Author Topic: New house, new projects  (Read 1658 times)

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Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 247
New house, new projects
« on: June 28, 2018, 09:43 AM »
I saw a couple members here started threads for all of their house projects so I'd like to do the same. I've mostly been a lurker since last summer due to lack of real space to work on anything. I'm a complete novice with woodworking having only started a few years ago with no real training just kind of shoot from the hip as I go. We just moved into our new home here in Northern Virginia and after all the stress and frustration of dealing with the housing market here I don't think we will be moving again unless it's to the grave. That's a tall statement for someone in their early 30's but if you knew what it's like to try to buy/sell in this area you'd understand.

I want to use this thread as a place to post some of my projects and to ask questions before I jump into new ones. My wife got me going into Festool a year ago almost to the day as an anniversary gift with the TS55 and CT26. Like many of you it turned into a slippery slope from there with me selling off a bunch of my other stuff to finance more. I'm more comfortable working on mechanical things like rebuilding motorcycle engines but I'm determined and have time to figure this out. Everything I do is basically by myself and self taught so it's slow going. I'm hoping to take a class at Greg Paolini's school soon but with small children I don't know if that will happen.

This is my space to work with pre-purchase. It's approximately 12x16 and is unfortunately shared with the furnace/water heater. The air intake for the furnace is in the finished side of the basement.



What I've done so far is to hang new lighting and install some foam matting to the floor:



I'm thinking this wall will be for guide rail and rigid foam storage:



The adjoining wall with insulation removed:



What I'd like to do here is frame it out and install a plywood french cleat wall. That way I can reconfigure as needed and hang heavier items like my clamps and any hand tools I have/acquire. I haven't moved on this yet as I'm still deciding if it's even safe to have plywood as a wall. I know drywall is safe because it has a 1hr burn time, and I know they make fire resistant plywood. .still researching best options.

Here's something I've wanted to do for years. It isn't fancy but it works. Keeps me from picking up a 77lb compressor and as a bonus the hose reel goes with it:





I think my next move is to put an air filter in the shop space, looking at the WEN from Amazon, to run on a timer when I'm done. And maybe a workshop cleaning kit to help clean up the floor.

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Offline KGB pilot125

  • Posts: 66
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2018, 11:38 AM »
such a smart idea with the compressor and reel

Online neilc

  • Posts: 2513
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #2 on: June 28, 2018, 09:17 PM »
I think you could be fine with plywood over the brick.  I'd suggest floor to ceiling and put a 2x4 below the ceiling joists to capture the top of the plywood and reduce the wall anchors you'd need for heavy loads.

Also, I would suggest you hang a fire extinguisher since you were talking about potential for fire. 

If MOST of your work will be with Festool tools and a dust extractor, I don't know if you would need the central dust filter.  Others here might have another POV, but I don't get a lot of airborne dust with my Festool tools.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3664
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2018, 08:41 AM »
I think I'd frame it out normally, with Roxul insulation all around (and overhead, too), use 5/8" FR sheetrock, then overlay it with 1/2" FR plywood as necessary to support the french cleat system.  The Roxul is a great sound barrier, and you have two little ones.  Roxul is also a significant fire barrier, if this is a concern. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline DynaGlide

  • Posts: 247
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #4 on: June 29, 2018, 09:24 AM »
I think I'd frame it out normally, with Roxul insulation all around (and overhead, too), use 5/8" FR sheetrock, then overlay it with 1/2" FR plywood as necessary to support the french cleat system.  The Roxul is a great sound barrier, and you have two little ones.  Roxul is also a significant fire barrier, if this is a concern.

When can you start?  [big grin]

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2000
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #5 on: June 29, 2018, 10:24 AM »
I'm with Sparktrician as far as process, only add would be to use steel hat channel rather than wood for studding.

Offline RustE

  • Posts: 342
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #6 on: June 29, 2018, 01:05 PM »
I'm with Sparktrician as far as process, only add would be to use steel hat channel rather than wood for studding.

What do you put between the bottom channel and the concrete floor?  Typical sill gasket foam?

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2000
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #7 on: June 29, 2018, 02:22 PM »
My understanding is that we're referring to walls here.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3664
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #8 on: June 29, 2018, 04:33 PM »
I think I'd frame it out normally, with Roxul insulation all around (and overhead, too), use 5/8" FR sheetrock, then overlay it with 1/2" FR plywood as necessary to support the french cleat system.  The Roxul is a great sound barrier, and you have two little ones.  Roxul is also a significant fire barrier, if this is a concern.

When can you start?  [big grin]

You know how to get in touch with me...   [scared]
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3664
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #9 on: June 29, 2018, 04:38 PM »
I'm with Sparktrician as far as process, only add would be to use steel hat channel rather than wood for studding.

Given the intended use of a french cleat system and the weight it may carry, I'd be reluctant to use steel hat channel or even steel studding.  I'm more concerned about pull-out strength for the screws that support the cleats. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young

Offline rst

  • Posts: 2000
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #10 on: June 29, 2018, 05:08 PM »
True regarding pullout, I was overlooking the french cleat business.  When I redid the almost 100 year house we live in I used hat channel rather than wood for the 5/8 drywall I put up, so much easier to shim using screws.  Part of that reason is that I'm much more familiar with commercial/industrial work than true residential.

Offline Sparktrician

  • Posts: 3664
Re: New house, new projects
« Reply #11 on: June 29, 2018, 06:45 PM »
True regarding pullout, I was overlooking the french cleat business.  When I redid the almost 100 year house we live in I used hat channel rather than wood for the 5/8 drywall I put up, so much easier to shim using screws.  Part of that reason is that I'm much more familiar with commercial/industrial work than true residential.

Hat channel does have its place, especially when one has to straighten walls that wander all over heck's half acre, or when one needs to create a space in which to insert sound barrier insulation.  It's just not a good weight-bearing solution. 
- Willy -

 "Remember, a chip on the shoulder is a sure sign of wood higher up." - Brigham Young