Author Topic: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....  (Read 1581 times)

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Offline fritter63

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Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« on: April 06, 2018, 12:37 PM »
As requested by Michael Kellough after seeing it in the background of my other post, here are pictures of the kitchen in our straw bale house.

There is (was?) a local store that imports handmade furniture from Mexico. We liked the look of some of it and thought it would go better in the mission style look of our house compared to regular cabinets, but everything tended to be in 6' lengths. We also wanted one cabinet made deeper so it could house/conceal the double ovens. The owner of the store was willing to work with the builders to get custom dimensions for the much larger cabinets.

The only issue we had was a bit of "lost in translation" requests. I asked for the island and stove cabinet to both be 10' long..... they came in at 9'6" and 10'6".... guess they must have thought I meant "20 feet total"! The drawers on the island, although they had 3 feet to work with, are only 12" deep! That is still on my "list" to fix after 9 years.... I'm gonna have to get creative on removing the back panels and providing drawer guide support.

I made it work. Biggest issue was fitting it against a very non-straight straw bale wall. Tiling was fun too.

Getting that 5 x 10 island (one piece!) through the french doors *sideways* was a lot of fun... had to hire some local movers.

I actually made the range hood myself, inspired by one I'd seen in Fine Homebuilding years ago. They wanted 5K to make me one to match, which I thought was ridiculous for pounded sheet metal, so I ended up just using doug fir framing lumber, and had the neighbors son tack weld the clavos (nail) heads onto the metal. Then a special patina called "leave it behind the barn for a year while I build the house", and a top coat of poly.

In case you're wondering how we make do with no "uppers", the frosted door conceals an 8' x 10' walk in pantry.

Counters are poured in place concrete, ground smooth with diamond wheels. The sink is  "reconstituted granite", with the counter literally poured around it (made a foam knockout to form the nice edges).... not my best decision in retrospect. Good thing it's tough.....

Total cost was about 10K IIRC.

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Offline fritter63

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2018, 12:47 PM »
Forgot to mention that they also misunderstood my request about the deeper oven cabinet. While did they make it deeper, they also made the interior partitions the same depth. Ie, 5 inches too forward. I had to remove them all carefully, cut them down by 5" (to accommodate the door handles) and then re-install them. The trick was not damaging the distressed front pieces.

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2018, 01:00 PM »
Very nice. Look the look of the floor patina and plastered walls.

We did a lot of dreaming before building and spent time learning greenie sustainable techniques then ran into a brick wall when it came to finding contractors and making it fit our budget/timeline. In the end about all we did non-conventionally was spray foam.

We also had a small window to work in because we were squatting in the existing home that was renovated and expanded. Someday hope to get a re-do.

Anyways, really beautiful stuff. PS - also enjoy the luthier videos.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline fritter63

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2018, 01:05 PM »
Very nice. Look the look of the floor patina and plastered walls.

We did a lot of dreaming before building and spent time learning greenie sustainable techniques then ran into a brick wall when it came to finding contractors and making it fit our budget/timeline. In the end about all we did non-conventionally was spray foam.

We also had a small window to work in because we were squatting in the existing home that was renovated and expanded. Someday hope to get a re-do.

Anyways, really beautiful stuff. PS - also enjoy the luthier videos.

RMW

Thanks. You've seen my new channel then?

Yeah, I was worried about getting approvals... but key was we did "straw bale infill" (post and beam construction for structural) and the building dept didn't bat an eye at the SB (wasn't the first in town). Fortunately I did most of the "weird" stuff myself (stacking bales and running conduit through them) and we were able to fund a stucco guy who'd done SB before.

Offline dwilson143

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2018, 06:35 PM »
Nice job my friend. Just curious what was your budget and timeline?

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2018, 06:44 PM »
Very nice. Look the look of the floor patina and plastered walls.

We did a lot of dreaming before building and spent time learning greenie sustainable techniques then ran into a brick wall when it came to finding contractors and making it fit our budget/timeline. In the end about all we did non-conventionally was spray foam.

We also had a small window to work in because we were squatting in the existing home that was renovated and expanded. Someday hope to get a re-do.

Anyways, really beautiful stuff. PS - also enjoy the luthier videos.

RMW

Thanks. You've seen my new channel then?

Yeah, I was worried about getting approvals... but key was we did "straw bale infill" (post and beam construction for structural) and the building dept didn't bat an eye at the SB (wasn't the first in town). Fortunately I did most of the "weird" stuff myself (stacking bales and running conduit through them) and we were able to fund a stucco guy who'd done SB before.

Yep watched all the cnc videos. I just got my little Shapeoko3 fine tuned with a Super-PID router control and cable chain so for the first time in it's 2 year life using it is not totally jury-rigged. Now I'm focused on learning WCS and getting repeatability so I can do something more complex than cut french cleats from ply. Your videos set the standard I am aiming for.

The gitters aren't bad either...

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!

Offline Michael Kellough

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2018, 07:03 PM »
Thanks @fritter63 ! That is really unique and nice to see.

Now I would like to see pictures of the house. Post and beam with straw bale infill sounds very interesting.

Offline fritter63

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2018, 07:04 PM »
Nice job my friend. Just curious what was your budget and timeline?

Thanks. Budget for the kitchen? I don't know that we had one specifically.

Timeline? We quit our jobs, moved back to Cali and in with my mother (we built the house with a granny unit for her) and planned to take a year off while I built the house myself.

After the Architect and City had wasted my year off, I went back to work and I built it on the weekends and evenings. We lived onsite in a 30 foot RV (with teenage boys and dog) as extra motivation to finish.

It still took nearly 3 years, from breaking ground to final inspection.

Note that we are "finaled, not finished".

Finaled gets the city off your back.

Finished gets the wife off your back.

Offline fritter63

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #8 on: April 06, 2018, 07:06 PM »
Yep watched all the cnc videos. I just got my little Shapeoko3 fine tuned with a Super-PID router control and cable chain so for the first time in it's 2 year life using it is not totally jury-rigged. Now I'm focused on learning WCS and getting repeatability so I can do something more complex than cut french cleats from ply. Your videos set the standard I am aiming for.

Oh, so you've had it long enough to realize it's not nearly big enough?  [cool]

Quote

The gitters aren't bad either...


Thx. My goal is to automate as much tediousness as possible, and focus on what really matters if it's done by hand.

Offline jobsworth

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #9 on: April 07, 2018, 10:58 AM »
Very nice one of the better mexican kitchens I seen.

I have done some research on them as i was going to build one.

 If you dont mine telling me (us) where did you get the hardware from?

What wood species did you use?


Even though the job fell through, I still might make one for myself if we decide to move from Calif to Az.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2018, 11:01 AM by jobsworth »

Offline Richard/RMW

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Re: Our "Mexican" kitchen.....
« Reply #10 on: April 07, 2018, 01:32 PM »
Yep watched all the cnc videos. I just got my little Shapeoko3 fine tuned with a Super-PID router control and cable chain so for the first time in it's 2 year life using it is not totally jury-rigged. Now I'm focused on learning WCS and getting repeatability so I can do something more complex than cut french cleats from ply. Your videos set the standard I am aiming for.

Quote
Oh, so you've had it long enough to realize it's not nearly big enough?  [cool]


Yup, but given even it takes up 10% of my shop floor space I think I'm spatially constrained. To alleviate this I just added the Shaper Origin to the fleet.  [big grin]

AND the JMP2 showed up last week. Due to space constraints I think it is going to live inside in my office/workroom. I can use it at 2 AM without any complaints.

RMW
As of 10/17 I am out of the Dog business and pursuing other distractions. Thanks for a fun ride!