Author Topic: Welding table prototype  (Read 1952 times)

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Offline Northernlight

  • Posts: 67
Welding table prototype
« on: November 02, 2017, 05:37 PM »
Hi guys, this time ive made something evolutionary i think. I took inspiration from another Welding table and added a clever (atleast i think so) solution for bolting together laser cut metal to each other. Designed it in fusion and ordered from a laser cutter company. The small size is because i didnt want to commit to the design without testing tolerances and so forth.

With this method you dont need to weld the table together and thus risking the chanse of distorting your precious table.


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Offline bnaboatbuilder

  • Posts: 88
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2017, 05:43 PM »
Have to run out but wanted to say that's really brilliant. I have several tables from the company you most likely got the inspiration from. I'll add some more comments later this evening.
- John

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3987
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2017, 05:44 PM »
They (some company) makes one a bit like an MFT top with bolt holes every 2 or 4" for production jigs... Very schmicko/slick.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3609
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #3 on: November 02, 2017, 06:12 PM »
I like it a lot... [thumbs up] I really like the way the nuts are captured.  [smile]

Offline bnaboatbuilder

  • Posts: 88
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #4 on: November 02, 2017, 09:02 PM »
It looks like you went with 1/4" steel. Much better choice than the 3/16" that an unsaid company uses which is honestly too thin. I have a 3x4 ft and 2x4 ft table from the unsaid company. The ribs from them would arrive somewhat in a mild banana shape which would cause the table top to either dish or dome. I spent a long time on the tables to get each part as straight as can be with a shop press. When I would clamp them, the tables would be within about 5/1000" or less over the length of the table, but once welding started, even tack welding, the tops did distort. Going opposite corners, leaving time for cooling, just didn't matter, they would go beyond their claimed 15/1000" tolerance. Oh well. My 3x4 is actually pretty good and has let me make plenty projects square over the last 2-3 years. My 2x4 top humped a bit so I use it to hold tools more than for an accurate welding station.

I like your idea. I would caution you that the unsaid company has a patent on the "t a b and s l o t" connection for a welding table assembly.

I do like their welding tables because they are essentially mft type tables. I've made 5/8" steel dogs, layout for squaring corner welds. It does work great. I even use the Festool screw clamps on the welding table.

Don't know where you are located. I would interested in either a 2x4 ft or 3x4 ft version in your design with 5/8" dog holes. A top only, a base can always be self created.
- John

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1118
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #5 on: November 02, 2017, 09:16 PM »
Why not just name the mentioned company?

Offline bnaboatbuilder

  • Posts: 88
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #6 on: November 02, 2017, 09:25 PM »
Because G o o g l e indexes EVERYTHING. It allows us to have an open discussion about his design without being watched over.

If you really need to know, then search online for t a b and s l o t welding tables, just take out the spaces.

Why not just name the mentioned company?

Also I'll note that in my 4 years on the FOG, I've made over 600 posts but honestly I just don't like that it's out there for eternity. So over the course of this year, I have deleted basically everything because the forum software allows it. At some point I may delete more. I've moved away from most forums, and I despise social media.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2017, 09:31 PM by bnaboatbuilder »
- John

Offline Michael Kellough

  • Posts: 2971
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #7 on: November 02, 2017, 11:03 PM »
Yes, bigger and with dog holes and it would be great.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1118
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #8 on: November 03, 2017, 01:02 AM »
If flatness is that important wouldn't it be easier to construct the frame from aluminum t-slot extrusions and then bolt down steel plate onto it? There is a reason its preferred material for CNC. Why does support frame has to be steel?

Offline Northernlight

  • Posts: 67
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #9 on: November 03, 2017, 01:57 AM »
Hi guys, and thank you for your kind words. this Will never be for sale just to be clear, i just love to tinker with ideas.

Also i too have heard of people not having such a good successrate with weld together solutions.

In regarding to things needing to be flat aluminium has a tendency to 1. Warp from heat 2. Be weaker Than steel 3. Expensive to laser cut due to the fact Of a special gas.

Offline Svar

  • Posts: 1118
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #10 on: November 03, 2017, 02:44 AM »
In regarding to things needing to be flat aluminium has a tendency to 1. Warp from heat 2. Be weaker Than steel 3. Expensive to laser cut due to the fact Of a special gas.
#1 I might agree with it, but really, is that much heat transferred to the base frame?
#2 depends on the extrusion you use. In terms of rigidity in major axis 40×80 mm t-slot extrusion from 8020inc. is equivalent to 6×80 mm steel beam, and exceeds it in minor axis 15-fold.
#3 no need to laser cut it.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2017, 05:36 PM by Svar »

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3987
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #11 on: November 03, 2017, 05:22 PM »
I watched the video today and I like it...
(Need to get to the welding table myself.)

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 623
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #12 on: November 03, 2017, 08:39 PM »
that is a great idea. out of curiosity what does laser cutting something like that cost..... ballpark.

Offline Northernlight

  • Posts: 67
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #13 on: November 04, 2017, 03:14 PM »
Tallgrass: this small table would be around 40usd, not exactly free but considering its thickness i feel that the price is fair. For something mft sized i would imagine the price to be around 160usd.

Offline Cheese

  • Posts: 3609
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #14 on: November 05, 2017, 07:02 AM »
Tallgrass: this small table would be around 40usd, not exactly free but considering its thickness i feel that the price is fair. For something mft sized i would imagine the price to be around 160usd.

That price seems pretty reasonable to me.

Offline Northernlight

  • Posts: 67
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #15 on: November 06, 2017, 09:22 AM »
I feel that is More than fair also.

Offline tallgrass

  • Posts: 623
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #16 on: November 06, 2017, 11:01 PM »
one can not argue with that kind of price. the difficult part is that most places have issues with small orders and bill accordingly.

Offline Holmz

  • Posts: 3987
Re: Welding table prototype
« Reply #17 on: November 10, 2017, 07:57 PM »
If flatness is that important wouldn't it be easier to construct the frame from aluminum t-slot extrusions and then bolt down steel plate onto it? There is a reason its preferred material for CNC. Why does support frame has to be steel?

The coefficient of expansion between steels is the same, and alloy is different.
(The table tops often can get a bit warm)