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Author Topic: Setting up my work truck for Festool  (Read 26204 times)
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JD2720

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« on: June 12, 2010, 03:11 PM »

This post was deleted because those that do not live in this country have determined that it was showing an unsafe use of Festool tools.
As our President states every day, those people know the right way to do everything.
  
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 07:54 PM by Chris Rosenberger » Logged
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WarnerConstCo.

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« Reply #1 on: June 12, 2010, 03:38 PM »

Nice Chris, now get an enclosed trailer. Big Grin

I can fit all I need for a door, window, and/or trim job in the back of my suburban.

I like how much I can cram into small spaces.

Now what to do with my 20' trailer? Huh?!

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JD2720

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« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2010, 03:50 PM »

Thanks Darcy.

I have a 16' cargo trailer that I use on bigger jobs, but there are a lot of places I cannot get into with a long pickup & a big trailer.
On top of that, I do not like pulling a trailer unless I have to. Although I have been considering something like an 8 footer for small jobs if I can find one at a good price.
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WarnerConstCo.

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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2010, 04:16 PM »

I drag my 20' around my small old town all the time.

Most jobs I can park on the street in front of the house and take advantage of the side walks.

I enjoy pulling trailers and such, I really like backing them up into really tight or awkward spaces.

Got some practice on the farm backing up double hay wagons when I was growing up.
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« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2010, 05:06 PM »

Chris,

Good utilization of space.  You are maxxing yours out!  

I am vehicle and trailer heavy at this point and have been considering getting a 75 inch rail to connect with a 55 so that I can carry rails in a 6.5 foot bed and occassionally downsize the vehicle size.  Sorry Shane, that doesn't mean that I am doubling up on my tools!

If others read this post, remember when planning for rail lengths, if you can store them diagonally some way, they may fit.  Unfortunately carpenters all too often think in parallel and perpendicular and not in 3D space or in diagonals.  A spot that is often overlooked is the ceiling of a van, a truck cap, etc., or a sidewall where a false back could be constructed

Just thoughts for other situations.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 05:07 PM by Peter Halle » Logged

The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
mastercabman

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« Reply #5 on: June 12, 2010, 05:26 PM »

I used to pull a 6x10 trailer,but it was getting expensive on gas.So i made a roll out tray in the back of my truck and put a full shelf flush with the top of the bed.I am planing on putting another roll out tray on the upper shelf.
In the picture i was getting loaded to do a raised panel wainscotting job.I had to take some tools out so that i can fit all the wood parts.
I am also planing on putting a ladder rack and i will be able to transport my longer rail that way.


* Tim Riley 005.jpg (173.42 KB, 1024x768 - viewed 1176 times.)
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I don't understand!?! I keep cutting it,and it's still too short!
WarnerConstCo.

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« Reply #6 on: June 12, 2010, 05:38 PM »

I would like to make a slide out for the back of my Suburban.

I would need it to come out easy so I could put the third row seat in.

The third row is for the 4 year old, keep her quarantined to the very back.
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mastercabman

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« Reply #7 on: June 12, 2010, 05:58 PM »

The tray is very easy to take out.I just have to remove couple screws that holds the stop block and slide it out.Of course i need to remove any heavy weight that is in the tray.But the tray itself is not too heavy.i can pick it up by myself with no huffing and puffing Smiley
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jonny round boy

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« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2010, 06:00 PM »

Chris,

I truly hope it never happens, but if you're ever in an accident those systainers will sure make a mess of you. I really, really hope you put the seat belts round them...  Eek!
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Alex

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« Reply #9 on: June 12, 2010, 06:10 PM »

Those systainers in the back look nice if you have to make an emergency stop. Unsure Looks like somebody needs a van.  Tongue Out
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« Reply #10 on: June 12, 2010, 06:23 PM »

Is the back seat a fold flat type set-up?

That may offer you even more room.


