board for someone I work with. Getting ready for the end grain glue up and it measures 11.5" W x 18.5
"L x 2"T. I have never had the best luck in producing flat glue ups and was thinking about using my Domino 500 to assist in getting as flat as possible to eliminate as much sanding as possible. Has anyone ever used them for an end grain board? Was not sure about how it would hold up over time since you are introducing another grain direction with the Domino and the added swelling of it.

Festool USA does not pre-approve the contents of this website nor endorse the application or use of any Festool product in any way other than in the manner described in the Festool Instruction Manual. To reduce the risk of serious injury and/or damage to your Festool product, always read, understand and follow all warnings and instructions in your Festool product's Instruction Manual. Although Festool strives for accuracy in the website material, the website may contain inaccuracies. Festool makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness or timeliness of the material on this website or about the results to be obtained from using the website. Festool and its affiliates cannot be responsible for improper postings or your reliance on the website's material. Your use of any material contained on this website is entirely at your own risk. The content contained on this site is provided for informational purposes only and does not constitute professional advice.


Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2345
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2017, 05:58 PM »
I wouldn't use Dominos as alignment aids because you're just introducing another flaw into the overall design since you won't get a good glue joint.  If you are having problems with the size of the glue up and alignment, why don't you do it in stages?  You can also set up two perpendicular boards to help keep your glue up square.

Offline buckeyeguy

  • Posts: 9
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2017, 06:26 PM »
Kinda what I was thinking.

The main issue I get when gluing cutting boards up is the high and low boards, where every second, third or fourth board is higher or lower than the next. Not too much issue with keeping them "squarish", more getting a flat glue up. My method has been placing wax paper on my MFT, putting down my four parallel clamps, and then do my glue up. I've tried culls with no good results.

I have thought about just placing two scraps of the same height down on my MFT over some wax paper (same direction as my clamps go) spread the glue and just start aligning them on too of the scraps. When I'm done applying glue and they are all aligned, bring my clamps to the MFT and clamping them with the jaws facing the MFT.

I think where it goes south on me is when I move my clamping jaws into place to start tightening.

Offline jacko9

  • Posts: 2345
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2017, 07:06 PM »
What adhesive are you using?  It seems that you might need more assembly time to get everything aligned.  Plastic resin glue has a very long open assembly time in the 20 to 40 minute range.  I have used this kind of glue on cutting boards in the past and if I discount the cutting board my sister put in the dishwasher, I have never had a glue failure.

http://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/weldwood-plastic-resin-glue/

I like using wax paper and you might be able to get parchment paper at Costco that is wider than the narrow wax paper rolls.

I was alluding to earlier that you clamp down two perpendicular backing boards then use your cauls against these fixed 90 degree stops.  You build you assembly then clamp the remaining two sides (I like Bessey K body Revo clamps).

Good luck

Offline bnaboatbuilder

  • Posts: 88
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2017, 09:52 PM »
Dominos are not needed. People have been making end grain boards by the millions with just glue and clamps. But if you are having issues of getting flat boards, then you should use cauls. It's my main method every time. Wood or metal cauls both work great. Good explanation on making wood cauls: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodnews/2010april/cauls.html

I use those and box aluminum tubing and get perfectly boards from normal size cutting boards up to 3x4 ft ones I make. I also clamp at every end junction between pieces so nothing slips or moves out of flat.

An end grain board is simply a double process of making a board, cutting it and gluing again to make a board again. Edge grain, end grain doesn't matter. Ensure flatness at glue up. Titebond II, III, original Gorilla, all work fine, plenty of working time.







I also use large pipe clamps as the cauls themselves by alternating top to bottom.

« Last Edit: November 05, 2017, 09:55 PM by bnaboatbuilder »
- John

Offline Bert Vanderveen

  • Posts: 379
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2017, 06:58 AM »
If you have problems keeping the glue up flat the strips may not be really square (eg have sides that are parallel, but not square in relation to each other — in other words: skewed). I experienced this and discovered that the saw was slightly off. Now I double check it whenever I am cutting strips for boards.
Cheers, Bert Vanderveen

TS55 · TS55R · OF1010 · DF500 Mk2 · MFT/3 + VL + CMS TS55 + CMS PS300 + LA-CS 70/CMS · CTL Midi · RTS400 EQ · 2 x CXS Li 1,5 · T15+3 Li 4,2 · TI15 Impact Li 4,2 · Centrotec Sets 2008 + 2015 · PSB300 · LR32-SYS · RO150 · Kapex KS120 · 2 x MFK700 · RO90 · OFK700 · BS75 · OFK500 … | Mirka 1230L P&C | Hammer A3 31 Silent Power · Hammer N4400 

Offline HowardH

  • Posts: 1096
Re: Dominos in Cutting board?
« Reply #6 on: November 09, 2017, 11:34 AM »
Dominos are not needed. People have been making end grain boards by the millions with just glue and clamps. But if you are having issues of getting flat boards, then you should use cauls. It's my main method every time. Wood or metal cauls both work great. Good explanation on making wood cauls: http://www.highlandwoodworking.com/woodnews/2010april/cauls.html

+1. Cauls work great.  Also, alternating the clamps from the top and bottom will help too.
Howard H
The Dallas Texas Festool Fanatic!

Mark Twain:  "I didn't attend the funeral, but I sent a letter approving of it." "If you tell the truth you don't have to remember anything."

mft1080, Trion, MFT/3, T15, OF 1400, RO150FEQ, TS55, RTS400, CT22, 800, 1080, 1400, 1900 rails, CSX, Vecturo, Qwas dogs, Parf Dogs, Zobo's, Syslite Uni, Kreg router table