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Author Topic: Entry Doors with side lites  (Read 35498 times)
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Eiji Fuller
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« on: April 25, 2008, 09:36 PM »

Ribbon Sapele doors for my best client

I lost the other pics of this door set. I will post some better pics when I get the chance.



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« Last Edit: April 25, 2008, 09:38 PM by Eiji F » Logged

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Dovetail65

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« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2008, 09:43 PM »

SWEET! Smiley I love them!

The doors look really wide. What are the dimensions?

Did you make everything, install the glass, etc?

Nickao
« Last Edit: April 25, 2008, 09:46 PM by nickao » Logged

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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2008, 09:54 PM »

Nickao,

the doors are a pair of 36" x 80" or 915mm x 2032mm. And yes I designed and built everything and installed the glass which is 5/8" dual glazed and acid etched.

Eiji
« Last Edit: April 25, 2008, 09:54 PM by Eiji F » Logged

poto

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« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2008, 12:17 AM »

Hey Eiji - superb work. Yow! I'm also in San Diego, and am in the midst of a major remodel. At some point (when I have some money again) we're going to replace the front door. I was thinking of contacting you, but after seeing this, I clearly cannot afford your work! Plus, it would make the rest of our house look shabby. Do you have a web site or some place to see other pictures of your work?

Poto
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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #4 on: April 26, 2008, 12:37 AM »

Poto,
thanks for the compliment. Sadly I am still in the dark ages and do not have a website. I am finishing a very large project that took me about 8 months of onsite work and when that is ready for pics I think I will need to have a website to showcase it and some other projects I have festooled. I will PM my contact info. My doors are no more expensive than any other custom doors.

Eiji Fuller
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Dan Clark

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« Reply #5 on: April 26, 2008, 01:12 AM »

Eiji,

Gorgeous doors!   Can you give us some construction details?  (Not that I'll be able to copy them!)

Also, just curious... Why Sapele? 

Thanks,

Dan.
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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #6 on: April 26, 2008, 01:30 AM »

Eiji,

Gorgeous doors!   Can you give us some construction details?  (Not that I'll be able to copy them!)

Also, just curious... Why Sapele? 

Thanks,

Dan.

Dan,

Sapele is a beautiful wood and the ribbon grain seen in the quartersawn cut is almost magical in the way it reflects its colors and depth. It is has a hardness factor of about 1100,  african mahogany hardness is about 800 and red oak is at 1290. It is somewhat difficult to mill due to its interlocking grain. I can no longer obtain Sapele of this quality and have switched to Sipo for a similar look.

The door stile and rail are 45mm thick and the panel is 28 mm thick with 12mm  x  7 mm deep grooves routed on 32mm centers. stile and rail connections are traditional mortise and tenon. The doors are rather heavy so I opted for 4 - 4" SS ball bearing hinges per door.

Eiji
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Robert Robinson

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southern Indiana, U.S.A.


« Reply #7 on: April 26, 2008, 05:21 AM »

Beautiful work!
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« Reply #8 on: April 26, 2008, 05:49 AM »

Eiji,

I thought they were pretty heavy given the four hinges.   Sapele and Sipo Again, thanks for posting this.

Regards,

Dan.

p.s. Now I wonder if one of my local wood vendors has Sapele or Sipo...   Grin
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Eli

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« Reply #9 on: April 26, 2008, 07:32 AM »

Lovely Eiji. Thanks for sharing.
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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #10 on: April 26, 2008, 10:44 AM »

Eiji,

I thought they were pretty heavy given the four hinges.   Sapele and Sipo Again, thanks for posting this.

Regards,

Dan.

p.s. Now I wonder if one of my local wood vendors has Sapele or Sipo...   Grin

My asthetic preferences are in linear designs and I am in love with quarter sawn and ribbon grains right now.

Eiji
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SRSemenza
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« Reply #11 on: April 26, 2008, 11:12 AM »

Hi,


   Very , very nice!   Some of that grain reminds me of some ribbon mahogany I used recently.