And for you emergency stoppers, just duck. Big Grin
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erikfsn

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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2010, 06:41 PM »

I've often thought about the safety hazards of putting tools in the cab with me. How about an open wooden toolbox that weighs about 50 pounds, full of things like chisels, flying around the cab at 60 miles an hour?

I've read that unbelted passengers in the rear seat in a front-end collision will sometimes decapitate the front seat passengers on their way out through the windshield.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2010, 06:42 PM by erikfsn » Logged
JD2720

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« Reply #12 on: June 12, 2010, 07:50 PM »

Those systainers in the back look nice if you have to make an emergency stop. Unsure Looks like somebody needs a van.  Tongue Out

It would be much safer to have a whole van load of tools behind you instead of a few stead of a few plastic tool boxes now wouldn't it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2010, 08:23 PM »

Chris,

I'm with you.  If case of an accident I would guess that your seats would offer some protection.

I am sure that everyone who transports tools in the line of earning a living has first on their minds the projectile factor in case of an accident.  NOT!

Peter
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The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
Brice Burrell

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« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2010, 09:43 PM »

My mother was an ER nurse for part of her life. She told me about a couple of guys in an accident in a work van. The passenger was killed by a makeshift shelving unit and the tools it was filled with. Don't take this lightly, it is a real danger.     
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WarnerConstCo.

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« Reply #15 on: June 12, 2010, 11:11 PM »

Everything is dangerous in one way or the other.

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Alex

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« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2010, 04:52 AM »

Those systainers in the back look nice if you have to make an emergency stop. Unsure Looks like somebody needs a van.  Tongue Out

It would be much safer to have a whole van load of tools behind you instead of a few stead of a few plastic tool boxes now wouldn't it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'd assume most vans have some sort of dividing board between the driver's compartment and the back. But maybe we build vans differently over here.
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Peter Halle
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« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2010, 05:13 AM »

Alex,

The dividers are installed as an aftermarket item.  Most company supplied work vans will have the dividers installed for safety and insurance reasons.  Private individuals who use vans for work may or may not install a divider of some sort.

Peter
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The tools in my truck were talking the other day.  The Dewalts, PC's, Boschs, Makitas were not happy.  They also were in the minority.  Their complaint:  They felt unused and unappreciated since the Festools moved in.  I guess the truth hurts.
woodguy7

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« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2010, 05:55 AM »

I have just sold my 5 year old Renault Traffic van & am awaiting a new one.  Both these vans come as standard with a steel bulk head which totally separates the cab from the back.  Safe, keeps the cab clean & easy to heat in the winter.  I don't understand why vans are not used more in the states as everyone uses them over here.  Is it because they are used for pleasure as well as work ?

Cheers, Woodguy.
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jvsteenb

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« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2010, 06:24 AM »

In the Netherlands, a certain height of bulkhead is mandatory for a van to be treated as a commercial vehicle. In most cases, this translates to a full height bulkhead.
The tax-regime is such that you'll need a commercial vehicle to reclaim some of the outrageous sales taxes on vehicles in my country, and to avoid "bijtelling" - a rather bizarre construction where the use of a vehicle that's used in the line of work is considered "income" and thus susceptible to income tax - simply adding a certain percentage of the vehicles worth as new to your annual income.
In most cases this means that a "commercial" vehicle is MUCH cheaper to operate and the manufacturers cater to that.
I don't know of any van-type vehicle available in the Netherlands without a ful height bulkhead. Some commercial models of semi-vans or 4x4's  have a lower bulkhead, but they're usually supplied with a sturdy rack to augment it.

Regards,

Job
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« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2010, 07:02 AM »

Alex,

The dividers are installed as an aftermarket item.  Most company supplied work vans will have the dividers installed for safety and insurance reasons.  Private individuals who use vans for work may or may not install a divider of some sort.