Seth
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« Reply #12 on: April 26, 2008, 01:43 PM »

Eiji,

Very nice clean looks, I m sure that was a very happy client
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Les Spencer

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« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2008, 02:44 PM »

Eiji,

Super work and a beautiful eye for design and detail. I'm jealous. Grin
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Les (near Indy) XL
Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #14 on: May 02, 2008, 02:08 AM »

Well, I have 2 more orders of this door to build one is a pair of 3-0 with side lites and one is a single 3-0 with an operable side lite. I have built all the door frames that get glass so now I am working on the wood panels. The pics that follow show how to use the domino and MFT top for perfect glued up panels.

Stock prep is key. This stock is jointed and layed out for dominoes.

To the Domino. For domino mortising I prefer the speed of the kreg clamp. Some simple alterations to the holes in the MFT top accomodate the 5/16 bolt on the kreg bench clamp. (Carrey's idea)


Dominoed and ready for glue.


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« Last Edit: May 02, 2008, 02:50 AM by Eiji F » Logged

Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #15 on: May 02, 2008, 02:40 AM »

MFT top is protected with wax paper. I stack the boards in order and with the edge to recieve the dominos facing up. I place all the tenons needed for the glue up in a dish of glue. I insert the gluey tenons the apply a liberal amount of glue spreading it out with a trim roller.  I prefer to insert the tenons before spreading the glue on the board edges so that the glue doesnt start to set up while placing the tenons. Next I place the last board in the panel order near the edge of the table and support it with a wooden clamp. In the proper order I then stack each board on top. After removing the support clamp I lay the panel flat and lightly clamp the edge of the panel to the MFT top. I then clamp across the joint. Clamping in this manner forces the panel tightly against the MFT top ensuring a flat panel.


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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #16 on: May 02, 2008, 02:43 AM »

As you can see the panel is flat.

After pulling the clamps and sanding to 180. and a pic with some spirits to show the grain.


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« Last Edit: May 02, 2008, 02:44 AM by Eiji F » Logged

Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #17 on: May 02, 2008, 02:48 AM »

To be continued.

Next: Utilizing the OF1400 with LR-32 system and guide rails for grooving the panels.
          Utilizing the OF1400 and OF-FH plexiglass routing template for groovy grooving of door stile and rail to accept panels.
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Concrete

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« Reply #18 on: May 02, 2008, 10:25 AM »

This is a killer thread.  Great info, please keep it up.
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SRSemenza
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« Reply #19 on: May 02, 2008, 11:03 AM »

This is a killer thread.  Great info, please keep it up.



Hi,  Concrete
         Welcome to the forum  Smiley


     I have to second your thoughts.  It is great to see a method for this type of thing demonstrated.  Keep it coming Eiji.



Seth
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John Russell

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« Reply #20 on: May 02, 2008, 11:59 AM »

These are exquisite looking doors ... glad you are offering the construction details since on my list of projects is doing something very similar: entry door with sidelights. There seem to be several suggestions for dealing with the potential for warping with door such as this, things such as "sandwiching" a plywood core between hardwood exterior. Do you have any concerns about the potential for warping or is this just not an issue with your construction technique?

Thanks,
JR
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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #21 on: May 02, 2008, 12:40 PM »

These are exquisite looking doors ... glad you are offering the construction details since on my list of projects is doing something very similar: entry door with sidelights. There seem to be several suggestions for dealing with the potential for warping with door such as this, things such as "sandwiching" a plywood core between hardwood exterior. Do you have any concerns about the potential for warping or is this just not an issue with your construction technique?

Thanks,
JR

John,

I use solid wood for the panels, stile and rail. The stile and rail are either solid 8/4 stock milled to 45mm or 2- 4/4 pieces milled and glued together. On 2 1/4" thick or 58mm doors I like to glue up 3 - 4/4 or 2 - 6/4 then plane to final thickness. With careful selection of quarter sawn stock and proper milling technique the doors will not warp. Make sure they are finished properly and they will last 100 years. Also when glueing multiple pieces for a stile and rail make sure to oppose the grain. the glued up stiles tend to be a bit stiffer and stay straighter than one solid piece.

Eiji

Cut off of glued up rail showing opposing grain.


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« Last Edit: May 03, 2008, 11:52 PM by Eiji F » Logged

Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #22 on: May 02, 2008, 10:02 PM »

Well I didnt get to put in a full day today but got a little done. I decided to have the door stile and rail completely prepped before getting on with the panels.