Peter

I see. Cultural differences. Here the dividers come like that out of the factory, metal, and part of the body work. I think we haven't seen all open vans since the 80's. Here almost all contractors and people who do some sort of installation work drive vans. The vans all come standard with integrated  bulkheads and their back interiors are in many cases completely customised to hold tools and materials in a safe way.  
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 07:21 AM by Alex » Logged
Chris Hughes

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« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2010, 09:44 AM »

Here in the US most of us contractor types drive trucks.  I'm not sure why, maybe it is the negative connotation with the seedy behavior that goes on with vans. Eek! 

Last week the drive shaft in my truck dropped out and because it is a very long wheel base the genius'  at Ford came up with a part that can't fixed so it must be replaced.  So I am without, as it turns out, my most valuable tool for more than a week.  Man did I take my truck and it's setup for granted.  I am borrowing a friends truck until Wednesday to move my equipment about the three jobs I have open.
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Wonderwino

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« Reply #22 on: June 13, 2010, 09:58 AM »

Here in the US most of us contractor types drive trucks.  I'm not sure why, maybe it is the negative connotation with the seedy behavior that goes on with vans. Eek! 

Around here, the joke is that all you need to be a "carpenter" is a van & a hammer.   Scared  Then, there's the Chris Farley syndrome: "you'll end up living in a van, down by the river!!!" 
« Last Edit: June 13, 2010, 11:26 AM by Wonderwino » Logged

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jvsteenb

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« Reply #23 on: June 13, 2010, 10:12 AM »


Around here, the joke is that all you need to be a "carpenter" is a van & a hammer. 

So you do have actual job requirements? You bunch of bureaucrats ! That sort of over-regulation will kill the free business spirit Wink


Regards,

Job
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« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2010, 10:19 AM »

wonderwino,

Is Tyvek (or the like) considered `approved siding`. Here in New Hampshire one would almost swear that was the case for as many houses as you see with that as the only exterior wall treatment for several years. Sometimes even replaced to go for several more years! Cheesy
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JD2720

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« Reply #25 on: June 13, 2010, 12:43 PM »

My mother was an ER nurse for part of her life. She told me about a couple of guys in an accident in a work van. The passenger was killed by a makeshift shelving unit and the tools it was filled with. Don't take this lightly, it is a real danger.     

In March my son was driving a mini van. He died in a head on crash with a large delivery truck.

Using your logic, I should not drive on a road that is traveled by vehicles larger than the one I am driving.
Also, people are injured or killed everyday by power tools. Yet almost every day you post here promoting the use of power tools. 
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Mac

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« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2010, 12:49 PM »

I think Brice was saying more that we should do what we can to minimise risks where possible, whether it's out on the road or in the workshop. Of course risk is always there, but there's no point in adding to it unnecessarily. 

For what it's worth Chris, I think of you and your loss very often.

Rick
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« Reply #27 on: June 13, 2010, 01:22 PM »

I think Brice was saying more that we should do what we can to minimise risks where possible, whether it's out on the road or in the workshop. Of course risk is always there, but there's no point in adding to it unnecessarily. 

For what it's worth Chris, I think of you and your loss very often.

Rick

Yes, that's what I was getting at Rick. I think it make sense to consider minimizing risks.

Chris, I don't know if your setup is particularly dangerous, not necessarily directed at you. My comments are more of a general warning for anyone reading this thread.
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« Reply #28 on: June 13, 2010, 02:49 PM »

We like trucks.  It is easy to throw things in the bed.

I have not owned an actual pick-up truck in over 3 years.
I use a 3/4 ton gmc suburban with the 454 big block.

I like pulling things, cleaning it out and taking the family someplace in it and I also enjoy the occasional off-road excursion with it and my old 4runner.


It is dangerous just waking up at my house.  Dang 4 year old and 8 month old.
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Alex

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« Reply #29 on: June 13, 2010, 05:29 PM »

This post was deleted because those that do not live in this country have determined that it was showing an unsafe use of Festool tools.
As our President states every day, those people know the right way to do everything.
  

I don't think this was necessary or the proper way to respond to this.
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