I've cut all my door pieces. I lay them out and label them. In the next operation it is important to keep the faces oriented properly.

The door panels are 25mm thick and I plan to plow the grooves to a depth of 6.5mm which leaves me with 12mm thickness of panel at the edges and in the grooves.

I am setting up the OF-FH guide and put a 12mm festool bit into the 1400. I set the depth to 10mm for the rail grooves. I could probably do it in one pass but set it up for two 5mm passes.

Notice I've attached vac hoses to both ports. I feel that using just one or the other port is insufficient. Using both vacs leaves behind nothing and just one vac and the dado is packed with shavings.



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Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #23 on: May 02, 2008, 10:15 PM »

Notice the bits of blue tape on the pieces and also on one leg of the OF-FH. If I match the blue taped leg of the OF-FH with the blue taped label on the workpiece everything will line up later. (knock on wood Grin).

I've set up some stop blocks to center a shallow mortise in the rail groove for centering the panel.

On to the stiles. I've set all the stiles up so I can rout all the left side stiles then route all the right side stiles. With all this order it helps to keep me less confused. Cheesy I set  the rail  atop the stiles to mark out the groove ends. I made some gauges for starting and stopping for the left side stiles then realized they didnt work for the right side stiles and just marked out the start and end points with a sharpie.

A little paste wax on the OF-FH keeps it gliding along smoothly.

Stiles are routed to a depth of 15mm to accomodate panel expansion/contraction.


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« Last Edit: May 03, 2008, 12:05 AM by Eiji F » Logged

Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2008, 10:19 PM »

With all the rails and stiles grooved out I can move on to the mortising operation.

Some simple layout sticks keep every thing simple.

I've switched to a longer 12.7mm bit and mortise to a depth of 50mm.


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Dovetail65

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« Reply #25 on: May 02, 2008, 10:28 PM »

Eiji,

Super work and a beautiful eye for design and detail. I'm jealous. Grin


Les I usually do not usually correct people, but this is one word many use and at times the wrong meaning can be taken, one I do no think you want to convey.

I think you mean envious, which means: desirous of another's advantages

Jealous denotes a much more negative and mean spirited idea:    feeling resentment against someone

I see this mistake a lot on forums and have made it myself, until of course my mother corrected me and I have not forgotten. That's what mom's are for.

Nickao
« Last Edit: May 02, 2008, 10:29 PM by nickao » Logged

The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.
Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #26 on: May 03, 2008, 12:10 AM »

Nickao,

Thanks for the english lesson. I know I could use some help with my writing skills, but right now I'm consentrating on woodworking.

I know my descriptions are rather breif; if anyone would like me to explain anything in greater detail I will give it a shot.

More mortising to come on Monday.
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« Reply #27 on: May 03, 2008, 12:14 AM »

I am not an English major, but the more I post the more potential I see for offending someone by mistake. I hope I did not offend you.

A lot of times I do not post just because of that. I feel like I am walking on egg shells.

I am sure you do not want people thinking you are jealous of anyone. You seem much nicer than that in your posts and that was my point.

Nickao
« Last Edit: May 03, 2008, 12:15 AM by nickao » Logged

The one who says it can't be done should avoid interrupting the person doing it.
Eiji Fuller
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« Reply #28 on: May 03, 2008, 12:28 AM »

I am not an English major, but the more I post the more potential I see for offending someone by mistake. I hope I did not offend you.


Nickao

Nickao,

I'm not offended at all. I enjoy your posts and I also enjoyed the english lesson. Even if it was directed at someone else and off topic. You cant live life in fear of the possibility of offense. That is stupid (political correctness comes to mind). Say what you say, if someone is offended, so be it. That sentence is most likely not gramatically correct, but who cares? I probably offended some english professor somewhere. Grin Now don't get me wrong, I am not a mean person. I don't have a maliscious bone in my body. But you wouldn't call me the most delicate or diplomatic communicator on the block either.

Eiji
« Last Edit: May 03, 2008, 12:29 AM by Eiji F » Logged

poto

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« Reply #29 on: May 03, 2008, 05:42 PM »

Well you sure have a cute daughter, Eiji. When are you going to replace that chop saw in the background of your avatar with a Kapex?

P.S. Thanks for the excellent step-by-step on the door construction. Might even persuade me to try it myself!
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